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“Everybody can make something happen they just have to go out there and do it.” Ziegler has spent the last 11 years curating, designing and putting on events to generate exposure and appreciation for a genre that is now loosely referred to as ‘pop surrealism’, ‘lowbrow’ or ‘contemporary new art’. “I wouldn’t classify it anywhere near street art, or urban art. I try to give it a very vague description,” she says cryptically. “In the States people have coined it as lowbrow, which is fine – we need to describe it in some way. But within that title, there are so many different genres. It’s kind of like graffiti. You have this massive word ‘graffiti’ that describes a whole underground art movement but within that you have street art, stencil art, wheat-pasting, bombs, tags – like, so many different things. If you spoke to a wheat-paste artist and a bomber they’d be, like, ‘We don’t do the same thing’ and I think it’s the same thing with what I’m dealing with.” Ziegler started documenting artists of her personal taste on her blog, Hunt & Gather, and after three years she realised she had enough information to create an artbook. So she sourced pictures, interviewed artists, learnt InDesign and made three copies to send to publishers. Seven months later she had a call from New York and a deal was struck. “If you want to do something, you just go and do it,” she says matter-of-factly. “If you don’t know how, then teach yourself. Don’t use the excuse, ‘Oh, but I don’t know how to do it’. You can do it. Everybody can

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make something happen; they just have to go out there and do it. If you don’t have the confidence call somebody up who might. Or call me up. I’ll talk to you. I’ll help you do it. I just think you have to go out there and push yourself. Start small. Do whatever.” Ziegler’s selection of artists on Hunt & Gather helped define the ‘new art’ movement further and created a common platform for these artists to then market themselves. “I’m not an artist myself, I can’t draw or anything,” laughs Ziegler modestly. “Most artists don’t have a business sense or the ability to market themselves, and that’s why they’re creative. They need to stay in their studios and work because that’s what they’re good at. I love what they’re doing and it’s for people like me to go out and promote them, and push them to create more. That’s always been my mission.” And there is a definite thread to the art that the 25-yearold is drawn to. Whether it’s anime-inspired, cartoon or comic-book-style, the art Ziegler loves is almost always a product of an unschooled, natural desire to create. She explains: “The main difference with the art we show is that you can come in, see it and either you like it, or you don’t. You don’t need to read the description because there is no description. The artist doesn’t paint for

The Dream Factory  
The Dream Factory  

The Dream Factory

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