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NEWS & VIEWS FROM EQUESTRIAN HUB

MAY 2017 Eventing Advice from Dom Schramm Aquis Champions Showjumping HUB HERO Mary Warren Acupuncture SCIENCE NSW Pony Club RESULTS Plus plenty more!

2ND BIR THDA Y

WINNER ANNOUNCED

Photo Credit: Oz Shotz


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FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH

YOUR CLUB IN PROFILE

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THE PINTO

SYDNEY ROYAL EASTER SHOW PAGE OF PIX

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YOUR SAY

HUB SADDLE REVIEW

8 AQUIS CHAMPIONS SHOWJUMPING TOUR 2017

21 YOUNG RIDER OF THE MONTH

10 EVENTING 101 WITH DOM SCHRAMM

22 VETERINARY ACUPUNCTURE

13 HUB HEROES

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TOP RESULTS AT PONY CLUB CHAMPIONSHIPS

PERFECTING THE LEG YIELD

16 PRODUCT REVIEW

28 INTERNATIONAL CHARITY HIGHLIGHT

Front Cover: Gabrielle Kuna and Cera Cassiago in the Gold Tour 2nd Qualifier at Aquis Champions Tour

NEWS & VIEWS FROM EQUESTRIAN HUB HubVibes Editorial & Advertising Enquiries: penny@equestrianhub.com.au The Saddle Hub Sales Enquiries: Fiona Todd: 0414 760 067 Graphic Design: Joanna Reid: 0408 773 851 Published by Equestrian Hub PO Box 13 • Tintenbar NSW 2478 Phone: 0414 760 067 • Email: info@equestrianhub.com.au www.equestrianhub.com.au

PROUD SUPPORTERS OF


Luxury Escapes Voucher Valued at $1,000

R !

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A W E INN V A H E

Over the past month, Equestrian Hub has been running a competition to celebrate it's 2ND BIRTHDAY. Up for grabs was a Luxury Escapes holiday voucher valued at $1,000, giving the lucky winner the opportunity to enjoy a fabulous holiday. The winner was drawn on the 30 April at the recent Aquis Showjumping Champions Tour event by Madeline Sinderberry.

Congratulations to Debbie Angell. Have a great holiday! A very BIG THANK from Equestrian Hub to everyone who entered by either subscribing to, or advertising in HubVibes, buying or selling one of our saddles or adding a listing to Hub Directory.

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We would also like to thank LUXURY ESCAPES for their help and support in donating this fantastic prize.

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May has begun for us with some anxiety. This column is normally bought to you by the HubVibes editor, Penny Newbold. Following an accident last week Penny is laid up for a while, but for now we are soldering on without her incredible guidance. We thank everyone who has contacted us about her wellbeing and offers of help. Penn’s family are grateful to the equestrian community. For all the Equestrian Hub team, April has been a whirlwind month. Cleaning up from the floods has been completed and we have dealt with all the post flood issues that the horses suffered, thankfully limited to abscesses and greasy heel. Suffice to say, our hearts go out to those who are suffering as a result of not only the floods, the devastation and trauma have far reaching repercussions, the depth of which we are only just beginning to feel. On a much brighter note, the highlight of April had to be the incredible Aquis Champions Tour, an absolute spectacle of Showjumping at Canungra Queensland. There were so many highlights at this event, it was hard to decide what to include.

We take a look at Pinto’s, learn to do a perfect Leg Yield and go Eventing with Dom Schramm. Please keep the photo’s coming and maybe your club could be the next Club in Profile. May will see the introduction of some new

products on Equestrian Hub’s dashboard, we are going to start listing performance horses for sale as well as equestrian properties. Keep your eyes open for these new products and let us know if you would like your listing included In the meantime, sit back and enjoy, and please stay safe. Fiona

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Our Hub Hero and Young Rider this month are both inspirational and young! Watching Mary Warren ride at Equifest gave me goosebumps whilst watching Madi and Timmy carve up the speed derby at Aquis was nothing short of thrilling. These two riders are an inspiration for all riders, young and old.

Mary Warren and Mindarah Park Ramadan

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Pinto horses take their name from the Spanish word ‘pintado’ which means ‘painted’. The Pinto horse is not a breed in itself, but the result of selective breeding to achieve a broken coat pattern. American Indian Tribes actually preferred the Pinto horses to ride as their broken coat patterns provided camouflage and they were hardy horses for long hunting and exploration treks. They were also a popular choice for movie horses starring in western themed films. In Australia, the Pinto can be any height or bloodline and is distinguished by its coat pattern. These patterns are referred to as Tobiano, Overo, Tobero or Sabino. Historically the Pinto markings (like all equine colours and patterns) had their origins in ancient times. In the past the original description of a Pinto was piebald (being of black and white colouring) or skewbald (being of chestnut or brown and white colouring).

