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Mady Musiol • Magaly Villarroel Lisa Kester-Dodgson


Mady Musiol • Magaly Villarroel Lisa Kester-Dodgson

Teacher’s Guide 3

Table of contents

8

Introduction

13

Unit zero – Can you remember?

15

Unit 1 – School again!

26

Unit 2 – Exotic animals

37

Culture – The Natural History Museum

38

Unit 3 – Busy lives!

49

Unit 4 – What are people like?

61

Culture – Famous Food Markets

62

Unit 5 – That’s amazing!

74

Unit 6 – Working world

86

Culture – Amazing facts!

87

Unit 7 – Where were you?

98

Unit 8 – Travel time

109

Play – Dick Whittington and his cat

110

Festival – Harvest Festivals

112

Festival – New Year

114

Resource File

119

Unit Tests


Table of contents Unit zero – Can you remember? Objectives: To revise vocabulary and structures from previous courses. To revise wh-questions. To revise the alphabet and spell words. To write about oneself. Vocabulary: Animals. Food. The weather. Nationalities. Clothes. Language focus: What’s this? What are these? Where’s he/she from? What’s he/she doing? What’s the weather like? What’s your favourite (season)? What do you do every morning? Freddy gets up at 7 o’clock. He has his breakfast at 7:30. Pronunciation: Using the correct intonation in whquestions. Saying the letters of the alphabet. Practising rhythm and intonation in affirmative, negative and interrogative sentences. Strategies: Developing spoken interaction through a board game. Using charts and word spiders to classify vocabulary. Focusing on illustrations and context to complete a gapped text.

Unit 1 – School again! Objectives: To talk about school, school subjects and timetables. To learn Roman numerals. To ask and answer questions with why? To read and talk about school life in the Arctic. To speak and write about one’s timetable and favourite subjects. To revise the use of capital letters. To complete assessment and self-assessment activities. Vocabulary: English, Science, Maths, P.E., Art, Music, History, Geography, break, timetable, Roman, Latin, South Africa, museum, forum, friendly, fun, exciting, surprised, Irish, careful, special, stand (v). Language focus: How do you spell (Geography)? Why are you running? Because we’re late. I have English on Monday and Maths on Thursday. I like Maths. I also like Art because we can paint and draw. But my favourite subject is Music, so my favourite day is Tuesday. We sing and play the guitar. It’s lots of fun! What is he doing? What are they doing? Pronunciation: Recognising and producing the sounds /aI/ and /eI/ orally and in writing. Using the correct intonation in questions with why? Practising rhythm and intonation through dialogues, reading passages and a song. Strategies: Using word spiders and alphabetical

order to classify words. Interpreting illustrated contexts to create oral and written dialogues. Completing a grammar table for use in oral pairwork. Using a colour code to recognise and produce sounds. Using an illustrated glossary to understand a reading passage. Playing a board game to develop spoken interaction.

Unit 2 – Exotic animals Objectives: To talk about exotic animals. To use short answers in yes/no questions. To read and talk about the tropical rainforest and animals in danger. To describe animals and write an article about them. To revise the use of commas and full stops. To complete assessment and self-assessment activities. Vocabulary: Jaguar, butterfly, snake, condor, iguana, alligator, llama, toucan, goat, claws, wings, feathers, beak, horns, tail, mammal, South America, rainforest, waterfall, insect, arachnid, reptile, amphibian, cute. Language focus: Which animals have got horns? Which animals can fly? Is the (monkey) a mammal? Yes, it is. Does it live on a farm? No, it doesn’t. Can it climb trees? Yes, it can. Has it got feathers? No, it hasn’t. The goat is a mammal. It has got four legs but it hasn’t got any claws. It lives in dry places and it eats grass and leaves. It doesn’t usually eat bugs. It gives us milk and meat. Pronunciation: Recognising and producing the sounds /l/ and /r/ orally and in writing. Using the correct intonation in yes/no questions. Practising rhythm and intonation through dialogues, reading passages and a song. Strategies: Associating words with numbers in order to learn the unit vocabulary. Matching questions to answers to revise structures. Interpreting illustrated contexts to create oral and written dialogues. Using a colour code to recognise and produce sounds. Playing memory games to develop attention and observation skills. Using maps to locate countries and continents.

