Page 1

FREE

NEWS & VIEWS FROM EQUESTRIAN HUB

March 2017

BUMPER ISSUE!

Money Saving Tips Finding the Perfect Clubber Plaiting Top Tips Your Say Legal Advice


2

17

FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH

HUB MONEY

4

18 HUB SADDLE REVIEW

YOUR SAY

19

6

YOUNG RIDER OF THE MONTH

HOW TO FIND THE PERFECT PONY CLUBBER

20 HUB LAW

8

22

HUBVIBES PIX

PRODUCT REVIEW

11 PLAITING LIKE A PRO

24

13

CONFESSIONS OF A RIDING MUM

HUB HEROES

28

14

INTERNATIONAL CHARITY HIGHLIGHT

REINING 101

NEWS & VIEWS FROM EQUESTRIAN HUB HubVibes Editorial & Advertising Enquiries: penny@equestrianhub.com.au The Saddle Hub Sales Enquiries: Fiona Todd: 0414 760 067 Graphic Design: Joanna Reid: 0408 773 851 Published by Equestrian Hub PO Box 13 • Tintenbar NSW 2478 Phone: 0414 760 067 • Email: info@equestrianhub.com.au www.equestrianhub.com.au

PROUDLY SUPPORTERS


Dressage Saddles

$3,950 Passier Compact Size 1

$2,495 Pessoa PDS Monoflap 17.5”

$4,250 Peter Horobin Amazone 17.5”

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Southern Stars Dressage 17”

2

For more saddle information visit our website. equestrianhub.com.au

Peter Horobin Liberty 17”

$2,500

$2,250

$2,250

Sommer Esprit 17.5” LEATHERS & LUC GIRTH

$2,200

$2,100

$4,750 Luc Childeric DAC 17”

Peter Horobin Liberty 17”


This month will see some BIG changes at HubVibes. You might notice there are some new monthly segments including Hub Law, which deals with some common legal issues facing horse owners and riders and Hub Money, which will have money tips for the finance conscious amongst us! Your Say is also new and is an opportunity for our readers’ voices to be heard, so if you have something you’d like to say, a shout-out to a great business or recognising the achievement of an unsung hero (or yourself!) or to let us know if there is something you like – or don’t like – in any issue of HubVibes, please drop us a line at: editorial@equestrianhub.com.au.

Now for the biggest change in the air! The Saddle Hub has created a new umbrella under which all the Hub businesses

The Equestrian Hub umbrella will allow us to expand into new and exciting areas of all thing equestrian, so stay tuned for more developments over the coming months. BUT don’t worry! We’re the same team with the same awesome service as always, we’re just getting bigger and better with more to offer to the equestrian world. Exciting stuff! We’re also building up to a HUGE April. Why? It’s our 2nd birthday and we are ready to party! Keep an eye out for more special offers, prizes, competitions and give aways as we get ready to celebrate the last two years of massive growth for this little equestrian biz. Happy riding Hubbers! From all the team at Equestrian Hub H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Looking for the perfect pony clubber? Check out our tips for finding one on page 6. And if the thought of plaiting up leaves you with a feeling of dread, have a look at how the pros do it on page 11. As usual, this month we hear from the Riding Mum and we have a new look Hub Heroes and Young Rider of the Month.

(The Saddle Hub, HubVibes and the Hub Directory) will operate. So without further ado, we introduce you to Equestrian Hub!

3


YOUR

Say Top Riding Nothing stops a showjumper, not even losing their girth! This photo by Ozshotz at the February Grand Weekend of Show Jumping held at Nambour, Qld, captured rider Shannon Bates getting it done. Not only did he clear this jump, but he continued for another FOUR fences like this. Amazing!

outstanding care I received at Lismore Base Hospital. So quick, thoughtful and thorough, everyone I dealt with from the assistant wardsmen, the nurses and doctors, were lovely. Thanks for patching me up! Penny, Lismore NSW.

Super Service Recently I had the need to get a shipment of wrigglers from Freemans Reach in western Sydney to the Gold Coast airport for insemination on the same day. It takes me most of the day to make that particular journey and I am exhausted at the end - not the condition I wanted my wrigglers to arrive in.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Having never done this before I contacted Neale from Pak Air, someone I had seen at a trade show recently, he explained the process and made it seem all pretty easy - yeah right, I thought.

4

Top Notch Care I managed to be unlucky enough to cop a hoof to the face last weekend and I just wanted to say how much I appreciated the

I contacted the stallion owner, they organised for a collection to be done at 7.30am on the Friday morning - that was the end of my organisational requirements. Neale organised for a courier from Pak Air to collect the package from the vets, take it to Mascot, where it was

put on a plane and flown to Coolangatta. Every step of the way I received a text advising what stage the process was at. The hardest part of the process was driving myself to the Qantas Cargo bay and signing for the shipment. Drove home, mare was inseminated and we now have a beautiful Baluga baby on the way. I was really impressed with the service I received. Wish every other aspect of breeding was this easy. Fiona, NSW

Congratulations

Congratulations to one of my youngest students, Lucas at his first competition, on his pony Tiffany, at the recent Ballina Equestrian Fun Day. He came away with Reserve Champion Rider, placing in every event and can’t wait for the next one. Very proud of this little student! Pauline Kinsella, PK Riding Instruction, Ballina NSW.