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Over the years there has been the introduction of the Overo pattern and now the Pinto can be of Overo and Tobiano patterns, variations and colours.

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Paint Versus Pinto The million dollar question is usually what is the difference between a Paint and a Pinto, and the short answer is that Paint is a breed based on bloodlines while the Pinto is a coat colour pattern that can be found in horses of many different breeds.

The breeds that commonly produce pinto horses include the Saddlebred, Gypsy Horse and Miniature Horse. In Australia, Appaloosa, Palouse, Pintoloosa, Standardbred and Heavy Horse breeding are not eligible for Pinto registration as genetically they have their own unique coat patterns.

What’s in a colour? The Pinto is known for its beautiful markings and the ideal ration is 50/50 distribution of white and dark colouring. The common coat patterns are: • Tobiano – this is a white horse with patches of colour. It generally has white legs and white crossing the backbone. the head, chest, flank, buttock and often the tail are the usual coloured areas. • Overo – is a dark coloured horse with white markings. The white markings are of irregular shape with jagged edges and originate along the side of the horse often spreading towards the neck, legs and back. The colour appears to frame the white areas and the horse may have a bald or white (apron) face, blue or glass eyes, one to four legs may be solid or long white stockings, white may not cross the back or neckline. • Tobero – has the characteristics of the two patterns as described above in Tobiano and Overo are referred to as Tobero. Their coat can consist of completely different coat patterns on different parts of their body, Tobiano pattern in one place and jagged Overo edges in another. • Sabino - dark coloured horse with a white


baldy or apron face, solid coloured legs or long white stockings, white belly splashes, white always runs from the bottom upwards.

What is the standard of a well-bred Pinto? The Pinto is a well conformed horse or pony that is light riding type. • Head: Should not be coarse; proportionate with the body. Eyes should be well set to the sides of the head, teeth to meet evenly, no conformation defect to be exhibited. • Neck: Should be well set, and in proportion to the body; an even top line should be evidenced. • Body: Should have a well-rounded rump, with a natural curve in the back, the loins should be proportionate also. The entire body should present as a picture of balance appropriate to the horse. • Legs: Should be set squarely and display correct conformation.

To find out more about the Australian standard for Pinto’s, visit the Pinto horse and pony association website.

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• Action: Should exhibit a smooth, straight following action, should track up in all paces and should never trot wide behind.

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Dressage Saddles

$2,400 KN Melodie 17”

$2,950 Prestige Leonardo 16”

$2,300 Albion SL 18”

$2,500

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Defiance Force 17”

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For more saddle information visit our website. equestrianhub.com.au

$3,000 Black Country Kur 16.5”

$2,500 Peter Horobin Royal II 17”

$2,200 Southern Stars Dressage 17”

$4,500 Amerigo Classic Siena 17”


ed.....or this old one it will sit on their head.....

YOUR

Say Helmets are NOT Negotiable! Oh l'm just doing a bit of flat riding ......l don't need a helmet Or l shall just pop my child on and give them a little ride no helmet need-

I have just spent the day in ICU with my daughter a clever talented young lady who was just doing some flat work. She was wearing an approved helmet which now has an indentation the size of a quarter of a tennis ball and she has severe brain injuries Without it, l may not have my beloved daughter. I should like you all to ensure the helmet you put on you or your child is perfectly fitted and will protect their or your precious brain.

Champion Farrier Saves the Day. During the recent Aquis Champions Tour my horse had lost a couple of shoes, as they do immediately prior to a big event. I rang around and finally got onto Emma McKavanagh, a farrier located on the Gold Coast. Emma was brilliant, heading nearly half an hour out of her way and put both his shoes back on by 7am. Awesome service - thanks Emma. Bec

Pauline

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Photo Credit: Oz Shotz

AQ UIS CHAMP IONS SHO

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The stunningly beautiful property, Elysian Fields, owned by Aquis Farm in Canungra Qld, recently hosted the Australia’s most lucrative show jumping event on the Australian jumping calendar, the Aquis Champions Tour.

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Left to right: Emily and Elkee Lang-McMahon with their ro

With more than 300 riders and 750 horses, competitors and spectators alike were treated to the very best the sport of showjumping could offer. Although competitors hailed from New Zealand, Japan and even as far as Ireland, it was Aussie Jamie Kermond, riding Oaks Constellation, who took home the $20,000 in prize money for first place in the prestigious Gold Tour Grand Prix. Both spectators and competitors were full of praise for the way the event progressed, including some of the legends of the sport. Russell Johnstone winner of the Mini Prix!

