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TABLE OF CONTENTS Table of Contents Administration Ministry Department Chairpersons and Coordinators Guidance Department Letter of Introduction Graduation Requirements Required and Elective Courses Freshman Year Sophomore Year Junior Year Senior Year Policy Regarding Change of Courses Tracking System Academic Honors Rank in Class Quality Point Table Course Descriptions Theology Department English Department Social Studies Department Mathematics Department Science Department World Language Department Business/Technology Ed Department Family and Consumer Science Department Fine Arts Department Health/Physical Education Department Basic Skills Program Diocesan Scholar Program Videoconferencing Courses Driver Education Program Post Secondary Education Four Year Colleges Two Year Colleges Schools of Nursing Schools of Radiologic Technology Schools for Dental Hygiene

2 3 3 3 3 4 5 5 5 6 6 7 7 8 8 9 10 12 14 19 22 27 29 31 32 35 36 37 37 37 38 39 48 49 50 50


ADMINISTRATION President……………………………………………………..……Sister Mary E. Smith, IHM Principal……………………………………….…………………..…………Ms. Regina Craig Ass’t Principal Academic Affairs….…………………….….………..Ms. Stephanie Erdman Ass’t Principal Student Services……………………….…..……Ms. Karen Scott Benjamin Ass’t Principal Student Affairs………………………….……..…………..Mr. Joseph Anhalt

MINISTRY School Minister……………………………………………….…….....Rev. Thomas Sodano Assistant School Minister……………………………………………..…Ms. Teena Weisler

DEPARTMENT CHAIRPERSONS and COORDINATORS Business/Technology……..……………………………………………….Ms. Mary Slobogin English…………………………………………………..…..………………..Ms. Terese Lewis Family and Consumer Science.……………………………………………..Ms. Mary Green Fine Arts…………………………...……………………..……………......Ms. Regina Broden Health/Physical Education………………………….……………………Ms. Marybeth Scary Mathematics…………………..…………………………………………..……...Ms. Mary Reil Theology..………………………………………………………………Ms. Kathleen DiDonato Science…………………………………………………………….…………..Ms. Patti Kubach Social Studies………………………………………………….…………..Ms. Carol Snowden World Language..………………………………………….…………...Ms. Marianne Burpulis

GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT Director…….…………………………………………………………...…..Ms. Sally Carpenter Counselor….………………..……………………...…...…………Sister Isabel Garrett, OSF Counselor………………………..……………………………….….…Sister Mary Flynn, IHM Shalom………………………………..……………………….…………….Ms. Anne Beguery AIM………………………………………..………………………………..…Ms. Kristin Bogart CORA………………………………………..…………………………………...Ms. Trisha Teti School Nurse………………………………….…………..……………………Ms. Lynn Kurek


Dear Student,

St. Hubert High School exists so that students may develop their God given gifts of body, mind and spirit. This is accomplished through an educational experience, which includes academic and spiritual programs, as well as a variety of sports and extracurricular activities. The academic program is designed to challenge students to achieve their full potential. Before considering individual courses, you should honestly appraise your ability and your interests. A discussion with parents/guardians, teachers, counselors and department chairpersons should help you reach decisions that best serve your needs. In February you will be choosing courses for next year. This will be accomplished online, and procedures will be explained to you in assemblies. If you are seeking exceptions for courses for which you may not be qualified, you must obtain a course exception form and follow all directions for submission, including deadlines. We encourage you to choose wisely and to utilize the resources that are provided for you at St. Hubert. We wish you the best in your selections and future studies. Sincerely,

The Administration of St. Hubert High School


GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS The minimum requirements for a diploma from St. Hubert High School are 26 credits earned in grades 9 – 12 as follows: Theology English Social Studies Mathematics Science Health Physical Education Related Arts Technology Electives

4.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 7.0

credits credits credits credits credits credits credits credits credits credits

All students are required to take a minimum of six major courses each year. Any exception to the above must be obtained from the Assistant Principal for Academic Affairs.

REQUIRED AND ELECTIVE COURSES Freshman Year REQUIRED: Theology 1; English 1; World History 1; Algebra 1; Physical Science; Related Arts; Technology Communications 1; one elective ELECTIVES: French 1; Spanish 1; Italian 1; Instrumental Music; Art 1; Basic Skills Freshmen whose 8th grade marks and standardized test scores indicate good verbal ability may, upon the approval of the World Language Chairperson, begin one of the language programs. Students who elect a language are expected to complete a minimum of two years of study in that language. Students taking Music or Art fulfill the Related Arts requirement. Freshmen who participated in an Honors Math program in elementary school and have demonstrated proficiency in Algebra may be rostered for Geometry. Freshmen who qualify for honors courses may be rostered for Biology. Sophomore Year REQUIRED: Theology 2; English 2; World History 2; Geometry; Biology; Health/Physical Education; one elective ELECTIVES: French 1, 2; Spanish 1, 2; Italian 1, 2; Art 1,2; AP European History; Algebra 2; Chemistry; Instrumental Music Upon approval of the World Language Chairperson, sophomores who did not have a language in their freshman year may begin study in one of the languages. AP European History fulfills the World History 2 requirement.


Sophomores who successfully completed Geometry in 9 th grade will be rostered for Algebra 2. Those who successfully completed Biology in 9 th grade will be rostered for Chemistry. Honors students who successfully completed Algebra 1 may be offered the opportunity to take both Geometry and Algebra 2 in 10th grade. Sophomores in Art or Music, or taking 2 Math courses, may need to delay their Health/ Physical Education requirement. Junior Year REQUIRED: Theology 3; English 3; American History; Algebra 2; Science 3; one or two electives ELECTIVES: Social Studies: AP United States History Mathematics: Trig/Pre-Calculus Science: Chemistry; Environmental Science World Language: French 1, 2, 3; Spanish 1, 2, 3; Italian 1, 2, 3 Business: Accounting 1; Business Law/Personal Finance Technology: Tech Communications 2 Family and Consumer Science: Clothing & Textiles Fine Arts: Instrumental Music; Art 1, 2, 3,4; AP Art History Health/Physical Education must be taken in junior year if this requirement was not fulfilled previously. Exceptions for Art and Music students may be made with the approval of the Assistant Principal for Academic Affairs. AP US History fulfills the third year Social Studies requirement. Senior Year REQUIRED: Theology 4; English 4; four electives ELECTIVES: English: AP English 4; (AP English 4 fulfills the English 4 requirement.) Social Studies: AP Psychology; Psychology; AP American Government; American History on Screen; Current Issues Mathematics: AP Calculus; Trig/Pre-Calculus; Trig/Analytic Geometry; Statistics; Living with Numbers Science: Chemistry; Environmental Science; AP Physics; Physics; AP Biology; Anatomy/Physiology, Science Seminar Language: French 2, 3, 4; Spanish 2, 3, 4; Italian 2 Business: Accounting 1, 2; Business Law/Personal Finance Technology: E-Business; Tech Communications 2; Advanced Technological Communications Family and Consumer Science: Clothing & Textiles; Child Development; Nutrition

Fine Arts: Instrumental Music; Art 2, 3, 4; AP Art; AP Art History Any required course not yet taken, must be taken in senior year. Seniors may not take both Psychology and Child Development.


Students need approval of the Assistant Principal for Academic Affairs to register for more than 2 AP courses in one year. Students taking AP Courses must take the AP test. There is an AP fee of approximately $90.00 per test.

POLICY REGARDING CHANGE OF COURSES Selection of courses should be done only after serious, careful and thoughtful consideration. Therefore, once you choose your courses and they are approved, you will be expected to abide by your decision and not request a change. The following are not valid reasons for requesting a change and will not be considered: dissatisfaction with a course or teacher academic difficulties in a course displeasure with your schedule conflict with employment – Your first priority should be your education and work schedules must be arranged to accommodate your school schedule. Due to complexities of rostering students, it is imperative that parents and students realize that schedules cannot be arranged to accommodate after school commitments. The only valid reasons for requesting a change would be if you were assigned a course you did not request or for which you were not qualified. If for any other reason a change or drop is requested, the Academic Affairs Office reviews the request and makes the final decision. If approved, there will be a $25.00 fee for the work involved in making the change.

TRACKING SYSTEM Most courses are offered on two or more levels or tracks. Since the range of ability among students is extensive, it is felt that tracking narrows the range to where maximum student achievement is possible. There are four different tracks on which a course may be offered: AP - College level courses that follow syllabi of The Advanced Placement Program of the College Board Honors - College preparatory courses for the exceptionally gifted and industrious student Track 2 - College preparatory courses for students of above average ability Track 3 - College preparatory or general classes for students of average ability


ACADEMIC HONORS Honors are awarded to recognize achievement in major subjects regardless of the student’s course load or tracks. First honors are awarded to students with a grade average of 93.00 or above, provided there is no mark under 90 in major courses. Second honors are awarded to those who do not qualify for first honors, but who have a grade average of 88.00 or above and no mark below 85 in major courses. The grade average is computed by dividing the sum of the weighted grades of the courses by the number of credits for the courses. Grades are weighted according to the credit value of each course. Honors are based on quarter grades.

RANK IN CLASS Rank in class, both current and cumulative, is determined by the adjusted quality point average. Quality points are earned for grades received in a particular track. The quality point average is computed by dividing the total number of quality points earned in tracked courses by the number of tracked courses studied. Quality points are weighted according to the credit value of each course, and a mathematical adjustment is made to compensate for carrying more than five major courses.