Culture – The Natural History Museum Objectives: To read and learn about The Natural History Museum in London, England. Vocabulary: Natural History Museum, fantastic,

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Table of contents exhibitions, fascinating, specimens, lab, restaurants, cafés, picnic area, packed lunches, souvenirs, shop, books, models, fossil replicas, zone, dinosaurs. Language focus: The Natural History Museum in London, England has some fantastic exhibitions. There are millions of fascinating specimens in the lab for you to look at and study. There are lots of restaurants and cafés in the museum. There’s a picnic area for packed lunches, too! You can buy souvenirs in the museum shops. They sell books, models and fossil replicas. There is a special zone where you can learn all about dinosaurs. Pronunciation: Practising rhythm and intonation through a reading passage. Strategies: Matching photos and texts to develop observation skills, reading comprehension and cultural awareness. Deciding if sentences are true or false to develop reading comprehension skills. Answering questions to get pupils to speak about themselves.

Unit 3 – Busy lives! Objectives: To discover what constitutes a healthy diet. To learn about the five food groups. To say the time and identify the parts of the day. To use adverbs of frequency. To ask and answer information questions. To learn a few onomatopoeia in English. To speak and write about freetime activities through the year. To revise the use of exclamation and question marks. To complete assessment and self-assessment activities. Vocabulary: Castle, King, Queen, princess, frog, shooting star, roast beef, water, lamb chop, cabbage, mushroom, cheese, pear, peach, melon, grapes, gym, pond, toad, diet, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, calcium, protein, fat, portion, bone, quick, healthy, have a bath, stargaze, protect, repair. Language focus: How often do you (eat chicken)? I eat chicken (every day), once a (week), twice a week, three times a (month). What do you usually do on Saturdays? I always help in the kitchen. Do you sometimes cook the dinner? No, I never cook the dinner. Vitamins and minerals protect the body. We need five portions of fruit and vegetables every day. Too much fat is bad for the body and too much sugar is bad for our teeth.

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Pronunciation: Recognising and producing the sound /r/ orally and in writing. Identifying the silent /r/. Using the correct intonation in questions and exclamations. Practising rhythm and intonation through dialogues, reading passages and a song. Strategies: Segmenting and classifying words in order to learn and revise vocabulary. Using timelines to sequence actions. Interpreting illustrated contexts to create oral and written dialogues. Using a pie chart to learn about healthy diet. Doing class surveys to get pupils to talk about themselves.

Unit 4 – What are people like? Objectives: To talk about physical appearance and personality. To describe people. To use the comparative of short adjectives. To discover how the French fries and crisps were invented. To speak and write about a mystery character. To revise the use of the connectors and, or, but. To complete assessment and self-assessment activities. Vocabulary: Face, freckles, wax museum, mystery, throne, century, conquistador, chemist, bouquet, short, tall, young, old, fat, thin, tired, angry, bored, grumpy, happy, sad, straight, wavy, curly, slice (v). Language focus: What are you like? What does she look like? She’s shorter than you. She’s fatter and her hair is longer. Is she taller than Amy? What is she like? She’s OK, but sometimes she’s very naughty. Pronunciation: Recognising and producing the comparative ending /er/ of short adjectives. Using the correct intonation in wh-questions. Practising rhythm and intonation through dialogues, reading passages and a song. Strategies: Using the C-V-C principle to form the comparative of short adjectives. Using maps and charts to understand a reading passage. Playing a board game to develop spoken interaction. Listening to dialogues and identifying the correct situation to develop listening comprehension. Spotting the differences between two pictures to develop observation skills.

Culture – Famous Food Markets Objectives: To read and learn about Famous Food Markets.


Vocabulary: La Boqueria, famous, food, market, beautiful, hundreds, stalls, products, olives, Borough Market, London Bridge, people, glasses, fresh orange juice, largest, world. Language focus: La Boqueria is the most famous food market in Barcelona. It dates back to 1200. It is one of the most beautiful markets in the world with hundreds of food stalls. You can buy lots of different products including olives which are very popular. Borough Market is a food market near London Bridge in South London. People love drinking glasses of fresh orange juice when they shop at the market. It is one of the largest food markets in the world and dates back to 1860. Pronunciation: Practising rhythm and intonation through a reading passage. Strategies: Matching photos and texts to develop observation skills, reading comprehension and cultural awareness. Deciding if sentences are true or false to develop reading comprehension skills. Answering questions to get pupils to speak about themselves.