“All four of my horses improved over the three


OWJUMPING TOUR 2017

osettes. The Wall. Spectators on the hill overlooking the arena. Hailey Paris and Laura-Jane Dancey.

days as the tracks in all rings and footing was awesome” said Olympian Vicki Roycroft and fellow legendary olympic jumping rider John Fahey agreed “If we had more of these shows riders wouldn’t have to go to Europe to compete”.

Event organisers and well-known jumping riders, breeders and thoroughbred breakers

And after the success of this year’s event? “We can’t wait to see what we can bring in 2018!”

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John was of course referring to the fact that, with Australia being located such a distance from the centre of the elite end of the sport, it can be difficult for us to produce elite level riders and horses without spending years, and countless dollars, on the European circuit.

and trainers, Peter and Michelle Lang-McMahon were also very happy how the event panned out. “We’re so fortunate to have the venue and the surface to do this (type of event). That’s the key,” said Michelle, “We are so grateful to all the people who make large events like this possible, from our amazing sponsors, show organisers, show officials, the ring crew, our hospitality crew, trade stand holders, spectators and of course our competitors.”

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EVENTING 101

with Dom Schramm

THIS MONTH WE CAUGHT UP WITH DOM SCHRAMM, THE QUEENSLAND BORN STAR OF EVENTION TV, TALENTED 3 STAR EVENTER RESIDING IN AMERICA AND ONE HALF OF SCHRAMM EQUESTRIAN. WHO ELSE WOULD BE BETTER SHOWING US THE ROPES?

Eventing can be held across one to three days and has three phases; dressage, cross country and show jumping. It’s basically a horse triathlon which requires guts, discipline, accuracy and a touch of craziness.

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What sets Eventing apart from the other sports is the cross country phase – you can have straight dressage or jumping competitions but Eventing is the only sport to have cross country.

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Its also a sport with a fantastic, friendly and supportive community. If you enjoy the camaraderie and fun of catching up with your friends as you travel around to different shows, Eventing definitely can offer that. Cross country is the exhilarating part that will satisfy the thrill seeker in you and basically

you either love it or you don’t. In my experience, if you don’t come back from a cross country course with a smile on your face, then Eventing isn’t for you. THE THREE PHASES OF INSANITY The first phase is dressage, where the horse and rider complete a test of predetermined movements in an arena. The test is judged by one or more judges in a 20 x 60 enclosed arena who are looking for balance, rhythm and suppleness as well as the obedience of the horse and its harmony with its rider. Each movement in the test is scored on a scale from 0 to 10, with 10 being the highest mark given. The maximum score for the test varies depending on the level of competition and the number of movements required.


The second phase is cross country, where horse and rider gallop across a field leaping over natural and man-made obstacles. The obstacles are between 12-20 fixed jumps in the lower levels to 30-40 at the higher levels and dotted around a long outdoor course. These obstacles are solidly built natural objects which include logs, stone walls, brush etc. as well as various obstacles such as water, ditches, drops and banks, and combinations. Today’s safety regulations mean that many jumps have a frangible pin system that allow part or all of the jump to collapse if hit with enough impact. When completing the course, speed is a factor, with the rider required to cross the finish line within a certain time frame. This is referred to as optimum time. Crossing the finish line after the optimum time results in penalties for each second over. Terrain also plays a role here, with different courses making use of the natural lay of the land. Its crucial that riders make sure that their horses have done adequate fitness training in the lead up to the event to make sure they have the stamina to complete the course with enough left in the tank to showjump well.

Penalties are also incurred if the horse refuses to jump a fence or has a run out (runs away from the obstacle). If the horse or rider fall there is automatic elimination in this phase.

The third phase is show jumping, where horse and rider jump a series of show jumping fences in an arena. This tests the technical jumping skills of the horse and rider who must clear between12-20 fences depending on their level. The fences are typically bold and brightly coloured and consist of items that can be knocked down, such as wooden poles and Styrofoam blocks. The show jumping is timed and penalties being given for every second over the required completion time – there are also faults given for refusals or knocking down a jump. The rider accumulates penalty points in dressage, cross country and show jumping depending on faults. The rider with the lowest points at the end of all three phases is the winner. COMPETITION LEVELS Each competition usually runs different levels, starting with the lower levels first. Events usually run several levels of competition. In Australia, eventing competition levels and typical heights of fences are EvA60 (previously called newcomers 0.6m) EvA80 (Introductory 0.8m), EvA95 (Preliminary 0.95m), EvA105 (Pre-Novice 1.05m), CNC* (1.15m), CNC** (1.20m), CNC*** (1.25m). There are four international levels recognised

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At lower levels, there is a penalty for riding too fast which means penalties are given to the horse and rider for completing the course too quickly.