QUALITY POINT TABLE

Grade 100 99 98 97 96 95 94 93 92 91 90 89 88 87 86 85 84 83 82 81 80 79 78 77 76 75 74 73 72 71 70 69 68 67 66 65 64 63 62 61 60

Track AP 54 53 52 51 50 49 48 47 46 45 44 43 42 41 40 39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14

Track Honors 48 47 46 45 44 43 42 41 40 39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8

Track 2 44 43 42 41 40 39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4

Track 3 40 39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

Track 4 36 35 34 33 32 31 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 0


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS The courses listed in this booklet are planned for the 2011 - 2012 school year. The School Administration reserves the right to cancel a course or merge two track offerings if an insufficient number of students register for a course or if other conditions warrant such a move.

CODES ppc – periods per cycle CR – Credit TR – Track

GR – Grade Sem – Semester AP – Advanced Placement

THEOLOGY DEPARTMENT Religious education endeavors to carry on the mission entrusted to the Church by Jesus within the dimensions of Message-Community-Service. Theology teachers proclaim the Gospel of the Risen Lord, which alone gives meaning to life, in order to arouse in the students a faith which is living and active. The goal of the Theology Program at St. Hubert High School is to present the basic teaching of the Catholic Christian message and to lead the students to value what the Department has established as its objectives: - to attain an openness to the actions of the Holy Spirit - to encourage a personal commitment to Jesus Christ and to the values He expresses - to develop an appreciation for Sacred Scripture and the tradition of God’s people - to promote an active and genuine participation in the Liturgy of the Church, and a habit of personal prayer - to arouse a desire to answer the Church’s call to service - to create a sense of loyalty and affection for the Church - to inspire a spirit of involvement in the issues of peace and justice in the world. Many of the courses described below include journal writing as part of the course work. Specific requirements for maintaining a journal may vary from teacher to teacher, however, as a rule, journals are spot-checked by the teacher and not usually read wordfor-word.


011 Theology I 012 013

Honors TR 2 TR 3

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 9

THE REVELATION OF JESUS CHRIST IN SCRIPTURE This course helps students understand the Sacred Scriptures. The Bible is the word of God where they encounter the living Word of God, Jesus Christ. Students learn about the Bible, its development and content, and how God is its author. Students focus on the Gospels, where they grow to know and love Jesus more personally.

WHO IS JESUS CHRIST This course helps students understand the person and message of Jesus Christ. He is the living Word of God, the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity. He is the ultimate Revelation about God, from God. Students penetrate the mystery of the person of Jesus and who he calls them to be. 021 Theology II 022

Honors TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 10

THE MISSION OF JESUS CHRIST (THE PASCHAL MYSTERY) This course helps students understand all that God has done for humanity through his Son, Jesus Christ. God has planned, from all eternity, for human beings to share everlasting happiness with him. This is accomplished only through redemption in Christ. Students inquire about the meaning of being a disciple of Christ. JESUS CHRIST’S MISSION CONTINUES IN THE CHURCH This course helps students understand that they encounter the living Jesus Christ in and through the Church. The Church was founded by Christ through the Apostles. It is sustained by him through the Holy Spirit. The Church is the living Body of Christ. Students explore the Church as a mystery which has both human and divine elements 031 Theology III 032

Honors TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 11

SACRAMENTS AS PRIVILEGED ENCOUNTERS WITH JESUS CHRIST This course helps students understand that they can meet Christ today in and through the sacraments. Each sacrament, particularly the Eucharist, is a means to a full and real encounter with Christ. Students examine each sacrament in detail so as to learn how they may encounter Christ throughout life. LIFE IN JESUS CHRIST This course helps students understand the moral life. Only in Christ can human beings discover the fullness of life. Disciples of Christ are guided by moral concepts and precepts of Christ and his Church. Students probe these moral teachings and reflect upon their implications.


041 Church and Vocation Honors 1.00 CR 6ppc GR 12 042 TR 2 This course will look at the history of the Church through a thematic approach and will include some ecclesiology. After looking at the Church, the course will explore how we live in the Church (vocation).

ELA DEPARTMENT Many of the courses described below include journal writing as part of the course work. Specific requirements for maintaining a journal may vary from teacher to teacher. However, as a rule, journals are spot-checked by the teacher and not usually read word-for-word.

111 112 113

English Language Arts I: Critical Reading, Writing, and Speaking supported through Genre Studies

Honors TR 2 TR 3

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 9

English Language Arts I is a required course for all ninth grade students. Based on the Common Core Standards, this course provides students with the skills and knowledge to become critical readers and writers by analyzing key ideas and details, craft and structure, and the integration of knowledge and ideas in literature and informational text. Students will develop their writing skills by examining text types and purposes and by writing arguments, explanatory/informational texts, and narratives. Using the full writing process, students will learn how to produce and distribute quality writing using technology’s capacity to produce, publish, and share writing products. Students will conduct short research projects and will participate in a range of collaborative discussions integrating multiple sources of information. This course will advance students’ knowledge of the conventions of Standard English and will strengthen vocabulary acquisition and use. This course is supported through various literary Genre studies. This course introduces the student to a consideration of the nature of literature with examples drawn from a variety of literary genres: myth, short story, essay, poetry, drama and novel. Review of grammar is related to the students’ development of competence in oral and written expression. Integrated language study includes the structure and development of the English language with emphasis on increased skills in composition and vocabulary. 121 122 123

English Language Arts II: Critical Reading, Writing, and Speaking supported through World and British Studies

Honors TR 2 TR 3

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 10


English Language Arts II is a required course for all tenth grade students. Based on the Common Core Standards, this course provides students with the skills and knowledge to become advanced critical readers and writers by analyzing multiple themes, interpretations, and details, craft and structure, and the integration of knowledge and ideas in literature and informational text. Reinforcing and expanding the writing objectives of the freshman year, this course will develop the student’s writing skills by examining text types and purposes and by writing arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts. Students will write explanatory/informational texts to examine and convey complex ideas, and will write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events. Students will learn how to produce and distribute quality writing using technology’s capacity to produce, publish, and share writing products. Students will conduct sustained research projects and will participate in a range of collaborative discussions and presentations integrating multiple sources of information. This course will further advance students’ knowledge of the conventions of Standard English and will strengthen vocabulary acquisition and use. This course is supported through various selections in World and British studies. 130,131 English Language Arts III: 132 Critical Reading, Writing, and 133 Speaking supported through American Studies

Honors TR 2 TR 3

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 11

English Language Arts III is a required course for all eleventh grade students. Based on the Common Core Standards, this course provides students with the skills and knowledge to become critical readers and writers by analyzing key ideas and details, craft and structure, and the integration of knowledge and ideas in literature and informational text. This course will develop the student’s writing skills by examining text types and purposes and by writing arguments, explanatory/informational texts, and narratives. Students will learn how to produce and distribute quality writing using technology’s capacity to produce, publish, and share writing products. Students will conduct short research projects and will participate in a range of collaborative discussions integrating multiple sources of information. This course will advance students’ knowledge of the conventions of Standard English and will strengthen vocabulary acquisition and use. This course is supported through various selections in American studies. 140 AP English 4 AP 1.00 CR 6ppc GR 12 This Advanced Placement course in English is a continuation of Honors Advanced English 3. Further emphasis will be placed on textual analysis and the development of critical thinking and writing skills in a seminar setting. It is designed for students who have achieved the competence in reading and writing that will enable them to read and analyze works of literature on the college level. “The teacher serves as a discussion leader, critic, and scholar helping members of the class assume much of the


responsibility of their own learning.� (Excerpt from AP Course description) The threehour Advanced Placement Examination given in the spring tests students ability to think critically and write analytically. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of 130 English 3 N.B. All enrolled in this course must take the AP examination. 141 142 143

World Literature/ Composition

Honors TR 2 TR 3

1.00

6ppc

GR 12

English for grade 12 includes the integrated study of language, grammar, literature and composition. Intense composition offers the student the opportunity to employ critical thinking and writing skills by offering practice in writing letters, paragraphs, short creative works and essays using the writing process. The literature presents works from around the world. Some originate in a language other than English. The survey represents writers from ancient times to the present.

150 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 2 0.5 CR

6ppc

GR 9

This is a one semester course, designed for students who wish to enhance their creative writing skills in the areas of prose and poetry. Students will be required to compose an original short story, expository and descriptive paragraphs, various forms of poetry as well as a digital narrative. Revision and peer editing will be included as part of the writing process.


SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT In order to graduate, all students must take two years of World History and one year of American History. World History 2 is required of all sophomores. American history is required of all juniors. Students who have completed their three-year course requirement may choose a Social Studies elective in senior year, provided they meet course requirements. Seniors may not take more than 2 Social Studies electives.

211 212 213

World History 1

Honors TR 2 TR 3

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 9

Students study the development of world civilization from the prehistoric world, through the river valley civilizations of the Middle East, Africa, China, and India to the development of nation-states in the seventeenth century.

