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FREE

NEWS & VIEWS FROM THE SADDLE HUB

October 2016

Equestrian PROPERTY Development Part II Extreme COWBOYS HOOF Imbalance Variables of VALUE ITCH, Scald or Allergy and PLENTY more!

HUB H

ERO

Christop her Burton Credit Libby Law Photography


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FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH

OUR NEW TEAM MEMBER

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TOP TIPS FOR DEVELOPING

HOOF IMBALANCE AND IT’S

YOUR EQUESTRIAN PROPERTY

AFFECT ON SADDLE FIT

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UNDERSTANDING

YOUNG RIDER OF THE MONTH

HORSE BEHAVIOUR

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VARIABLES OF SADDLE VALUE

PINK DAY OUT

19 ITCHY, SCRATCHY?

9 HUB HERO

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CHRISTOPHER BURTON

THE BROOKE

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EXTREME COWBOY RACING

THE 2016 GARRYOWEN

NEWS & VIEWS FROM THE SADDLE HUB Editorial & Advertising Enquiries: info@hubvibes.com.au The Saddle Hub Sales Enquiries: Fiona Todd: 0414 760 067 Graphic Design: Joanna Reid: 0408 773 851 Published by The Saddle Hub PO Box 13 • Tintenbar NSW 2478 Phone: 0414 760 067 • Email: info@hubvibes.com.au www.thesaddlehub.com.au

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Credit Pauline Kinsella Photography

Zarah and Bubbles born 1/10/16 at 1:45am, sired by Baluga from Diamond B Farm

September has proven to be a massive month in Saddle Hub world and the October edition of HubVibes reinforces that fact.

One of the principal objectives of HubVibes is to help different charities and support the smaller player in this big equestrian world. This month we bring two charitable organizations to you. The Brooke, supported by Chris Burton, was fascinating to research. The work

We hope you are enjoying reading HubVibes, because we love putting it together. It is very exciting to see the number of new subscribers we are receiving daily and are touched with the support we are receiving. The Equine world is sending some amazing people our way, enjoy some of their stories in this months e-zine.

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We are very honoured that Chris Burton took time from his very busy schedule to answer our questions and be our Hub Hero. On top of that, Australian Junior Showjumping Champion, Jessie Rice Ward is our Young Rider of the Month, Jessie, although from a different discipline to Chris, has all the hallmarks of attaining the same dizzy heights.

they do is inspiring and I encourage every one of you to not take for granted the happy lives we give our horses. The working horses in poorer countries aren’t afforded the luxury of bedtime carrots. We also encourage you to support Tweed Valley Equestrian Groups online auction supporting breast cancer, you can make a bid at: https://www.nominate.com.au/auction/default.aspx?AuctionID=34

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Top Tips for Developing Your Equestrian Property PART II Continuing on from last month, where we talked about making a wish list, planning, talking to people directly affected and consulting professionals.

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5. Do your research

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For every aspect of developing your property there will be many options to choose from in terms of price, function, durability and aesthetic appeal. The age of the internet means that there is no excuse for not thoroughly researching different products that are available on the market. Talk to professionals, friends, sales reps anyone who can provide information on a product you are considering using and then make a decision with your own purposes and priorities in mind. If you are planning on using your property for breeding or keeping stallions, then investing in state of the art foal and stallion safe fencing may be more of a priority than state of the art arena surfaces. It all comes down to YOUR priorities for YOUR property. 6. Budget This is the point where your project gets real,

fast. If you’re working with an architect and/ or general contractor, your team will meet with you about project requirements and costs, line-by-line. How much money you need depends on your local design and construction costs, material prices, and if you’re doing some of the work yourself. In general, pad your budget by at least 10%. Costs rarely come in less than you expect, and material and labor costs often increase as time goes by (i.e., a budget completed today won’t apply next year from now if your project gets postponed). For each item on your budget, check with at least two vendors or service providers (such as an excavator and builders) for pricing, and compare numbers before you purchase products (such as fence posts, troughs, or gates) or hire a service provider. In the case of arena installation, prices varied by thousands of dollars. When comparing general contractor


and subcontractor estimates, make sure you have an apples-to-apples comparison of services, and get it in writing. Not all contractors offer the same scope of service, and prices can vary greatly. More budget tips: • Avoid spending money on major things you plan on changing later (eg if you are unsure of paddock layout, perhaps go with portable electric fencing for internal fences as these tend to be less expensive and easily changed) • Be realistic and be prepared to compromise on some things (you don’t really need that concrete rearing horse water fountain feature out the front of your stables) • But don’t compromise on safety and functionality (secure and horse safe fencing is obviously a must) • Get quotes from more than one supplier/ contractor, preferably in writing

