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you to work out what it means. Most of these guys are, like, covered in tattoos and have very little art training. They’re just painting because they like to paint, and it’s a way for them to express themselves. That’s why this movement has such a community, because it’s just a bunch of kids that probably didn’t go to art school, but maybe got into tattoo, or comic books, or hot rod culture. They got together and started painting and realised, ‘Oh wow, I really like this’. And that’s pretty much it. There’s nothing more conceptual or deep about it.” The truth is, Ziegler’s own story is equally as intuitive as that of her artists. The Santa Barbara-native started her own business – a fashion company called Lucid Gear Clothing for which she designed the clothes and her graffiti artist brother provided the graphics – at 13 and, deciding that her fashion career happened “too easily,” she dropped everything and moved to Barcelona to immerse herself in European culture. “I literally just had this realisation, ‘I can’t take this place anymore’, America in general,” she remembers. “I bought a oneway ticket to Barcelona with a backpack. I sold my car and my collections, and left.” After four years, Ziegler found herself getting frustrated with the laid-back attitude and, just as she was thinking about relocating back to the States, she got a call from Phil Coleman, the

founder of London Miles Gallery, who had seen her blog. After a brief phone interview she was hired as manager and curator. “It’s been like a match made in heaven really,” smiles Ziegler. “He has so much business experience and is so clear-headed about everything and then there’s me with my chaotic, curatorial experience, it just really works.” But Ziegler isn’t about to get comfortable. Despite her hectic schedule she has another book in the pipeline, this time focused on people in the art industry, and various exhibitions and events including a show in Asia in 2011. She also hopes to share her experiences and encourage others to follow their dreams in workshops like the one she recently set up with comic-book artist Scott Campbell. “I love teaching,” she says passionately. “I just think it’s so awesome. It’s so fulfilling and I find that interaction amazing. You have an hour, you teach somebody something, they walk away and you can see the look on their face. It’s super gratifying.”

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But anyone lucky enough to meet or be taught by the infectious young Californian would agree, the pleasure belongs to them Shelley Jones www.huntandgatherart.com

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The Dream Factory  

The Dream Factory

The Dream Factory  

The Dream Factory

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