To me, cross country makes eventing the sport it is – it’s all about going out into a large field where you and your horse are exposed, there are no fences confining you into a small area. It’s about going fast and jumping big jumps – that appeals to certain people.

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in the sport. One Star, Two Star, Three Star and at the very top, Four Star.

can gallop, jump and take you safely through each Eventing phase.

There are only five CCI **** events in the world; Badminton and Burghley in the UK, Kentucky in the USA, Adelaide in South Australia and Luhmuellen in Germany.

WHAT EVENTING EQUIPMENT REQUIRED?

The Olympic Games and the World Equestrian Games, each held alternately every four years are also classified Four Star level. GETTING STARTED This is a very demanding sport, so you need to make sure that you and your horse are up to the job. To start off, why not participate in local chicken run to see if it’s for you. Chicken runs give a taste of what eventing is about without ‘ruffling feathers’ – so no high fences! Historically, Australia and New Zealand have produced more Olympic and World Champions in Eventing than any other countries. Most of those riders got their start at local pony club or starter events just like these! You can check out your local riding clubs or pony clubs to see if they have any chicken runs planned. WHAT SORT OF HORSE DO YOU NEED?

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In Australia, Eventing continues to be a sport for Thoroughbreds as we have a huge racing industry and that’s where the vast majority of retired racehorses go. That said, we are also changing towards using purpose bred sport horses (Thoroughbred x Warmbloods) after the steeplechasing element from the cross country courses were removed.

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People like the Warmbloods as they give a bit of sparkle to the dressage element, but the beauty of Eventing is there is no specific “type” that you should have. Australian Stockhorses, Draft crosses, Standardbreds and even ponies have been successful at the highest level! Basically you need a horse that

When you are starting out, keep it simple. A good all-purpose saddle can be used for the three phases and it doesn’t have to cost the earth. You will also need a good set of horse protection boots for the horse for cross country which can also be used in jumping too. For the rider, invest in a decent helmet and back protector and make sure they are up to current standard. Starting out, you don’t need the fancy gear but you can invest as you go.

THE NAME OF THE GAME IS FUN! IF YOU ARE LOOKING TO DIP YOUR TOE IN THE

WATER, PONY CLUB WOULD BE ONE OF THE BEST WAYS TO GET STARTED!

Cross country is not the same as showjumping at speed over solid jumps! Make sure you get some lessons with an instructor who has some experience with Eventing to help you learn cross country basics to keep you and your mount safe! Most riders (and horses) find they have a ‘knack’ for one or two phases, and have to work at one of the others. Make sure you have a riding routine that gives you time to improve and hone your skills across all three phases. I like to be training at least one full level higher than I compete at, so as to ensure that my horse has a confident time at the show. If that’s not quite the case yet for your horse, be patient and get more experience so that you set yourself up for success in competition.


MARY WARREN

HISTORY HAS NO AGE LIMIT Mary Warren took the dressage world by storm in 2016 after winning the Grand Prix Freestyle at the Australian Dressage Championships. Riding her beautiful homebred Warmblood Stallion, Mindarah Park Ramadan (Remi), Mary scored a whopping 71 per cent and at 18 years of age, became the youngest rider to win a Freestyle CDI-W in Australia.

the same week as the Championships,” said Mary. “Luckily for me I completed my education via distance so I had the flexibility to sit my exams at a school close to the event.” With lots of horses to work on her parent’s property, Mary is kept busy and rides every day but she still has her eye on the prize.

"My horse felt so good and got better and better throughout the day", explains Mary.

“In my test, it all came together and we had no mistakes. Remi had so much confidence and I was able to relax.”

Not only was the win breathtaking, but Mary was competing around her HSC exams and sat her Maths exam right after completing a Grand Prix test. “It just so happened that my final HSC exam blocks fell in

“My goal is to attend clinics with international coaches – I’ve found that you never stop learning and I want to further my knowledge.” We wish Mary all the best and look forward to seeing her journey with her amazing team of horses.

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"As a junior rider you can just go out and do your best, you don’t feel huge amounts of pressure as no one expects you to win against the big names.

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PERFECTING THE LEG YIELD with Natasha Althoff Whether you are starting out with leg yields or have been giving them a crack for a while and still not perfected them, there is no shame in admitting that they are difficult. When I started out with leg yields in my dressage tests I thought I was awesome at them, but in retrospect I was actually going across the diagonal with no cross in the hindquarters and my horses head was bent to the side – definitely not ideal!