H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

5


What is worth more than their weight in gold, is rarer than a blue diamond and is one of the most in demand investments for parents of aspiring horse riders under the age of 16? The Perfect Pony Club Pony of course! So you’ve finally given in to the “can I have a pony?” request, now you have to find one. What can you do to maximise your chances of finding Mr or Mrs Right?

educated: If you don’t have a lot of 1. Get experience in the horse world, now is the

time to get educated, BEFORE you buy the pony! Talk to your local pony club, get your child some riding lessons, start learning about horse husbandry and ensure you understand the money and time commitments of horse ownership. If you have never purchased a horse before, it is a very good idea to enlist the help of someone with experience to go on the hunt with you to hopefully avoid some of the pitfalls of buying horses.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

How to Find the Perfect Pony Clubber

6


prioritise safety first over 2. ALWAYS colour, breed, movement, age and just

about everything else: No matter how much your 9 year old daughter wanted a 13.2hh black pony mare with a star and four white socks, don’t disregard the not-so-attractive, 20 year old greying 12.2hh bay gelding that has spent 15 years in pony club, taught five other children to ride and takes a few extra little kicks to get into the canter.

is usually better: Depending on 3. Older the level of rider and the level of

activity that will be expected of the pony, an “aged” pony over 20 years may be worth considering if they have lots of experience and a great temperament. A bit like a good wine or cheese, many ponies improve vastly with age! DON’T make the mistake of buying a young horse for a novice rider thinking it might be nice if they learn together. It’s not fair on either of them and, ultimately, can be dangerous.

on the grapevine: Talk to horse 4. Get people, join social media groups, your

horse to go on a trial period which is very understandable, however if they are selling a true perfect pony clubber, it is likely that pony will have become like a member of the family to them so they will want to know that he or she is going to the right home. At the very least, go back and ride the pony several times and don’t be afraid to ask if you can see (and preferably ride) the pony away from its home environment.

a vet check: An older “been there, 6. Get done that” horse is likely to have the odd lump and bump and perhaps a bit of arthritis, but it is worthwhile to know what you are dealing with, particularly if there are long term, ongoing health management issues to consider such as laminitis or cushings or some other chronic problem with soundness.

a post purchase plan: Even if you 7. Have manage to secure the most perfect pony

clubber, there will still be a settle in period in which your child and the pony will be getting to know one another. Make sure you have a suitable, safe (preferably well fenced) place for your child to ride and consider investing in some lessons from a qualified instructor to assist your child in making the transition to a new horse. An experienced instructor will be able to pick up on any problems early, before they become problems, and help to ensure your child and their new pony develop a safe and happy relationship.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

local pony club, riding school, anyone who has any connection with the type of horse you are looking for because, as is so often the case, the best ones are never advertised and tend to be handed down between families, friends and pony/ riding clubs. Let people know what you are looking for and be very specific. And be sure to make it clear how well the pony will be cared for in your hands. Most owners who are thinking of selling their great pony clubbers are more concerned about the home their pony is going to than anything else.

for a trial: Sure, many people selling 5. Ask horses may not be willing to allow their

7


THE ACT DRESSAGE ASSOCIATION SUMMER SERIES 2 2017

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Photo Credit: Amy-Sue Alston

8

Anita Doswell and Meticulous after competing in the Novice 2.3.

Anwen Lovett and Brierley Scarlett competing in the 6 year old Young Horse Qualifier.

Revelwood Aston getting a well-deserved pat from Victorian Brooke Pearse after completing their Medium 4.2 test.

Danielle Ffrench and Hollands Bend Skyfall on their way to winning the Preliminary 1.3.

Lauren McIntosh and Velerius Scipio.

Rebecca Walshe and BHM Spanish Love on their way to winning the Medium 4.2.


Margarete Forster and Springfield Frosty in the Novice 2.3.

Rodger Fitzhardinge and Amerigo were the winners of the Freestyle and Prix St. George.

Sally Kirkwood and Bloomfield Furstinus were the winners of the Elementary 3.1 and 3.2 and also the 6 year old Young Horse Qualifier.

Callum Park Starski being ridden by Russel Jarret in the 4 year old Young Horse Qualifier.

HubVibes Pix proudly sponsored by

WATAGAN EQUESTRIAN CLUB MUTTABURRA, 4/2/2017 Dressage and Showjumping training day. Lyndel Taylor on Willow's Leap Bombadier.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

www.equestrianevents.com.au

9


APSB STUD SHOW Goulburn Pony Club Grounds, 22/1/2017 Photo Credit: Elizabeth Child

Blue Denim Paris Champion Australian Pony Mare, Blue Denim Pony Stud, shown by Ray Child, Judge: Jo Bensley. Imperial Patrone Champion Welsh A Stallion, Supreme Welsh Exhibit, Grand Champion Exhibit of the Show.

