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NEWS & VIEWS FROM THE SADDLE HUB

AUGUST 2016

George Grover Page 4

Hub Heroes Olympic Snapshot Saddle Skills Nutrition and Health Biosecurity Laws

BREED

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SPECI SEE

INSI

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2 FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH

4 DREAM BECOMES REALITY FOR GEORGE

6 ASSISTED BREEDING PART 1

11 YOUR GUIDE TO FOALING

17 NEW QLD BIOSECURITY LAWS

19 OLYMPIC SNAPSHOT

20 EQUINE NUTRITION

22 5 FLOOR EXERCISES FOR ABBADABBADOOOS

23 YOUNG RIDER OF THE MONTH

NEWS & VIEWS FROM THE SADDLE HUB Editorial & Advertising Enquiries: Penny Newbold: 0402 095 863 The Saddle Hub Sales Enquiries: Fiona Todd: 0414 760 067 Graphic Design: Joanna Reid: 0408 773 851 Published by The Saddle Hub PO Box 13 • Tintenbar NSW 2478 Phone: 0414 760 067 • Email: info@thesaddlehub.com.au www.thesaddlehub.com.au

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What a big month August is!

Firstly, Olympic fever is well and truly here. The Aussie Equestrians have already done us proud with clinching the bronze in the team eventing! What an awesome effort by the boys. Check out our Olympic snapshot with details of teams, dates and schedules for the remainder of the games, so you don’t miss a minute of the action!

1 August of course also marks the official “birthday” of our beloved four legged friends and the commencement of the breeding season. New regular contributor, Gold Coast equine reproduction vet Ben Purtle, gives us some insights into artificial or “assisted” breeding. We also have some tips to keep in

Speaking of foals, we want to see all your gorgeously cute baby photos (of the equine variety!) so we can include the cutest in our upcoming editions of HubVibes. Feel free to either email them or post on our HubVibes Facebook page with a little bit about their breeding and/or background story and stay tuned for our next edition. Check out our new Hub Heroes section and see who our August Hub Hero is. Is there someone you would like us to catch up with? A question you would like asked? Email us and we will do our best! We also have core strength exercises, equine nutrition and of course our August Young Rider of the Month. So grab cuppa and enjoy… Christopher Burton on Santana H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Olympians don’t just happen, they have to start somewhere and Remi Stud is doing their bit to help young riders achieve their equestrian dreams. We spoke with George Grover, the impressive young winner of the Remi Stud Young Rider Scholarship about what the opportunity will mean to him. Inspiring stuff!

mind if you are welcoming your first foal into the world.

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From left: Sue Austin (EA), Justine Scoffell (Prydes), Chris Lok (EQ), Ros Lipp from Edwards Saddlewo from Remi Stud, Tor Van Den Berge from Team VDB, with Remi Lord of the Vale S, George Grover (201 Craig Newton from Belrock Equestrian, and Jordyn Faint (2015 Scholarship winner

Dream becomes reality for George

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In a sport that can be very competitive and expensive, riding successfully at the top levels can seem an unachievable dream for some. Renowned warmblood breeders Remi Stud however, are doing their bit to bridge that gap with their Young Rider Scholarship.

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includes feed from Prydes Easifeed, registration with Equestrian Queensland, marketing from Equestrian Australia, legal support from HorseForce, a saddle, bridle and saddlecloth from Edwards Saddleworld, 10 weeks training by Team Van Den Berge when the horse turns three years old, show product from Dr Show, riding attire from Belrock Equestrian, and Veterinary care from Westvets. A total package valued at over $30,000.