220

AP European History

AP

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 10

The goals for students of the AP European History course are: - to gain knowledge of basic chronology and of major events and trends from approximately 1450 to the present, - to develop an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history, - to analyze historical evidence, - to express historical understanding in writing. Pre-registration is required. Pre-requisites: Grade average of 86 or above in Honors Social Studies Recommendation of Social Studies teacher Approval of Department Chairperson N.B. All enrolled in this course are required to take the AP examination. 221 222 223

World History 2

Honors TR 2 TR 3

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 10

World History 2 continues the study of the development of world civilizations begun in World History 1. Students study the creation of the nation-states, the revolutions of the nineteenth century, and the emergence of the modern world.


230

AP U.S. History

AP

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 11

This course is a comprehensive survey of American History. In class students are expected to be prepared for all lectures by doing assigned readings in the text and in contemporary sources. Semester assignments include book reviews, oral reports, and term papers. Enrollment will be limited and final selection made by the appropriate faculty members. College credit is granted upon successful performance in the Advanced Placement Examination held in May under the direction of the College Board. Pre-registration is required. Pre-requisites: Grade average of 86 or above in Honors Social Studies Recommendation of Social Studies Teacher Approval of Department Chairperson N.B. All enrolled in this course are required to take the AP examination.

231 Modern American History Honors 1.00 CR 6ppc GR 11 232 TR 2 233 TR 3 The History of the United States is a story of constitutional, economic and political growth. This course emphasizes these growth areas: constitutional development and its role in modern America; economic development across the nation and beyond the seas; and the spread of American power, continental and international. 240

AP American Government

AP

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

This course follows the recommended curriculum of the Advanced Placement Program and proposes to give interested and highly motivated students the opportunity to experience college level work while still in high school. To encourage this experience, entry into the course will be limited. The course will follow the historical/constitutional development of American government. Topics such as the three branches of government, the origins of political traditions, bureaucracy, and the two-party system are among the major themes developed and discussed. Pre-registration is required. Pre-requisites: Grade average of 86 or above in Honors Social Studies Recommendation of Social Studies teacher Approval of Department Chairperson N.B. All enrolled in this course are required to take the AP examination. 241 242

Current Events/ Issues in America

Honors TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

Designed to familiarize to familiarize the student with a genuine understanding of a broad spectrum of contemporary political, social, and economic issues hoping to motivate the young citizen to be well-informed, alert, constructively critical, healthfully skeptical, and able to discover the cause-effect interrelationships and view current and


future events and problems in their appropriate historical frame of reference. The above areas of concentration will be through the use of contemporary magazine, newspapers, and other multi-media materials.

251 The American Experience TR

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

This course will emphasize the history and culture of those who came to the U.S. for a new life and those who were forced here because of slavery. The students will discover the “salad bowl� that is America, the ethnic diversity of the American people, the contributions made to American life and the prejudice and discrimination these groups have experienced. Topics to be covered: Slavery, European Immigration, Hispanic and Asian Minorities, Prejudice, Discrimination, and Immigrant Legislation, Individual and cultural contributions, Areas of Settlements, Civil Liberties. This course would enable the students to work collaboratively and individually to research the role these groups have placed in American life. 260

AP Psychology

AP

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

The purpose of the AP course in Psychology is to introduce students to the scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major sub-fields within psychology, and the methods psychologists use in the science and practice. The aim of the course is to provide the student with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in most college introductory psychology courses. College credit is granted upon successful performance in the Advanced Placement Examination held in May under the direction of the College Board. Preregistration is required. Pre-requisites: General average of 88 or above in Honors or AP Social Studies, Recommendation of Social Studies teacher Approval of Department Chairperson N.B. All enrolled in this course are required to take the AP examination.


261 262 263

Psychology

Honors 1.00 CR TR 2 TR 3

6ppc

GR 12

One of the objectives of psychology is to assist students to develop a basic philosophy of life considering needs, values, and goals of the individual. Topics covered include the science of psychology, principles of learning, understanding human behavior, patterns of behavior, mental health, the family, and the individual and society. Preregistration is required. Pre-requisites: Honors Social Studies – Grade average of 86 or above Recommendation of Social Studies teacher Track 2 Social Studies – Grade average of 82 or above Recommendation of Social Studies teacher Track 3 Social Studies – Grade average of 75 or above Recommendation of Social Studies teacher Approval of Department Chairperson

272 273

American History on the Screen

TR 2 TR 3

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

Students study films dealing with the History of the United States. The purpose of the course is to allow the students to view the film as a lesson in critical analysis and historical interpretation. Students will analyze films in the same manner as they analyze and study historical documents. The students will analyze films and compare and discuss the films as they relate to American History today and when they were originally filmed. Students will present their findings in a well-documented research paper. Preregistration is required. Pre-requisite: Recommendation of Social Studies teacher Approval of Department Chairperson


MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT Track 1a

Grade 9 Alg 1

Grade 10 Geom

Grade 11 Alg 2

Grade 12 Trig/Pre-Calc

1b

Geom

Alg. 2

Trig./Pre-Calc

AP Calc

1c

Alg 1

Geom Alg 2

Trig/Pre-Calc

AP Calc

2

Alg 1

Geom

Alg 2

Trig/Pre-Calc Statistics

3

Alg 1

Geom

Alg 2

Trig/An.Geom Living w/ Numbers

All students are required to have a Graphing Calculator. In order for students to take AP Calculus, there are a few options for freshmen. If her elementary school has Honors Math and the student passed the Diocesan Algebra exam, then she may take Honors Geometry as a freshman and take AP Calculus in senior year. If her elementary school does not have Honors Math or the student did not pass the Diocesan Algebra exam, then she may double up on Math in sophomore year. Students who take two math courses in sophomore year are expected to take AP Calculus as a senior. 311 312 313

Algebra 1

Honors TR 2 TR 3

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 9

Based on the Common Core Standards, students enrolled in Algebra I will examine structure in equations, and will create equations that describe numbers or relationships. Students will reason with equations and inequalities abstractly and quantitatively, will solve systems of equations and will represent and solve equations and inequalities graphically. Students will construct viable arguments for their reasoning and critique the reasoning of others.


321 322 323

Geometry

Honors TR 2 TR 3

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 10

Based on the Common Core Standards, students enrolled in Geometry will experiment with transformations in the plane, will prove geometric theorems and will make geometric constructions. Students will understand similarity, right triangles and trigonometric ratios. Students will understand and apply theorems about circles, will express geometric properties with equations, and will use geometric measurement and dimension to solve problems. Students will reason abstractly and quantitatively and will construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

331 332 333

Algebra 2

Honors TR 2 TR 3

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 10, 11

Based on the Common Core Standards, students enrolled in Algebra II will interpret and build functions, will perform arithmetic with polynomials and rational functions, will analyze functions using various representations and will construct and compare linear and exponential models and solve problems. Students will reason abstractly and quantitatively, will construct viable arguments and critique reasoning of others and will use appropriate tools of mathematics strategically. Pre-requisites: A complete course in Algebra 1 and Geometry TR 1 Minimum of 82 in Algebra 1, Track 1 or 93 in Algebra 1, Track 2 Graphing calculator is required. TR 2 Minimum of 78 in Algebra 1, Track 2 or 93 in Algebra 1, Track 3 TR 3 Minimum of 70 in Algebra 1, Track 3

340

AP Calculus

AP

1.00 CR

9ppc

GR 12

This is an introductory college-level course in differential and integral calculus with elementary functions. It is intended for students who have a thorough knowledge of algebra, geometry, trigonometry and analytical geometry. It is expected that students will seek college credit or placement. Pre-requisite: Minimum of 82 in 337/341 Trig/Pre-Calculus N.B. All enrolled in the course are required to take the AP Examination.


341

Trigonometry/ Pre-Calculus

Honors

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 11,12

This is a pre-calculus course designed for college-bound students interested in a college math or science program. It enables the student to begin college math without an introductory course and provide her with a firm foundation in the basic concepts of calculus. Graphing calculator is required. Pre-requisites: Minimum of 82 in Honors Algebra 2, or 93 in Algebra 2, Track 2 342

Trigonometry/ Pre-Calculus

TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

This is a pre-calculus course, which enables the college-bound student to have a foundation in the basic concepts necessary for college math. Graphing calculator is required. Pre-requisites: Minimum of 75 in Honors Algebra 2, or 82 in Algebra 2, Track 2, or 93 in Algebra 2, Track 3 343

Trigonometry/ Analytic Geometry

TR 3

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

Two thirds of this course are devoted to Trigonometry and one third to Analytic Geometry. The course is ideally suited for the student who is interested in continuing her study of math. Graphing calculator is required. Pre-requisite: Minimum of 75 in Algebra 2, Track 3

344

Living With Numbers

TR 3

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

This course is for the non-college bound student. It includes some probability and statistics, some consumer math and some algebra not covered in Algebra 2. Pre-requisite: Registration by Department Chairperson Pre-registration required. 345

Statistics

TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

This course is designed for the 12th grade student who has completed Algebra 2 and wishes to continue her enrichment in mathematics. It covers topics involving games of chance, random sampling, distributions, data analysis and decision-making. This course would be useful to students taking business and many other majors in college. Graphing calculator is required. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Algebra 2, Track 1 or Track 2 or 93 in Algebra 2, Track 3 Recommendation of Department Chairperson Pre-registration required.


