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NEWS & VIEWS FROM THE SADDLE HUB

February 2017

TOP TIPS for Show Prep Riding Over 70 The Legend George MORRIS LEGAL advice BIOPTRON Product Review

O E N BO C I S S CLA

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2 FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH

4 RIDING OVER 70

8 THE 2017 BONEO CLASSIC

10 A CLINIC WITH LEGEND GEORGE MORRIS

15 GET SHOW READY - TOP TIPS TO A GOOD BATH

16 LEGAL EAGLE - ADVICE FROM SARCIS

18 CONFESSIONS OF A HORSE RIDING MUM

20 PRODUCT REVIEW - BIOPTRON

24 NSW THOROUGHBRED REHABILITATION TRUST

NEWS & VIEWS FROM THE SADDLE HUB Editorial & Advertising Enquiries: penny@thesaddlehub.com.au The Saddle Hub Sales Enquiries: Fiona Todd: 0414 760 067 Graphic Design: Joanna Reid: 0408 773 851 Published by The Saddle Hub PO Box 13 • Tintenbar NSW 2478 Phone: 0414 760 067 • Email: info@hubvibes.com.au www.thesaddlehub.com.au

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Well this month has certainly reminded us that it’s summer in Australia. With so many days in the mid to high thirties (and beyond!) it has been a challenge to keep both the humans and horses cool and happy over the last few weeks. We scored a great bit of luck however on our trip to the Boneo Park NAB Classic down on the Victorian Mornington Peninsula. The first day felt like we had arrived in winter with low temps, wind and even some rain, but then it fined up to give us some beautiful weather and fantastic showjumping and dressage, not to mention the shopping! Check out our double Page of Pics spread for some great shots from Stephen Mowbray, such an amazing photographer he is.

Thinking you’re too old to be riding at 70? Think again! We spoke with Paddy McKee who proves that age is only a number and that you’re never too old to do what you love. You may notice that we don’t have a Hub Hero or Young Rider for February, but never

And finally, after the very sad loss of a valued family member of The Saddle Hub (of the canine variety), we are happy to introduce the newest addition. We are running a competition on our FB page to give her a name, so if you have a great idea, let us know! She’s a bit of a cutie… Happy riding! The Saddle Hub Team

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This month is jam packed as usual, with some great tips for preparing for this year’s show season and our editor, Penny Newbold, gives us the low down of her experience at a recent George Morris held in Sydney.

fear, we are currently upgrading these segments and they will be back next month, bigger and better! So keep those Young Rider applications coming!

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Riding Over AGE IS JUST A NUMBER

Paddy McKee has been riding since she was three years of age and shows no signs of stopping anytime soon. A regular at local dressage competitions, Paddy has won countless prizes and always has a smile on her face and a kind word to say. The amazing thing is, Paddy is 73 but proves that age is only a number and never lets that slow her down. Whether it’s mustering cattle for weeks on end, burning up the local trails or taking part in the Masters Games – Paddy gives it her all and enjoys every second.

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“I’ve been riding for as long as I can remember,” explains Paddy.

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“I was born horse crazy and I still am horse crazy – something inside me every day urges me to get up, see my horse and ride. “As I grew up I was my father’s right hand man and helped break horses in, I then successfully competed them at shows where the horses were sold – that’s how we made money to feed the family.

“My father was a well-respected horse trainer and that’s how he made his money, so horsemanship skills were instilled in me at a young age.” After marrying and having a family of her own, Paddy was still heavily involved in the horse industry. “My husband was a jockey so we used to train racehorses for steeplechasing but before they could race they had to qualify in hunting events,” Paddy said. “Hunting events were quite good to get miles under the horse’s belt, so we’d take them through the hunting fields and pop them over the fences. If they could clear the five fences


at a hunting pace then they would qualify for the steeplechasing trials. “It got a bit tricky when I had a family to look after, but we still kept training horses and I’d often compete at events with my babies in the pram. We still had to work the horses and provide an income.” Fast forward to 2015 and Paddy had success in at the Masters Games in Charterville Queensland on a borrowed horse called Voltabolta. “He was a green Thoroughbred who had been off the track for twelve months and turned out for three months on the lead-up to the games,” Paddy said. “I didn’t really know the horse when I took him to compete – we’d only had a handful of rides prior to the games. I wasn’t out to win anything though, it was just about having a good time, having some fun and relaxing. “We ended up competing in the dressage and hacking events, coming away with six gold, three silver and one bronze medal.

