Page 1

FREE

NEWS & VIEWS FROM EQUESTRIAN HUB

September 2017 This month's hero

DAVID FINCH Equitana AUCKLAND

EVENTING with Christine Bates

Breeding

TIPS

Penny Newbold's Road to Recovery HORSE HOROSCOPES

PLUS plenty more! EQUITANA TICKETS + $100 VOUCHER

N! TO BE W2O & 33 See pages


Accidents Happen! Hub Help is raising funds to support victims and their families in the event of an equine accident.

If you have a story to tell or want to donate, contact:

info@hubhelp.com.au or head to this LINK.


3

21

FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH

YOUR CLUB IN PROFILE

23

4

PRODUCT REVIEW

THE LUCKIEST LITTLE CITY IN THE WORLD

25

8

YOUNG RIDER OF THE MONTH

DAVID FINCH THE QUIET ACHIEVER

26 CHARITY HIGHLIGHT

13

28

THE EVOLUTION OF EVENTING

AN AWAKENING

14

33

NSW RDA STATE DRESSAGE CHAMPIONSHIPS & GYMKHANA

HUB SADDLE REVIEW

16

34

CANDIDLY SPEAKING

STARS BY EPONA

18

38

BREEDING TIPS

BREED SPOTLIGHT

Cover image: David Finch on his Sporthorse stallion, Charlemagne Ego Z. photo credit: Kalyoxer Photography

NEWS & VIEWS FROM EQUESTRIAN HUB HubVibes Editorial & Advertising Enquiries: candida@equestrianhub.com.au The Saddle Hub Sales Enquiries: Fiona Todd: 0414 760 067 Graphic Design: Joanna Reid: 0408 773 851 Published by Equestrian Hub PO Box 13 • Tintenbar NSW 2478 Phone: 0414 760 067 • Email: info@equestrianhub.com.au www.equestrianhub.com.au

Proud supporters of


23-26 November, ASB Showgrounds

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

THE EQUINE WORLD IS COMING TO NEW ZEALAND

2

TICKETS SELLING FAST

WWW.EQUITANAAKL.CO.NZ IN PARTNERSHIP WITH


Also – trumpet sound – it’s giveaway time at Equestrian Hub! We have a double pass to giveaway to Equitana in Auckland, and this month we have a travel article to wet your whistle. Simply buy or sell a saddle through The Saddle Hub and you are automatically in the draw. Donny and Aunty Zar having a roll after the hail storm. and ensured he remained (relatively) relaxed throughout the event. I was greeted with an image of total joy. Donny was fascinated by this funny stuff lying all over the ground – rear, gallop, paw, roll, repeat several times. Watching him and his youthful play was such a delight.

We “asked” for light showers overnight, every night for a week or so. Surely that wasn’t too much to ask?

Meanwhile, on the HubVibes front we are very excited to welcome Penny back on board. Her article ‘Awakenings’ is truly inspirational, emotional and – of course - funny. Dannii completed an interview with the amazing Christine Bates, we can’t wait to catch up with her in person at SIEC next weekend. Candy had a long, often interrupted, and thoroughly illuminating chat with David Finch about the highs and lows of a lifetime in the horse industry.

Obviously we weren’t clear enough because we received a minimal amount of rain and instead were delivered masses of hail, huge car denting, tree stripping hailstones. As soon as it was over I headed out to ensure little Donny - my pride and joy - had survived his first hailstorm with no drama. Thankfully his paddock companion, Aunty Zar, had kept him safe

Thanks for joining us for the September edition of HubVibes. Have an awesome month and see you in October. Happy riding! Fiona Todd Director, Equestrian Hub

Melinda Down's horse "Safari", winner of last month's horse rug competition.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Believe it or not, after the torrential rain and horrendous floods we endured earlier this year we’ve been praying for rain for the past few weeks. Well, last week we got it – not exactly as we’d indicated we would like it!

Christmas, by the way, just to panic you, is just 114 days away!!!! Gift of the moment I Rock n Ride – check them out on our site.

3


THE LUCKIEST LITTLE That’s what they say about Auckland, which is consistently voted in the top ten most liveable cities in the world. This year the city is hosting the largest horse event in the southern hemisphere – Equitana – writes Dannii Cunnane. Auckland’s stunning beaches, architecture, culture arts and entertainment make it a perfect place for a holiday – throw in this year’s Equitana and visiting Auckland for the last week of November is going to be an exciting experience.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

For all of us mad-keen Equitana fans, the event is running from Thursday 23 November to Sunday, 26 November 2017 - four whole days jam-packed full of equine shopping, masterclasses and seminars.

4

There will be exhibitions and educational opportunities galore – Equitana is showcasing more than 40 diverse education sessions each day! It’s definitely worth booking a mini-break and visiting for the equine experience alone, but if you want to do a bit of New Zealand exploring on the side, we’ve got some top picks below that might pique your sight-seeing interest.

West Coast Beaches and Waterfalls The West Coach beaches are less than an hour from Auckland City. Enjoy the long stretches of black sand and breathtaking rainforests featuring exquisite waterfalls. Muriwai Beach has impressive cliff-tops and gannet colonies, or if you fancy a surf, Piha beach is the place for you. Waiheke Island Waiheke Island is a 35-minute ferry ride from Auckland and is known as the ‘island of wine’. It is home to many wineries and vineyards so a wine tasting tour is a must. Enjoy a day trip and explore the beautiful beaches, restaurants and other activities that the island has to offer. Great Barrier Island Great Barrier Island is 90 kilometres from Auckland and shelters the harbour from the relentless swells of the Pacific Ocean. This is a very relaxed area to visit and is covered in lush native forest. You can walk along the beautiful Aotea Track, visit the rare wildlife of Glenfern Sanctuary or relax on Medlands Beach.


E CITY IN THE WORLD Gulf Waters Tours The Gulf waters are teeming with marine life, and Hauraki Gulf Marine Park is a protected marine reserve. Wild marine mammals and rare birds living in their natural habitat are in abundance. An opportunity of special moments and close encounters with wildlife is not to be missed. If you are lucky, you might spot: • whales

• dolphins

• penguins

• rare water birds Middle Earth

Waitangi Treaty Grounds A three-hour drive from Auckland, the Waitangi Treaty Grounds provides a lesson in early New Zealand history - both Maori and European.

Market life Markets are an intrinsic part of Kiwi culture. Colourful and vibrant, these markets give visitors an insight into the New Zealand way of life and are a fantastic place to pick up delicious treats, local crafts, gifts and souvenirs. The following arts and crafts markets around

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Since the first Lord of the Rings movie was released in 2001, New Zealand has been known as ‘home of middle-earth’. More than 150 locations throughout the country were used to film The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit trilogy, and many activities and attractions offer the chance to see the film locations for yourself.