SCIENCE DEPARTMENT Track

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

1a

Phy Sci

Honors Biology

Honors Chemistry

1b

Honors Biology

Honors Chemistry

AP/Honors Physics

AP Biology

2

Phy Sci

Biology

Chemistry

Physics Anat/Phys

3

Phy Sci

Biology

Chemistry Environmental Science

Anat/Phys. Chemistry Environmental Science

AP Biology/ AP Physics

All students are required to take three years of Science and are encouraged to take four years. The third year will be either Chemistry or Environmental Science. 411

Physical Science

Honors

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 9

Students are introduced to chemistry and physics in a twofold manner. Basic laboratory skills are emphasized by scientific experiments. At the same time, physical science concepts are introduced and explained. This course provides an excellent foundation for future science courses. 412 413

Physical Science

TR 2 TR 3

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 9

This course presents basic knowledge in physical science. Emphasis is placed on chemical and physical concepts. Units in the course include metric measurements, classification of matter, chemical concepts, and energy in its various forms. Lab investigations, experiments, and problem solving are included in the course. 410 421

Biology

Honors

1.00 CR

7ppc

GR 9,10

This course places great emphasis on student inquiry and problem solving. Work in the laboratory is an integral part of all topics covered. The course follows the development and interdependence of all living things from the earliest cell-like structures to the biosphere as a whole. Special consideration is given to biochemical relationships, as well as ecology, genetics and evolution. The course is designed for high ability students.


422 423

Biology

TR 2 TR 3

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 10

This is a general biology course. The sub-topics listed above are all covered in this course. Films and models are used to strengthen concepts. Laboratory investigations are a vital part of the course. Current topics are included. In order to better understand and appreciate nature’s cycles, ecology is introduced. 450

AP Biology

AP

1.00 CR

8ppc

GR 12

An advanced placement course designed to offer an extensive study of the concepts of modern biology. Major themes include energy transfer, regulation, evolution, continuity and change and the relationship of structure to function. It follows the curriculum set by the College Board AP Biology Program. The class includes two double lab periods each cycle. Pre-requisites: Successful completion of Honors Biology and Honors Chemistry Teacher recommendation N.B. All enrolled in the course are required to take the AP Examination. 452

Anatomy & Physiology

TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

This course is directed toward the student who is college bound and interested in further pursuing her knowledge of biology. Topics studied include cell biology, human anatomy, physiology and biochemistry. Concepts will be emphasized through both classroom discussion and laboratory investigations. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Chemistry Teacher recommendation 453

Anatomy & Physiology

TR 3

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

This course is designed for students who are interested in a fourth year of science. The anatomy and physiology of vertebrates are compared with an emphasis on the human systems. Invertebrate phyla are included when applicable. Laboratory investigations are included to reinforce and emphasize class material. Pre-requisites: Successful completion of Environmental Science OR Chemistry Teacher recommendation


CHEMISTRY – General Introduction The study of chemistry provides the student with an understanding of the nature and behavior of matter as well as the role that energy plays in the transformation of matter. The student tours the world of the atom and its spectacular phenomena, and learns the reasons behind the simplest changes in matter that affect the world and us. 420 431

Chemistry

Honors

1.00 CR

7ppc

GR 10,11

This course is directed toward the college-bound, science-oriented student, as well as those who are highly motivated and intend to pursue a health-related career. It provides a thorough study of matter and all its properties. Problem solving skills, critical thinking and analysis of information are stressed. Both qualitative and quantitative applications of laboratory work are emphasized with a double lab period scheduled each 6-day cycle. A firm grasp of the fundamentals of mathematics is required. Pre-requisites: Physical Science and Honors Biology, Algebra 2 completed or taken concurrently Approval of science teacher 432

Chemistry

TR 2

1.00 CR

7ppc

GR 11

This general chemistry course is directed toward college-bound, liberal arts students, as well as those intending to pursue health careers. It provides a basic background in the traditional concepts of chemistry while developing critical thinking skills. Inquiry based labs are performed to strengthen topics covered. A good understanding of basic mathematics and algebra is needed in this course. Application to daily life experience is incorporated into the lectures. Pre-requisites: Physical Science, Biology, Algebra 2 completed or taken concurrently Approval of science teacher 433

Chemistry

TR 3

1.00 CR

7ppc

GR 11, 12

This level of chemistry is designed to develop the understanding of basic chemical principles. The content of the course is selective in order to develop scientific literacy and critical thinking skills. Emphasis is placed on the role of chemical concepts in daily life. Math and problem solving skills are strengthened, and all math tools used in the course are taught. This course fulfills both the colleges’ and the state’s science requirement.


435

Environmental Science

TR 3

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 11, 12

The Environmental Concerns course is directed towards non-science-oriented students who will, nevertheless, be citizens of an increasingly technological society. The course covers on-going environmental issues such as air pollution, global warming, water pollution and endangered species, as well as those topics that are critical at the time the course is being studied.

PHYSICS – General Introduction Physics is the study of energy transformation and interactions with matter. Topics studied include mechanics, heat, light, sound, electricity, magnetism, radiation, atomic, and nuclear phenomena. Since it is a basic science, physics is highly recommended for anyone who wishes to pursue further studies in any of the sciences as well as for those who wish to be scientifically literate. All physics courses are college preparatory. They differ in the level of mathematics (and, therefore, math pre-requisites), the depth of topic coverage and the number of laboratory sessions. 440

AP Physics

AP

1.00 CR

9ppc

GR 12

Algebra and Trigonometry based. Pre-requisites: Honors Chemistry AP Calculus or Trig/Pre-Calculus taken concurrently Teacher recommendation Requirements: Three double periods per cycle Must take AP Physics examination at the end of the year 441

Physics

Honors

1.00 CR

7ppc

GR 12

Pre-requisites: Honors Chemistry AP Calculus or Trigonometry/Pre Calculus taken concurrently Teacher recommendation 442

Physics

TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

Pre-requisites: Chemistry Trigonometry/Pre Calculus taken concurrently Teacher recommendation

GR 12


462

Science Seminar

This seminar will be composed of two one semester courses. You must take both courses. 465 Forensics TR 2 .05 CR 6ppc GR 12 This course provides an introduction to modern methods used in detection, investigation, and crime lab functions. Upon completion, students will have a broader understanding of criminology, laboratory procedures and its function in modern day society. Prerequisites: Biology, Algebra 2 Teacher Recommendation 466 Genetics TR 2 .05 CR 6ppc GR 12 This course provides an introduction to classical and modern genetics. Upon completion, students will have a broader understanding of Mendelian genetics, gene linkage, quantitative, population and evolutionary genetics and genetic diversity, disorders and diseases. Prerequisites: Biology, Algebra 2 Teacher Recommendation


WORLD LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT The World Language Department offers Spanish, French, Italian and Latin. In these times of international communication, commerce and diplomacy, the knowledge of a second language is an invaluable asset to any career and will enhance the student’s chances of success in every sphere. Minimum college requirements at most area colleges stipulate two years of one modern language. Many colleges request that students consider three or four years of one language rather than two years of two languages. Any freshman or sophomore who is not already taking a language is asked to preregister with the language department chairperson. Students who qualify for Latin will be invited to register for that course.

Language 1 The first year is a basic introductory course using proficiency-based texts. It aims to give the student the ability to begin to become proficient in the language through listening and dialogues between students and teachers and the knowledge of fundamental grammar. Stories, videos, computer software, DVDs and songs acquaint the student with the historical and cultural background of the people. Pre-requisite: Acceptance by department

Language 2 The proficiency-based approach is continued and fundamental concepts are built. Emphasis is placed on grammatical and reading skills, as well as speaking, with further development of vocabulary. Proficiency skills are enhanced through group projects and cooperative learning activities. Pre-requisite: Recommendation of teacher

Language 3 Level 3 of all languages develops basic language skills by providing expanded practice in the target language, by using important grammar structures in reading and writing. The curriculum is expanded to include the history and civilization of the language being taught. Pre-requisites: Recommendation of Language 2 teacher based on academic performance (both written and oral), genuine interest and available space

Language 4 The main thrust of this year is to improve communication skills. There is a further development of the knowledge of literature, history, art and music of the language. Students learn to apply skills mastered in levels 1 – 3 through cognitive learning and inferential processes. Pre-requisites: Recommendation of Language 3 teacher based on academic performance (both written and oral), genuine interest and available space


N.B. Please note that Spanish 1 and 2, Track 3 is a two-year-only program. Due to the slower pace of instruction and reduced amount of material covered through the use of a more basic textbook program, students in Spanish 2, Track 3, may only enroll in Spanish 3 with the recommendation of their Spanish 2 teacher and with a commitment to study additional vocabulary during the summer. Placement is also conditional on class size. 511 512 513

Spanish 1

Honors TR 2 TR 3

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 9, 10, 11

521 522 523

Spanish 2

Honors TR 2 TR 3

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 10, 11,12

525 526

Spanish 3

Honors TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 11, 12

527

Spanish 4

Honors

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

531 532

French 1

Honors TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 9, 10, 11

541 542

French 2

Honors TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 10, 11,12

545

French 3

Honors

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 11, 12

547

French 4

Honors

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

552

Italian 1

TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 9, 10, 11

562

Italian 2

TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 10,11, 12

565

Italian 3

TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 11, 12

571

Latin1

Honors

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 9, 10, 11

572

Latin 2

Honors

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 9, 10, 11


BUSINESS/TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION DEPARTMENT The Business/Technology Education Department offers skilled and academic courses that strive to meet students’ current and future interests and needs. Students are encouraged to elect these courses in the 11th and 12th grades, since every occupation requires an educational foundation in business and technology. Students become familiar with business concepts, terminology, technology, and trends. Guest speakers visit classes to advise students of educational and career opportunities. 611 612

Accounting I

Honors TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 11, 12

Accounting I is designed to develop a strong foundation in basic accounting theory and procedures. The accounting cycle is presented in a sole proprietorship/service business. Students will be able to prepare payroll and have a basic understanding of the accounting cycle so that they can obtain an entry level accounting position.