This year Paddy has a new horse and intends on

“I purchased my new horse Jack in November last year,” Paddy said. “He’s a twelve year old Thoroughbred and stands at 15.2hh – the best part is he’s been out and done some hack shows and dead quiet. “He’s good with other horses and working well, I’ve put a few miles under him with my trail riding and he handled it nicely. “We don’t do a lot of work in the arena at home, I go out on regular fourteen kilometre trail rides where you can go through the horses paces and work on their laterals – it’s a nice atmosphere and gets the horse thinking.” When asked how she keeps her confidence, Paddy had some wise words to say. “I don’t really have much of a fearful bone in my body but it’s important that you feel confident on the horse,” Paddy said. “Know your limits but get out there and have fun – relax and take your time. Confidence comes from having the right partnership, being able to achieve small goals and allowing your horse to look after you.” We look forward to hearing of Paddy’s achievements in 2017 – she’s a true inspiration!

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“I was the only one at seventy years of age competing and my fellow competitors were calling me the Senior Citizen. I absolutely had the time of my life! Voltabolta was lovely and looked after me.”

competing as much as she can.

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Winner of the ticket to see masterclass, Louise Wheatley with Penny Newbold.

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Para rider, Emma Booth and Zidane.

2017 BON

Para equestrian, Stella Pearl Barton wins the Grade 1 Championship.

Matt Williams on a brief visit from Europe riding Chris Chugg's horse, PSS Chantilly.

Emma Booth and Zidane.

Gabi Kuna and Cera Cassiago, winners of the FEI World Cup Jumping Grand Prix with Mary Hanna and Sancette Grand Prix Dressage Champions.


NEO CLASSIC

Gabi Kuna and Cera Cassiago with Chris Chugg winner WC.

Gary Lung and Chester trotting up in readiness for the Grand Prix Dressage.

EA Australasian Show Horse National Championships. Clint Beresford on his horse "Jitterbug", winners of the 2016/2017 World Cup Australian League Series. We wish him the best of luck at the World Cup Final at the end of March to be held in Omaha, Nebraska in the USA.

All photos are courtesy of Boneo Park and Stephen Mowbray.

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Winner of TSH bridle, John Hart with Fiona Todd.

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There are many stories that I have heard about the infamous Mr George Morris and I would be lying if I said I wasn’t more than a little nervous when heading off on the 18 hour round trip to attend my first clinic with him held at Vicki Roycroft’s beautiful property on the central coast of NSW.

George Morris is passionate about the progress of the riders in his clinics because he truly, wholly and oh so genuinely LOVES his sport. Period. He also, truly, wholly and oh so genuinely LOVES horses. All horses. He might not love your particular horse but he loves and feels so connected to the species that he will, most likely until the day he dies, spend his days trying to help riders bring out the best in their horses. To ride them fairly, sympathetically and systematically in a way

I have had the opportunity to attend several clinics as a spectator, watched hours of video footage, read all the books and was born and raised on his system against all the odds (given that I commenced my riding career in the backwaters of regional NSW in the early nineties).

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Yet he still managed to surprise me.

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And the surprise wasn’t a bad one, it wasn’t when he called me as mad as a “cat on a hot tin roof” or a “desperate housewife” or gave me a hard time when I lost my way on a course (all of which were well-deserved mind you and I wore with a badge of honour of being the subject of a George Morrisism!). The surprise came when his real motivation for the strong remarks became so obviously clear and starkly simple.

George Morris and Sinjon at Paris during the 1959 European Tour. that will maximise their potential, whatever that may be. The system itself is not rocket science, and George himself says he didn’t invent it. It’s


LOTS of counter canter for both balance and obedience (I didn’t realise just how much my horse, Remi, anticipate the flying change until I had to tell him not to do it!). His dedication to the forward seat flies in the face of current European (and, most of the time, Aussie) practice, however his theory is that if the horse is educated correctly on the flat a deep, behind the motion seat is unnecessary and even detrimental to the development of the horse’s natural jump.

a system built on classical riding principles developed throughout the 20th century with “forward, straight and calm” being the foundations. And given some thought, arguably just about every problem encountered in riding stems from a fundamental problem in one of these three cornerstones.