• Look for recommendations from other horsey property owners • Don’t even think about trying to DIY the important stuff (for example any electrical work, building foundations or the base of your arena) • Keep in mind the resale value of your property and try not to overcapitalise • Plan to undertake the work in phases and over time. Rome wasn’t built in a day! Developing your equestrian property can be an expensive, time consuming and frustrating process but it can also be hugely fun and ewarding at the same time. By investing some time and energy into the planning stage you can make savings in angst, time and money as well as reap the benefits from facilities that will provide both function and enjoyment for you and your horses for many years to come.

Introducing...

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To book a fitting for your custom designed CWD contact your local distributor: New South Wales ~ Leah Scott South Australia / Tasmania Australian Agent lscott@cwdsellier.com ~ Dale Flynn ~ Kaden Weaver 0418 147 511 dflynn@cwdsellier.com kweaver@cwdsellier.com Victoria ~ Kane Chester 0408 191 229 0429 300 827 kchester@cwdsellier.com 0487 847 241 Queensland Western Australia ~ Nadia Gronow ~ Penny Newbold ngronow@cwdsellier.com pnewbold@cwdsellier.com 0438 098 780 0402 095 863

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Understanding Horse Behaviour READING THE EMOTION BEHIND THE BEHAVIOUR

I was reading a Facebook question where someone was asking about why their horse was pawing and what that meant. It gave me the idea for this article, because there could be such a diverse range of answers to this question. It all depends on the emotion behind the behaviour.

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Helium - asking a question, enthusiastic, alert

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What we need to look at is not only the behaviour but the context it is in and the emotion behind it. If we think about pawing, horses can paw because they are curious or they are trying to check something out, like a tarp on the ground or a horse float tailgate to see if it is safe. They can paw when they are in pain with colic or they can paw when they are very anxious and distressed. They might also paw if they are angry and frustrated. So the key to understanding any behaviour is to know the emotion behind the behaviour, because the same behaviour can come from a very diverse range of emotions. The next

thing to know is that horses are capable of feeling all of the emotions or feelings that humans do. To discover the emotion underlying the behaviour we need to LOOK, LISTEN AND FEEL, it is the same as observing people. We can get an indication of how people are feeling through observing their body language and actions and listening to the words they use. With horses we can’t listen to the words but there are some sounds they may make that can give us information. Firstly, we need to look at the context of the situation and then we look for qualities of softness and relaxation or their opposites, tightness and tension. Tightness and tension are going to indicate that the horse is in a more negative mental and emotional state, or a state of physical imbalance in the body, whereas softness and relaxation indicates a more positive mental and emotional state and a physical state of balance. When I use the word soft I am referring to softness everywhere. Soft eyes, soft ears, soft loose muscles (to see and touch), soft joints, tail movement will be soft and the feet land softly on the ground. The horse’s movement would be soft, portraying rhythm and flow and bending through the spine (ribcage) as opposed to being stiff, straight, rigid or braced through spine and in particular the ribcage area. Bending through the ribcage means that horses are soft and loose through the spine and nervous system, since the central nervous system runs through the spine.


Another indicator of how they are feeling and the mental space they are in will be noticing the speed of how they do things. Are they thinking, calculating or planning before they act, or are they just reacting instinctively, immediately and sometimes violently with no prior thought? They can sometimes react so quickly that even they didn’t know what they were going to do before they did it. The latter is indicative of a horse that is extremely fearful and in survival mode, severely stressed and possibly pain related. In this state they can be a danger to themselves and all around them so the first management strategy is getting them to stop and THINK. In the case of a horse being more calculated and thinking, if the rest of the body shows signs of softness then this is good, a thinking, soft horse is a very good thing. If the rest of the body shows signs of tightness and tension, this can be indicative of pain, discomfort, resentment or anger and clearly they are not happy about what is happening or about to happen. In this case I would be investigating any possible physical reasons for the horse to be feeling pain or discomfort, saddle, feet, teeth, sore back etc. or any possible emotional reasons for this resistance to cooperating, like confusion, holding onto memories of previous past experiences and lack of trust in humans for example and these emotional issues would need to be addressed through training and having the horse feel understood and supported by the trainer/rider.