The Remi Stud Young RidCredit Oz Shotz Photography er Scholarship is an annual Scholarship and is awarded to a very deserving Young Rider who has the talent and dedication in either dressage This year the Remi Stud or eventing, but needs finanYoung Rider Scholarcial assistance to purchase ship was awarded to 17 a horse of their dreams. year old, George Grover Cheryl from Remi Stud has from Kingston in Tasmaput together a great team of nia. George received the Supporters to help make this stunning colt REMI LORD dream come true for one lucky young rider. OF THE VALE S by Lauries As (imp)/ Court Musician xx by Salieri xx (known as “Pete” to The Scholarship includes the ownership of a his friends). purpose bred Hanoverian weanling by either Lauries As or Fishermans Friend - two of the On the selection of the scholarship Recipibest performed Hanoverian stallions in ent, Cheryl says “George is a very dedicated Australia - plus the support package which young rider and competitor in the field of


Credit Oz Shotz Photography

orld, Isabella Wilkinson-McIntyre with Remi Livingstone S (2013 Scholarship winner), Cheryl O’Brien 16 Scholarship winner), Neil Harris from Dr Show, Alexandra Barlow (2014 Scholarship winner), Below: George Grover, Cheryl O’Brien and Remi Lord of the Vale S eventing, so we look forward to seeing him competing Pete in the years ahead. He has proven that he is prepared to do whatever it takes to make it in his chosen field. Equestrian sport in Tasmania has benefited from his achievements, talent, inspirations of excellence and sheer determination to be the best person and rider that he can be. With young riders like George, our Equestrian sport will continue to prosper in Australia well into the future.”

to ride and compete on a beautifully purpose bred youngster.

George has ridden all of his life “I think I was first put on a horse when I was 4 days old!” but it wasn’t until he watched his older neighbours rise up through the pony club ranks that he started to become really interested in competition riding. With supportive, horsey parents, he found his eventing legs in Huntingfield Pony Club and has competed up to Pre Novice, his horse unfortunately going lame just before his first 1* event.

After finishing year twelve this year, George hopes to spend a year as a working pupil in an eventing stable on the mainland to pursue his riding goals full time. When asked if he had any of the top eventers in mind, he replied “I’m still working on that!” George’s dressage coach, Lydia Jackson was the one who first brought the Remi Scholarship to George’s attention however “I never imagined that I actually had a chance. It was a huge surprise to receive the phone call saying that I’d won it.” “I’m just so thankful to Remi Stud and Cheryl O’Brien as well as all the other sponsors involved in this scholarship for providing such an amazing opportunity. It really has changed my future in the sport.”

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“I’m riding my sister’s horse at the moment because I’m trying to sort out some soundness problems with my main horse. He’s 17 and heading towards the end of his career.” Which means that the scholarship has come had a perfect time for George. In just a few short years, George will have the opportunity

“The Scholarship will allow me to continue in the sport for longer than I thought possible. Having access to the good horses, the top bloodlines, is much more difficult when you’re not from the mainland! It just wasn’t going to be a financial reality for me, but now that’s all changed.”

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ssi s ted Areeding B

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PART 1

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The breeding season is approaching. You have decided to breed with your mare and she has never had a foal? Or perhaps she foaled by “natural” service but this time you wish to take advantage of the amazing genetics available through frozen semen. It is truly amazing that semen can be stored in liquid nitrogen for 20 years and longer and still be viable when thawed. Not only that, but horse breeders can access some of the most prestigious competition bloodlines in the world at a fraction of the cost of the top thoroughbred stallions thanks to “Assisted” or “Artifical” breeding techniques such as Frozen semen breeding. Currently there is a worldwide ban on the use of frozen semen in Thoroughbreds. This is for reasons that are political rather than


medical or biological. So in the meantime we focus on non thoroughbreds when it comes to horse breeding and frozen semen.

Regular contributor Dr Benjamin Purtle B.V.Sc, is a veterinary surgeon based on the Gold Coast. He specialises in equine reproduction, preventitive medicine and acupuncture.