Over the three days of the clinic, it became very evident where each rider and horse’s strengths and weaknesses lay, however often it was correction of the small and simple details that made the biggest impact. Ultimately, everything we worked on was directed towards the development of control, strength, balance and rhythm, so that when we jump, the jump itself should come easily both for us and our horses, no matter what the height.

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George teaches the forward seat to relieve the horse’s back and stay with the horses motion and centre of gravity, a straight line from the hand to the mouth (so yes, if the head goes up, so do the hands), deep heel for lower leg security and shock absorption, educating the horse on the flat, always leg to hand, to react to lateral aids, inside leg to outside hand, lots of shoulder fore to improve straightness, shoulder in, travers, renvers and

To prove his point, it is easy to identify the many riders who have adopted the forward seat with massive success, and the American showjumping team, in which he has played such an instrumental role in developing for the past several decades, has always been a high level contender on the international scene.

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He is tough on his riders, not to degrade or to be “mean” but to apply the same black and white systematic training approach that he does with the horses. So when we do the right thing we are praised, we are “superstars” and “perfect students” but when we get it wrong we something else entirely!

George Morris wins the Aachen Grand Prix in 1960 with Night Owl. However, what George does so brilliantly, which is something that I don’t believe you can fully appreciate as a spectator, is his ability to convey, at least to some extent, his sense of timing. The timing of a rider’s reaction is so fundamental to achieving the sought after result yet is one of the most difficult concepts to teach.

The strength of the correction relates to two things: firstly, the degree of the crime (which I guess is obvious) but secondly, I found that the strength of his correction was also closely related to his attempt to instil a sense of timing in the way we correct our horses. His goal is to teach us to react immediately when we need to and not 1 or 2 seconds later. And the reality is that if George barks we react immediately, even if our basic human reaction is to feel offended and emotional! The faster we can with the correct response/ correction to our horse, the more likely we are

How to survive a clinic with George… 1. Make an effort: • Your tack should be simple andimmaculate. You should be able to explain every piece of tack used.

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• Present your horse like you care, he should be clean, trimmed, fit and well groomed.

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• The same goes for you – collared shirt, immaculate boots and a belt is a MUST (apparently this is not just for asthetic reasons…you never know if you are going to fall off and/or need to catch your horse with a belt!)

• If he corrects you once, he gets pretty frustrated if he has to make the same correction with you 50 times. • Read his books or at the very least have some idea of who Bert de Nemethy and Caprilli were. • Pay attention: that one time you were concentrating on something other than the course plan he was explaining will be the time he asks you to go first. • Commit to his system 150% for the time that you are there with an open mind. You can always go back to your old ways after three days.


to get the result we are after, which means we are more likely to understand and embrace the George Morris system, which has been built and developed by George from a love of both horses and showjumping. And it wouldn’t be an overstatement to say that George’s life’s work is all about leaving a legacy that improves the future for both of those things. Having spent many years following him as an idol, it wasn’t until I rode a clinic with him that it dawned on me where his true genius lies. And it’s not in what he teaches, it’s in the teaching itself. So I guess that means I’ll be trying to get back to as many clinics as I can for as long as he keeps willing to make the trip across the Pacific. We were all still smiling at the end but I think Remi looks a little shell shocked!

Want to do a clinic with George? This is how you'll survive it (hopefully!) relatively unscathed… 2. He REALLY doesn’t like: • Lack of effort

3. Consider the following totally essential musts: • A standard length jumping crop;

• Tack with clips (eg clip on rings)

• Standard spurs;

• Pony tails

• Running martingale

• Anything other than heavy stainless steel stirrups • Bling of any kind, either colour or sparkle! (you might want to rethink the diamante browband and matching saddlecloth, belt and helmet ;)

• A belt

4. Don’t worry too much and remember to enjoy the whole experience. He’s not nearly as intimidating as the legendary tales make him out to be!


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With the show season about to kick off, it’s time to pull those mud and dust monsters out of the paddock, apply a bit of elbow grease and get them ring ready!