Often there is a combination of emotions. Sometimes horses will be excited and playful but there can be nervousness at the same time. This is often the case when horses see something a bit scary or different and they prance with a high head and high tail, blowing out through their nostrils.

Mare and foal are a little worried and apprehensive. As well as looking for tension or relaxation we need to feel for it. We can feel for it physically through our physical touch but also energetically. Tune into the horse and then into yourself and see how you feel when a horse displays a behaviour. Do you feel happy and at ease or distressed? You may be working with a horse or just in their presence and feel Continued from page 21

Understanding Horse Behaviour - Mel Fleming http://www.melfleming.com.au/ Connection with Horses and Riding with Synchronicity

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Where there is anger and resentment, underneath there is usually a deep hurt or sadness which needs to be acknowledged and then released and then they can be supported and encouraged to take a fresh start and give

things another go.

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Pink Day Out The Power of Pink dressage and show jumping weekend is fast approaching. It’s a National Breast Cancer Foundation endorsed charity event, held on the 8th and 9th of October, 2016 at the Murwillumbah Showgrounds. In support of the event The Australian Dressage Council has approved an official dress code exemption to allow the riders to compete in pink, even their horses! Thanks to all the participants and sponsors, The Power of Pink has raised over fifty three thousand dollars for Breast Cancer Research over

the past 7 successful years. Fun prizes for the Pinkest Horse, Pinkest Rider and Pretty in Pink are awarded each day. Prizes are awarded to the winners in all divisions, including over 10 official Equestrian Australia dressage classes. All riders, sponsors, volunteers and spectators have a fantastic weekend. There are smiles everywhere you look and the atmosphere is always fun. There’s plenty to do between watching the horses and riders, browsing the sponsor’s tents and

bidding on auction items. All funds raised including riding class entry fees, sponsorship and donations are donated directly to the National Breast Cancer Foundation. This year’s auction is being run via Nominate with plenty of great items available. One of the highlights being a Black Country Adelinda kindly donated by The Saddlefitter.

Power of Pink e onlin

CHARITY AUCTION

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Black Country Adelinda 17.5”

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Click HtoEmRakEe a bid!

Kindly donated by:


HUB HERO

OCTOBER

Five minutes with EQUESTRIAN

Christopher Burton

Q1. What is your most memorable moment in your equestrian career?

Q3. What’s the most unusual item in your tack box?

There have been many, good and bad, but I think winning Aachen for the second time with Holstein Park Leilani as her final run before retirement was a big moment.

I am not a real gadget person, I like to keep things simple but I do like to use Sekur grip on my boots and saddle before I go XC.

I have had so many, but there is no doubt I owe my career to Deo Juvante who took me from Pony Club to 4*.

I would love to do some dressage training with Ingrid Klimke. Q5. Your best advice for an aspiring World Cup show jumping rider is‌ Never give up on your dreams and that nothing is achieved without hard work.

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Q2. Which is your all-time favourite horse?

Q4. If you could train with anyone in the world, past or present, who would you choose?

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w o C e m e r t Ex Are you looking for a new fun and challenging equestrian sport to try? How about Extreme Cowboy Racing? Designed to test out your horsemanship skills, Extreme Cowboy Racing involves an obstacle course not unlike a trail class but much more intense!

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You will need to have a trusting relationship with your horse as you manoeuvre through each obstacle and do so with smoothness and style. You and your horse have to be prepared for a variety of challenges from dragging a tarp to crossing a narrow bridge or going through the cowboy curtain. Usually the obstacles are brightly coloured and noisy, you

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will score points not only for riding through each obstacle but also for the way you do so, the calmer the horse and the looser the rein the better! Each race is made up of different obstacles and they are not ridden in the same order. A score is given for each obstacle on the

course. Each obstacle consists of three components: the approach to the obstacle, the obstacle itself and the departure from the obstacle. The race also includes the free ride element which is an exciting part of every Extreme Cowboy Race where the rider has the opportunity to clearly show speed with control. A score is also given for overall horsemanship. According to President of Australian Extreme Cowgirls Club Bianca Gillanders, don’t let the word extreme put you off, it is not about crashing through a set of obstacles at speed without concern for the horse or the safety of the rider. Quite the opposite, everything is set up with safety of horse and rider in mind and most of all the way you handle and ride your horse is considered extremely important. There are eight divisions in the competition including youth and novice so anyone can give it a go at the speed they feel comfortable


g n i c a R y o wb when they first start out. Each division has been assigned a specific level of difficulty for the obstacles that the riders are allowed to attempt and a rider may also choose to skip an obstacle that they decide will be too

loose over the obstacles and it will do the job itself, you will lose points if you have a tight rein, are pulling on your horse or your horse is gaping its mouth. Once again the more collection and style you have the prettier the picture and the judges love it to look pretty and smooth. When at Equitana this year keep watch of the Extreme Cowboy Challenge on Saturday 19th November from 4pm.