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So how is stallion semen processed before it is frozen you ask? Basically, step one is to collect the stallions semen with the help of a “Phantom” or “Dummy”, a mounting device which the stallion is trained to mount usually with the help of an in season mare nearby. Ben Purtle at work This procedure often takes three people: one holding the Stallion, one holding the “teaser” mare and one collecting the semen via the Artificial Vagina device or “AV” (usually the Veterinarian). This is performed often at the start of the breeding season. A good sample is crucial and once collected the sample is tested for its concentration of Semen straws are A “dummy” mare spermatozoa by a machine within used for storage minutes of collection. The aim is to freeze semen at an end concensoftware program, is gradually guided to a tration of 250 million spermatozoa per ml. As final temperature of minus 121 degrees celsius each straw contains 0.5 mls, this means 125 after approximately 20minutes. In other words million individual sperm per frozen straw. At a lot of research and preparation has gone into insemination your Veterinarian will use on avmaking this service available to breeders! erage 4 straws per cycle but more on that latSo the next step if you wish to breed er! The fresh semen is placed into a centrifuge with frozen semen is to contact the closest which spins and separates off the unwanted Equine Breeding Centre who can safely care portion of the sample i.e. the “Gel” fraction. for your mare during the breeding season The remainder is measured for concentraand hold the Semen you have purchased tion and re-suspended in a mixture of egg on the same premises. yolk and glycerol. Pre-labelled plastic semen Oh and I forgot to mention, she will need to straws are then filled with the sample either be examined three to four times a day when manually or by machine and capped with a she is close to ovulating but I will elaborate small metal sphere. Now ready for freezing on this as well in the next article! the straws are put into a device that starts at 21 degrees celsius and with the help of a Happy Breeding!

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Contact: 0407 586 872 Monday to Friday 8am – 5pm (After hours consults available) Dr Benjamin Purtle B.V.Sc Cert IVAS


Situated in the beautiful Lockyer Valley of Queensland, Remi Stud is a small family operated stud that has been breeding Hanoverians for 20 years. All our broodmares are classified with the Hanoverian Horse Society and have been bred or selected for their ability to produce progeny that are elegant, yet have outstanding temperaments and athletic movement. A breeding service is provided for the

agistment, foaling and breeding of mares with either chilled or frozen semen, including embryo transfer. Our foals and youngsters are grown on improved pastures, giving special attention to balanced nutrition and general health requirements.

LOCKYER VALLEY, QUEENSLAND, AUSTRALIA Email: remistud@bigpond.com

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www.remistud.com

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Your guide to foaling The expected birth of a foal from a favourite mare is an exciting but worrying time for many horse owners. These are some of the basics you need to know.

Before the Big Event • Vaccinate the mare against tetanus and strangles approximately one month prior to foaling as this will boost antibody levels in the colostrum (first milk) which helps to protect the foal against infection during its first few weeks of life. • If your mare is to foal away from home, she should be moved four to six weeks prior to foaling so that she can develop specific antibodies to potential infections in her new environment.

• Prepare the foaling area: a small, clean paddock where they can be clearly observed and helped if needed is an ideal place to foal down a mare. If the mare is in a stable shavings are not a good bed for foaling as they stick to the birth fluids and find their

• A first aid kit containing scissors, disinfectant, string, wound powder and towels should be on hand. Have a phone and your vet’s number handy just in case. And don’t forget your camera!

Signs your mare is getting close to foaling Individual mares can vary enormously in their timing, so keep that in mind when looking for “the signs” of an impending birth: • In the weeks leading up to foaling your mare will start producing milk resulting in gradual enlargement of her udder. This is called ‘bagging-up’. • During the week before, or on the foaling day, small amounts of colostrum may ooze from the teats, creating wax-like droplets which stick to the tip of the teats. This is called ‘waxing up’. • The ligaments over the pelvis and under the tail head will relax slightly giving a ‘dropped’ appearance to the hindquarters.

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• If the mare’s vulva has been stitched (Caslick’s operation) it should be cut by us approximately 2 weeks prior to foaling.

way into foal’s noses and other places that they should not be. Ideally the area should be well lit and there should be a readily available supply of clean warm water.