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dirt to the surface. Let the suds sit for a few minutes and then rinse off. Remember that leaving any suds in the coat can irritate and cause itching, so ensure that your horse has been thoroughly rinsed afterwards.

H

TO

TIP ONE: optimum shine comes from within.

massaging the suds HOW REA Gently S DY into your horses coat will T E help bring any trapped G

TI

T

For some of you this might be your first season, but never fear – we have you covered with our top tips to bathing your horse and entering your competition on a gleaming steed.

PS

TO A GOOD

Sure, you can spritz and spray your horse ‘till your hearts content, but a healthy and balanced diet with the correct vitamins and minerals will allow your horse to be in optimum health. This reflects not only in the horse’s coat, but also in their hooves, mane and tail. TIP TWO: elbow grease Give your horse a really good grooming session before you turn on the hose. Make sure you remove all the mud and dirt from your horses legs, hooves, mane and tail so you’re not wasting precious water on trying to spray it all out. TIP THREE: rub-a-dub-dub

TIP FOUR: glorious legs Much like tip three, dilute your shampoo in a bucket and gently work your way from the bottom of the leg to the top. Be sure to stay safe to avoid any accidents and work the suds down into the horses fur. Rinse and then repeat for each leg. While washing the legs you can use this time to check for any fungus or abrasions that may need to be treated. TIP FIVE: facials Well we don’t really give our horses facials, but it’s important that we remove any scurf and build-up. If your horse is opposed to having his face washed, try removing what you can with a baby wipe. If your horse doesn’t mind a bit of water, gently hose the face and add a little shampoo in a bucket and gently rub a clean sponge over the front of the face – keep suds away from eyes and the inside of ears. The sponge should not have been Continued on page 25

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Gently horse your horse all over and remove any sweat and dirt that may be coming out of the coat. Invest in good quality horse shampoo (medicated is a bonus) and dilute it in a bucket. Remember that depending on the quality of the shampoo, a little may go a long way. Apply the suds to the neck body using a sponge – focus on the legs and face separately.

BA

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Legal Eagle: Advice from the Stock and Rural Crime Investigation Squad Are you selling or purchasing a horse but want to ensure you won’t be caught up in any legal drama in the future? Sure, most purchasers and sellers are honest but it doesn’t hurt to make sure you’re protected should any issues arise. We get some hot tips and information to keep in mind from Detective Sargent Brendan Murphy who works in the Stock and Rural Crime Investigation Squad (SRCIS). When buying a horse it is no different to buying any other type of property. Ensure you receive a receipt for the purchase clearly outlining the price, the description of the animal and ensure there are no obstructions to the sale.

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If there is an issue with the sale, it must be noted that disputes between parties over purchases is a civil issue and not a police matter. Police will only become involved where a criminal offence has been identified, a stealing or fraud related issue.

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With respect to ‘fraud’, the buyer of a horse must be aware of what they are buying and if unsure or lacking experience they should ask someone to assist in viewing the horse on purchase. Just because the animal is advertised as ‘quiet’ or a ‘bomb proof’ horse, this is often open to interpretation and the terms may not be a cut and dry should a civil case arise. When gifting, loaning or agisting a horse you should ensure both parties are in agreement as to what the desired outcome is. If you or

another party is giving a horse away or the ownership changes, there should be some type of documentation to reflect to this. Too often police are called into to settle issues where the parties involved are in dispute as to what was agreed on at the time of the horse changing hands. Make sure you write up an agreement and if substantial money is involved you should engage a solicitor. This is the best form of protection in case issues arise. If you have in fact had a horse stolen you should contact your local police or police assistance line and provide as much information as you can. The following should be provided as a minimum: • full description of the horse • electronic chips • value of the horse • location of when the horse was last seen • all enquires made with neighbours and a search of surrounds to negate wandering or being let out of its paddock/enclosure • any suspects or persons of interest. Local SARCIS officers may become involved depending on the circumstances of individual cases. If you have knowledge of a stolen horse or information which may lead to the recovery of a stolen horse please call Crimestoppers on 1800 333 000, your local police or SARCIS office. Did you know there is a Stock Squad in each state and territory? Why not contact your local police service for more information!


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by "The Riding Mum"

The Riding Mum has a co kids as well as a varying n legged variety in the form cats, chickens and the od and goes (although admit only have 2 legs not 4 whi

Birthday parties and creepy crawlies…

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I’ve finally reached that phase in my children’s lives where I actually look forward to birthday parties.