The easiest gait to practice the timing and co-ordination of the leg yield aids is the walk. Be careful though, as the walk does not have as much forward momentum in it and the horse may get stuck. If this is the case with your horse, move into trot and practice in the trot - remember forwards with a bit of sideways is better than sideways when the horse is tense. The aid for a leg yield is for your leg to push the horse over sideways while moving forward. Remember to use the leg to ask the horse to move sideways only when the leg is in the air. Your outside hand should stay firm so that no bend is created in the horse’s neck but they also don’t bulge out through the shoulders. If you feel the horse falling onto the shoulder, you will need to do some half halts

Leg yielding is exactly what it sounds like – it is yielding (moving away) from the leg. Leg yielding is the best exercise to check on your forward aids and sideways aids and how they all interact and influence each other with taking and softening almost simultaneously. Riders should add the leg yield into their training exercises as it increases the feel and timing of the aids. It also increases strength, suppleness, and reaction to our aids from the horse.

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Getting Started

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To start us off, your legs control the horse’s legs and your hands on the reins control the horse’s shoulders. You will need to be a little ambidextrous though, as you may find that by pushing your horse with your outside leg might also require your inside leg to block and encourage the horse forwards. Some horses just want to go sideways while others may just want to go forwards – it’s a juggle to get them to do both in the same movement.

and a push with the inside leg to stop that from happening. To keep the straightness, gently move your fingers when required – I call these baby fingers – to keep the horses neck straight and supple as well as to keep your horse soft. You will need to do this with both reins when needed.

Leg Yield Exercises To begin with, the easiest way for the horse to learn leg yielding is heading to the wall. I don’t like this way as the horse knows where it is


or in rare instances the hindquarters, slow the tempo down. If you’re trotting, slow it right down and fix the leg yield as you go. You can be barely trotting but still working on this exercise - your brain needs time to feel what's going wrong and then time to fix it so the slower the better. You can practice leg yield: • Across the full diagonal • Down the centre line to the wall • From corner to centre line and back to corner the other way • On the circle

Putting It Into Practice

going and will want to lead with the shoulders so be careful and control the front end (remember to use your baby fingers and half halts) but the steps will be easier as the horse knows where it is going. Remember the rhythm, connection, position should all stay the same as you leg yield. Always keep in your mind these points: • Rhythm • Connection • Steadiness in the head • Forward • Ease and flow of moving over • Straightness

Don’t Just Sit There – RIDE! Even a seasoned horse won’t be push button with the leg yields; it is up to you, the rider, to keep the movement together. The leg yield is a balance exercise. How well can you feel and control each leg underneath you. I think leg yield is more a rider exercise than a horse exercise as it needs so much feel to be developed from the rider for it to be executed well. By nature you may find your horse leading Continued on page 25

Natasha Althoff is a Victorian based Grand Prix rider who is widely known for her talent and enthusiasm to help other riders. She successfully runs the Ebony Park Stud as well as the Your Riding Success website, providing free informative online videos, fact sheets, blogs, ebooks and programs to help riders overcome fear, increase competition results, learn dressage and set goals.

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If your horse is leading either by the shoulders

The current Australian Novice 2.2 test has the rider coming off the track at R, making a half circle 10 meters to the left and then trotting to X where the rider then leg yields out to K. This is a good exercise to try at home, just keep it simple and ask for a few steps at first and then build it up. Remember to reward when the horse gets it right – if you get frustrated it will lead to tension and the horse rushing.

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PRODUCT REVIEW

Pot of Courage POT OF COURAGE IS A UNIQUE AND VERSATILE LEATHER DRESSING WITH A DIFFERENCE. THE PRODUCT WILL ENSURE TO LEAVE YOUR

LEATHER SUPPLE, SOFT AND TOTALLY REJUVENATED. THE PRODUCT INCLUDES A SELECTION OF NATURAL OILS AS WELL AS A MOULD RETARDANT TO SAFE GUARD YOUR GEAR.

Unlike other dressings Courage is hand friendly so application is fast, affective and leaves your hands moisturised. Courage is suitable for all types of leather and upholstery. So keep a pot of Courage in your cupboard to ensure long leather life. “I tried The Little Pot of Courage and I have to say I'm impressed!

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Where to Find Us

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The product isn't goopy, it glides onto leather easily and

a small amount really goes a long way. It makes cleaning bridles a breeze - you can get into fiddly areas without much effort. I've used it on my Childeric and it's now gleaming! The best part is, the product has a mould resistant formula so no more green saddles or tack! I'll be using this on my stiff-as-allhell Petrie boots! It will soften them right up. Your hands feel soft and moisturised after too. Win/Win! Dannii Cunnane

You can purchase this amazing product from the Tack Shop located on the Equestrian Hub’s website at www.equestrianhub.com.au

Come and have a chat about how we can help you find a home for your pre-loved saddle, or check out the saddles we currently have available. We can also answer all your questions about our HUB DIRECTORY and HUBVIBES E-zine. M AY 2 0 1 7 12th may Qld Festival of Dressage at QSEC 25-28May Lismore Hack Championships 8-11 June National Cutting Horse Association Futurity - Tamworth (TBC)


Your Club IN PROFILE

CENTRAL VICTORIAN SHOWJUMPING CLUB Central Victorian Showjumping Club was founded in September 2015, so we are still a relatively new club. Currently we have approximately 45 members, and hold monthly lessons on the second Saturday of each month in Mandurang South, which is located just out of Bendigo.