The grounds consist of 18.5 hectares of varying landscapes from native bush, boardwalks, paths, tracks, beaches, lawns, and coastal cliff-tops. Here you will find the Museum of Waitangi Te Kōngahu, the Treaty House, Te Whare Rūnanga (the carved Meeting House), the Flagstaff and the Ngātokimatawhaorua (ceremonial war canoe).

5


the country are a must see if you are in the region: • Creative Queenstown Arts & Crafts Market – Saturdays on the lake front. • The Nelson Market (Saturdays) and Monty’s Sunday Market at Montgomery Square Carpark. • Riccarton Market in Christchurch every Sunday. • Wellington Underground Markets on Saturdays • Otara Market on Saturdays, Titirangi Market (last Sunday of the month) and Auckland Night Markets. • Bay of Islands Farmers’ Market in Kerikeri on Sundays. • The Wanaka region's Farmer's Market offers fresh, local seasonal produce and gorgeous local products; held every Thursday evening Horse Riding We might be lucky to have our own horses at home, but what better way of taking in the New Zealand beauty than on horseback! From beaches that stretch as far as the eye can see, to snow-capped volcanoes and enchanting native forests, exploring and enjoying the scenery in the saddle lends its own magic to the experience.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

There are many horse tour operators around the country, so be sure to find one in the vicinity you wish to explore.

6

Māori Culture The best place to observe Māori culture is on a marae (tribal meeting grounds). Organised tours provide a traditional Māori welcome onto a marae, where you'll hear Māori speeches and singing, see carved meeting houses, meet the local people (you'll greet them with the traditional pressing of noses) and enjoy a hāngi feast cooked in earth ovens. You will need to be part of a tour to visit a Marae. Tickets to Equitana are on sale now, so don’t miss out. There are also travel packages available to those traveling over the ditch, with flights, transfers, accommodation and Equitana entry all included. To purchase tickets visit the Equitana website.


H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

7


Young ones on the farm, 'poking along' until they're ready.

DAVID FINCH

The Quiet Achiever

Our Hub Hero this month is the much-loved David Finch, formidable showjumper, breeder of sport horses at his property Finch Farm, five times Equestrian Queensland Coach of the Year, and of course, Chair of Equestrian Queensland, writes Candida Baker. It’s not easy getting hold of David Finch, or Finchy, as he’s inevitably and affectionately known in the industry.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

“Darl,” he says, when I call him for our first appointment, “I’m just loading a horse, can I call you back?”

8

the proprietor of his stud, Finch Farm, but as a coach and teacher, current chair of Equestrian Queensland – and let’s not forget – a gun showjumper on his brilliant horse Charlemagne in his own right. David can’t remember a time without horses. Growing up on the family farm outside Roma, he learned on ponies and bush-horses. “I always wanted more riding,” he says. “I was the kid that used to hang around after mustering to go for another ride. I grew up in a stock saddle behind a mob of cattle, and I think in the long run it’s been a great thing for me to have those country skills. You learn to keep it real.”

David Finch with Charlemagne Ego Z (left) and Calgary GNZ.

The next morning on the rescheduled appointment we get a few sentences in and then he tells me, “I’ve got a load of people here for breakfast.” Then there were lessons, a visit to his grandfather and some work he had to do.

I was just beginning to take it personally when we made a firm booking – for 7.00am – it seemed about the only time David could take a moment out of his busy life as, not just as

‘Keeping it real’, meant, as it almost inevitably does for anyone wanting competition horses,


supplementing his income. “I got into teaching just to help support my own riding and competing,” he says. “It just grew like topsy and almost overnight I had a business.” But not all riders make good teachers, and having watched him teach at numerous clinics over the years, there’s something about

“One of the things I love about teaching is that I could be helping a young kid, mentoring a seasoned competitor, or teaching a 60-yearold who just wants to pop over low jumps because that’s their passion,” he says. Did he ever envisage such complete immersion in the industry, I wonder? “I always knew

David Finch on his Sporthorse stallion, Charlemagne Ego Z. the horse industry would be my life, but things didn’t come easily, and financially it was often tough, so I had to really think about what I was doing,” he says. “I traded my way up, at first through the classic avenue of re-training off the track thoroughbreds, later through my breeding program. I’ve had to learn to improvise which has really helped me in the industry. I’ve learned to survive – and if you want to be involved in the equestrian world long-term that’s what you have to do.”

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

his natural, down-to-earth approach which is not only sensible, but also very reassuring to all levels of riders. As a teacher he becomes deeply engaged with helping the rider get the best from their horse – and he doesn’t discriminate, travelling Queensland teaching showjumping, cross-country and dressage. It’s not difficult to see why he’s won the Australian Equestrian Coach of the Year gong and the Equestrian Queensland Coach of the Year five times.

9


Perhaps, more than anything, David’s longterm survival could be put down to the planning he’s executed for his breeding program, which has earned his horses an amazing reputation as competition horses in Australia. His main ‘man’ at the moment is the wonderful 2005, 17hh Sporthorse, Charlemagne Ego Z, by Calvaro Z – a horse that won Grand Prix and World Cup events, and sired a prolific stream of Sporthorses, including Charlemagne, who is truly the classic embodiment

one for forcing young horses to compete too early – it’s not good for their long-term physical health, and I don’t think it’s good for them mentally either – these larger horses need time to mature, physically, mentally and emotionally, and we give them that time. We've got young horses going into dressage, showjumping and eventing, but we never push them too young.” He pauses for a beat. I’ve never been one for early peaking. In fact I’ve never peaked early in anything. I just poke

The winning Queensland team with David Finch at the 2016 Tamworth World Cup State of Origin.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

of an European pedigree in a modern sport horse body. David comes as close to waxing lyrical as I’ve ever heard when he’s talking about the big grey. “He’s the best horse in the world,” he says. “He’s just come up through the ranks to Grand Prix, and he’s taken it all in his stride. I always mean to do more with him, he’s such a pleasure to ride. And he is siring some amazingly talented progeny.”