616

Accounting II

Honors TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

Accounting II is designed to expand the students’ basic knowledge in Accounting I. The accounting cycle is presented for merchandising businesses, partnerships, and corporations. Students will be able to read, understand, and make informed business decisions based upon common business Financial Statements. Students will be prepared to obtain an entry level accounting position. Pre-requisites: Accounting I

680

Technological Communications 1

TR 2

0.50 CR

6ppc

GR 9

This is a one semester course designed to prepare students to use technology in our present society. Students will review computer basics and acquire experience with application practice in document processing and formatting skills using Google Docs and Microsoft Office software. Students will be introduced to Web 2 as a tool for gathering, organizing, and documenting information. The Modern Language Association’s (MLA) method for formatting term papers will be taught. Depending upon availability of classes in different schools video conferencing can take place. 681 682

Technological Communications 2

Honors TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 11, 12

This course provides application practice for basic through intermediate features of Microsoft Office and Google Docs. Document processing and formatting skills are reinforced. Students learn to create letters, memos, tables, forms, outlines, reports,


research papers, spreadsheets, and presentations. The techniques learned and knowledge gained are helpful for educational, business and personal use. Depending upon availability of classes in different schools video conferencing can take place. This course prepares students to work in a more connected digital world and create a learning system of interactive sharing of information.

684

Advanced Technological Communications

TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

This course is designed to develop the skills learned in Technological Communications 2. Students will cover the following programs: Adobe Photoshop, Macromedia Flash, review of Google Docs, and advanced features of Microsoft Office. Students will learn Digital Citizenship which involves appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use. Students will go on to learn basic graphic design skills through Adobe Photoshop. Students will learn basic animation skills in Macromedia Flash. Depending upon availability of classes in different schools video conferencing can take place. This course prepares students to work in a more connected digital world and create a learning system of interactive sharing of information. 686

Entrepreneurship/ Honors Small Business Management

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

This course defines academic skills, management concepts and practices, legal issues, marketing concepts, human resources, global economy, internet, E-Business, ECommerce and the personal traits entrepreneurs need. Students also expand their knowledge of Microsoft Office, Presentation Skills, and the Internet. Students will convey their vision for a company in a Business Plan. Depending upon availability of classes in different schools video conferencing will take place. 692

Business Law/ Personal Finance

TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 11, 12

This course teaches characteristics of the American system of free enterprise, property rights, ethics, criminal, civil and contract law, and court procedures. Legal terminology, cases and mock trials are presented and discussed so students know their rights and obligations and can apply their knowledge in their academic work and personal experiences. Internet research is emphasized. Personal Finance is designed to help students make wise financial decisions as consumers, family members, citizens and employees. Included in the curriculum are topics such as investments, budgets, insurance, banking, income tax preparation and stock market analysis. Also introduced are issues concerning personal marketing, renting/buying real estate and pensions. Students are challenged through current financial topics in order to be adequately prepared to succeed financially.


FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES DEPARTMENT 722

Nutrition

TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

The purpose of the course is to provide a basic foundation in the science of nutrition, and to show how nutrition can be applied to dietary selection of foods with simultaneous consideration of economic, psychological, social and cultural factors. The course gives a great deal of information that is useful and necessary for those students who are thinking about future study in any health related field. Today’s society puts a great deal of emphasis on the awareness of good health and the role that we assume pertaining to the important issues on nutrition. Some nursing schools require a basic course in nutrition as part of their curriculum. 732

Clothing and Textiles 1

TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 11, 12

This course is designed to help the student to acquire the information and skills related to clothing problems. The student learns how to operate the sewing machine, to read a pattern, and to develop a good idea of fashion and design. An in-depth study of the fundamental elements of design and of the man-made and synthetic fibers is required to help the student purchase fabric and ready-made clothing. * Students will supply their own fabric and thread. 731

Clothing and Textiles 2

TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

This course is a continuation of Clothing 1. Students must have permission of the Department Chairperson to take this course. 742

Child Development

TR 2

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

The major aim of the Child Development course is to focus attention on the young child as a unique individual. The course follows an in-depth study of pre-natal development and birth, and then progresses to the intellectual, emotional, social and physical development of the child from infancy to age six. The student, through a better understanding of children, should come to a better understanding of herself. The course also serves as a preparation for parenthood.


FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT 800

Related Arts

This course is designed to develop an appreciation for, and an understanding of, the various art forms including drama, music, dance, film and art. The student becomes aware of these artistic disciplines through the study and experience of the elements of these disciplines. This course encourages students to attend performances offered by the students at St. Hubert. This course is also offered to those sophomores who did not take it in freshman year.

ART COURSES Art courses are offered to students who desire to develop their artistic skills. A wide variety of experiences are provided through the different levels. Drawing, color theory, design principles, paint, ceramics and computer graphics are the major areas of study. An understanding of the basics through progressive lessons prepares the student to meet new challenges on her own. A half-credit for Related Arts is preferred before entering the art courses; however, it is not mandatory. All art students are required to participate in the annual Art Exhibit in May. An art fee is charged for each art course to cover supplies. 810

Art 1

Honors

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 10, 11

Art 1 is open to any student seriously interested in studying Art. The course deals with the fundamentals of drawing, design, composition and perspective. Students use pencil, charcoal, pen and ink, watercolor and pastels, as well as computer graphics, to explore their creativity. The students are introduced to different periods and cultures in Art. Pre-requisite: Pre-registration with approval of the art teacher. 820

Art 2

Honors

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 11, 12

The second year art student is introduced to processes and techniques that include printmaking, ceramics, colored pencil, watercolor & acrylic painting, interior drawing/design, and graphic design. Artists who made their mark in history are studied and their styles are explored. Pre-requisites: Successful completion of Art I or equivalent, as determined by portfolio with approval of the art teacher


821

Art 3

Honors

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

In Art 3 the emphasis is placed on enrichment and on the development of an individual approach to art in a variety of media. Painting, color theory, graphic design/advertising, introduction to sculpture, independent projects and preparation of a portfolio comprise the special offerings. Students continue to develop a critical eye as they analyze master artists and various cultures. Pre-requisites: Successful completion of Art 2 or equivalent, as determined by portfolio with approval of the art teacher 822

Art 4 - Advanced Portfolio

Art 4 is a portfolio development course where students will continue to develop their individual drawing and painting styles. Students will be given more challenging visual problems to solve, while developing their own “voice”. Many assignments will be more thematic in nature, and will require strong problem-solving and advanced technical skills. Focus will be placed on developing a strong, comprehensive body of work that demonstrates the students ability level, and varied art experiences. Pre-requisites: Successful completion of Art 3 or equivalent, as determined by portfolio with approval of the art teacher 825

AP Studio Art – Drawing

AP

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 12

Students demonstrating advanced ability in ART 2 and ART 3, upon the approval of the Art Department, may elect to participate in the AP Studio Art - Drawing program for advanced, college-level study. This course will consist of challenging observational work, in depth study and usage of color, various drawing problems and painting techniques. The workload is double that of an Honors Art course. Students will be expected to work on several projects at one time. Students with strong drawing skills, a consistent work ethic, and an average of 95 or above are eligible. The AP test fee is additional to the art fee. Pre-requisites: Successful completion of Art 2 and Art 3 as determined by portfolio with approval of the art teacher. Juniors in Art 2 demonstrating advanced abilities may be invited into the AP program for Senior year. 828

AP Art History

AP

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 11,12

This course is designed for students who have an interest in the study of history, cultures, and the arts. The course offers an overview of history from an art perspective and emphasizes the connection between arts and cultures. European art history as well as Asian, Indian and African cultures are covered in the course with an emphasis on how the past has influenced the art we create today. It is not required that students be involved in Studio Art to take this course as no art production takes place. Pre-requisite: Honors level English or History in sophomore year. Students not in Honors must have approval by Department Chairperson.


MUSIC COURSES Music courses are offered to provide the study of music to a variety of students: those committed to the serious study of music, those who wish to pursue music as a subject of secondary interest, and those who through a greater knowledge would develop their aesthetic sensitivity and thus enjoy music more fully. A $120.00 music fee is charged for each instrumental course. 830 840

Instrumental Music 1,2

Honors

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 9,10

This course consists of instruction on an orchestral instrument, weekly lessons, guided practice periods, ensemble work, and the study of music theory. Piano and guitar lessons are not given. This course deals with the elements of music and their use in reading, writing, and performance. First year students concentrate on developing musical skill on their particular instrument. Second year students are required to perform in the Christmas Concert, Spring Musicale, and Service Performances for the school and community. Membership in the String Ensemble, Wind Ensemble and, after successful audition, the Symphony Orchestra, requires attendance at all scheduled rehearsals and public performances. * Concert dress is required. Pre-requisite for grade 9: A desire to learn an orchestral instrument. Pre-requisite for grade 10: Completion of one year of music or by audition. 850 860

Instrumental Music 3,4

Honors

1.00 CR

6ppc

GR 11,12

Music 850, 860 is an intensification and amplification of Music 830, 840. Through weekly group instruction, daily supervised practice, self-evaluation, chamber ensembles, and orchestral performance, students are encouraged to strive for excellence. Membership in the Symphony Orchestra and chamber ensembles requires attendance at all scheduled rehearsals and public performances as well as Graduation. * Concert dress is required. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Music 830, 840 or equivalent as determined by audition. * Concert dress – ankle-length solid black skirt or black dress pants (with belt), white pleated front tuxedo shirt, black crosstie, black shoes and stockings.