Pictured: Sam top left, Mindy below left, Harriet below middle, Bec below right, Mel.

If you would like any more information about our club please feel free to ask, or head over to our website: http://centralvicjumpclub.wix.com/cvsjc H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

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TER SHOW 2017

SYDNEY ROYAL EASTER SHOW 2017

Jess Stalling, winner of the Ida Buring Rinegolde Perpetual Prize Mount, Rider (Lady), & Equipment, Rider 17yrs & over.

A Clydesdale having a play.

SYDNEY RO

Junior Judging APSB winners.

Best Shire Gelding.

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Supreme Shetland.

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Best Welsh In Hand – Eagle Park Play with Fire bred by Daniel Harvey, owned by Lyn and Luke Heyne.

Winner of Open Pony Whitmere Top Model - owned and bred by Darren Telford and Greg Gerry Whitmere Stud.


OYAL EASTER SHOW 2017

SYDNEY ROYAL EASTER SHOW 2017

Part Welsh Filly winner and Res Champion Mare/Filly - owned by Haber Family, shown by Kim Martin.

Supreme Buckskin Exhibit Joemoor Special Girl - owned and bred by Lori Howell, shown superbly by Anthony Mountney.

Supreme Thoroughbred.

Champion Welsh A Mare/Filly Imperial Bow Belle - owned by Smith family.

Ella Cowgill pictured with Less Friend on Supreme ridden ANSA.

Photo Credit: Tess Peacock Images

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY www.equestrianevents.com.au

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HubVibes Pix

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HUB SADDLE REVIEW

"I've always had County saddles and the Saddle Hub had the perfect one for me when I was looking," Sarah explains. "To purchase new would be really expensive, so to see the perfect match for me on the Saddle Hub website was great.

Saddle r e v i e w : Sarah English Sarah English recently purchased her County saddle through the Sadde Hub and is extremely happy with it.

"The saddle has put me in a better position for my dressage tests - even better than my previous saddle! "I'm really happy with it and the Saddle hub were great to purchase from."

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In 2009 Edward Gal and Totilas set a world record in their County Perfection.

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MAY Young Rider of the Month

Madeline Sinderberry Madeline Sinderberry isn’t just a go-getter, she’s an absolute athletic machine and in the world of show jumping she’s known for her terrific results. At just 16 years old she has been awarded the Australian Young Rider Champion, NSW Young Rider Champion and the Sydney Royal Most Successful Young Rider. Her main mount is Fernhill Zinzan who is a powerhouse around a show jumping course and together they make an impressive combination. Having a reputation of being a very hot horse, and maybe too crazy to ever be consistently good, Madeline has ridden Fernhill Zinzan to success. Hub Vibes wishes Madeline all the very best. If you are a young competition rider and would like to be considered for HubVibes Young Rider of the Month, send us a pic of you and your horse and 150 words about who you are, what you want to achieve and why you love your sport to info@hubvibes.com.au.

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Hub Horse & Rider HEALTH VETERINARY ACUPUNCTURE

demystifying the science It’s not about being stabby – it’s all about the points and meridians. Acupuncture is the insertion of fine, flexible needles into strategic points to stimulate the body to maintain homeostasis. Homeostasis is the balance the body exists in for optimal performance and function.

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Recent research has revealed microscopic differences between acupuncture points and meridians and surrounding tissue. These differences include a thinner layer of skin cells, increased numbers of inflammatory cells (specifically mast cells), and a higher concentration of capillaries, nerve bundles and free nerve endings.

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One of the most confusing parts of acupuncture theory is often the meridians; which seem to wander magically along the body, linking different areas with each other and, according to Traditional Chinese Medicine, to internal organs. These meridians have been shown to have lower electrical resistance, allowing action potentials (produced from stimulated nerve cells) to preferentially travel along these networks. Meridians also often follow known nerve pathways or muscle fascial attachments. The main area that Veterinary acupuncture is currently utilised with our domestic animals is to treat musculoskeletal conditions. In these

conditions muscle tension and localised tissue hypoxia is the major problem targeted. Chronic overuse or misuse of muscles, whether due to poor conditioning, injury or osteoarthritis, result in initiation of the inflammatory cascade and eventually restricted blood flow to the muscle cells. Poor blood circulation means lower oxygenation and decreased removal of waste products. Without oxygen the cells are unable to recover and relax fully.