10

One of the main differences between David and many other trainer/breakers, is, it seems to me, the more European route he takes with his horses – who are not started under saddle until they’re three or even four. “We really don’t do much with our horses here until they’re five or six,” he says. “I’ve never been

along, and that’s what I get my horses to do.” Those of us who have watched him jump a Grand Prix jump course might agree to differ, but unlike some other showjumpers who concentrate on only the competition side of the sport, it is the holistic balance of his life that makes David such a respected figure in the industry he loves so much. With his official Chair of EQ hat on, he talks about his ambitions for Equestrian Queensland and the kind of work that it can do supporting young riders. “I think because of my country background one of the things that is really important to me is helping genius country kids that may not have access to the money or support other kids may have,” he


says. “I would love the sport to be accessible to everyone, and I like to think Australia is a place where kid can have a go. I also love the fact that equestrian sport is one of the few sports where men and women compete equally and age makes very little difference,” he says. “Look at Laurie Lever. He was 60 when he made his Olympic debut in showjumping at the Beijing Olympics.” One of the advantages, as he sees it, to the type of horse that we breed in Australia is the

good at it. I’ve never been the smartest person in the world, I surround myself with smart people – at EQ for instance, on the board we have some amazing people. You can’t let your own ego and self-gratification get in the way of success.” Back on his 400-acre farm, south west of Toowoomba, the breeding provides the backbone of all the operations. “At the end of the day you can’t help but get emotionally connected,” he says, “although I’m definitely not

David Finch riding Charlemagne Ego Z. presence of the purebred thoroughbred line in our sport horses. “These days with technology, you can collect genetics from around the world,” he says, “but the fact is that our thoroughbreds became a particularly tough strain of the breed, and it’s that toughness, speed and desire to win that you can use in Australian horses.”

If you really want to get good at something, he says: “Hang around with people who are

In fact, chances are that if you’re at a showjumping competition, ‘Finchy’ will have had something to do with it. He could be riding, coaching, there in an official capacity, watching horses he’s bred compete – or he might even have designed the jump course. “The horse industry is my world,” he says. To our minds the industry is all the better for his presence in it. For more information, visit David's website.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

A downside though, to the world of technology is that it’s too easy for us to compare ourselves to the rest of the world, according to David. “Australians do incredibly well on the world scene for a country with a small population,” he says, “but I’m not a fan of comparisons.”

a rainbow and unicorn person! But delivering a foal, standing it up, seeing it take its first steps, growing them up, getting on them for the first time, and then seeing them at competitions, it can’t help but be rewarding.”

11


Promote your club and feel the Love!

Hub for Clubs is an exciting new way for equestrian clubs to proudly promote themselves and receive great membership benefits.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

this s u h t i bw u l c r e u o List y mber to receiv Septe

12

F F O xt e n 50% r u o y s d n a l r a

G w o h S

HUB for CLUBS Membership Fee: $55 per year

equestrianhub.com.au

A division of: Equestrian Hub Garlands by: La Flor Equestrian Designs

For enquiries contact: promote@equestrianhub.com.au


The Evolution of Eventing Christine Bates has been an elite-level eventing rider for the last 20 years. She talks to Dannii Cunnane about the changes in safety within the sport.

decades, there has been an acknowledgement that eventing needed to evolve.” One of the main changes has been the introduction of the rule that if a rider has a fall in the cross-country phase they are immediately eliminated. It’s a rule which would have seen numerous medal-winning rides, including Australia’s own Gillian Rolton, disqualified, but there is no doubt that it has improved the safety aspects of the sport.

A seasoned professional, Christine Bates has produced many horses to international level eventing and her sights are currently firmly set on achieving success with her multi-event winning horse, Adelaide Hill.

“It’s disappointing from a competitor’s point of view,” says Christine, “but the safety aspect is overwhelming. There were so many riders getting back on their horse concussed – it was wild and woolly back then. Nowadays the priority is to makes sure the rider is ok. They need to be checked out and medically cleared – which is new. It’s a very positive step to make the sport safer.”

This successful horse and rider combination was previously short-listed for the 2012 London Olympics. Christine was also listed for the Atlanta and Sydney Olympics, as well as being the reserve for the 2002 World Equestrian Games in Jerez.

“Horse riding is a dangerous sport in itself, but when you add open country with fences to navigate, it’s a whole new level of risk,” says Christine, “but over the last couple of

Another change to safety has been the introduction in Europe of the frangible pin system, which was trialled at the British Eventing horse trials in 2002. The trial was successful and the pins were introduced to other events within the UK. The breakable metal pins are inserted between the top rail and the uprights Continued on page 37

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

One of the most exciting equestrian disciplines, eventing is made up of three phases – dressage, show jumping and cross-country - it’s the latter where most riders get injured.

13


NSW RDA State Dressage C

Michelle Dalmazzo riding Our Thomas in Grade 3 Sections B & C.

Annabelle Reynolds riding Just Call Me Casper in the 45 cm showjumping.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Leah Harker riding Bowdantic in Grade 1 Sections B & C.

14

Marnie Clapham riding Bella in Grade 1 Sections B & C.

Kristy Dalmazzo riding Sprinkles in Grade 1 Sections B & C.


Championships & Gymkhana photo credit:

Mickayla Prindable riding Wild Child In the Le Trec.

Brittany Bates Photography

Kaye Hannan riding Bradgate Park Wexford in Grade 4 Sections A + C Elevated.

PIX

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY www.equestrianevents.com.au H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Gemma-Mae Stemp riding Hezallgemz in the Le Trec.

15


C A N D I D LY S P E A K I N G

Why Green on Green is a BAD Colour Combination It’s been an odd thing to me to observe over the years a certain pattern repeating itself – I’m talking about the, to me, rather extraordinary decision of a lot of parents to buy their relatively inexperienced child a relatively inexperienced horse.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

It’s not usually the first pony (although I’ve witnessed that as well), it’s more often the second or third, when the child has been riding for a few years, and because older, more educated horses are more expensive, or seen as a future liability, the choice becomes to buy a young horse – often at exactly the time when children are moving off a pony or Galloway onto their first full-sized horse.