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• During the 24 hours prior to foaling the mare may appear restless and uncomfortable and may re-arrange bedding as if ‘nest making’. • Most mares foal during the night, an instinctive means of helping to protect their vulnerable new-born foals from predators, but this cannot be relied upon and full term mares should be watched to make sure that they do not get into difficulty. A foaling alarm can be very useful, so make sure the batteries are fresh and test it before use. There are also milk strip testers which measure the calcium and electrolytes in the milk which can give an indication of if foaling is getting close.

The Big Event! What does labour look like?

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During first stage of labour, the mare will probably appear restless and will get up and go down several times with apparent abdominal discomfort and will possibly sweat. She will also likely raise and lower her tail and produce small quantities of droppings and urine frequently.

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This stage may last for several minutes to several hours and ends when the mare ‘breaks water’, (i.e. the placenta ruptures) and allantoic fluid is released. During the second stage of labour, the foal’s muzzle and two front feet should appear at the vulva covered by a thin white membrane (amnion). The feet are just ahead of the muzzle and one foot should be just ahead of the other.

Once the placenta has ruptured, most mares will lie down on their side for quite rapid delivery of their foal. With the foal in the normal position foaling should progress normally and should be delivered within a few minutes. The umbilical cord should rupture naturally at a point of natural constriction which develops just below the umbilicus. There should be minimal bleeding unless the cord has broken prematurely. The cord should only be clamped and cut if it is too thick to break naturally or if it breaks prematurely and the foal is haemorrhaging. The umbilical stump should be treated with disinfectant solution (e.g. 0.5% chlorhexidine or iodine), spray or powder. During the third stage of labour, after the birth of the foal, the uterus contracts, which can cause the mare discomfort until the placenta is passed. When the mare stands, the placenta should be tied up into a ball so she does not walk on it and tear it, and so the extra weight will help its gradual separation from the mare’s uterus. When it drops from the mare it should be checked carefully to make sure that it is complete and none has been retained inside the mare. The placenta is normally passed within 1 to 4 hours of foaling. Retained placenta can result in infection of the uterus, toxaemia, laminitis and even death of the mare, thus its removal is important.

Afterwards The mare usually stands and starts to lick her foal a few minutes after birth. The mare may squeal and ‘nicker’ at it and generally make a fuss over it. The foal should make attempts to stand and suck and should have achieved both within 4 hours of birth, usually within 1-2 hours. They should also have passed the first faeces which


is always black/greeny colour (meconium) within 6-8 hrs.

• Any bleeding that does not resolve itself, or if it is excessive.

If the mare’s vulva has torn it will need to be re-stitched after foaling, usually during the next day.

• If the either the mare or foal becomes unresponsive.

When should you call the vet?

• If the placenta has not come away by 4 hours.

• If your mare appears to “give up” after an extended period of non-productive labour

• Many mares will lie down again soon after foaling. This may be just to rest or may be because she is in pain (colic). The mare may scrape or roll indicating her discomfort. If these signs do not pass within an hour, or gets progressively more severe, this may indicate complications (uterine artery haemorrhage, uterine or colonic rupture) and veterinary intervention will be required without delay.

• If the head or one or both legs are back, or if more than two feet are present, or if only the foal’s neck or back can be felt and you are unable to correct minor misplacements yourself.

(the above is largely an excerpt of on article courtesy of Meadows Veterinary Centre. The whole article can be found here http://www. meadowsvet.com.au/Foaling-pg18548.html )

If veterinary assistance is necessary, it will be needed quickly, so be sure to let your vet know when your mare is looking like she is getting close. Call your vet immediately in the following circumstances: • If your mare is excessively distressed or is in prolonged, non-productive discomfort.

x i P l a Fo Send to: info@thesaddlehub.com.au with the “subject” marked as HubVibes Foals

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Send us your foal pic and we’ll publish it!

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The Hub Directory is an online equine services directory (a bit like Yellow Pages online but only for horse businesses!). You can access it through The Saddle Hub website, where we already have our first few listings. More are now being added regularly and to get things really rolling, we are offering some great subscription deals.