Unit 5 – That’s amazing! Objectives: To talk about famous races and racing. To identify geographical features. To describe location. To use prepositions of place. To use the superlative of short adjectives. To learn about a famous regatta. To speak and write about a holiday. To revise the use of parentheses. To complete assessment and selfassessment activities. Vocabulary: River, island, hot air balloon, ocean, whale, mountain, city, lake, building, race, clock, Big Ben, Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, Mount Everest, Nile, life jacket, fox, squirrel, turtle, forest, fast, slow, large, small, super, amazing, cool, in, on, under, behind, in front of, next to, near, between, cross (v), go down, race (v). Language focus: The red frog is (near) the door. The blue frog is (next to) the green frog. What’s the biggest animal in this forest? The fox is the biggest animal here. Is the fox the fastest animal? Pronunciation: Recognising and producing the superlative ending /st/ of short adjectives. Using the correct intonation in wh-questions. Practising rhythm and intonation through dialogues, reading passages and a song.

Strategies: Drawing and labelling simple maps to practise the vocabulary. Doing a picture dictation to revise prepositions. Using the C-V-C principle to form the superlative of short adjectives. Using comparative charts to understand a reading passage. Matching titles, photos and texts to develop observation skills and reading comprehension.

Unit 6 – Working world Objectives: To talk about professions. To use the comparative and superlative of long adjectives. To form nouns from verbs by adding -er. To read and talk about the Galápagos Tortoise. To describe plans orally and in writing. To write a report. To revise the use of contractions and long forms. To complete assessment and self-assessment activities. Vocabulary: Explorer, firefighter, pilot, police officer, computer programmer, office worker, doctor, dentist, scientist, teacher, diver, pirate, ballet dancer, basketball player, singer, runner, surfer, writer, painter, boring, exciting, interesting, difficult, Galápagos Tortoise, weigh, endangered species, giant, grass, leaves, cactus, survive. Language focus: Is science more difficult than English? Yes, It is. No it isn’t. Which is the most difficult subject? It’s Maths. What do you want to be when you grow up? I want to be a famous ballet dancer. Who wants to be a basketball player? Pronunciation: Recognising and producing the sounds /oU/ and /u:/. Pronouncing contractions correctly. Practising rhythm and intonation through dialogues, reading passages and a song. Strategies: Reordering words and writing questions to focus on grammatical structures. Filling gaps to complete words and focus on their spelling and pronunciation. Using word maps to practise and extend vocabulary. Using peer correction to improve written work. Listening to dialogues and identifying the correct situation to develop listening comprehension.

Culture – Amazing facts! Objectives: To read and learn amazing facts about places in different parts of the world. Vocabulary: Everest, border, highest, mountain, coldest, temperatures, longest river, Nile, flows,

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Table of contents Mediterranean Sea, historical sites, Ancient Egypt, banks, deepest, Lake Baikal, Russia, freshwater, world, seal, tallest, tree, Redwood National Park, California, Big Ben, Statue of Liberty, smallest island, located, Isles of Scilly, lighthouse, San Marino, Republic, Apennine, stamps, coins. Language focus: It is 8,850 metres high and is the highest mountain in the world. January is the coldest month with temperatures between -36°C and -60°C. The longest river in the world is the River Nile in Egypt. It is 4,160 miles long and flows into the Mediterranean Sea. At 1,637 metres deep, Lake Baikal is the deepest freshwater lake in the world. The tallest tree in the world is the Coast Redwood, the smallest island in the world is Bishop Rock, San Marino dates back to 310 AD and is the oldest Republic. Pronunciation: Practising rhythm and intonation through a reading passage. Strategies: Matching photos and texts to develop observation skills, reading comprehension and cultural awareness. Deciding if sentences are true or false to develop reading comprehension skills. Answering questions to get pupils to speak about themselves.

Unit 7 – Where were you? Objectives: To talk about special feast days and holidays. To ask for and say the date and the time. To learn about St George, the patron saint of England. To describe past events with to be. To learn about different calendars. To use cardinal and ordinal numbers. To write a diary. To learn the abbreviations for ordinal numbers and months. To complete assessment and self-assessment activities. Vocabulary: Calendar, date, time, clock, o’clock, first, second, third, fourth, fifth, eighth, ninth, twelfth, twentieth, twenty-first, (five) past seven, quarter past (one), half past (ten), quarter to (three), five to (nine), patron saint, knight, dragon, mobile phone, pocket, market, cycle, sun, moon, earth, motion, leap year, extra, till (until), kill. Language focus: Where were you at twelve o’ clock? I was at the market. No, you weren’t! You were here in the kitchen. Calendars were based on the cycles of the sun and the moon. A year was based on the motion of the earth around the sun.