16

Sometimes, it’s simply because the parents are not horsey people and don’t understand that a pony that is only four-years-old, looks beautiful and was started under saddle six months before, isn’t suitable for their young one (unless it happens to be a miracle pony). My parents actually did it to me. After a few false starts with ponies, my father decided that breeding me one was the best option,

so he borrowed an unbroken, scarcely handled Fell Pony mare, and put her to a beautiful but somewhat flighty pure Arabian stallion. By the time I was 14 I had my very own somewhat mad, spooky young horse that bucked and bolted with me around the English countryside! Did it teach me anything? Well, it gave me exceptionally good balance, but a rather large dose of nerves I’ve fought with consistently ever since. Curiously though, and I’d be the first to admit it, I did almost the same thing when my jump-mad son was 10, and we bought him a 12-year-old Arabian who had only been gelded and started two years before. But he could jump for the moon, and in my defence by then I did know a fair bit about horses so Johnny’s


The Queen out riding in Windsor with two of her grand-children, Lady Louise and Prince Edward. Whilst HubVibes can't condone the lack of helmet - even for Her Majesty we love both generations out together. ongoing training – which did include Sam collecting a broken arm – was at least within the realms of possibility, and boy, could they jump together. I think perhaps, the high moment of our achievements was at Grafton Show one year, when a man came up to me having watched Sam and Johnny blitz a round and said, “I’ll give you $10,000 for that horse, right now.” I was completely flabbergasted. “He’s not for sale,” I told him. “Didn’t you hear me?” He asked belligerently. “I said I’ll give you $10,000 for him. I’ll withdraw the offer if you don’t accept it…” “Withdraw away,” I said. “I don’t think you heard me. He’s family and he’s not for sale.”

By then, of course, Johnny was a seasoned campaigner (and now he is an old Grandpa paddock ornament), of 16 or so – a perfect age, and with a lot of education under his belt.

I would ask – what price safety? Because if you keep your young one safe until they gain enough experience then they, in their turn can become the wise one that can teach a young horse, and bring it up through the ranks. And there’s nothing more satisfying than helping a young horse fulfil its potential. But green on green? You may just find that’s a way to hasten your child’s exit from the equine scene. HubVibes editor, Candida Baker is the President of Save a Horse Australia and also runs a Facebook page, The Horse Listeners.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

The man muttered something under his breath and walked off and if a back could sulk, his was sulking.

So here’s the thing I know about older horses – yes they are more expensive, but they are worth their weight in gold as long as they’ve had the right homes and education behind them. Does it matter if you buy an 18-year-old or 20-year-old for your young rider knowing that you might lose money if you have to sell it on, or even potentially give it away to a retirement home?

17


BREEDING TIPS With Spring just around the corner, it’s an exciting time for horse breeders – they are either waiting on a much anticipated foal or finalising the choice of stallion to put their mares to. If you aren’t an experienced breeder but are thinking about putting your mare in foal, there are a few things to consider.

If you don’t know your mare’s breeding history, have a vet check her before breeding. The vet will check her general health and reproductive confirmation to highlight any problems she may have. If there are any difficulties likely to occur, preventative measures can be taken to allow safe breeding and foaling. Temperament and conformational traits are genetically passed to offspring, so you will

Firstly, it is strongly advised that anyone wishing to breed their horse gain advice from their vet. While it’s tempting to find information in the internet and ask the social media experts, it’s always best to seek a professional’s opinion if you’re inexperienced or have any medical questions.

The Mare

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

If your mare is already approved for breeding in one of the breed registries you should first consider the stallions that are approved in the same registry. This will simplify the registration of the foal.

18

If your mare is not yet approved, or needs to be approved in a different registry, you will need to decide when to get this done. The safest time is before you breed or before the foal is born. If the mare is not approved or she was to die soon after the foal is born in most breed registries you would not be able to get papers on the foal.

need to ensure your mare and chosen stallion have qualities you want in your foal. Remember that nothing is ever 100 percent certain - the Olympic jumping horse you are aiming to breed may turn out to be a nice Dressage horse. Although it may seem cheaper, breeding your horse does come with significant costs. You will have to weigh up whether it is cheaper to breed your own or to purchase a horse that is already on the ground.


Selecting a Stallion Basic to all considerations is the stallion's conformation. Breeding to a stallion that is conformationally better than the mare gives the prospective foal a better chance of improving upon the mare. Avoid selecting a mediocre stallion and expecting your mare's good conformation points to overshadow his weak points. You might get lucky, but it's a much better idea to start with the best genetic material possible in the stallion since your mare is the unchanging factor. The best indicator of a good stallion isn’t what he does, but what his offspring do – that is what you are going to get. Try to talk to some of the owners of the stallion’s offspring to find out about their character, rideablilty, and how hard or easy they were to train. If they have yet to perform, you must give extra consideration to the grandsires and granddams. Beyond that, although their names can look wonderful on the pedigree, third and fourth generation progenitors have seldom made much contribution to the prospective sire. You will also need to look into whether the stallion is sound or not. If the stallion is unsound, you have a red flag warning you to consider carefully before choosing to breed from him.

Increasing Breeding Success

• Intense scanning and hormone supplementation is necessary if you are using advanced reproduction techniques, such as artificial insemination and embryo transfer. • Taking bacterial cultures of the mare’s uterus to determine if it is healthy (this is useful

• Determine the right time to mate by using the mare’s behaviour towards your chosen stallion or towards a ‘teaser’. • Testing the follicles increases the success of conception if the mare’s ovaries are ultrasound scanned. This is to see when an ovum (the mare’s egg) is ready to be released and to check that the uterus is healthy. • Scanning for pregnancy can be done after 16 days post-mating. The ultrasound can show the tiny foetal vesicle and action to be taken should there be multiple vesicles.

Caring for Your Mare Once your mare is in foal, her health needs to be monitored as the developing foal relies on this. Ensuring the mare is on a balanced diet with quality feed is a necessity – you’re aiming for the mare to be in good condition without obesity so keep an eye on the portions. It is important that you keep up with regular worming, as a burden can affect both mare and foal. Regular farrier work and dental checks are also required. Continued on page 24

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

There are several breeding procedures on offer to increase success of conception as well as checking that the pregnancy is going well. These include:

in problem breeders).

19


Breeda

Superior Nutrition for their future

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Breeda速 is one of the most popular and highly palatable complete feeds available to support the development and replenishment of body tissues during key growth phases. Packed with high quality ingredients in a fully steam extruded feed for maximum digestibility, Breeda速 also contains Bonafide速 to support bone density and good health.

20


Your Club IN PROFILE

GLENORIE HORSE & PONY CLUB

Glenorie Horse & Pony Club has been announced as the 2017 Club of the Year by the Pony Club Association of NSW. Pony Club NSW made the announcement at their Annual July Council Meeting, with Executive Officer Kerren Britton describing the winning club to have made a large contribution to Pony Club in NSW. “The Club of the Year award is presented to a NSW Pony Club that fosters participation and enjoyment at all levels of the sport, showing innovation in administration, skills development, and has provided personal growth and opportunities for members as well as the broader community”.