Why it works - the proof! The numbers speak for themselves of this fast growing and unique brand that is The Saddle Hub: • We average over 1,500 visitors to our website daily, in excess of 40,000 per month • Facebook: over 10,000 “likes” on The Saddle Hub page, plus the new Hub Directory and HubVibes pages are growing daily • Our posts reach beyond 500,000 people every month!

How to list your business

Once you’ve subscribed to Hub Directory, we’ll promote your service or business on our Facebook page. We would love to hear from you and add your business to the Hub Directory!

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A listing form is available from our Facebook page: facebook.com/HubDirectory/ Just download the form, complete and return to have your business listed in the Hub Directory. Otherwise send us an email at: info@thesaddlehub.com.au and we will send you a form to complete.

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NEW QLD BIOSECURITY LAWS https://www.daf.qld.gov.au/services/news-and-updates/animals/news/newbiosecurity-laws-for-horse-owners-from-1-july-2016

Biosecurity Queensland is urging horse owners to be aware of new biosecurity laws that will commence on 1 July 2016. General Manager for Animal Biosecurity and Welfare, Dr Allison Crook, said it was important horse owners understood the new laws. “A new approach to managing cattle tick will commence from 1 July 2016,” she said. “The new framework will provide more flexibility for low risk activities such as moving horses across the tick line,” Dr Crook said.

The new tick line map can be viewed at: www.biosecurity.qld.gov.au Owners of low risk livestock, such as horses, will have

All horse owners will still have an obligation to report the presence of cattle tick in the tick free zone. Cattle tick infested properties in the tick free zone will need to ensure their livestock are tick free before they are moved and will need to eradicate ticks from their property. Dr Crook said the property identification code (PIC) system would continue under the new legislation and changes to property registration would be minimal. “If you keep a horse, you are considered a registrable biosecurity entity and must register your details with Biosecurity Queensland from 1 July 2016. “This is similar to the previous property registration requirements – the terminology of who must register is a little different, but what is considered a designated animal remains unchanged,” she said. You must register if you keep: • One or more cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, bison, buffalo, deer, members of the camel

family, members of the equine family • 100 or more designated birds– those that are raised for human consumption (poultry) or the production of eggs for human consumption (e.g. chickens), or that have been released into free flight since they started being kept in captivity (e.g. pigeons) • One or more bee hives. Dr Crook said in most cases the owner of the horse would need to register because they normally had ultimate care and control of the animals. “If you keep a horse, when you register as a biosecurity entity a PIC will be issued. “If you already have a PIC, you’ll be automatically registered as a biosecurity entity on 1 July 2016 and registration will remain effective for three years.” Dr Crook said the requirements for recording horse movements had changed to ensure a stronger traceability system.

Continued on page 21

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From 1 July 2016, part of Queensland will be designated as the tick free zone and the remainder as the tick infested zone. The tick line has been strengthened and simplified by removing the control zone and aligning the tick line with stronger, double fenced boundaries in some areas.

an obligation to only move tick free animals into the tick-free zone.

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Olympic Snapshot: Bronze to Australian Eventers at Rio! It was a fabulous effort by the whole team but Chris Burton’s glorious clear in the cross country around such a tough track on his young, Santano II, who was making his 4* debut at Rio, followed by Sam Griffiths and Paulank Brockagh’s double clear in the showjumping really kept us in contention. Stuart Tinney and Pluto Mio’s solid team score was also vital after Shane Rose’s elimination on CP Qualified in the cross country, meaning Australia went into the showjumping round with only three riders. It may not have been the Games’ Shane DATE

EVENT

was planning for however he was one of seventeen combinations who were either eliminated or retired from the cross country. Individually Sam and Chris were so close, finishing 4th and 5th respectively, with Stuart finishing in 22nd. So what’s happening for the rest of the Games?