HEALTH/PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 900 Health TR 2 0.50 CR 6ppc (1 sem) GR 10 The purpose of the health program is to help the student make independent informed decisions concerning her physical, mental and social well being. It encourages the student to discover her unique capability and responsibility for developing attitudes and patterns of behavior that will provide a full and satisfying life. Individual, family and community interests are considered in relation to many factors affecting health in today’s world. Areas of concentration include: alcohol, drugs and tobacco, circulatory system, common female disorders, first aid and CPR certification, heart disease, reproductive system, pregnancy and childbirth, respiratory system, stress, mental health, sexually transmitted diseases, and women’s health issues 910 Physical Education TR 2 0.50 CR 6ppc (1sem) GR 10 This course is designed to meet the physical and recreational needs of adolescents. The program is planned to develop the student’s cardiovascular endurance, muscular endurance, strength and flexibility. Through participation in individual, team, and lifetime sports, the student is able to enhance leadership qualities and self-confidence. Students are exposed to a variety of activities including: aerobics (low and high impact, kick and jab, tae bo, step aerobics), basketball, dance, flag football, fitness components, gymnastics (balance beam, climbing ropes, horizontal ladder, rings, tumbling, uneven parallel bars, vaulting horse), Pilates, track and field events (broad jump, high jump, hurdles, shot put, relays), volleyball, Yoga and weight training. Medical Exemptions: Students who are unable to actively participate in physical education classes due to a medical condition must provide current documentation from their attending physician. Forms may be obtained from the Health/Physical Education Department. Medically exempt students may be rostered for physical education, but these students are required to complete research articles on various sport-related topics. Dress Regulations: Shorts or sweatpants, T-shirt (short-sleeved, first initial and last name on front with two-inch letters of contrasting color), cross-training shoes (heel of shoe should have sufficient cushion for shock absorption, laces must be properly tied to prevent injury). Jewelry and body piercings (including tongue- rings) are not permitted.


BASIC SKILLS PROGRAM 950

Basic Skills

TR 3

1.0 CR

6ppc

GR 9

Basic Skills is a program designed to provide diagnostic testing, reading remediation, educational counseling and study skills development. Students complete the Basic Skills Program at the end of the rostered year. Students may be re-referred if further skill development is needed.

951

Basic Skills 2

TR 3

1.0 CR

6ppc

GR 10

Basic Skills 2 is a continuation of the Basic Skills program for those students for whom further skill development is deemed necessary. Students are rostered for Basic Skills 2 with the recommendation of the Basic Skills teacher or the recommendation of other faculty members, in consultation with the Assistant Principal for Academic Affairs

970 Achievement/Study TR 3

0.5 CR

GR 11,12

The Achievement program is for those upperclass students who have been referred for assistance in study skills. Students attend class 3 days a week and are rostered for study hall the other 2 days. Students are given guidance in study skills and assignment completion. 971 Enrichment Writing TR 1

0.5 CR

GR 11,12

This course is designed for students who want to continue to strengthen their writing skills through the power of words—including poetic terms—and how words are best put together in essay and poetry writing. The students will practice personal, creative, and expository writing while reinforcing the five step writing process. Various genres will also be utilized to demonstrate the different styles that are used by authors. Practice topics for the SAT’s will also be included in the course.


DIOCESAN SCHOLARS PROGRAM Sponsored by the Office of Catholic Education and local Catholic colleges and universities, the Diocesan Scholars program honors students who excel academically and who would benefit from beginning college work during their senior year. Each scholar will be permitted to take, free of charge, two college courses each semester on the campus of a nearby college or university. Scholars will complete the remainder of the roster with regular courses at St. Hubert. Juniors ranked in the top thirty cumulatively are eligible to apply.

VIDEOCONFERENCING COURSES St. Hubert has teamed with Holy Family University and Neumann University to allow interested and qualified students to take college level courses while remaining on St. Hubert’s campus. The courses are offered in real time and students actively participate in the class through a video hookup. As with the Diocesan Scholars Program, the students receive college credits for the courses they take, as well as credit on their High School transcript. There may be a cost associated with the course offered.

DRIVER EDUCATION PROGRAM This program is conducted by the American Driving School. Students who are at least 15 years of age may take the thirty-hour Classroom Theory class. Students, who are at least 16 years of age and have a valid PA learner’s permit, may take the six-hour Behind-the-Wheel training. Sessions are offered during both semesters.


POST SECONDARY EDUCATION Listed below are the admission requirements requested by some of the local colleges and nursing schools. In general, they represent the requirements for most academic handbooks. Please note that electives should be chosen in accordance with your intended college major. Special note for prospective Division 1 college athletes: In order to strengthen academic requirements for Division 1 college athletes, Proposition 48 went into effect August 1, 1986. Generally, a student athlete must achieve a 2.0 (a C on a 4.0 grade scale) in a specified core curriculum, or a score of 820 in the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). The 2.0 is calculated by taking the final grades from the freshman, sophomore, junior and senior reports in specified “core” subjects. A “core” subject is defined by the NCAA as an academic course designed to prepare a student for college level work. Courses that are taught at a level below the high school’s regular academic instruction level shall not be considered as core courses. Points are assigned using the following scale: 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0

for subjects for subjects for subjects for subjects

70 77 85 93

- 76 - 84 - 92 - 100

(D) (C) (B) (A)

The earned grade points are divided by the number of courses in the specified core subjects, the minimum of which is 11. An overall 2.0 (77 – 84 average) in the core subjects would earn the student the privilege to participate in athletics in Division 1 schools.


FOUR YEAR COLLEGES ARCADIA UNIVERSITY - GLENSIDE, PA 215-572-2910 SAT or ACT required Toll Free 1-877-ARCADIA High School Transcript or GED Units recommended English - 4 Math - 3 (including Algebra II and Geometry) Science - 3 lab Modern Language - 2 (same language) Social Studies - 4 Electives - 3 (language, math or science) Common Admissions Application Personal Essay Resume of extracurricular activities/community service recommended Recommendations - 2 (Counselor and Teacher) Rolling Admissions Priority Admissions Application Deadline for Distinguished Scholarship Consideration – January 15 Priority Admissions Application Deadline for Achievement Award Consideration – March 1 CABRINI COLLEGE - RADNOR, PA 610-902-8552 SAT required (980 combined math and verbal is average) - 3.0 / 85 / B grade average Units required English - 4 Math - 3 (Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II) Science - 3 (2 laboratory) Language - 2 (same language) Social Studies - 3 Electives - 2 - 4 Arts/Humanities recommended Rolling Admissions Recommendations – Upon Request Personal Essay – Upon Request CHESTNUT HILL COLLEGE - PHILADELPHIA, PA 215-248-7001 SAT required – Spring of Junior year and/or early in Senior year (recommended score 1000) Rank in class - Prefer upper 1/5 of class Applications - Fall of Senior year – Rolling Admission decisions begin October 15 Units required English - 4 Science - 3 Math - 3 Social Studies - 4 Language - 2 Electives - 4 Rolling Admissions


DE SALES UNIVERSITY - CENTER VALLEY, PA 610-282-1100 SAT or ACT required (Minimum SAT 1000, 3.0 GPA) Application early in Senior year recommended (Physician’s Assistant deadline January 15) College prep courses recommended Units recommended Math - 3–4 English - 4 Science - 2–3 (2 laboratory) Language - 2 Social Studies - 3 Rolling Admissions Interview not required but strongly recommended Recommendations - 2 DREXEL UNIVERSITY - PHILADELPHIA, PA 215-895-2400 SAT or ACT required (Junior year and early Senior year) GPA – 2.5 or better Applications - First semester of Senior year Units required (Math and Science vary per major) English - 4 Science - 2 - 3 Math - 3 - 4 (college prep) Electives - 6 – 7 Arts and Sciences (humanities and social sciences), Business (except Business and Engineering), Education, Information Science and Technology, Media Arts & Design, and Professional Studies Majors – 3 years of Math (Algebra I and II, Geometry) and at least 1 year of a laboratory science Arts and Sciences (sciences) and Business and Engineering Majors – 4 years of Math (Algebra I and II, Geometry, Trigonometry) and 2 years of a laboratory science (Biology, Chemistry or Physics) Biomedical Engineering and Engineering Majors – 4 years of college-prep Math including Algebra I and II, Geometry/Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus, 1 year of chemistry (with lab) and 1 year of Physics (with lab) Nursing and Health Professions Majors – 3 years of Math (Algebra I and II and Geometry) and 2 years of a laboratory science (Biology, Chemistry or Physics) Recommendations two required - One from counselor Rolling Admissions Essay - one to two pages Essay optional for non-College of Media Artists & Design students Extracurricular activities and work experience will aid applicant Fee waived if applying on campus or online