CURRENT CLUBS Australian Extreme Cowgirls www.australianextremecowgirls.com

difficult or they have not prepared for so they don’t compromise their horses confidence or their own safety. The ultimate goal is to have your horse seek the obstacles themselves and understand where their feet are and how to control the speed and balance at which they take the obstacle, this way you can turn your horse

Downunder Cowboys www.downundercowboys.com Geelong & District Extreme Cowboys High Country Extreme Club listing contacts for Australia can be found on the EXCA website and information about starting up your own club.

www.extremecowboyassociation.com

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OUR NEW TEAM MEMBER

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The Saddle Hub has grown considerably over the past few months! We would like to introduce you to Charmaine Patterson, the newest member of our little clan.

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You can contact Charmaine at: info@hubvibes.com.au, through our Facebook page HubVibes or Hub Directory or you can call her on 0409 785 104

Charmaine is from Cambridge, Horse Heaven in NZ and home of Sir Tristam and Mark Todd, so a life long love of these majestic creatures is not surprising. She was an amateur jockey, showjumped at the amazing Horse of the Year - Epic in Japan and is a past winner of Waikato Eventing Charmaine is not from a sales background, so if she calls to have a chat it will be to give you information about our businesses and to see if your business is a good fit with HubVibes and or Hub Directories.

Charmaine and her current love Felix


Listing Your Business

The Hub Directory is an online equine services directory, accessed through The Saddle Hub website. Launched this August in direct response to ever-increasing customer enquiries, listings are already steadily growing.

Why it works - the proof! The numbers speak for themselves of this fast growing and unique brand, The Saddle Hub: • Website: over 1,500 hits per day, over 40,000 per month • Facebook: over 10,000 “likes” on The Saddle Hub page, plus Hub Directory and HubVibes pages growing daily • Our posts reach beyond 500,000 people every month!

Our Rates 1 MONTH: $33 3 MONTHS: $91 Prices include GST

6 MONTHS: $167

12 MONTHS: $310

How to list your business 1. Simply go to our website: www.thesaddlehub.com.au 2. Click through to the Hub Directory page and select Create a Listing 3. Select a Service Category (you can add to this later). 4. Choose which Listing Period you want. 5. Fill in the Form (fields with * are required) and tick the terms and conditions box. 6. You can upload an image or logo (note file size requirements). 7. Make a payment using PayPal.

All done!

You’ll be notified when your listing is approved and we’ll start promoting your service or business on our Facebook page.


Hoof Imbalance and it’s Effect on Saddle Fit

LHS Medial-lateral imbalance

High-low syndrome

THE HOOF Hoof imbalance can come in many different forms, and is a primary cause of lameness in horses. If the hoof is not balanced at ground level, it is going to cause imbalance to the whole horse from the ground up. In addition to problems with imbalance, a vast majority of horses also suffer from hoof pathologies such as laminitis, navicular, thrush and pedal osteitis, which can be incredibly painful.

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Walt Taylor, former president of the American Farrier’s Association, wrote in the American Farriers Journal, November 2001:

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“Of the 122 million equines in the world, only 10% are clinically sound, 10% (12.2 million) are clinically, completely & unusably lame, the remaining 80% (97.6 million) are somewhat lame and could not pass a soundness evaluation.”