“Very proud to be the President of such a wonderful Pony Club, the spirit of the members and committee is just exceptional. Our Riders are talented and passionate about

Glenorie is a family friendly, skill building club that encourages the positive development of all riding abilities, up to 25 years of age. The Club focuses on, building friendships, confidence and enjoyment in riding. Glenorie Pony Club President: Beth O’Brien beth.obrienlw@gmail.com Glenorie Pony Club Secretary: Paige Cape info@glenoriepc.com.au

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Beth O’Brien, President of Glenorie Pony Club said the Club is very grateful to receive the award.

the Club’s heartbeat. The horsemanship skills and friendships formed within our club are for life. Our Club is one that gives back to the local community and provides a safe fun riding environment for local kids. Thank you to you, the members for making it what it is today ‘2017 Club of the Year’! Thank you to Pony Club NSW and Zone 26 for their great continued support of the Club. Pony Club plays a very important part in our rural local community and something every child will reflect on fondly in their adult years”

21


w ! e s N rival Ar Peter Horobin Liberty 17" with some mounts

PDS Euro Pro 17.5"

Amerigo Vega Monoflap 17.5"

Equipe Emporio 17"

Bruce Smith Jump 17" with some mounts

Antares Jump 17"

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Get them while you can!

22

HUB

the

Saddle

Buy, Ride, Decide!

equestrianhub.com.au


PRODUCT REVIEW

EQUINE RIDER Accessories Stock Equestrian Hub’s rider extraordinaire, Shae Herwig, was lucky enough to try out a stock tie from Equine Rider Accessories. Here is what she had to say about the product

it was hard picking out just one to trial.

“As a dressage and show rider I love any opportunity to make myself and my horse stand out in a crowd so I was thrilled when I received my stock from Equine Rider Accessories,” explains Shae. “They have a beautiful range of designs to choose from and a kaleidoscope of colours, so

“I’m a big fan of bling and bright colours, so I went for the pink and white stock which has a lovely silver piping and a beautiful bling stock pin. The pink colour stands out and the silver piping finishes it off perfectly. “The material is polyester which makes cleaning that little bit easier - you can iron it too! I also love that it has a Velcro attachment which makes it super easy to put on and it looks so professional in the ring.

You can check out the huge range of Equine Rider Accessories stocks online.

E info@nuwallacontracting.com.au M 0428 486 165 W www.nuwallacontracting.com.au

or find us on Facebook

• LUCERNE • CLOVER • MEADOW • OATEN • WHEATEN • 8x4x3 bales also available

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Supplying NSW with premium hay and chaff

“The best part is, they are Australian made. I highly recommend these stocks as they are value for money and absolutely take your look to the next level.”

23


IN STOCK READY TO SHIP!

Hands-free Bluetooth Equestrian

SPEAKER

Attaches securely anywhere.

Cont. from p.19 - Breeding Tips

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

If your mare becomes unwell, immediate attention is needed. Diseases will cause loss of the foal or can compromise its health. It is especially important to call vet if the mare develops a vaginal discharge at any stage of the pregnancy.

24

Facilities for Foaling Ideally broodmares should be isolated from other horses on the property that leave and return from shows and events. This lowers the chance of diseases and infections being spread. Facilities should include a horse crush that

can allow safe and easy mare procedures when required. Once the mare is close to foaling or the foal is born you’ll need to make sure there is some space for them to be separated from other horses. A dedicated foaling area such as an extra-large stall, yard or small, grassed paddock should be warm and clean. Yourself or an appointed person should be available for monitoring the mares at term and the newborn foals. Foaling alarms may not always work and mares may have issues delivering so it’s always a great idea to have someone checking in on them regularly (day and night).


Young Rider of the Month SEPTEMBER

Thea Horsley

Gun eventer, Thea Horsley, from the Southern Highlands in New South Wales is our September Young Rider of the Month. Thea started riding at the age of 4 and now at 17 years of age, has her eyes set on competing at the Adelaide 2**. Her current horse is Kelecyn Supernatural, a 12yo, 16.3hh, thoroughbred. She is coached by Sam Lyle. The best piece of advice Sam has given is "ride the opposite to what you feel" which helps Thea to adjust her riding for different horses on different days.

photo credit:

Alira Fontana Photography

Thea is currently in year 12 and when she is not riding, she loves playing sport and cooking. Thea is sponsored by Performance Saddlefits & Equine Bodyworx.

If you are a young competition rider and would like to be considered for HubVibes Young Rider of the Month, email us for a questionnaire to complete: promote@equestrianhub.com.au.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

25


• • •

CHARITY HIGHLIGHT

• • •

White Angels Horse Rescue WHITE ANGELS HORSE RESCUE IS LOCATED IN THE KINGLAKE RANGES OUTSIDE OF MELBOURNE. IT IS A NON-PROFIT ORGANISATION WITH THE MISSION TO RESCUE NEGLECTED AND ABUSED HORSES. men. Once they arrive at White Angels Horse Rescue they often require extensive feeding and work that includes teeth, hoof care and veterinary attention.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Most of the horses in their care have been purchased from the auctions, where they would otherwise go to the slaughter-houses. White Angels Horse Rescue also takes on horses that have been neglected or abandoned by their owners.

26

ship courses and have the option of being adopted by capable horse enthusiasts. Horses that are too injured or old to be rehomed, live out their days in the White Angels Horse Rescue sanctuary with plenty of love and attention.

When horses arrive at White Angels Horse Rescue they are washed, rugged, wormed and immunised. They have their teeth and feet done and live in quarantine paddocks until they are seen by the vet. After that the horses can enter the rehabilitation program.

How to Help

Horses that can be nursed back to health and are capable of being rehomed, undertake natural horseman-

Funds are required to purchase these horses at auction, when often their only option is to go to the meat

Donations are always welcome and payments can be made online with regular direct debits being the preferred option. You can also apply to adopt one of the many horses that White Angels Horse Rescue have available. Want to know more? Why not visit the White Angels Horse Rescue website and see what wonderful work they do for horses in need.


H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

27


Caboolture, August 2016.

An Awakening

Recently our own 'Horseriding Mum' Penny Newbold, had a terrible accident off her beloved horse, and was in a coma for several weeks. Penny, who is now out of hospital, has written a moving account of her gradual awakening. “You’ve had a fall from your horse. You’re in the Princess Alexandra Hospital in Brisbane. You’re being well looked after.”

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

If I had a dollar for every time I’ve heard that statement over the past few months I’d be rich. Well, at least part of the way there. Mind you, if I only got a dollar for each time I remember hearing that statement, I’d be poor! Such, my friends, are the joys of injuring your brain.