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Until they entered the primary school years, I used to shudder when I spotted the dreaded Disney themed A5 invite imploring my beloved offspring to help celebrate another 3 year old making it through another year. In those days, naturally, the parents are expected to stick around, make awkward chit chat and keep an eye on their own toddlers to minimise the angst for the hosting parent/s. Once they can survive through a day of “big” school, however it becomes an acceptable practice to

leave your child, with 20 other children, in the care of one or two harried parents for a solid couple of hours. Brilliant! There may even have been the odd occasion when, being ultra-prepared (for a change!) I have rolled up to a birthday party with horse float in tow, heading to a lesson, the car still in gear, barely stopping to nudge my darling child out the door and continue on my merry way calling out the window “sorry no time for coffee, have a great time darling! See you tomorrow! No wait, sorry that’s right, only in a couple of hours. Bye….no I won’t forget to pick you up!” Of course that’s all come to an end now. I’m pretty sure we’ve been officially struck off the party invite list. Blacklisted.

It all began with a ponythemed party. Fantastic! Being a little pony clubber herself, Miss 7 couldn’t wait to show off her jods, boots and helmet and, of course, her supreme riding skills. By the time we arrived, two little ponies named “Princess” and “Star” (of course!) were being led around the hostess’ garden carting excited little girls. (As an aside though, it has to be said that the ponies and their handlers looked a little less than excited about the whole procession). We went to give the girl of the day her birthday present when Miss 7 realised that she’d left her helmet at home. No problem, they had a couple of helmets there, she could use one of them. Satisfied with


ouple of two legged number of the four m of horses, dogs, dd rodent that comes ttedly, the chickens ich is probably a

good thing) who all live together on the Happy Family Farm with one VERY long suffering other half. Needless to say, life is many things, but dull it is not! We look forward to hearing her monthly tales of juggling, kids, horses and life in general.

this outcome, Miss 7 said goodbye, took the birthday present and ran off to join 15 other pony mad kiddies. Now, unbeknownst to anyone but me, I had, just that morning, noticed Miss 7 having the odd scratch of her head. Not unusual in itself, however the week before we had received a note home saying something along the lines of “Head Lice Outbreak: Be vigilant”. Or something like that.

be honest I’ve had quite a few “not great moments” in my life and, at the time at least, this one just didn’t seem so bad. Until I got the phone call a week later, “Umm, so it appears most of the girls at Mandy’s party have contracted head lice this week. I just thought I’d check in with you and see if Miss 7* has had any since the party?”

So as she ran off about to share a helmet with 15 other children, I had a moment. I had a thought. I made a decision. And I did nothing. NOTHING! I broke the cardinal mother rule: Never Knowingly Expose Other People’s Children To Head Lice. Instead, I crossed my fingers and toes. And went riding. Looking back, I can see it was perhaps not my greatest moment, but to

“Hmmm, I don’t think so” it was a good thing she couldn’t see me, my face was on fire with the outright lie. (Actually, to be fair, it wasn’t a complete lie. She’d had them before

the party, and as I’d done the correct motherly thing, for a change, afterwards and treated her head as well as the whole family, we were louse free by that time) “But I’ll keep an eye on it! Thanks for letting me know.” Lies do have a tendency to bite you on the behind though, so when Miss 7 came home from school that day and announced to me that all of her friends had had head lice, but that she had proudly informed them that she had already had them last weekend and didn’t have them anymore, I knew karma had come to get me. My mother of the year status has been destroyed yet again, possibly never to be resurrected. Needless to say, we haven’t been inundated with pony party invites since then. *Not her real name, in case you were wondering. I just try to limit my childrens’ exposure to any more “mother shame” than is necessary.


PRODUCT REVIEW

Bioptron LIGHTING THE WAY TO ALTERNATIVE THERAPY Mirjana Arlov used to be a Chemical Engineer but has always felt close to nature after growing up tending to crops and animals. She now treats horses with an interesting alternative therapy which uses handheld lights and colour lenses to assist in health and recovery from injury. For the last seventeen years, Mirjana has been promoting and teaching Bioptron Polarised Light and Colour Therapy since its very beginning in New Zealand and has been deeply in love with the philosophy of holistic healing. “Bioptron Light and Colour Therapy is a natural complimentary therapy made in Switzerland that has been widely used since 1988,” Mirjana explains.