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Pronunciation: Recognising and producing the sounds /e/ and /ø/. Pronouncing contractions correctly. Practising rhythm and intonation through dialogues, reading passages and a song. Strategies: Rewriting mirror words to practise spelling. Drawing the missing hands on clocks to practise telling the time. Reading and correcting sentences aloud to practise oral expression. Filling gaps to complete words and focus on their spelling and pronunciation. Comparing calendars from different cultures to develop cultural awareness.

Unit 8 – Travel time Objectives: To talk about travel and means of transport. To learn some compound verbs. To describe plans with going to. To read and talk about hot air balloons. To speak about summer camp and write an advert for a summer camp. To use descriptive adjectives appropriately. To complete assessment and self-assessment activities. Vocabulary: Bus, train, plane, boat, car, bike, airport, summer camp, parachute, China, Africa, technology, envelope, burner, basket, passenger, on foot, by car, next, get on, get off, kid (v), heat (v), lift (v). Language focus: Where are you going to be? At the beach. When are you going to go? On Monday. Where are you going to go this summer? I’m going to go to China. Are you going to go by train? No, I’m not. Are you going to go by plane? Yes, I am. Pronunciation: Recognising and producing the sounds the sounds /I/ and /i:/. Pronouncing contractions correctly. Practising rhythm and intonation through dialogues, reading passages and a song. Strategies: Segmenting and classifying words in order to learn and revise vocabulary. Playing memory games to develop listening and observation skills. Matching questions and short answers to practise wh-questions. Learning about hot air balloons and how they work to develop technological awareness. Playing board games to develop spoken interaction.


Play – Dick Whittington and his cat Objectives: To read a traditional English play. To develop reading comprehension. Vocabulary: fortune, steps, house, cook, bread, hungry, tired, job, kitchen, floor, lazy, daughter, kind, night, bedroom, cold, rats, cat, market, rich, merchant, ships, mice, weeks, impossible, day, church bells, Lord Mayor, land, Captain, King, Queen, dinner, dining room, gold, jewels, box, man. Language focus: I want to go to London to seek my fortune. Dick walls all the way to London, Wake up! What are you doing here? Can I have some bread, please? That night Dick can’t sleep. His room is cold. I need a cat! But I’ve only got my cat! Dick doesn’t sleep for weeks! The next day Dick is leaving the house when he hears the church bells. What are we going to do? Here is some gold and jewels! They all live happily ever after. Pronunciation: Practising rhythm and intonation through a play. Strategies: Reading a play to develop reading comprehension. Learning the lines of a play to develop oral expression. Matching pictures and texts to develop observation skills, and revise structures and vocabulary.

Harvest Festivals Objectives: To read and talk about Harvest Festivals in the UK, Canada and Africa. To use an illustrated dictionary. To develop reading comprehension. To develop cultural awareness. To illustrate a Harvest Festival or other feast. To develop oral expression. Vocabulary: Harvest, Thanksgiving, festival, celebration, land, ceremony, people, meal, turkey, corn, yam, pumpkin pie, corn dolly, costume, mask, feast, second, grow, celebrate, decorate, bring, UK, Canada, Africa, food, Sunday, Monday, September, October, world, moon, children, school, basket, fruit, egg, food, home, table, luck, family, country, picnic,

hiking, fishing, good, beautiful, big, happily, go, eat, sing, dance, wear, end. Language focus: Harvest Festival is a celebration of the food we grow on the land. There are many thanksgiving ceremonies and celebrations all over the world. Children celebrate Harvest Festival by decorating their schools. They go hiking and fishing and then they eat their Thanksgiving meal. They sing and dance happily. The dancers wear beautiful costumes and masks. Strategies: Matching photos and texts to develop observation skills, reading comprehension and cultural awareness. Identifying pictures to revise vocabulary. Deciding if sentences are true or false to develop reading comprehension skills.

New Year Objectives: To read and talk about New Year in the West. To develop reading comprehension. To develop cultural awareness. To talk about the Chinese New Year. To complete a quiz. To make a New Year card. To develop oral expression. To develop cultural awareness. Vocabulary: West, parties, New Year’s Eve, tradition, ‘first footing’, good luck, midnight, coal, warmth, strike (v), January, people, friend, relatives, square, Big Ben, Piccadilly Circus, Trafalgar Square, everyone, house, hair, cake, food, clock, grape, month, dark, celebrate, eat, rat, ox, rooster, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, goat, monkey, dog. Language focus: In the West, the New Year begins on 1st January. People usually go to parties on New Year’s Eve. They have a special tradition called ‘first footing’. The coal is for warmth and the cake is for food. Spanish people eat twelve grapes one by one. This is for good luck during the next 12 months. Strategies: Matching photos and texts to develop observation skills, reading comprehension and cultural awareness. Answering questions to develop spoken interaction and oral expression.