28

Surprisingly though, I’ve found that forgetfulness is useful in many ways I’d never imagined – if you have a conversation or an event (or even a person!) that you would prefer to conveniently “forget” about, no one questions your inability to remember it (or them!). Very handy! To fill you in on my extraordinary journey -

four months ago, my life took a somewhat unexpected turn in the form of a pretty serious TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury). For some time the potential speed and quality of my recovery was in doubt, but this month I felt strong enough for the first time to be able to share my story with you. Let me start by saying that to be honest I’ve never really been an outspoken advocate of wearing helmets, even though I’ve always worn one and I’ve never allowed my kids to ride without one helmets were not, in my mind at least, a completely essential part of horseriding. But funny how knocking yourself out and spending a couple of weeks in a coma can change your opinion! The fact is that I wouldn’t be writing this at all if I hadn’t been wearing a helmet that fateful


day in early May. I would either be dead or possibly – and to my mind worse - spending the rest of my life in a nursing home. I am now absolutely convinced that helmets are an essential, non-negotiable piece of equipment. Have a close look at the photo below – I’m pleased to report that that dint is in the helmet, not my skull! So how did it happen? While nobody saw my fall, I have faith in my horse Rem that he did nothing too stupid or idiotic. It was simply one of those things – maybe he tripped or spooked and caught me off guard – no one will ever know, but one thing is for certain - it was not some malicious, vindictive act on his part, it was simply an accident. Why do I feel so confident that this is the case? Because I bred him, broke him to saddle and trained him to competition level. At that point, no one else had even ridden him, so I’m confident in saying that I knew him well and I know that whatever happened, it was an accident, pure and simple. It doesn’t matter how much experience you have, things can and do go wrong.

through the chopper ride! Spending some time in the brain injury recovery unit was both educational and heartbreaking at the same time. So many people who suffered injuries, some far worse than mine, all basically living together under the one roof has its challenges and (at times!) entertainment of sorts.

My days were punctuated by statements like: “No, David that’s not your room, go back to your bed.” Or: “Put your pants back on Richard,” or “Whose teeth are they, Stephen? Because they’re not yours, are they?” The result of listening in to conversations made me only too aware of how fortunate I was that those comments were not directed at me. I was grateful as well, to be My first time outside and breathing fresh air in a month! capable of having a quiet chuckle to myself and to think “at least I’m not that bad”.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Of course don’t ask me how many times I got lost on my way to Physical Therapy (in the next corridor) or Occupational Therapy (which, it’s a little embarrassing to admit, was at the end of the The helmet that saved corridor in which my room Penny's life. was located!). And don’t ask me to tell you the names of the nursing staff or other patients that I spent I have nothing but praise and gratitude for the the best part of six weeks living and interactNSW Ambulance paramedics, the ing with, because I can’t. Lismore Base Hospital, the Westpac Rescue Helicopter service, the Gold Coast University The highlight of my time in rehab has been Hospital and the Princess Alexandra Hospital getting the opportunity to see my horses, in Brisbane. If not for all their efforts, skill and who have gone into the care of a friend near expertise I also might not be here writing this Brisbane while I am ‘incapacitated’. And I’m – I am just a little bummed though that I slept pleased to report that the love and passion I

29


have for this sport has not dwindled or been overtaken by fear of another accident (much to my long suffering husband’s despair) and I am determined to ride again, and even compete, in the dressage arena at this stage – although I do think my days of jumping are in the past, a decision I’ve arrived at much to the relief of my family. So I’m happy to say that I’m back and this month’s column is somewhat lacking in the

equestrian/kids content, rest assured that next month will see me back on track with a vengeance! And many, many thanks for the enquiries into my wellbeing through this challenging time. It’s been a nice reminder that regardless of how competitive we might be with our horses, the little (or not so little!) equestrian community is such a supportive group of awesome people and I am privileged be a part of it.

Don’t follow the trend, start it.

VENTING SYSTEM: Based on two honeycomb-like aeration grids built in the polystyrene, a smart venting system integrated in the helmet provides high standards of cooling airflow.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

EXTRA SUN PROTECTION: The wide peak protects the skin against weather damage, while assuring maximum visibility.

30

SOFT CHINSTRAP: Eco-leather hypoallergenic chinpad offers unique comfort and prevents skin irritations. Easily washable, water repellent, and abrasion resistant. FIT SYSTEM: The helmet has to fit correctly to the rider’s head,

guaranteeing the crucial advantage in terms of safety and wearer comfort. The KASK’s patented self-adapting adjusting system allows the helmet to perfectly and automatically fit on the rider’s head by gently cradling the back of the head. INNER PADDING: Ensures the maximum comfort and hygiene. The internal padding can easily be removed in order to wash it. VELVET: Velvet covered shell. SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS: The Original Swarovski Elements on the helmet frame will give a sophisticated look of elegance.

Available from: www.trailrace.com.au Call: 02 4353 1922


H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

31


High Quality & Affordable Stock Ties HAND MADE IN AUSTRALIA

HAND-MADE STOCK TIES • RIDING GEAR BAGS EQUESTRIAN JEWELLERY • HORSE TENDON BOOTS EAR BONNETS • EQUINE COUTURE • TUFFRIDER For any enquiries contact: enquiry@equinerider.com.au

www.equinerider.com.au


HUB SADDLE REVIEW

Saddle r e v i e w : Emma Rust Emma Rust is a returning Saddle Hub customer and recently purchased a County Competitor for her five year old riding pony gelding, Bayview Boom Town. “I’ve had County saddles in the past and have always liked them,” says Emma. “They sit you in a great position, have a lovely deep seat and are neat enough for the showring – plus they fit a wide range of horses. “I was looking for a County

Competitor to fit my small galloway and came across the one I purchased on the Saddle Hub. It was exactly the right size, gullet width and colour I was looking for.” Emma occasionally gets pain in her lower back so she has to be careful what kind of saddle she uses. “I have an intermittent sore lower back and I find that riding in this saddle alleviates any potential lower back pain.,” she says. “The County range are such versatile saddles and keep their resale value.”

Name the Baby Competition WIN

an Equestrian Hub voucher worth $100!

She is by Copabella Visage from Jazdan and Raphaela (Raphael x San Amour). Entries close at the end of September 2017.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Think of a name starting with V for this gorgeous filly foal and let us know via our Facebook page or email us at: info@equestrianhub.com.au

33


Aries

y b s r a St pona E

Mars into Virgo post total

eclipse, with ruling Mercury out of phase, Murphy’s Law rules. Owners best plan for quirks, glitches and unexpected news. Steeds, all you can do is hope they have the sense to listen to your signals, before things

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

escalate. Patience, and a sense

34

of humour helps!

post total eclipse, with ruling Mercury out of phase, Murphy’s Law rules. Owners best plan for quirks, glitches and unexpected news. Steeds, all you can do is hope they have the sense to listen to your signals, before things escalate. Patience, and a sense of humour helps!