Otway View Eric-The-Red Rae Park Taylor Made

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Best Yearling Exhibit Of The Show, Reserve Champion Welsh B Colt.

10

Cardwell Park Jezebel Champion Part Welsh Mare/Filly, Judge: David Ross, Champion Part Bred Apsb, Judge: Jo Bensley .

Champion Led Shetland and Champion Ridden Shetland, owned and shown by Charlotte Fouracre, Judge: David Ross. (Vic)

Carinya Fade To Black Supreme Miniature Pony, Owner: Liz Nugent, Judge: Brooke Keir.


Do your plaits look like hairy golf balls? We’ve got some hot tips from champion British equestrian, Jo Bates, on how to tame that mane!

The thought of having to plait is enough to cause sleepless nights if the process seems like some impossible challenge, but a well plaited mane will be admired. If you are aiming for the show ring with a riding horse, hack or hunter then plaiting is mandatory. Tools for the job The whole task can be made much easier by careful preparation. Make sure that you have everything you need: blunt needle (threaded), wax thread, scissors, mane comb and hair clips can all be put in the pocket of an apron so that they come easily to hand when needed. You may need to stand on a plastic crate or steps and it is a good idea to make sure that your horse is used to this before you need to plait on the morning of a show.

Step-by-step Step 1: Wet the mane and divide it using the mane comb. Each section should be about ž of a mane comb width and I use a hair clip to keep the loose hair out of the way.

LIKE A PRO!

Step 2: It is ok for the mane to be a bit tacky and I apply plaiting spray to the section which helps to keep all the hairs in the plait. Step 3: Divide the hair to be plaited into three equal sections and start plaiting keeping your thumbs on top. Each plait should be firm, not loose, and this can only be achieved by keeping your thumbs on top. Step 4: Plait down to the bottom and hold tight with one hand while you pick up your needle and thread. If the horse shakes and you let go at this stage, you will have to start again. Step 5: Sew round the plait twice near the bottom, and then fold under the loose ends and sew round again to secure the end. Step 6: Fold the plait in half, turning the end under, putting the needle through from underneath, near the base of the mane, coming out on top. Step 7: Finally fold the plait in half again, putting the needle through from underneath near the base of the plait and sew up and down through the plait several times to secure it in place. This is the stage when you can shape the plait by pushing it up or down slightly before sewing up and down through the plait to secure it.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

It is also useful to have someone to hold the horse for the first few times that you plait, so that the horse gets used to the idea and doesn't start messing about because he thinks that you are about to pull his mane.

PLAITING

11


If you need to make it smaller, you can wrap the thread around the plait to pull in the sides. Tie off on top of the plait and use scissors to cut the thread. Repeat the process all the way down the neck. There are no rules about how many plaits you should have down the neck, provided it looks balanced. I usually get about 12 plaits - I try not to have 13 as it is unlucky!

Each plait should be roughly the same size, although the last plait near the wither might be slightly smaller. Don't forget that the plaits nearer the wither are the ones that are likely to get rubbed by hands so they need to be secure.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Forelock plaits

12

The forelock should also be plaited and can be done the same way or as a French plait. The latter takes practice to make it look good but it can help to tie in all the side bits. If you have a chunkier forelock it is sometimes the only way to get a nice plait that does not look like a football. However I rarely find that it is necessary and it is often easier and less time consuming on the morning of a show to do a regular plait. Choosing the right type of plait There are no hard and fast rules as every horse is plaited to suit type and conformation, but there are a few guidelines that will help to improve your plaits. Plaiting is an important

part of the turnout of your horse for the show ring and can enhance the overall look. A short neck can be made to look longer by making more plaits, and a weak neck can be enhanced by standing the plaits higher to give the impression of more crest. Similarly, the mane can be thinned and plaits can be made smaller on a cresty type of horse to make the crest appear smaller.

Finishing touches Plaits can be sprayed with hair spray can be sprayed with hair spray to keep stray hairs in place. I do not trim loose hairs with scissors as, after a few times, you will end up with a spiky mane all the way along, but I might make an exception to this for the really big occasions! Plaits need to feel firm to touch, not loose, and the secret is to learn to make the initial plait tight, you can only do this by keeping your thumbs on top. It is worth practicing to get this right and it also gives you an opportunity to thin the mane some more if you think the finished plaits are not dainty enough. Practice at home and getting someone else to give an honest appraisal will help you achieve neat plaits - and the immaculate turnout that is essential to become a winning combination.