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“It is used for assisting healing of humans and animals; it is safe and easy to use and it works - medical professionals use this in hospitals worldwide.

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“The biophotons (particles of light) we absorb from the sun’s rays affect every biochemical reaction in the body. Light is transformed into electrochemical energy, increasing the activity of the cell membranes, which in turn boosts cell production of enzymes and energy reserves. “The higher the level of light energy in a cell, the greater its vitality and ability to absorb more oxygen, boosting the way the body’s organs function; which then strengthens the

entire immune system and its ability to heal itself naturally.” In 1903, Danish physician Niels Ryberg Finsen was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine for the invention of a device to generate synthesised sunlight to help patients with Tuberculosis. He found that it assisted them in a positive way. “Basically the light is non-invasive and can be used over the skin to penetrate muscles, tendons, ligament, joints, bones and aid in recovery or injury,” Mirjana said. “We can use the polarised medical light, or we can place a filter over the lamp which will change the colour to promote specific healing.” The lenses used are hand blown crystal and not mass manufactured which contributes to the healing abilities and comes in a range of colours, such as indigo, purple, blue, yellow, green, orange and red.


“The colours work on the mental, physical and emotional body of the horse,” explains Mirjana. “They can be used individually or together and they have their own vibrations that are used to treat different ailments.

“If the horse doesn’t have an injury, then I shine the different lights on the horses muzzle to see which one they like the best and then use that in my treatment sessions. We start by moving the light over the spine and down towards the rump which opens the muscles in the front and hind legs. I can then move the light across the body or focus on one area which may require more attention. “Being non-invasive means that the light can be used through bandages and can penetrate through to the muscles and cells that have experienced trauma – we don’t have to stress an injured horse by exposing their wounds and they will still receive benefits of the light therapy. “I have had great success using the Bioptron Light System and it is a great therapy for riders and their horses.”

Come and have a chat about how we can help you find a home for your pre-loved saddle, or check out the saddles we currently have available. We can also answer all your questions about our HUB DIRECTORY and HUBVIBES E-zine. FEBRUARY 2017

18 - 19th February: Grand Weekend of Showjumping at Sunshine Coast Equestrian Club

17th-25th of March:

2016 National Cutting Horse National Finals and 2017 Snafflebit Futurity

30th March - 2nd April: Equifest

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Where to Find Us

Mirjana introduced Bioptron to Australia’s riders at Equitana in Melbourne in 2005 and returns biannually to support many existing Bioptron equestrian clients and to hear their successful stories.

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thesaddlehub.com.au

Are you passionate about the equestrian world and have a knack for selling? Are you self motivated and organised? Do you want to be part of a growing and exciting business with many opportunities? Have you worked in advertising? This is a small, vibrant team of which you will become an integral part. Part–time position with view to becoming full-time, this position is available for an immediate start.

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JOB DUTIES:

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• Source and contact leads • Explain how HubVibes and The Saddle Hub group will help promote our customers products or services • Outline pricing structure to prospective clients • Process paperwork relating to sales

• Prepare and deliver sales presentations to new and existing clients

• Inform clients of available options for advertising

• Deliver ad proofs to clients for approval • Assist in promoting HubVibes and contribute towards its growth

Please message us or email to promote@thesaddlehub.com.au, your resume as well as a short description on why you feel you would be perfect for the position.

• Provide input into the development of promotional plans, sales literature, media kits and sales contracts Remuneration will be a retainer plus commission. Our geographic territory is Australia wide, so the majority of work will be done via telephone and email.


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THIN LINE ARE NOW AVAILABLE IN THE SADDLE HUB’S TACK SHOP

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I N T E R N AT I O N A L

CHARITY

HIGHLIGHT

NSW Thoroughbred Rehabilitation Trust THE NSW THOROUGHBRED REHABILITATION TRUST (TRT) IS A NOT-FOR-PROFIT CHARITY THAT ASSISTS THE REHABILITATION AND RE-EDUCATION OF FORMER NSW THOROUGHBRED

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RACEHORSES AFTER THEY FINISH THEIR CAREER IN THE RACING INDUSTRY.