Taurus

I’m hungry! Seriously, what is this ration crap? If you want to reduce my feed, don’t be surprised if I start chewing on anything in reach, like rails, posts, or even ferns (you really want that vet bill?). I do this to show you that my needs are not being met. You might want to give the whole feed schedule a rethink too. I prefer to sleep in, and stay out late.

Gemini

If you never took me for a perfectionist, this month will shock you. Easy going is gone. I want the girth just so, not a notch higher. Watch my ears, if this confuses you. And whatever you rinsed my bit in last time, puleeze! It needs a re-do. Taking a little more care around my grooming, tack and training if you want me calm. Otherwise, I’m jumping out of my skin. Not my fault!

Cancer

You may have been proud of the way I loaded into the float, the self-contained trust and ease with which I travelled. Hint: not this month. For now, I don’t want to go anywhere, and if you insist on teleporting me to unfamiliar places, for the goddess’s sake, bring my stablemate along. This apprehension is caused by the absence of my significant others. Plan for it!


Leo

There is only one thing I want to do this month, and that is train. You know the term ‘workhorse’? It applies to me, at least for the next thirty days. Take advantage of this by going up a level. I want challenge, recognition and rewards. Treats are not out of the question either. The only thing I won’t handle well is inexperience. You’ll need to level up too!

Virgo

The only way to describe me this month is HOT MESS. Actually, there are other words, like anxious, hysterical, obsessive and #$^@!… but let’s avoid those terms. They only feed the neurosis. Bottom line, I have all this energy shooting through my limbs. You’re going to need to help me channel it. More exercise is the obvious, but extra currying helps too. Good luck.

Libra

Any charitable event, meet up or demonstration scheduled this month suits my current state of mind perfectly. Load on the kids for the photo shoot. Let the first timers have a go with the brush and hoof pick. My compassion and care towards the lesser, smaller species has reached guru proportions. I will be giving dissertations after lunch on the lanai deck. Light refreshments to follow.

Scorpio

I might surprise you this month with a new, improved attitude towards the training schedule, workload and general routine. Whatever it was that had me cranky seems less important as I focus on self-improvement. You can support this with lessons, workshops and advanced classes. The only glitch on the horizon is the lack of horizons. I want endless possibilities. Now.

Capricorn

While others are slogging through this tricky astro-weather, I’m zinging with energy, zest and zeal. A new lease on life never felt so good. Obviously, this supports recovery and recuperation, but just know, given half a chance, I’ll overdo everything. Help prevent injuries with thorough warm-ups, cool downs and the timely vet checks when appropriate.

Aquarius

My ruling planet Uranus is amped up by Mars. Think of it as rocket fuel for the soul. I’m in a philosophical mood, where everything is open to debate. Why, for example, must I stand flawlessly still while you mount and dismount? Have you never seen the Lone Ranger? Silver pawing the air? I think I’d like to try that, at a point in time you least expect. Sound good?

Pisces

I didn’t see this coming. All my relationships are skewed out of shape. From stablemates to farriers, trainers to vets, constant companions to the acquaintance down the lane, no one’s behaving predictably. Not even you! None of this is my fault. Frankly, it feels like I am the only sane creature on the planet. My only hope is that everything will get back to normal soon. Please? Also, can you hook me up with some acepromazine?

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

September is cantankerous for me, but you can smooth the way with companionship. Not you; my own kind. It’s a birds of a feather time and if you isolate me from other superb beasts of my stature, I won’t play nice. I probably won’t play at all. If you find me a sourpuss, look to improving my social wellbeing. Cows, donkeys, mules and goats do not count.

Sagittarius

35


Imported Bloodlines 15.2hh, 7yo, WB Mare Sire: Renegade Z (Imp) (Ramiro Z/Quidam de Reval) Dam: Zarah Leander (imp) (Zapateado (Zeus) Quattro Price: $10,000 MUST SELL! For more info click here.

Apen Park Lourdes Filly, born Oct 16, should mature 15.2-15.3hh Sire: Lord Deniro Dam: Apen Park Lakeisha Price: $11,000 For more info click here.

EQUINE BREEDING SUPPLIERS Reproduction supplies:

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

pArtificial Insemination Equipment pSemen Extender pBreeding Mounts and Artificial Vaginas pEmbryo Transfer Equipment

36

Diagnostic Equipment:

pDVM Rapid Test instrument pIgG and Sperm Concentration Test Kits pMicroscopes and Accessories

Foal Resuscitation Kit

Free Call: 1800 647 860 Call for a Product Catalogue! Email: sales@pacificvet.com.au New Website: www.pacificvet.com.au


Cont. from p. 13 - The Evolution of Eventing supporting it. The pin is designed to drop the jump’s top element by at least 20 centimetres if the fence is hit from above, which research confirmed happens when a horse somersaults over a fixed fence. “This drop is designed to allow the horse to get a leg forward to save itself from rotating over the fence,” explains Christine. “While this system may not prevent the horse from falling, it will help moderate the risk of a more serious injury.” Another initiative is the introduction of collapsible tables. “The table jumps are now being designed so that when they are hit at speed or a certain angle, they collapse flat to the ground,” Christine says. “This will also assist in preventing a rotational fall.” Of course, there’s always been a focus on safety, but as Christine says: “Research into the safety aspects has always been a high priority but to get ideas approved and implemented takes time but these days on a global scale, everything to keep horses and riders safe is being investigated and designed into each course.” In regards to personal safety, Christine believes that each rider can minimise some of the risk themselves by correct training at home.

As in every discipline, in the end it comes down to training and schooling. “In the training of a good cross-country horse it’s all about schooling them over the different type of fences,” Christine emphasises. “They need to gain experience for themselves and learn what is the correct pace for each obstacle. They need to have an understanding of what footing each jump will have and to have gained confidence in themselves and their rider. The higher you go the more technical and educated you need to be to tackle the more difficult fences.” In the same way that riders need to concentrate on their lines in showjumping, it’s extremely important that eventers never underestimate their jumps, she says. “Riders should understand what pace and speed they should tackle every jump at,” she says. “The most important thing of all is to invest in a good instructor to help you learn, the key to safety here is that both rider and their horse are educated and can tackle the cross-country course competently and correctly. For all of us involved in the elite levels of eventing, we hope that more knowledge and changes in technology will mean we will see less accidents in the cross-country phase of eventing world-wide.” For more information on Christine and her wonderful mount, visit her webpage.