We thank Jo for her tips! Photography Credit: Holly Bates


We offer huge congratulations to mother and daughter team, Letitia and Emma Langbecker, who were recently awarded the Equestrian Queensland Volunteer of the Year award for their hard work at the 2016 Gatton World Cup Show Jumping. The Gatton World Cup was held in Queensland’s Lockyer Valley and ran for three days attracting 469 horses and more than 2000 spectators. Letitia took on the demanding role of Event Director while her daughter, Emma, organised the event sponsorship. After being surprised by their nomination, Letitia and

DYNAMIC DUO WIN VOLUNTEER

AWARD

“We absolutely did not expect to win so to hear our names being called out was fantastic. “We volunteered our time to help the sport, support the committee and make the Gatton World Cup a great event for competitors and spectators. “We loved it so much that we are volunteering again this year!”

Emma were over the moon with their win. “Emma and I were so surprised when we heard we have been nominated,” Letitia explained.

Volunteers play a huge role in organising equestrian events and we tip our hats to all the volunteers that work behind the scenes to make equestrian events run so smoothly.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

13


Reining 101 Reining is a western riding competition that requires the rider to guide their horse through intricate patterns if circle work, spins and stops. The work must be performed in a relaxed canter, called lope, and at the gallop. Reining takes great skill where the horse and rider must be in tune with one another – in America it is often referred to as western dressage as the aids should not be seen and the horse should be submissive and relaxed. The reining patterns are made up of between eight to twelve movements and require the following movements to be performed : • small slow circles • large fast circles • flying lead changes • roll backs • 360 degree spins

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

• sliding stops

14

When at a competition, the judges will score each horse beginning at 70 and then add or subtracts either half points to 1.5 on each executed movement. Penalties may also apply for an incorrect performance (such as performing too many circles). Scores are written on a score sheet and announced at the after each run. Deductions are given should the horse excessively raise its head, refuse to move forward, moves sideways or backs up, anticipates a movement and speeds up or slows down, stumbles, falls or is disobedient during its

run. Credit will be given to a horse that has a willing attitude, is accurate and goes about its work gracefully. Thinking about getting into reining but don’t know where to start? Like most sports, get yourself a good trainer who can help you learn the basics. Your trainer can give you the reining skills you need with the finesse that the judges are looking for. They can also provide you with a strong foundation and build your confidence as you go along. You can hone your skills by watching other reiners – why not head out to local competitions and see what it’s all about? While it might be tempting to head over and watch the professionals strut their stuff, make sure you spend time watching the lower runs so you can pick up some tips and know what to expect once you decide to head into the arena. Study patterns and watch YouTube


clips too, there is a treasure trove of information on getting started on the Internet. There are a number of active associations that you can join that run competitions and offer support to their members. Why not join on in your area? What about my horse? Reining may be performed by any breed, but the stock horse breed (particularly the Quarter Horse) dominates the field. To perform its job correctly your horse must be agile, quick and responsive to all commands. Powerful hindquarters are also required for the sliding stops and rollbacks. As the horse’s joints are under considerable stress when performing their patters, it is important that your horse has correct leg confirmation. What do I wear? A long sleeved shirt, jeans and cowboy boots are the order of the day with chaps and gloves optional. Lovely bright shirt colours complete with diamantes, sequins and studs have crept into the competition arena but are not a must. A western style hat or safety helmet is also worn. Do I need special tack? Riders use a western saddle and a western styled bridle. There are strict rules about what bits can be used so check the rules to see if any apply to you.

Want to know more? Check out Reining Australia for further information. Photography Credit: Stephen Mowbray and Reining Australia

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Special leg protection such a splint and skid boots are also used but must be applied correctly else they can cause injury.

15


Animal Reproduction Logistics Pakair provide specialised courier solutions to move Animal Insemination samples around the country or around the world. From direct vehicle deliveries to access to aircraft, Pakair provide the best possible solution to meet the Time Critical nature of these shipping movements. next available flight international network domestic 24/7

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

validated packaging

16

temperature control clinical trials clinical trial logistics real time tracking logistics� IVF logistics Stem stem cells stem cells and cellCells line Finished Pharma finished pharma Data data Loggers loggers

Our service includes: • Pakair provide a global network for AI sample distribution, including the Goulburn Valley area in Northern Victoria. • Overnight or same day air courier deliveries Australia wide, NZ wide or Worldwide. Pakair are the specialists in chilled and frozen semen. • Assistance with DAFF, Biosecurity NZ, USDA, DEFRA and all other regulatory requirements • Adherence to time constraints for delivery of ambient shipped semen • Pakair can supply packaging, temperature control and Liquid Nitrogen Dry Shipper hire • Door to door or airport collection ensuring best possible transit times and economical pricing.