Long toe and underrun heels

Walt’s statement highlights how important the hoof is to the horse and how domestication generally can affect the hoof in terms of soundness. Hopefully we have made some progress in recognising where we were going wrong in terms of hoof care since that statement was made way back in 2001 however hoof pathology is still a very big problem in the horse world today. THE HOOF AND SADDLE FIT Saddles, for obvious reasons, are built symmetrical. Hoof imbalance and pathology will inevitably cause variations in biomechanics. Over a period of time, those variations in biomechanics will cause changes in posture and imbalance in the musculature. In addition, if there are musculoskeletal issues present that cause a horse to move incorrectly, or load the hoof incorrectly, it is also going to affect the way the hoof grows, causing problems such as flares and hoof cracks. High-low syndrome, is a perfect example of how hoof and/or musculoskeletal imbalance


can cause problems when it comes to saddle fit. Often caused by the horse grazing with one foot forward and one back but it can also occur due to musculoskeletal dysfunction and even rider imbalance. Whenever you see uneven heel heights, there will always be asymmetry of the dorsal scapula, the height of the top of the shoulder blades when viewed from the rear of the horse, causing asymmetry in the musculature of the back creating saddle fit issues, rider imbalance and also asymmetry of the hindquarters. Whenever there is asymmetry in the body or limbs, there is compensation. Horses are

incredibly stoic creatures. More often than not they will deal with their discomfort by altering their biomechanics without owners even realising there is a problem. By the time it manifests in lameness, it has usually been there for some time, it is so bad they can’t hide it any more. Our job as horse owners should be to learn how to recognise problems in the early stages before they become bigger problems. Understanding the key points of hoof care, body work, saddle fit and dentistry goes a long way towards keeping our horses sound well into their 20’s.

Congratulations Jessie! you’ve won a $50 gift voucher from

If you are a young competition rider and would like to be considered for HubVibes Young Rider of the Month email us your answers to the same questions we asked Jessie, along with a great pic of you and your horse. We can’t wait to hear from you! Name: Jessie Rice-Ward Age: 14 Discipline: Showjumping Horse/s: JFK (Snowy), 15yr old Aust. Riding Pony cross stock horse. Kiwi Guard (Hemi), 14 y/o Irish sport horse. Bonaventure (Gully), 20 y/o OTT. Gypsie Queen (Gypsie), 13 y/o Clydesdale cross. Cutawang Cruiser (Cecil), 18 y/o OTT.

Past achievements: Most successful Junior Rider at Sydney Royal 2016. NSW Junior Champion 2016 and Australian Junior Champion 2016. Future goals: Successfully competing in young rider classes next year. To be in contention for the Youth Olympics 2018. Best advice: Hard work beats talent if talent doesn’t work hard.

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Young Rider of the Month

OCTOBER

Samantha McCormack - Certified trimmer with the Australian Certified Equine Hoofcare Practitioners (ACEHP) and bodyworker (Craniosacral Therapy, Photonic Therapy, Equine Touch & Myofascial Release). http://australianhooftrimmers.com

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VARIABLES OF SADDLE VALUE

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Fittings and Flocking

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Open the bonnet of a BMW, a Ferrari or a Bentley and I am sure that a car aficionado can wax lyrical about what makes these vehicles so worthy of the price. For me it is the same when conducting a saddle autopsy, dropping the panel to view the tree, the fittings, the craftsmanship and the flocking. Like your car, in a saddle, good quality suggests longevity, comfort and safety.

Starting at the foundation: Trees are the basic structure around which most saddles are built. The whole purpose of a tree is to ensure the spine of the horse is kept clear while carrying the weight of the rider. Quality trees are built to last, are symmetrical, often have “built in” flexibility to move with the horse’s movement, use quality fittings to attach stirrup bars/billets and do not spread underneath the rider. The best saddle companies know the importance of quality trees and a high quality tree can be as much as several thousand dollars additional cost in the top saddles. A quality, safe tree is not exclusive to the high priced saddles but should certainly be examined in the older or off shore cheap models for the safety of rider and horse. Taking the pressure: Panels are the soft cushioned underbelly of your saddle that protects the horse’s back as they absorb impact from the rider. Pan-


els typically in most modern saddles contain either latex, foam, pure wool, synthetic wool, air bags or a combination of the above. For hundreds of years saddlers have gravitated towards the best quality wool flocking that has a tendency to “crinkle” and absorb pressure and thus protect the horse.

his saddles. In the same vein a quality saddle fitter will ensure a quality wool is used in total reflocks or take the care to ensure for partial reflocks that the flocking used will match that already in the saddle so that the panel consistency is smooth and less likely to form clumps. Like tyres on a car the panels of your saddle should be checked for wear and when required, replaced. Not all latex is the same, the cheaper latex panels also breakdown and will need to be replaced sooner than one filled

The author Kathryn Sullivan-Butt is “The Saddlefitter” a Society of Master Saddlers Qualified fitter, ASFA fitter and an EA accredited coach. With formal saddle and saddlefit training in Australia, UK, US and Europe she is fortunate to have had the opportunity to train under some of the industry’s most respected leaders. She fits full time in South-East Queensland.