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Introduction Welcome to Merry Team! The following introduction will guide you through the practicalities of using the course and the principles on which it was compiled.

Levels Merry Team is a six-level course for children studying English at Primary level. It has been created to meet the specific needs of young learners between the ages of 6 and 12 approximately, taking into account the cognitive, affective and social development of children that age.

Duration Merry Team 5 offers sufficient material for between 80 and 90 lessons, including assessment. Each lesson is expected to take approximately 45 to 60 minutes. However, the teaching notes cater for situations where teachers need to cover more or fewer hours.

General objectives This course aims to teach English as a communicative tool and convey the idea that through English one can access other cultures and other ways of life. The language is always presented through attractive characters and within a familiar context so that children are given the opportunity to use it in real-life situations from the very beginning. In this way they will realise that they can understand and do things in English, thus increasing both their self-esteem and their general knowledge. Furthermore, this course takes into account the principles of Howard Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences theory by providing activities which stimulate each type of learning style and intelligence, including the linguistic, logicalmathematical, spatial, inter/intrapersonal, bodily-kinaesthetic and musical intelligences. This will help children acquire the language faster and more effectively. While developing our material, we have kept in mind some factors which may be common to primary classrooms in many countries. The main ones appear to be crowded conditions, lack of resources, diversity among teachers (specialists who have had little experience working with children versus experienced non-specialists), diversity among pupils (different backgrounds, levels of abilities, etc.) and variations in the numbers of hours per week. The syllabus of Merry Team is based on the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages for A1+ (Basic) users.

DIDACTICS Merry Team has been developed in line with the following sound pedagogical principles:

Pupil-centred approach Children acquire knowledge based on their own experience, through a complex interactive process involving themselves, the materials and the teacher who links the two. Merry Team contains varied activities which are centred on the pupil and are appropriate to the conceptual and cognitive development of children between the ages of 6 and 12. This approach means that children learn in a meaningful way. It also means that teachers play many different roles: as helpers, monitors, observers, instructors and mediators.

Global approach In primary education, English is not an isolated subject, but forms part of a comprehensive curriculum of interrelated areas. Merry Team uses the same types of strategies as covered in other subjects, such as handling materials, observing, predicting, sequencing, grouping and discriminating, amongst many others. Moreover, pupils are called upon to apply different types of intelligences to the tasks involved in language learning and problem solving.

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Introduction Welcome to Merry Team! The following introduction will guide you through the practicalities of using the course and the principles on which it was compiled.

Levels Merry Team is a six-level course for children studying English at Primary level. It has been created to meet the specific needs of young learners between the ages of 6 and 12 approximately, taking into account the cognitive, affective and social development of children that age.

Duration Merry Team 5 offers sufficient material for between 80 and 90 lessons, including assessment. Each lesson is expected to take approximately 45 to 60 minutes. However, the teaching notes cater for situations where teachers need to cover more or fewer hours.

General objectives This course aims to teach English as a communicative tool and convey the idea that through English one can access other cultures and other ways of life. The language is always presented through attractive characters and within a familiar context so that children are given the opportunity to use it in real-life situations from the very beginning. In this way they will realise that they can understand and do things in English, thus increasing both their self-esteem and their general knowledge. Furthermore, this course takes into account the principles of Howard Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences theory by providing activities which stimulate each type of learning style and intelligence, including the linguistic, logicalmathematical, spatial, inter/intrapersonal, bodily-kinaesthetic and musical intelligences. This will help children acquire the language faster and more effectively. While developing our material, we have kept in mind some factors which may be common to primary classrooms in many countries. The main ones appear to be crowded conditions, lack of resources, diversity among teachers (specialists who have had little experience working with children versus experienced non-specialists), diversity among pupils (different backgrounds, levels of abilities, etc.) and variations in the numbers of hours per week. The syllabus of Merry Team is based on the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages for A1+ (Basic) users.

DIDACTICS Merry Team has been developed in line with the following sound pedagogical principles:

Pupil-centred approach Children acquire knowledge based on their own experience, through a complex interactive process involving themselves, the materials and the teacher who links the two. Merry Team contains varied activities which are centred on the pupil and are appropriate to the conceptual and cognitive development of children between the ages of 6 and 12. This approach means that children learn in a meaningful way. It also means that teachers play many different roles: as helpers, monitors, observers, instructors and mediators.