Contact Details: Australian call centre: 1300 972 565 International Phone: +61 3 9286 0260 Global: enquiries@pakair.com.au Asia: asiaops@pakair.com.au Asia: asiabiz@pakair.com.au www.pakair.com.au | www.pakairasia.com | www.pakair.net.nz ABN 58 098 250 170


HubMoney TOP 24 MONEY SAVING TIPS FOR HORSE OWNERS There is no doubt that horse ownership is an expensive undertaking. With Christmas over and those credit card bills arriving, we thought it might be good timing to share some of our top money saving tips! Feed 1. Purchase feed in bulk. Can’t store a large load of hay yourself? Round up some friends and share the cost between you. 2. Buy hay early: don’t wait until you have run out in the middle of winter and you have to pay double the price!

4. Be careful in your choice of breed/type: that 16.2hh

5. Rug your horse through the colder months. Horses use energy to keep themselves warm when it’s cold, which means they will need more feed at a time of year when the grass has minimal growth. Stabling/Paddocks 6. Look after your paddocks, pick up manure, rotate and manage weeds. The more good grass in your paddocks, the lower your feed bill. 7. Keep on top of repairs, usually small repairs turn into big repairs if you leave them too long. This applies to everything from tack, fences, cars, trucks and floats. A broken fence for example can lead to a nasty unexpected vet bill very quickly! 8. Don’t stable unless you have no choice and save on the cost of bedding and

additional feed (not to mention the labour!) 9. If you need or choose to stable your horse, consider installing rubber floor matting. Yes, it’s more expensive initially, but it will save you enormously over time with reduced amounts of bedding required and it is much more efficient to muck out. 10. Collect and sell your horse’s manure. Tack & Equipment 11. Go for good quality second hand rather than new where you can. 12. Look after your tack and gear; it will last longer and save early replacement. 13. Before tossing out old rugs, remove any still working leg straps, clips, buckles etc. They can come in handy if one breaks on a new rug. 14. Be a bargain hunter! Shop around for everything both in store and online. Even Continued on page 29

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

3. Don’t over feed. Educate yourself on what your horse really needs in their diet, if in doubt, talk to your vet. There are so many supplements and feed premixes out there that it’s quite possible that your horse really doesn’t need that $200 additional supplement.

lean Thoroughbred is likely to cost you a lot more to keep on average than the 15.2hh stockhorse.

17


HUB SADDLE REVIEW H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

18

While it was initially a large investment, she hasn’t regretted her purchase. “I’m a big advocate for the Childeric saddles after trying so many other brands to fit my Thoroughbred,” Bec said. “We went through so many brands and styles to no avail – I was wasting so much money and time trying to find something that would suit his shape. “I tried a friend’s Childeric DSG and it was a great fit on my horse, then I rode in it and it was like nothing I’d ever tried before. “The Childeric puts you into a good position that seems effortless and it’s so comfortable, it’s not forced and unnatural. “After that ride I was hooked and bought my own – I recommend them to everyone! “I’ve also found that my saddle has been a great fit

Next month in Equestrian Hub Turns 2! Eventing 101

Childeric r e v i e w : Bec Whiteley Bec Whitely bought her Childeric saddle in 2010 after trying numerous other brands. for my other horses too, which is an added bonus.” The Equestrian Hub currently has several Childeric saddles for sale – why not have a look and offer one a new home?

… More from our new regular segments, Hub Law and Hub Money

Developing A Relationship With Your AND a new series: Horse With Ribbleton Horse Atunement "A DAY IN THE LIFE OF...."


MARCH Young Rider of the Month

Stella Barton Riding since she was seven, Stella enjoys riding as gives her a sense of control and makes her worries seem unimportant. Born with Cerebral palsy, Stella finds it difficult to control her body movements but that doesn’t get in her way when she’s riding her beautiful eight year old Warmblood gelding, Cabaret. Although this special combination have only been partners for five months, they are already achieving great things. In 2016 they competed at Werribee Dressage Festival with great scores and recently at the Boneo Classic they were the Grade 1 Championship Winners. With her eye on the prize to compete at next year’s World Equestrian Games and her ultimate goal to compete at the 2020 Paralympic Games, Stella is focused and dedicated.

Stella has WO beautifu N a l Gift Pa ck CON

GRATUL

Proudly

ATIONS

supplie d by

Samson

& Bronc

We wish you all the best, Stella! If you are a young competition rider and would like to be considered for HubVibes Young Rider of the Month, send us an email, along with a great pic of you and your horse.

samsonandbronc.com.au

NEW SOUTH WALES

The Harvest Deli - Newrybar The Farm - Byron Bay Millar & More - Bangalow Maggie & Mr Jones Espresso - Ballina

Riley Burnett - Lennox Head Cactus Hill Project - Mullumbimby Resould - Brunswick Heads Hyde - Bellingen Rag & Trader - Armidale

Natural Progression - Bondi QUEENSLAND

The Happy Cabin - West End (Bris) VICTORIA

Linen & Moore - Doncaster

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

FIND OUR CANDLES AT THESE WONDERFUL PLACES

19


We will be running a monthly series of myth busting the law as it relates to horses over the coming months.

Horses and the Law

Busting The Myths MYTH #1 Caveat Emptor AKA “let the buyer beware”.