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Whether pure wool or a synthetic wool the panel should still yield to pressure and have a soft spongy feel – a flocked panel that has lost this give is due to be reflocked and a panel that feels like a brick, is going to have the repeated effect of a brick on your horse’s back. Today there is a plethora of fabrics in the panel and in better quality saddles this will have been tested for endurance and effect as the panel is so very important to your horse’s well being and performance. Be it wool, air, latex or other, the educated horse owner will examine Fitting a quality English tree to a horse. these options and decide the one that meets their needs best (and that of their horse). with quality foam. Again like your car tyres you get what you pay for. Quality comes at a price, saddles that are flocked with cotton tailings swept up off a So while your pink trimmed saddle may look factory floor (and yes I have opened a panel pretty remember it is what is under the bonnet due for reflocking and discovered this) have that counts and make sure these fundamenno give and in this particular case a lumpy tals are safe for you and your horse. A better consistency. At the other end an exacting quality reputable synthetic saddle with a safe saddler craftsman may examine a bale of tree and suitable flocking may well be a better a particular type of wool known to absorb option than a poor quality saddle that has cut pressure best and select only this to use in costs on flocking, fittings and tree.

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Rodeo Champion A True Story

The inspiring true story of how rodeo champion, Fiona Johnson’s faith and determination helped her achieve her dreams and overcome some of life’s greatest obstacles.

decided now was the time to finally learn how to rope. She desperately wanted to be part Fiona Johnson was born a city girl, always of the Rodeo drawn to horses. Aged 10 she saved all of world. After her pocket money to buy a saddle at a gamany failed rage sale. Eventually, after months of nagging practice sessions, her parents, she persuaded them to buy her she eventually got the hang of it and a horse to go with the saddle. And so began went on to win the rookie title for ladies a life-long love affair with horses and Rodeo. breakaway roping in 2005. Fiona eventually moved from city to country when she met the love of her life Matt. Sadly tragedy struck shortly after they were married. Fiona was diagnosed with Leukaemia, a rare form of cancer. She wasn’t given very long to live.

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But Fiona is a fighter. She was determined to beat her illness and to fulfill her dream of participating in Rodeo events. Shortly after her release from seven months in hospital, Fiona

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Now ten years later, in remission and with two children, she can look back at the most difficult time in her life and revel in her triumph over near tragedy. This is the story of Fiona’s fight to survive and her ambition to fulfill her dreams of becoming a rodeo rider and a mother. Told with honesty, warmth and a fierce determination, this is an inspiring true story of beating the odds.


Itchy, Scratchy? Itch Scald or Allergy? the key factors to managing the A horse affected by Rain Scald itch. Mosquitoes and midges live Watching horses suffer and breed in wet, low lying from skin irritations is areas so endeavour to keep agonising for owners as your itch prone horses away their horse will selffrom these areas. mutilate or remove a

section of mane or tail. In this article by Katelin Dale, owner of Natural Itch Remedy gives some insight into causes and treatment.

Having a good understanding of the environment your horses are in will be one of

Rain scald is a skin disease that is caused by bacteria, typically contracted in persistently rainy conditions, it is contagious so it is essential not to share your

Although some of the signs for itch and rain scald are very similar you will soon find out if your horse has rain scald. It won’t be itchy and there won’t be open enflamed sores around the affected areas, instead there will be chunky/scabby areas on your horse that may be a bit sensitive to touch. Continued on page 23

Try Natural Itch Remedy Contact: Katelin 0431 277 467 www.naturalitchremedy.com.au facebook.com/naturalitchredy

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Queensland itch is a severe allergic reaction to sand flies, known as midges. March flies, black flies and stable flies can cause the same reactions resulting in chronic and un-controllable itching.

Other preventative factors are rugging and insecticides, a low to NO sugar and starch diet will also help keep the itch at bay. There are chemical treatments available as well as some brilliant natural products, which are typically nicer to your horse and deliver good results.

horses gear and to keep it clean.