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Racing NSW has established a Horse Welfare Fund which will be predominately financed by a deduction of 1% of all prize money paid in NSW.

• Rehabilitating inmates and providing adequate skills, training and prospective employment opportunities in the Thoroughbred Racing Industry.

Since 2011 TRT has rehomed more than 240 horses and currently has 44 horses that are in the Thoroughbred Rehabilitation Program.

It is estimated that $204 million of prize money will be paid in the coming year, accordingly $2 million will be taken from prize money. This will be in addition to Racing NSW's existing horse welfare schemes.

The TRT aligns directly with the Thoroughbred Rehabilitation Program, an initiative set up by Racing NSW and Corrective Services NSW, which offers a unique way to rehabilitate former racehorses and inmates alike. The Program offers many positive benefits to the NSW Racing Industry through: • Retraining and re-homing Thoroughbred horses for a life after racing, including equine competition, police work, recreational riding and companion animals.

Once horses have completed their time in the Thoroughbred Rehabilitation Program, suitable equines can be sold on to undertake various equestrian pursuits which include everything from eventing, polo, interschools, pony club, mounted police or become well cared for companion/paddock mates. In 2016 TRT had their first Royal Easter Show entrant Elusive Dawn. Elusive Dawn

and his owner Lauren have also qualified again in 2017 - keep your eyes peeled for them in the main arena. Want to donate? The NSW Thoroughbred Rehabilitation Trust raises money in direct support of the Racing NSW and Corrective Services NSW Thoroughbred Rehabilitation Program. All wages and administration costs of the Thoroughbred Rehabilitation Program are currently donated by Racing NSW, meaning that every dollar donated to the NSW TRT goes directly to the care of horses in the program. The NSW TRT is a registered charity and all donations are tax deductible. Donations and further information can be made through the TRT website: http://www.nswtrt.org.au/ TRT_Donations.html


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TOP TIPS for Managing Money and Horses How to Find the IDEAL PONY CLUB HORSE FRIESIAN Breed Focus Perfect PLAITS RIBBLETON

used for the rear end or legs of the horse as we don’t want to create a circus of infections. Gently work the suds in and rinse when ready – again be careful to remove all the shampoo.

don’t use conditioner as it can make the hair slippery. If you’re not plaiting, go fourth and release the cracken! Gently massage and rinse – when the water runs clear you know all the conditioner is out. Don’t brush the mane or tail until it is dry, else you can cause knots, tangles and breakage.

TIP SIX: oh ma hair!

TIP SEVEN: air dry

Quality mane and tail shampoos are available to purchase, although you may choose buy an off the shelf human brand from woolies. Just be aware that human hair PH is different to your horses, so we do recommend using a brand that caters to your equines luscious locks.

Scrape your horse down with a water scraper – on hot days ensure that you’ve scraped all the water off your horses coat else it can warm up and raise your horse’s body temperature. Allow your horse to dry (you can help them out by using a chamois or towel) and then groom with a soft bristled brush.

Continued from page 15 Get Show Ready

Rinse the mane and tail well – repeat the shampooing process if your horse is an extra dirty hippo in the hair department. If you intend on plaiting, we advise that you

TIP EIGHT: rug up Apply a clean rug to keep your horse dirt free. If you’re plaiting, a skinny hood over the top of the head and neck will help protect your plaits and keep the hair down for a smooth and sleek finish come competition day. Now you’re ready to hit the arena in squeaky clean style! Remember: Be sure not to bathe your horse too often else you’ll strip the coat of its natural oils which will make it appear dull and feel brittle.

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Like all good brands, a little goes a long way so sparingly add the shampoo to your horses mane and tail and gently work the product in. If you need more, then add some extra until your happy with your lather efforts. Be sure to gently work the product into the mane and tail, you don’t want to cause breakage or pull out any of those long grown strands.

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NEWS & VIEWS FROM THE SADDLE HUB Published by The Saddle Hub • PO Box 13 • Tintenbar NSW 2478 Phone: 0414 760067 • Email: info@thesaddlehub.com.au www.thesaddlehub.com.au

HubVibes February 2017  
HubVibes February 2017  

A free Australian equestrian e-zine brought to you by The Saddle Hub.