Part 1: What laws apply when buying and selling horses?

A common myth when buying and selling horses is that the principle of “caveat emptor” or otherwise known as “let the buyer beware” always applies to the sale.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Whether you are buying or selling it is important to know that this is not always the case.

20

Firstly, is the sale a private transaction or commercial? This just means, did you buy from someone who sells horses as a hobby, or who buys and sells horses as a business? (And just because a seller claims to be a hobbyist, doesn’t mean that they are!) The principles of contract law

will apply to either transaction, but if you purchase a horse from a business then the seller will also be subject to the Australian Consumer Law. Basically this means that the horse you buy must be subjected to the same merchandise regulations as if you went to a big chain store and bought a computer! For instance the horse must be: • Fit for the purpose for which they are purchased; • Of merchantable (acceptable/saleable) quality; • Match the advertising description; • Meet any additional promises or guarantees offered by the seller. Failure to meet any of the above guarantees, may mean that you can make a claim for damages through the Department of Fair Trading. BUT that doesn’t mean private sellers get off the hook! Contract law principles apply when a legal contract has been made. The next logical question that follows is this: What constitutes a legally enforceable contract?


A contract is simply an agreed set of specific terms between consenting, competent adults, for consideration (simply put, most of the time “consideration” just means money). I give you something and, in return, you give me something. Does it have to be formalised by a solicitor? NO. Does it have to be witnessed? NO (there are exceptions to this rule, but for horse sales, generally no) Does it have to be written? NO (but it’s easier if it is! More on that next week) The types of conditions are very important when it comes to horse sale contracts. Terms need to be specific and measurable: for example, describing a horse as a “good jumper” or a “extravagantly moving dressage horse” are very broad and subjective and are unlikely to give rise to a grounds for pursuing breach of contract. However should a seller describe a horse as a “competitive Grand Prix dressage horse” or “World Cup jumper”, these are measurable qualities. Has the horse competed in a Grand Prix dressage or world cup jumping competition? If not, and the buyer only discovers AFTER the sale that this statement is untrue, then the buyer may have an avenue for recourse. However, if the seller can prove that, at the time of the sale, they had reason to genuinely believe that the horse was a grand prix dressage horse or world cup jumper, they may have a valid defence to the claim.

Part 2: What can you do when a sale or a purchase goes wrong? This article is published for educational and interest purposes only. It is not in any way intended to be received or acted upon or in any way intended to be a substitution for legal advice.

A seller sold a horse a sound pony club, low level show horse. After the sale, the buyer discovered the horse had chronic arthritis. Vet reports proved that the arthritic condition would have been known to the seller at the time of the sale. The Department of Fair Trading ordered that the seller refund the buyer, pay the costs of the care and agistment of the horse while in the purchaser’s care as well as their legal costs.

Case example of the importance of wording A mare was advertised as “in foal to” (as opposed to “served by” or “inseminated with”). The Court decided this was a guarantee by the seller that the mare was pregnant. When the buyer found out that the mare actually wasn’t pregnant, they successfully sued for breach of contract.

Case example of genuine belief of truth of statement A seller advertised a horse as 8 years of age. The buyer bought the horse on this basis and, at the time of the sale, the seller gave the pedigree of horse to the buyer which confirmed the horse was 8 years of age. When the buyer later discovered the horse was in fact 14 years old, they sued the seller. The Court decided that there was no recourse for the buyer as the seller sold the horse in good faith and held a reasonable belief (based on their reliance on the registration papers) that the horse was 8 not 14.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Next Month in Hub Law:

Case example of fit for purpose

21


PRODUCT REVIEW

CoreX Equine Have you ever had someone take a photo or video of you riding and you have recoiled in horror at your duck bum, rounded shoulders or slouched posture? Do you wish you could work on these issues in-between your riding lessons? Well look no further as EquiCanine™ has come up with the solution – the CoreX Equine Level Belt system!

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Simply download the application and install it on your Apple device for use in your lessons or out riding by yourself. Using the special CoreX Equine Level Belt, your device is clipped in and ready to go – just ride as normal and the application provides real-time feedback on the position of your pelvis.

22

Alexandria Bailey, founder of EquiCanine™ explains how it works. “A rider's perception of the position of their pelvis and torso can often be incorrect so it is valuable to receive timely and accurate feedback,” Alexandria said. “The CoreX Equine Level Belt and application bring science to the saddle through assess-

ing the position of the rider's pelvis during riding. “Alerts and vibrational cues make the rider aware of postural errors as soon as they occur, so the position can be quickly fixed. “Over time, riders learn to avoid poor postural habits which promote muscular correction and coordination.” With the non-evasive belt and easy to use application, the CoreX Equine Level Belt system is a great way to improve your position and balance while working on core strength. You can also review your ride to see how many postural errors occurred as well as monitoring and measuring your progress. “Basically we are empowering riders to effectively take control of their postural strength and alignment,” Alexandria said. “We have found that once riders improve their balance

and core strength, their horse can work effectively without having to compensate for rider error. “We often find that some riders maintain balance by lifting a leg, gripping one rein tighter than the other or they sit in an unusual position to try and stay centred and balanced. “This puts physical stress on the horse which may result in movement issues or pain for them. “Once the rider is balanced and can maintain the ideal position, the horse is free to maintain their own balance and move more freely which reduces the risk of soreness and injury.” When you invest in the CoreX Equine Level Belt system you’re not only helping yourself – you’re helping your horse. Want to know more? Why not visit the EquiCanine™ website.