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StripHair Wonder! The Gentle Grooming Kit is all you need in your tack box to keep your horse looking great all throughout the year. The large StripHair is an all-purpose grooming tool that will effectively and gently remove loose hair, dirt, dust, dried mud and sweat. StripHair can also be used to massage tired muscles and bathe your horse. The mini StripHair tool works the same, yet is flexible and gentle on areas like the face and legs. Try StripHair, your horse will love you for it!

The kit for horses includes: • StripHair Gentle Groomers, large & mini - use for shedding, grooming, massaging and washing. • Betty’s Best Healthy Skin spray all natural healing ingredients for a variety of skin issues. • StripHair Grooming Cloth - use to clean the horse’s face, wipe away dust on the coat, or to clean your StripHair tools. • Burlap Bag - a breathable tote and storage bag for StripHair grooming supplies.

Watch “Grooming a Horse? Use StripHair Of Course!” on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/166290011?ref=em-share Watch “Shedding the Hairy Horse” on Vimeo: https://vimeo. com/138600663?ref=em-share

Available from - www.horsepeople.com.au

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THIN LINE ARE NOW AVAILABLE IN THE SADDLE HUB’S TACK SHOP

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FAMILY OWNED WARMBLOOD STUD

Standing at Diamond B Farm - Baluga diamondbfarm.com.au


Continued from page 7 - Understanding Horse Behaviour very agitated and you were not feeling like this before – you may have picked up this feeling from them. The more we practise connecting into our horses, which really means getting quiet and still with the intention to better know and understand what is going on for the horse, the better we will get at knowing how they are truly feeling even when the signs are much more subtle. With practise you may start to feel some of the physical sensations that they are feeling. Practising being centered, grounded and breathing fully (down into your centre, and expanding your centre on the in breath) will be keys to

developing your intuitive and energetic feeling of the horse. It is important to know what the emotion is behind the behaviour so we can respond appropriately. Horses emotional states can change from moment to moment and we need to recognise this and be ready to adjust. Be observant, aware, open and “in the question” ? Being in the question means your mind is always asking why, how, what if and what for and then the counterbalance of this asking is the “allowing”, the quietness and the openness of the mind that allows the answer to come in.

Why use a neck rope? A neck rope or ‘cordeo’ is placed so that it lies loosely around the base of the horse’s neck.

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Originally intended for bridleless riding, neck ropes work well for groundwork too. One of the greatest benefits of using a neck rope in your you an opportunity to train without having training is that you can’t force your horse to use controlling pressure. You cannot get into doing what you want. It simply applies harder and harder or use physical pain. pressure (direct or indirect). This allows you to use it as a tool to increase your bond with your horse. By using it only as a communication tool and not a pain inducing tool, you can gradually gain more of your horse’s trust. It allows your horse to be confident that he will not be hurt. It also allows www.horsepeople.com.au

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THE BROOKE Their mission is to transform the lives of vulnerable working horses, donkeys and mules around the world. They relieve their immediate suffering and create lasting change by working with people, communities and organisations. The welfare of a working animal depends on the people that own and use the animal. In recent years, Brooke has been delivering an increasing amount of community training and support to share better welfare practices.

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Brooke is an international animal welfare charity dedicated to improving the lives of the 1.8 million working horses, donkeys and mules that are operating in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. These animals represent the engine that powers some of the world’s poorest communities, their health affects the livelihoods of the people that own them. Sadly, many of these working equines suffer ill health, exhaustion, dehydration and malnutrition as a direct result of unmanageable workloads.

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The vision of Brooke is of a world in which working horses, donkeys and mules are free from suffering. The charity improves the welfare of these equines, creating a flow on effect to the communities to which they belong.

Brooke is a charity supported by Chris Burton and is represented by ambassadors such as Charlotte Dujardan, Monty Roberts and Major Richard Waygood. There are several ways in which you can help Brooke move towards their vision. The most obvious is to donate or to fundraise.

thebrooke.org


Continued from page 19 Ichy, Scratchy?

may need some antibiotics to help combat the bacteria.

Preventative practices include providing protection during inclement weather, either through provision of a shelter or having waterproof (but breathable) rugs. Don’t over rug, getting hot from excessive rugging can cause rain scald due.

A grass allergy is a reaction to certain types of grasses – usually containing mycotoxins. This can happen when you have mould spores in your hay/fodder or in your pastures.