So what does Acupuncture do? Acupuncture stimulates the body to increase blood flow to targeted areas; this has the effect of improving oxygenation and waste removal and allowing muscle recovery. Because muscle tension results in changes


at a cellular level simply resting the muscle rarely resolves the problem as resting does not increase blood flow to the area; this is where muscle therapy is utilised. So spelling a sore horse usually results in the horse coming back into work still with the same underlying weak and sore muscles which resurface shortly after the workload increases. Acupuncture is very effective at stimulating blood flow into fascia, the fibrous casing around muscles, and tendinous attachments

Acupuncture also can provide pain relief. Needle insertion has been shown to result in release of a substance called encephalin in the spinal cord as well as encephalin, noradrenaline, serotonin and beta-endorphins in the brain. This hormonal effect in the brain

Why use acupuncture? While musculoskeletal conditions are the most common complains treated there certainly in much greater applications of acupuncture including gastric ulcers, gastrointestinal disease, infectious diseases, skin conditions, reproductive concerns and renal failure. These effects are achieved by stimulating blood flow to the tissues concerned, altering hormone release from the brain and glands and influencing the immune system. There are still some effects of acupuncture that have been shown to occur, both from clinical experience and scientific experiments, however we are yet to understand how these effects occur. While modern scientific investigation continues to uncover the mechanics behind acupuncture’s widely varied benefits the application of acupuncture into the daily life and health of our pets continues to grow. For the performance animal, acupuncture relieves muscle tension, eases pain which could be due to joint degeneration or injury and aids in muscle growth. For our companion pets acupuncture helps injury recovery, muscle tension, arthritic pain, internal diseases and much more.

Want to know more? Dr Emily is very friendly and happy to answer questions via her Facebook Page.

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of muscles onto bone. Tightness in these areas is a frequent cause of muscular pain and poor muscle development. Recent work mapping fascial planes has found close correlations to acupuncture meridians, mapped thousands of years ago in Ancient China. Understanding fascial tension and the effect on muscle function is important, however, knowing how to relieve this tension is of higher importance and this is an area where acupuncture performs very strongly.

has been credited with the feeling of wellbeing that is frequently experienced by both human and animal acupuncture patients.

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Continued from page 15 Perfecting the Leg Yield

with the shoulders or hindquarters, it is up to you to be active and fix the issue. Use your legs, half halts and fingers to keep your horse forward and sideways.

Advanced Leg Yielding A horse needs time to build up the strength and the understanding of the aids to perform this harder work. Never train the leg yield for too long – ask for a little each training session and then move onto something else. Remember it’s not about whether you make it across the whole diagonal it’s about the

quality of the steps and the ease of the movement. Once leg yield is established in the walk on straight lines, you can then start to work on it on the circle. There are two ways the leg yield can be done on the circle. The first way is by spiralling in and leg yielding in from a 20m circle to 10m circle and then leg yielding back out to a 20m circle. The second way is by turning the shoulders in and the hind legs out and keeping your body going around the 20m circle, you leg yield around the circle. Once that is all mastered in walk you can do it in trot and then in canter. Need more information? Why not watch Natasha’s video with Go-Pro footage. You’ll be a leg yielding master in no time!

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Top RESULTS

at Pony Club Championships The first of four Pony Club NSW State Combined Championships for 2017 were held from 8 - 10 April at the Gravesend Pony Club Grounds. More than 150 riders made the journey to the remote small town of Gravesend to contest their speed, skills and agility in Sporting, Campdraft and Team Penning over three days of competition.

The highest point scoring Campdraft riders in the Champion State of NSW went to (L-R) Jack Hart from Zone 27, Matthew Ireland from Zone 13, Daniel Kelly from Zone 9 and Katie Kelly from Zone 9.

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The State Sporting Championships kicked off on the Saturday morning with the best sporting riders from all over NSW and QLD taking part in seven races including the Flag, Barrel and Bending Races.

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Queensland dominated the interstate point score for the sporting championship, claiming the Champion State Award with riders Thomas Smith, Madison Shaw, Kate Patch and Hannah Gordon scoring the highest points for Queensland. The pace didn’t slow down though with the State Campdraft Championships following on the Sunday with just under 100 competitors taking part. Cattle were brought in from neighbouring farms and the event was held in the newly built Gravesend Campdraft Arena.

Riders were fortunate to have two runs in the campdraft, doubling their chances to get a great score. The Champion State Award was on everyone’s mind as the points came very close between NSW and QLD, but for the 3rd year in a row NSW was declared the winning state with riders Daniel Kelly from Wingham in Zone 9, Katie Kelly from Wingham in Zone 9, Matthew Ireland from Walcha in Zone 13 and Jack Hart from Breadalbane in Zone 27 awarded the highest point scoring riders in the state. The State Team Penning Championship was the final event to be held on the Monday and, in only its second year running, the entries were on the rise with 22 teams competing.