GWYNEDD-MERCY COLLEGE - GWYNEDD VALLEY, PA 1-800-DIALGMC SAT or ACT by end of Junior year and early Senior year – minimum score of 850 (combined Critical Writing and Math scores) – Nursing Major may require 1000 Rank in class - top ½ of class Units required English - 4 Science - 3 (Chemistry required for Nursing and Math - 3 Allied Health) Social Studies - 1 Electives - 3 (Academic – Physics required for Radiation Therapy Technology) Applications – Nursing and Allied Health – before November 1st or until program is filled Other programs before June 1st Interviews required for Allied Health Recommendation required (Counselor or Teacher) Rolling Admissions HOLY FAMILY UNIVERSITY - PHILADELPHIA, PA 215-637-3050 SAT preferred by December of Senior year; Spring SAT scores will be considered, ACT scores also considered Average SAT scores (Critical Reading and Math = 950-980) Certain majors have minimum SAT requirements Rank in class – upper 3/5 of class Units required English – 4 Science – 2 (Chem, Biol and science History – 2 electives required for Nursing; Physics Math – 3 recommended for Radiologic Science) (Algebra I, II and Geometry) Electives – 3 (Academic) Language - 2 (strongly recommended) Nursing Majors require Algebra I and II, Geometry, Biology, Chemistry and a third science is strongly encouraged (Anatomy & Physiology) Nursing only – SAT minimum – 450 Critical Reading, 400 Math – Total must be 860 minimum Applications – early Senior year Recommendation required – 1 (Principal, Counselor or Teacher) Rolling Admissions Radiologic Science deadline for application – December 15 Radiologic Science only – SAT minimum – 400 Critical Reading, 450 Math


IMMACULATA UNIVERSITY - IMMACULATA, PA 610-647-4400 ext 3060 SAT or ACT required end of Junior year or Toll Free 1-877-42TODAY early in Senior year – take all 3 scores, best from any sitting GPA Range from 2.5 – 4.0 Units required English - 4 Science - 2 (3-4 preferred with 1 laboratory) Math - 2 (3-4 preferred) Social Studies - 2 (3-4 preferred) Language - 2 (3-4 Electives - 2 (Academic) Preferred) 2 Recommendations required Essay required Rolling Admissions Part of The Common Application effective now Nursing – No deadline but capped at 65 incoming students per year. Thomas Jefferson University program deadline – December 15th  Need 3.2 or higher GPA; 1650 or higher SAT’s  Essay has to be major specific  For PT/OT – need 25 hours of documented observation or volunteer work. LA SALLE UNIVERSITY - PHILADELPHIA, PA

215-951-1500 www.lasalle.edu SAT or ACT required – scores to be reported preferably by the end of January Overall SAT average – 1100 on a 1600 point scale, writing section not a factor in app review Overall ACT average – Composite score of 24 on a 36 scale Rank in class - Top 40% GPA – 3.0 to 3.5 average, B or B+ Units required English - 4 Science - 1 laboratory (Science major – 4) Math - 3 with 2 yrs of Algebra (Science major – 4) Social Studies – 1 Language - 2 (same language) Electives - 5 (Academic) Applications after completion of Junior year LaSalle application or Common Application (Paper - $35, Online – Free) Essay required (Topic of your choice) Recommendations required – 2 Parent Letter of Recommendation (Optional – does not count for one of the two original recommendations Early Action Deadline – November 15 (Decision made by December 15) Rolling Admission after November 15 National Candidates Reply Date – May 1


NEUMANN UNIVERSITY - ASTON, PA 610-558-5616 SAT or ACT required early in Senior year Units required English - 4 Social Studies - 2 – 3 Math - 2 Language - 2 Science - 3 Electives - 4 (Academic) Applications as early as possible Recommendations are optional Rolling Admissions Biological Science majors must have taken high school biology and chemistry; physics is highly recommended. Biol and Chem required for Nursing. PEIRCE COLLEGE - PHILADELPHIA, PA 215-545-6400 SAT not required Units required - 16 with satisfactory grades Entrance test optional Rolling admissions Developmental classes required for students that choose not to take the placement exam or those that score below 70. All students accepted as long as they have high school diploma or GED. PENN STATE UNIVERSITY - VARIOUS CAMPUSES 1-814-865-5471 SAT or ACT – Must be sent directly from the testing admissions.psu.edu service Units required English - 4 Arts, Humanities, Social Studies - 5 Language - 2 (same language) Science - 3 Math - 3 (4 recommended) Engineering, Science, Business Administration, Earth and Mineral Sciences, Information Sciences and Technology - require 2 units of Algebra, 1 unit of Geometry and ½ unit of Trigonometry or higher level math. Modified Rolling Admissions but encouraged to apply before November 30th – Online application preferred Basis for acceptance: The most important factor, high school performance, accounts for approximately two-thirds of the admission decision. The remaining one-third is based on other factors, which may include ACT/SAT scores (using the highest score from a single test date), class rank, personal statements, and activities lists. Students taking the ACT are required to complete and submit the writing component.


PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY - PHILADELPHIA, PA 215-951-2800 SAT or ACT required early in Senior year Units required English - 4 Science - 2 (laboratory)* Math - 3 (Geometry and Social Studies – 3 Algebra II required)* Electives – 2 (Academic preferred) Language – recommended *For those applying to Science/Health or Engineering Programs, four years of math and science courses are preferred. Applications – early in senior year recommended – prior to January 1 preferred Recommendations are required (1) Essay required (topic is at student’s discretion) - Interview optional Rolling Admissions ROSEMONT COLLEGE - ROSEMONT, PA 610-526-2966 SAT required – Junior year and early Senior year Average SAT score – 1000 Critical Reading and Math, SAT essay reviewed – ACT also accepted Average GPA – 3.0 or B Honors Admission – 3.5 and 1100 SAT CR and Math Units required English - 4 Science - 2 laboratory Math - 2 (college prep) Social Studies - 2 Language - 2 (same language) Electives - 2 (Academic) Applications as early as possible One recommendation and essay REQUIRED Interview recommended, visit recommended Rolling Admissions Flagship program – Elementary Education, BS/MD Medical with Drexel, Dual Degree Psychology. Common Application and Institutional Application – online application is free on www.rosemont.edu. ST. JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY - PHILADELPHIA, PA Tel 610-660-1300 SAT or ACT score required Fax 610-660-1314 Rank in class - upper 2/5 of class email admit@sju.edu Units required English - 4 Science - 3 (1 laboratory) Math - 3 (Algebra I & II, Geometry) Social Studies - 3 Language - 2 Electives - 5 (Academic) 1 (Health and Education Recommendations - 1 required (Teacher or Counselor) Early action deadline – November 15th (non-binding) Regular admission deadline – February 1st Strongly suggest applying before November 15th Strongly suggest activities resume

Physical


TEMPLE UNIVERSITY - PHILADELPHIA, PA 215-204-7200 SAT or ACT required in Junior year and/or early tuadm@temple.edu Senior Year Units required English - 4 Science - 2 - 3 (1- 3 laboratory) Math - 3 - 4 (college prep) Social Studies - 2 Foreign Language - 2 (same language) Electives – 2-5 (Academic Core) Additional units recommended in foreign language, math or social studies Essay required Rolling Admissions Applications - file before March 1 Nursing Deadline – February 15 Averages for admitted students for Fall 2011 GPA: 3.42 SAT Middle 50% Critical Reading: 500-600 Math: 510-610 Writing: 490-590 Highest Critical Reading and Writing scores are averaged together, then added to highest Math scores. Scores are measured on a 1600 scale. ACT: 24 Automatic consideration for merit-based scholarship and Honors Program UNIVERSITY OF THE ARTS - PHILADELPHIA, PA 215-717-6049 SAT or ACT required www.uarts.edu If applicable: art work portfolio, writing sample and auditions required Personal essay and one recommendation required Rolling Admissions – March 15th priority deadline for scholarships Offer academic programs that prepare students for professions in the visual, performing, media and communication arts Admission is based upon both academic and artistic performance UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA - PHILADELPHIA, PA 215-898-7507 SAT I with Writing required - end of Junior year, early Senior year SAT II required 2 (check to see which SAT II’s are preferred by the undergraduate school to which you are applying - must be taken before November if applying for early decision) ACT with Writing can be taken in lieu of SAT I and (2) SAT II Units required English - 4 Social Studies - 3 - 4 Math - 4 Science - 3 - 4 Language - 3 - 4 Challenging, well-rounded curriculum recommended, depending on intended major Honors/AP level courses preferred Wharton School requires as much Math as possible, preferably Calculus Applications by November 1st for early decision/by January 1st for regular admission Two essays required