Ocean Easy Stables

Find OES at Equifest Stand D2

We’re all about Equine Innovation and Education

info@oceaneasy.net

www.oceaneasy.net

0474 634 766

THIN LINE ARE NOW AVAILABLE IN THE SADDLE HUB’S TACK SHOP

Come and have a chat about how we can help you find a home for your pre-loved saddle, or check out the saddles we currently have available. We can also answer all your questions about our HUB DIRECTORY and HUBVIBES E-zine. MARCH 2017

17th-25th of March:

2016 National Cutting Horse Championships Finals and 2017 Snafflebit Futurity 30th March - 2nd April: Equifest April 21-31: AQUIS Show Jumping Tour, Elysian Fields, qld

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Where to Find Us

asy s

See our exciting range of innovative products online

23


by "The Riding Mum"

Someone vaguely commented to me the other day, as I was handing over some astronomical sum of money for “god knows what” (as my darling other half would say) at the local feed store, that if my children ate as well as my horses did I must be a very good mother.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

I, of course, nodded and smiled and modestly shrugged my shoulders, silently acknowledging my obvious maternal prowess.

24

As I ran my eye down the docket, making sure I hadn’t missed anything of massive importance (and deliberately missing the massive tally down the bottom. Sometimes denial is the key to sanity) it oc-

Feeding the Family curred to me that she was probably right. “If” though would be the key word in that statement. “If” my children ate as well as my horses. Hmmm. At the moment I have five horses to feed of varying ages, sizes, breeds and workloads. The skinny OTTB seems to need 20 times what the welsh pony does (despite only being twice the size), the older jumper needs more energy, the young horse needs less, and then there’s the vitamin and mineral supplements, the oils, the electrolytes, the natural herbs and ulcer prevention, this one can’t deal with too much protein, that one can’t have too much starch….is it any won-

The Riding Mum has a co kids as well as a varying n legged variety in the form cats, chickens and the od and goes (although admit only have 2 legs not 4 whi wh

der that, on occasion, the human kids are lucky to be handed a tin of baked beans and a fork and told “it’ll be fun! Just pretend we’re camping!” And then of course there are the treats. I’m not a big fan of feeding treats. At least not

to the horses at any rate. (An experience that I had, many years ago, of nearly losing half my hand to a young horse who had been “over-treated” made me rethink my treating mentality!). Sure the kids can wear me down enough to cave in and buy them the lat-


ouple of two legged number of the four m of horses, dogs, dd rodent that comes ttedly, the chickens ich is probably a

good thing) who all live together on the Happy Family Farm with one VERY long suffering other half. Needless to say, life is many things, but dull it is not! We look forward to hearing her monthly tales of juggling, kids, horses and life in general.

est sugary fad bit of deliciousness but no, none of my horses will ever see a sugar cube while in my care! It’s all fruit and veg, natural, organic, nothing but the best all the way. I figure that at least children can brush their teeth and if they start trying to bite my hand off, well, in that case I think we have bigger problems than what they’re eating to be perfectly honest. Not all treats are created equal of course and my favourites at the moment are the Hygain Smoochies*, but perhaps not for the reasons one might think. You see, technically, these little bite size snacks that are oh so popular with my four legged crew, are also natural and preservative free enough that we, the humans I mean, can actually eat them without dying a terrible death (I know this one first hand as I’ve tried them). With this in mind, I’d be

lying if I said it hadn’t occurred to me on the odd occasion (usually towards the end of the week when I’m trying to hold off doing the weekly shop until AFTER I’ve bought the horse feed) when the breakfast cereal situation is looking grim and a packet of Smoochies has been lying around….I wonder would they notice if I served them up a bowl of fenugreek goodness? Honestly, as long as it was smothered in honey and milk my kids would eat just about anything. (NB: Just for the record, please don’t do this. I can’t afford to be sued and it definitely is NOT on the packet that Smoochies are a suitable substitute breakfast cereal for children!) Maybe that’s the key though – the kids need to develop some allergies and specific dietary requirements and then maybe their diet will receive the same level of attention as the fur kids! In the mean-

time, I think I’ll just appreciate the fact that they are allergy free, healthy and resilient little beings. And cost less to feed each week than the horses. *Yes, these are available from Equestrian Hub’s website, but this is not a shameless plug – I don’t have any kind of vested interest in Smoochies, I just genuinely like the things!