To treat wash with an antibacterial shampoo daily until you start to see new hair growth forming. Let the shampoo sit for 10 mins allowing it to penetrate deep into the skin and kill the bacteria. NOTE: For severe cases it is recommended that you contact your vet as your horse

Mycotoxins are propagated by endophytes predominately inside your high oxalate grasses, such as Rhy, clover, kikuyu, paspalum, phalaris, Seteria. A horse displaying signs of grass allergies will become itchy and display the EXACT SAME symptoms of a horse that suffers from QLD itch. To determine whether or not your horse is suffering from

mycotoxins is knowing if your horse has been a continuous itcher every itch season or if it’s something that has only just started happening recently. The main itchy areas affected by grass allergies are the face, legs and under their belly – one of the main signs is extreme itching, although every horse is affected differently and can display an array of symptoms To reduce the chance of grass allergies keep your paddocks maintained to a good height and not allowing the grass to become out of control and go to seed. Sow the paddocks with ‘horse friendly’ grasses such as Rhodes grass.

Welcome to Glen Haven Park Glen Haven Park is owned and operated by the Hamood Family. Paula and Olivia Hamood are the principal riders and Paula is also the principal horse trainer and show jumping instructor. Kilcoy Qld 4506 Phone: (07) 5497 1243 Email: info@glenhavenparkaust.com. auwww.glenhavenparkaust.com.au

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Garryowen THE 2016

This year the Garland was made by HM Garlands and is an absolute work of art. We asked Phillipa Harcourt of HM Garlands about this astonishing floral creation. In 2016 the colour scheme is mainly white, with touches of ivory, beige and using pearlised trim and lush Australian themed greenery. Inspiration for garland was drawn from the event itself and the tradition of the dress the competitor’s wear. The costume itself is almost a trademark of the event, being very detailed and precise.

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The Garryowen was named after a horse who sadly perished in a stable fire in 1934 alongside his owner, top show rider, Violet Murrell. The coveted Garryowen Turnout Perpetual Trophy has been awarded at the Melbourne Royal every year since, in their honour.

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This prestigious event has six judges, each awarding points in a separate category. Those categories are; manners and paces, conformation and soundness, costume, saddlery, riding ability and general appearance of the horse and rider. The presentation criteria is rigorous covering every facet of the horse and rider. The winner of this prestigious event are awarded a trophy and an amazing garland.

The costume element is a visible throwback to the garment style worn in 1934. The tradition of this costume makes a competitor in this event easily identifiable by its strict and exact nature of each element of costume. To represent the 6 elements of judging, the garland has 5 silver florin’s from 1934 as well as one penny from 1934, which is a tribute to the design from last year. These silver coins while maintaining a link to the year also were selected for their colour. The bright silver tone complimenting the crisp white flowers. To celebrate the tradition that is the costume of the ladies who compete, particular elements were sourced of the actual outfit that would be worn during this class. This year, hiding amongst the gardenias and other floral features is a genuine tiny turnout cane, a set of collar studs, a set of cuff links and a tiny pair of turnout gloves complete with pearl clasp. As a gift to the competitor there was also a silver and diamantÊ stock pin. The garland includes a leather and silver wither clip strap to attach the garland at the wither


and allow room for adjustment. A feature of this years garland is the addition of detailing on the back of the piece. As a tribute to the winners of past Garryowen years, each winner has their name printed onto the fabric and the year of their win. This runs down one side of the body of the garland. On the other side of the garland

Next month in

are printed photos of Garryowen and Violet Murrell. This brings together the modern day competitor and links a connection to the past. Much thought has gone into this piece as a celebration of the many years of this event and a dedication and payment of respect to the woman who is the namesake of this event.

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Come and have a chat about how we can help you find a home for your pre-loved saddle, or check out the saddles we currently have available. We can also answer all your questions about our HUB DIRECTORY and HUBVIBES E-zine. OCTOBER - NOVEMBER TRADE STALLS

Showcase of Showjumping, Richmond, Sydney .... 12 - 16 October Equitana Melbourne Showground ................. 17 - 20th November

See you there!

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Where to Find Us

Equitana Carriage driving - the disciplines A look at the heavy horses Showing - the tricks and tips Young Rider feature

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NEWS & VIEWS FROM THE SADDLE HUB Published by The Saddle Hub • PO Box 13 • Tintenbar NSW 2478 Phone: 0414 760067 • Email: info@thesaddlehub.com.au www.thesaddlehub.com.au

HubVibes October 2016  
HubVibes October 2016  

The Saddle Hub's October 2016 e-zine featuring news and views from the Australian equine industry.