Recommendations required - 3 (counselor and 2 teachers) Strong extra-curricular activities background recommended Engineering school would like to see Physics UNIVERSITY OF THE SCIENCES - PHILADELPHIA, PA 215-596-8810 SAT or ACT required – No test preference admit@usciences.edu Most important admission criteria – Academic record (especially Math, Science, English), GPA, SAT scores, class rank. Units required – college prep curriculum minimum English - 4 Science - 3 laboratory (must include two of the following biology, chemistry or physics) Math - 3 (4 strongly recommended - Algebra I, II, Geometry minimum with another year of Pre-Calc, Trig or Elem Functions) Social Studies - 3 Electives – 3 (Academic) Strong background in science and math recommended Candidates are admitted directly to the program of their choice for the entire program length, and as a result, many of our programs have become very competitive. Students especially interested in pharmacy, physical therapy and physician assistant should apply during the early fall of their senior year. Rolling Admissions UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON - SCRANTON, PA 1-888-SCRANTON Students in the top 30% of their class may apply without submitting SAT or ACT scores. SAT optional deadline – November 15 SAT or ACT are accepted - recommended during Junior and Senior years Application early in Senior year recommended (Early action by Nov 15/Regular admission by March 1) Units required English - 4 Math - 3 - 4 (college prep) Social Studies - 2 - 3 Science - 2 - 3 Language - 2 Electives - 4 Recommendations – 1 required Personal statement required – List of extracurricular activities and service optional Application is free online (Scranton’s application or The Common Application and Supplement)


VILLANOVA UNIVERSITY - VILLANOVA, PA 1-800-338-7927 SAT required - Junior year and/or early Senior year Rank in class - upper 2/5 of class Units required - college prep program required English - 4 Social Studies - 4 Math - 4 Science - 4 (2 laboratory required but 3 Language – 2 – 4 recommended) Electives – 4 Nursing requires Biology and Chemistry Engineering requires Physics and Chemistry Business requires four years of Math Sciences require Chemistry and four years of Math Essay required - 2 Secondary School Report and Guidance Counselor Recommendation Letter and 3 Teacher Recommendations Extra Curricular Activities and Community Service is a part of the application process and is taken into consideration Applications by November 1st for early action; by January 7th for regular admissions Common Application with essay Supplemental Application with essay WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY - WEST CHESTER, PA 610-436-3411 SAT or ACT required - Junior year and/or early Senior year (1020 SAT / 22 ACT) Rank in class - upper 40% of class B Average Units required - 13 to 21 recommended with satisfactory completion of college prep courses English - 4 Social Studies - 3 Math - 3 Science - 3 Foreign Language – Recommended Higher requirements may exist for some majors (check catalog) Audition required for all Music applicants Interview required for the following programs – Athletic Training, Pre-Medical, Pharmaceutical Product Development and Respiratory Care **Applications by December of senior year recommended** Modified Rolling Admissions WIDENER UNIVERSITY - CHESTER, PA 610-499-4126 SAT required in Junior year and early in Senior year Rank in class - upper ½ of class Units required - college prep courses recommended English - 4 Science - 3 (1 laboratory) Math - 3 Social Studies - 3 Language - 2 (dependent on major)* Electives - 3 Recommendations encouraged Campus visit strongly recommended Rolling Admissions * In most situations, high school graduation requirements will meet or exceed Widener’s basic curriculum requirements.


TWO YEAR COLLEGES BUCKS COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE - NEWTOWN, PA 215-968-8100 SAT not required - placement test required once admitted for all new time students High school diploma or GED required for Financial Aid and Nursing Program Financial Aid Applications - Fall deadline May 1st Spring deadline November 1st Open Admissions Selective admission to Nursing, Chef Apprenticeship, and Fine Woodworking Special admission program for high school students that want to start early: Submit official high school transcript and letter of permission from high school Take placement test Applications for Admission accepted on a rolling basis. Portfolio review required for entrance into art programs. Audition required for entrance into music programs. COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA 215-751-8010 SAT not required but considered for placement test waiver – Minimum scores to waive placement test – ACT (math 14/verbal 17) SAT (math 470/verbal 510) Units required - 16 with satisfactory grades, high school diploma and final high school transcript Open Admissions Selective admission to health and some technical programs. There are various deadlines for nursing, diagnostic medical imaging and dental assisting/hygiene. Call school for dates. HARCUM COLLEGE - BRYN MAWR, PA 610-526-6050 Health Related Programs – 2.5/3.0 GPA, strong grades in Math and Science Courses, 900 SAT (Critical Reading and Math) Non-Health Related Programs – 2.0/2.5 GPA, 750-800 SAT (Critical Reading and Math) Science-oriented programs require Math – 3(Algebra I and II, Geometry) Chemistry and Biology Rolling Admissions except Dental Hygiene by February 15 Radiologic Technology by December 31 Evening Nursing by December 1 Recommendations required (Teacher or Counselor) Nursing program requires two letters of recommendation, resume and original Criminal Clearance Check dated within year of application and original Child Abuse History Clearance dated within year of application Essay required Interview required for some programs.


MANOR COLLEGE – JENKINTOWN, PA 215-884-2216 SAT or ACT required www.manor.edu Units required – 16 – with satisfactory grades and high school diploma Allied Health, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Clinical Laboratory Technology, Dental Hygiene, Dental Assisting and Veterinary Technology require Biology with Lab, Chemistry with Lab and 2 Math Courses Interview optional Recommendations optional – Teacher or Counselor Rolling Admissions

SCHOOLS OF NURSING ABINGTON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL DIXON SCHOOL OF NURSING 215-481-5500 *1 year college – 2 years nursing school SAT required - 900 or higher (450 Math and Verbal) Rank in class - upper ½ of class - 3.0 / 85 / B average preferred Units required English - 4 Science - 3 (Biology & Chem with lab) Math - 2 (Algebra) Social Studies - 3 Electives - 4 (Recommended - Geometry, Nutrition, Word Processing, Physiology, Anatomy, Psychology, Sociology, Computer Science) Personal Statement required with application Recommendations – 2 required Students are welcome to attend an Information Session held monthly or our Meet a Student Nurse program in the fall. Visit our website www.amhdixonson.org for additional information and to apply or print an application. *Students may be permitted to attend College for 2 years to finish prerequisites. *Strongly recommend volunteer experience in medical field. ARIA HEALTH SCHOOL OF NURSING 215-831-6740 ext 124 2 years and 10 month program SAT required - 400 in each section required Rank in class - upper ½ of class preferred Pre-nursing test required. Go to www.atitesting.com for ATI TEAS test information and study guide. Units required Electives - 3 English - 4 Social Studies - 3 Math - 3 Science - 3 (Chemistry required with grade of C or above) Optional interview available, 2 professional recommendations and essay required


The following degrees can be obtained through Aria Health School of Nursing RN degree, Associates Degree in Letters, Arts and Sciences from Penn State University Upon completion students can earn a BSN degree from Penn State’s World Campus in 3 more semesters.

DREXEL SCHOOL OF NURSING 215-895-2400 5 year co-op program resulting in BS in Nursing with eligibility to sit for RN licensure exam SAT or ACT required (Junior year or early Senior year) Units required English - 4 Science - 2 (Biology, Chemistry and/or Physics) Math - 3 – 4 (College prep) Recommendation required (recommendation from counselor) Rolling Admissions NORTHEASTERN HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING 215-926-3172 24-27 month program – upon graduation you will be eligible to sit for RN licensure exam and credits earned can be used toward a BSN at many colleges and universities GPA – 2.85 or better from college pre-requisite courses Rank in class - upper ½ of class SAT required - 900 or above Units required in High School English - 4 Science - 2 (Biology and Chemistry with lab) Math - 2 (1 Algebra) Social Studies - 3 Electives - 5 (Academic) Students must take 10 prerequisite courses from an accredited college/university with a grade of C or better: Anatomy/Physiology I and II, Microbiology, English Comp I & II, Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Introduction to Sociology, Chemistry and College Math Classes begin in January and May. ROXBOROUGH MEMORIAL HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING 215-487-4344 www.RoxboroughMemorial.com 21 month full-time day program – upon graduation you will be eligible to earn an Associate in Applied Sciences from Community College of Philadelphia and to sit for State Boards to obtain RN license Interview required – Pre Entrance exam may be required You must complete the following college courses with a grade of “C” or above prior to starting this program. It is recommended that you attend Community College or the college of your choice to complete these courses: College Algebra, Anatomy & Physiology I and II, Chemistry (if did not receive a “C” or above in high school Chemistry), Developmental Psychology, English Composition, Introduction to Psychology, Microbiology, Nutrition, and Sociology. Dual admissions with Thomas Jefferson University for RN to BSN Completion Program.


SCHOOLS OF RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY ***CLASSES ARE LIMITED – APPLY AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE*** ABINGTON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL (affiliated with Gwynedd-Mercy College) 215-4815526 COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA – 215-751-8230 EINSTEIN MEDICAL CENTER – 215-456-6398 HOLY FAMILY COLLEGE – 215-637-7202 MANOR COLLEGE (affiliated with T. Jefferson University Hospital) 215-884-2216 PHILADELPHIA SCHOOL OF RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY AT ST. CHRISTOPHER’S HOSPITAL 215-427-6751 HOSPITAL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA – 215-662-7825

SCHOOLS FOR DENTAL HYGIENE ***CLASSES ARE LIMITED – APPLY AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE*** COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA High School diploma required Units required

Biology and college prep mathematics with grade of C or better Must complete Dental Assisting program at Community with a GPA of 2.5 or better HARCUM COLLEGE – BRYN MAWR, PA (See information listed above) MANOR COLLEGE (See information listed above)


Course Catalog 2012-2013  

St. Hubert Course Catalog