Smoochies

Make your horse’s taste-buds party. Available from equestrianhub.com.au


Jumping Saddle Specials! $3,500

$4,500

$2,750 Black Country Vinici 17.5"

CWD SE02 17.5” For more saddle information, visit our website.

$2,500 Stubben Roxane CS - Biomex 17.5”

$2,950 Pessoa Gen X Elite 18"

equestrianhub.com.au

Show Saddle Specials! $2,250

$2,000

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Icon Show 16”

26

$3,300

$2,900 Windsor Esquire 13.5” #5 For more saddle information, visit our website.

$2,750 Defiance Force 17"

$3,250 Mal Byrne Atelier Profile 16.5"

equestrianhub.com.au


SPORT PHOTOGRAPHY SPECIALISTS STATE OF THE ART MOBILE OFFICE ON-SITE PRINTING OZ SHOTZ CAN ATTEND YOUR EVENT

E-mail: earle@ozshotz.com.au Telephone: (07) 5497 0466 Mobile: 0411 810 647 PO BOX 193, MORAYFIELD QLD 4506

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

www.ozshotz.com.au

27


I N T E R N AT I O N A L

CHARITY

HIGHLIGHT

Heavy Horse Heaven HEAVY HORSE HEAVEN (HHH) IS A HEAVY HORSE RESCUE THAT WAS FOUNDED IN SEPTEMBER 2011 IN YASS NEW SOUTH WALES. Karen Hood, President of HHH, noticed that there were no rescue organisations that were dedicated to the heavy horse breeds and decided to start the charity.

HHH currently have 17 heavy horses in care and have had a total of 72 ‘guests’ who have come through the gate since they started in late 2011.

“There are all sorts of reasons why people surrender their horses to us,” Karen explains.

Like most charities, HHH needs donations to cover their costs and has a number of options to choose from.

“Deceased estates, illness, financial and the realisation of just how much the larger horses cost to keep.

“We welcome all donations and any donation above $2.00 is tax deductable,” Karen said.

“We are here to rescue, rehabilitate, retrain and rehome where possible.”

“We also offer sponsorship on the horses in our care with costs ranging from $50 to $500 per year – this money goes towards the large costs of horses feed, shelter and veterinary bills and any financial help is truly appreciated.”

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

While not all horses that come into the care of HHH can be saved, most of them are able to be rehabilitated through feed, vet and farrier work, education and some TLC where they can eventually be rehomed.

28

source of horses are now coming from people who are realising that owning a large horse isn’t as easy as they first thought.

“We have had 47 horses rehomed which is a great achievement,” Karen said.

They have a great reputation as being ‘gentle giants’, however they need to be handled and cared for in the right way for them to be like that, and unfortunately this isn’t always the case.

Originally HHH were bidding against “doggers” (the term given to buyers for abattoirs) at local sales to save horses, but while they will still help the odd sale horse, their main

“Some people are unaware of the needs of these big guys and may find themselves in a financial bind once providing feed, veterinary care and tack for them.”

If you would like to find out more about HHH and what their amazing team does, check out their Facebook page.


Continued from page 17 -

Top 20 Money Saving Tips

from store to store there can be slight differences in prices. Remember that every dollar counts. 15. If you know you are going to need a new winter rug next season, plan in advance and look for the sales at the end of this winter (and vice/versa for summer!) 16. Belong to a riding or pony club? Organise a swap meet or second hand sale.

18. Barter for lessons/feed/ agistment or anything else. Are you awesome at plaiting

Sharing is Caring 19. Ask your vet/dental/farrier if they are willing to consider a group discount for routine visits. It’s much easier for them to see 10 horses in the one location than one or two in 10 different locations! 20. Struggling with the costs and time of horse ownership on your own? Consider “sharing” a horse with a friend 21. Share a float. Unless you are competing every weekend, it might be more cost effective to share one with a friend. It’s even better if you are both going to the same events!

Budget 22. Plan ahead – Keep track of what you spend weekly/ monthly/yearly and include everything. You can’t save if you don’t know what you’re spending! Categorise the costs and see where your money goes. When it’s in front of you it is easier to see where savings might be made. 23. Make a budget and stick to it! (And if the pack of wormers is looking expensive this month, you probably don’t need that second set of blingy bandages!) And finally… 24. Don’t cut the wrong corners! Trying to save on things like vaccinations, worming, vet and farriers, quality feed will only cost you money in the long run.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

17. Do regular tack/gear cleanouts to cash in on unused items.

for a show or making browbands? Can you offer to do chores? Bag and sell someone else’s manure as well as your own? Be creative.

29


NEWS & VIEWS FROM EQUESTRIAN HUB Published by Equestrian Hub • PO Box 13 • Tintenbar NSW 2478 Phone: 0414 760067 • Email: info@equestrianhub.com.au www.equestrianhub.com.au

HubVibes March 2017  
HubVibes March 2017  

A free e-zine from Equestrian Hub.