TIME

DRESSAGE TEAM • Mary Hanna and Boogie Woogie

(Aus EST)

Friday, 12th August

Dressage: Individual & Team Grand Prix Special

11pm

Sunday, 14th August

Jumping: Individual & Team 1st Qualifier

11pm

Monday, 15th August

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11pm

Tuesday, 16th August

Jumping: Individual 2nd Qualifier Team jumping round 1

11pm

Wednesday, 17th August

Jumping: Individual 3rd Qualifier Team jumping round 2

11pm

Friday, 19th August

Jumping: Individual Final Round A Individual Final Round B

11pm 2:30am (Sat am)

• Lyndal Oatley and Sandro Boy • Sue Hearn and Remmington • Kristy Oatley riding Du Soleil JUMPING TEAM • Edwina Alexander and Caretina • Scott Keach and Fedor • Matt Williams and Valinski • James Paterson-Robinson and Amarillo H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

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Equine Nutrition Your horse’s next performance is only as good as his recovery from the previous one. Muscle repair after exercise is one of the most important factors affecting follow-on performance ability, so it is absolutely essential to ensure that muscles are provided with the nutrients they need to recover at the time when these nutrients are going to be most effectively absorbed, immediately after exercise. Exercise causes micro-tears in muscle fibres and protein is required to repair these and build them stronger so that they can bear more load in the future (muscle building). This means that for about 60 minutes following exercise there is a ‘window of opportunity’ when muscles are actively looking for protein to absorb like a sponge to repair these micro-tears. After about 60 - 90 minutes this process of accelerated protein absorption slows to pre-exercise levels.

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To take advantage of this ‘window of opportunity’ for accelerated protein absorption, feed your performance horse a high quality, highly concentrated protein supplement within 15 minutes of completing exercise. This results in faster, more thorough muscle repair and greatly improves muscle recovery after performance.

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Using protein powders or pastes after exercise can be messy, inconvenient and difficult to feed within the essential 20 minutes’ post exercise timeframe. Muscle Max Bar, the first protein bar for sport horses, provides the performance horse with a full dose of post-workout protein, all wrapped up and ready to feed, take anywhere, highly palatable bar. Made from all-natural ingredients that are scientifically proven to support muscle repair and recovery in sport horses.

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Next month in Assisted Breeding: Part 2

The Dos and Don’ts of Equestrian Property Improvements – how to get the most for your money and avoid the pitfalls

…. Latest tips from our nutritionist

and exercise experts

Find out who our September

Hub Hero and Young Rider of the Month are

The latest in legal and more…

updates

Continued from page 17 “From 1 July, every time a horse moves from a property, a movement record must be created,” Dr Crook said. The movement record must include: • where the horses/s are being moved from • where the horses/s are being moved to and the name of the person receiving the horse/s • a description of the horse/s including species, breed and any distinguishing feature sufficient to identify the horse/s • the date of movement • the person completing the record

“The person receiving the horse must also create a movement record,” Dr Crook said. “If you are moving a horse across the tick line or from an infested place in the free zone, the record must be in your possession while

“Organisers of horse events must also keep records of each horse that has attended their event.” A major theme of the new laws is that of shared responsibility –everyone is responsible for managing their own biosecurity risks. The laws introduce the general biosecurity obligation, meaning horse owners must take an active role in managing biosecurity risks under their control and must ensure their actions do not spread pests or diseases. Queensland’s new Biosecurity Act 2014 will commence on 1 July 2016. To find out more about your responsibilities visit: www.biosecurity.qld.gov.au or call 13 25 23. If you suspect Hendra virus infection in your horse after 1 July 2016, you must still report it to Biosecurity Queensland on 13 25 23.

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• the actions taken to minimise the risk of cattle ticks if moving a horse from the tick infested zone to the free zone, or from infested places in the free zone.

travelling. “A range of methods can be used to record the details of the movement record, including electronic format on a smart device or in writing. As long as it includes the required details, it will be a valid record.

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Regular contributor Leah Everingham B. Hum Mov Sci, M. Clin Ex Sci (Rehab), ESSAM, AEP, Exercise Physiologist from Optimum Health, sees and treats many horse related injuries. www.opt.net.au

5 floor exercises for abbadabbadooos Accidents can result in diminished strength, coordination, poor core strength or balance. If you’ve had an injury, exercise shouldn’t cease when you feel rehabilitated, that ongoing exercise is the key to injury prevention too. Over the next few months we will be bringing you a series of exercises that will help you with one facet of repairing from an injury. This month we focus on exercises to improve your core strength.