Teams consisted of 3 riders whose aim is to separate three specifically identified cattle from a herd of 30, and put them into a pen at the opposite end of the arena within two minutes. The Team Penning is always fun to watch

and this year did not disappoint with both the Junior and Associate Age groups setting great scores. In the Associate Team Penning competition, the home-town Gravesend Team of Rhiannon Byers, Charlee Haley and Tayla Macey scored the best time of the competition, penning three cattle in a time of 53.22 seconds to be awarded the Associate Team Penning Champions.

The Champion Team Penning Junior Team was awarded to the Gloucester Pony Club Team from Zone 25 with riders (L-R) Chloe Shultz, Amy Shultz and Charlotte Maslen who received a Champion Sash, Trophy and Rug thanks to Horseland.

Such a great event, the NSW State Sporting, Campdraft & Team Penning Championships will be held again in 2018 with applications for suitable venues being welcomed now through the Pony Club NSW Website. The next State Combined Championship for this year will be held at Tamworth for the Show riding, Showjumping, Dressage & Jumping Equitation Championships being held from 1 - 8 July. Photos taken at the Gravesend State Sporting, Campdraft & Team Penning Championships by Paul Smith Photography are available to view and purchase at www.paulsmithphotography. com.au

Left: Rose Malone from Garah Boomi Pony Club in Zone 8 competed in the State Campdraft Championships. Right: Charlotte Bennetts from Cassilis Pony Club in Zone 7 is pictured with President of Pony Club NSW, Mr Wayne Pernice.

To find a Pony Club near you visit the state website on www.pcansw.org.au Photo Credit: Paul Smith Photography

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For more information contact the PCA NSW State Office on (02) 4229 8977.

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I N T E R N AT I O N A L

CHARITY

HIGHLIGHT

Save the Brumbies THE TERM ‘BRUMBY’ REFERS TO A FREE-ROAMING FERAL AUSTRALIAN HORSE AND THEY ARE THE DESCENDANTS OF ESCAPED HORSES FROM THE EARLY EUROPEAN SETTLERS. ALTHOUGH FOUND IN MANY AREAS AROUND THE COUNTRY, THE BEST-KNOWN BRUMBIES ARE FOUND IN THE SNOWY RIVER REGION AS WELL AS THE NORTHERN TERRITORY AND QUEENSLAND.

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A group of Brumbies is known as a "mob" or "band" and they are the subject of some controversy – regarded as a pest and threat to native ecosystem by environmentalists and the government, but also valued by others as part of Australia's heritage.

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Save the Brumbies have two sanctuaries in New South Wales which are dedicated to caring for these beautiful horses. Their goal is to see legislative changes where the Australian Brumby is given protection in line with other nations such as the United

States, where the Mustang has been protected for more than thirty years. Save the brumbies also wishes to maintain the unique genetics of the brumby for future generations and to ensure that no captured Brumby is to be inhumanely slaughtered, consigned to the sale yard or sent to the abattoirs. To raise money for their cause, Save the Brumbies allows the public to get involved. This can be done by sponsoring or adopting

a Brumby, as well as through donations and purchasing gifts. For further information about Brumbies, or to donate to the Save the Brumbies cause, visit their website: www.savethebrumbies.org


Clarend Winter Festival 2017

Thurs 8th, Fri 9th, Sat 10th & Sun 11th June

Dressage NSW Arenas—Hawkesbury Showground Clarendon

Come join us for 4 days of great Competition at our lovely Dressage NSW Clarendon Arenas.

Champions and Reserves in all Levels from Preparatory to Grand Prix

Saturday “Happy Hour” during Freestyle Competitions Levels split into Open Horse, Open Pony, Amateur Owner Rider Horse/Pony, Junior/Young Rider Divisions* Camping and Stable are available

Entries close Monday 16th May Organised by: Dressage NSW Clarendon Grounds Sub Committee Competition Enquires, Trade stands and Sponsorship: Karen Lever 0405 384 201 dnsw.clarendonsec@equestrian.org.au

*Division splits will be subject to entries received and will be combined if less than five entries are received

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Heaps of trade stands too, so come and do some retail therapy!

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NEWS & VIEWS FROM EQUESTRIAN HUB Published by Equestrian Hub • PO Box 13 • Tintenbar NSW 2478 Phone: 0414 760067 • Email: info@equestrianhub.com.au www.equestrianhub.com.au

HubVibes May 2017  
HubVibes May 2017  

News and views from Equestrian Hub