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

“Each phase of eventing requires practice and all three phases should be practiced equally,” she says. “In cross-country, the obstacle height and technicality is a factor with each level. The higher you go the greater the speed and technical riding knowledge you’ll need to know. The riding knowledge comes down to speed and how to jump each obstacle. There is less emphasis on riding to time these days but this really is something that each rider should focus on. The more you practice this, the better you get. The second part is the judgement of the obstacle and how you

will go about clearing it. You will need to be knowledgeable on when to accelerate and when to apply the brakes.”

37


BREED SPOTLIGHT

Appaloosa – the ‘spotted’ horse

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Although the Appaloosa is generally believed to have originated from North America, but artwork depicting horses with leopard spotting their coats actually goes back to cave paintings in Europe, Ancient Greece and even China.

38

But the much loved spotted horses as we know them were bred by the Nez Perce tribe from north-western USA, and the name Appaloosa is derived from the word Palouse, a local river. The American Indians valued them for their hardiness in the rugged mountain conditions and their coat patterns. Originally the American Appaloosa horses were derived from descendants of Spanish stock brought to Mexico by the Conquistadors in the 17th century. It is claimed that descendants of these horses spread north

through the United States via traders who bartered them with native Indians for goods. Those that got away and bred as wild mustangs, were caught and tamed by the Nez Perce tribe. The Appaloosa type nearly perished when native American Indians were forced onto reserves during the late 1800s and their horses slaughtered, or left to roam the mountains and plains. In 1938 the American Appaloosa Horse Club began, with a few descendants of the Nez Perce Appaloosa being used to develop the breed we as we know it today. The first Appaloosas were imported into Australia in 1967 and the Australian Appaloosa Association was formed in 1971. There are now currently nearly 20,000 registered Appaloosas nationwide with 18 Appaloosa Associations. The Appaloosa stands at approximately 14.2-


15.2 hands high and is a great all-rounder for any riding discipline. They are famed for their spotted or mottled coat colour that can spread across the whole body or just across the rump – although this is not the defining characteristic of the breed standard. To be registered as an Appaloosa a horse needs to have a white sclera (the area of the eye surrounding the iris), the skin should be

mottled and the hooves must be marked with vertical black and white stripes. There are five principal coat patterns for Appaloosa horses: Leopard, Snowcap, Blanket, Marbleised and Frost. Some horses can also be one solid colour and not show any of the below patterns. • Leopard pattern: a white area over all or part of the body with dark egg shaped spots on that area.

• Blanket: the coat colour of the hips can be either spotted or white (in which case it is called a Snowcap blanket). • Marbleised: there is a mottled pattern all over the body. • Frost: white specks on a dark background.

The downside to owning one of these beautiful horses and something owners need to be aware of is that the breed can (depending on the genetic strain) be prone to developing equine recurrent uveitis and congenital stationary night blindness. Nevertheless these horses are a wonderful example of a hardy breed brought into the modern-day equestrian world and used in every discipline. For further information about the hardy and versatile Appaloosa, visit the Australian Appaloosa Association website.

Come and have a chat about our pre-loved saddle division, The Saddle Hub. We can also answer all your questions about HubVibes E-zine, Hub Directory, Hub Property, Hub Horses and our new addition Hub for Clubs. SEPTEMBER 2017

9-10 September The Sydney Eventing Summer Classic

26 - 29 September Australian Interschool Championships Toowoomba QLD

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Where to Find Us

• Snowcap: white spotting occurs all over the

body but is usually concentrated over the hips.

39


SADDLERY AND TACK

GIFTS

Filly and Co Horse Gifts We have a wide range of horse gifts for horse fans of all ages.

Looking for affordable matching tack sets? We ship worldwide. Find us on Facebook and Instagram.

fillyandco.com.au

matchymatchysets.com

SADDLERY AND TACK

Nags to Riches Equestrian

Saddleworld

"For me, showing is all about giving it a go and having fun at the same time."

nagstoriches.com.au

saddleworld.com.au

Snaffle Travel

snaffletravel.com.au/ badminton-horse-trials-2018 Travel company that specialises in Equestrian events and horse riding holidays around the world. STABLES

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

SADDLERY AND TACK

We've been providing products for 31 years. Our stores are nation-wide along with our online store. Friendly and expert professionals are ready to help you.

TRAVEL

40

Matchy Matchy Sets

Priefert Australia Stable and Horse Farm Equipment Supplier to Australia

priefert.com.au/ Stables/Stable_Fronts

CLOTHING

Rhinestone EMPIRE We all need a little

bling

in our lives! rhinestoneempire.com.au ARENAS & FENCING

Bounce BackÂŽ Australian made fencing supplier distributing nationally from the factory door. SAFE, AFFORDABLE, DURABLE AND ATTRACTIVE.

fencing4horses.com.au


BLING

BLING

Equine Rider Accessories equinerider.com.au Largest range of Australian Hand Made Equestrian Stock Ties and other accessories for horse and rider. BLING

Forever ENTWINED

La Flor Equestrian Design Call: 0456 664 096 Custom-made floral garlands and browbands. BLING

TT Browbands & Accessories

foreverentwined.net

Call: 02 4362 3932

HORSEHAIR JEWELLERY & INLAY BROWBANDS

BEAUTIFUL, QUALITY BROWBANDS & ACCESSORIES.

VET, HEALTH AND THERAPEUTIC

Equine Performance & Rehabilitation Solutions Equine Musculoskeletal and Rehabilitation Therapies

equinerehabsolutions.com.au

VET, HEALTH AND THERAPEUTIC

Equistretch

0400 612 355

Equine Muscle Matters Equine body work including massage, kinesiology taping, photonic red light therapy and stretching.

equinemusclematters.com.au DENTISTS

Dr Chris Darmody Byron Bay Equine Dentistry Professional dentistry by an equine dental vet. We come to you with our mobile clinic. Servicing Northern Rivers and parts of the Mid North Coast

byronbayequinedentistry.com.au

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Equine sports massage and Red Light Therapy.

VET, HEALTH AND THERAPEUTIC

41


NEWS & VIEWS FROM EQUESTRIAN HUB Published by Equestrian Hub • PO Box 13 • Tintenbar NSW 2478 Phone: 0414 760067 • Email: info@equestrianhub.com.au www.equestrianhub.com.au

HubVibes September 2017  
HubVibes September 2017  

News and Views from Equestrian Hub.