Dead Bugs: Brace core and tilt pelvis back

towards body so that lumbar curve flattens into the floor. Extend opposite arm and leg slowly without allowing your lower back to arch. Draw the extended arm and leg back into start position and repeat on the other side. Remember to breathe fluently and focus on drawing your navel in towards your spine. Complete 3 sets of 10 repetitions.

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Plank: Position yourself on your elbows and

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toes and raise your body up into a neutral plank position. Be careful not to elevate your buttocks too high! Hold this position for as long as you can maintain good form. Again, focus on pulling the navel into the spine and remember to breathe. Repeat for 3 attempts.

Toe Touches: Lying on the ground with legs

elevated to 90 degrees, extend your arms towards your toes. Brace and squeeze your abs to lift your shoulders off the ground and get your fingers as close to your toes as possible. Keep the neck neutral and breathe every repetition. Perform 3 sets of 12 repetitions.

Ankle Touches:

Position yourself as pictured, brace the core and tilt the pelvis back to flatten the lumbar curve. Squeeze your abs and lift your shoulders off the floor with arms extended towards your feet. Keep shoulders elevated and reach down from side to side to touch each ankle alternatively. Again, keep neck neutral and breathe with every repetition. Perform 3 sets of 20 repetitions.

Bird Dog: Begin on all fours with a neutral

neck and spine. Engage the core and extend the opposite arm and leg to equal height as above. Do this slowly and with control then return to the start position and swap over. If this is too difficult at first, just practice using arms or legs only. Try to remain mostly aware of your abdominal muscles and keep that squeeze throughout the whole movement. Remember to breathe. Perform 3 sets of 10 repetitions.


Age: 16 Discipline: Pony Club, Jumping, Campdrafting

Congratulations Neve! you’ve won a

$50 gift voucher from

Horse/s: Tommy Girl (Anglo Arabian), George (ASH) Past achievements: Champion Senior E grade showjumping (2015), Reserve Champion Senior D grade showjumping (2016), 5th at the ODE Championships at D grade with dressage score of 67.5% (2016) Future goals: Being able to compete in a 1.05m course at show and finish it, and achieve a dressage score of 75% Best advice: Patience and persistence are the keys to achieve anything with horses.

If you are a young competition rider and would like to be considered for HubVibes Young Rider of the Month email us your answers to the same questions we asked Neve, along with a great pic of you and your horse. We can’t wait to hear from you!

Come and have a chat about how we can help you find a home for your pre-loved saddle, or check out the saddles we currently have available. We can also answer all your questions about our HUB SERVICES DIRECTORY and HUBVIBES E-zine. OCTOBER - NOVEMBER TRADE STALLS

Queensland Dressage Championships, QSEC .... Aug 26th to 28th The Showcase of Showjumping ................... October (dates TBA) Equitana .............................................................. 17-20 November

See you there!

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

Where to Find Us

YOUNG RIDER OF THE MONTH August

Name: Neve Kelly

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SPORT PHOTOGRAPHY SPECIALISTS STATE OF THE ART MOBILE OFFICE ON-SITE PRINTING

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

OZ SHOTZ CAN ATTEND YOUR EVENT

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www.ozshotz.com.au E-mail: earle@ozshotz.com.au Telephone: (07) 5497 0466 Mobile: 0411 810 647 PO BOX 193, MORAYFIELD QLD 4506


LIMITED PLACES AVAILABLE!

H U BV I B ES M AG A Z I N E

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NEWS & VIEWS FROM THE SADDLE HUB Published by The Saddle Hub • PO Box 13 • Tintenbar NSW 2478 Phone: 0414 760067 • Email: info@thesaddlehub.com.au www.thesaddlehub.com.au

HubVibes August 2016  
HubVibes August 2016  

The Saddle Hub's August edition of HubVibes e-zine.