Global approach In primary education, English is not an isolated subject, but forms part of a comprehensive curriculum of interrelated areas. Merry Team uses the same types of strategies as covered in other subjects, such as handling materials, observing, predicting, sequencing, grouping and discriminating, amongst many others. Moreover, pupils are called upon to apply different types of intelligences to the tasks involved in language learning and problem solving.

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Topics Each unit of the book develops around a specific topic. All the topics have been chosen to reflect the age and developing interests of the children and cover aspects of the real world as well as imaginative themes. Apart from the core units, there are additional stories, festivals and cultural pages to consolidate structures and vocabulary and develop different types of skills and intelligences. Teachers can use them or not, depending on the time they have. In Merry Team 5, the topics aim at widening pupils’ horizons. In addition to the core topics, they include three double culture pages: The Natural History Museum, Famous Food Markets and Amazing facts. In each of these sections pupils can read about different aspects of culture around the world while developing their reading and listening comprehension as well as cultural awareness. At the end of the core units we also have a play, Dick Whittington and his cat, and two festivals: Harvest Festivals and New Year. Each unit features a CLIL page (Content and Language Integrated Learning) in which pupils learn a subject through the medium of a foreign language. This can provide effective opportunities for them to use their new language skills immediately rather than learning them now to use later. This approach is being used increasingly across Europe and provides greater opportunities within the school curriculum for exposure to foreign languages.

Progress and skills The Merry Team course offers a thorough coverage of appropriate structures, functions, vocabulary and pronunciation. Its syllabus is based on graded structures and vocabulary, and develops all four skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) through a variety of communicative tasks, while recycling vocabulary and language patterns regularly.

COURSE COMPONENTS OF LEVEL 5 Level 5 comprises a Pupil’s Book, an Activity Book with downloadable audio material, a Teacher’s Guide, audio material, a DVD with animated stories, a Digital Book and posters. For the pupil • Pupil’s Book • Activity Book + downloadable audio material with activities, stories and songs. Pupil’s Book 5 It contains an introductory (revision) unit, 8 core units, 3 cultural pages, a play and two festivals. The objectives of each unit are stated at the beginning, these also being to develop each topic on the P-P-P-Pmodel (presentation, practice, production, personalisation). Upon finishing each unit, pupils do the Unit Test and record their progress in language learning with the help of their teacher. Activity Book 5 + downloadable audio material This is an attractive, fully-coloured book that contains the practice work for all the units in the Pupil’s Book and a self-help section which can be used at any time to revise the basic structures presented in each unit. The eight core units follow the same pattern as in the Pupil’s Book. The audio material includes the chants, the stories and songs in the Pupil’s Book and can be downloaded at www.hubeditorial.com.ar.

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Introduction Teacher’s Resource Pack • Teacher’s Guide • 2 audio CDs • DVD (levels 5 and 6) • 3 Posters The Teacher’s Book provides step-by-step lesson plans, reinforcement and extension activities, the answers to the exercises for both the Pupil’s Book and the Activity Book, a photocopiable progress test – with answers – for each unit, photocopiable instruments for formative and summative assessment, as well as the audio scripts of all the listening activities. The Class CDs include all the recordings for the listening activities in the Pupil’s Book and the Activity Book. The Pupil’s downloadable audio material includes the vocabulary, dialogues, texts, pronunciation exercises and songs, all of which are necessary for home study.

The Posters in Merry Team 5 There are three posters, each one is a contextualised picture dictionary, which teachers can use to present and consolidate the new vocabulary at any time. The first poster is entitled Positions and focuses on prepositions of place. It consists of a farmland scene featuring a variety of animals with speech bubbles contextualising the prepositions. The language in the speech bubbles is the following: I’m running across the fence. We’re walking around the pond. I’m at the top of the ladder... and I’m at the bottom. I’m on the bridge. Follow me through this log. I’m going under the bridge. I’m outside the cage. I’m inside the cage. I like being beside my mum. Are we going to the near house or the far house? I’m on the left… and I’m on the right. I’m among the white sheep. I’m between two dogs. I’m above the rooster. I’m under the hen. Wait for me! I’m behind. And I’m in the middle. Hey, I’m in front of you. The meaning of up, down, near and far is also illustrated on the poster. This poster can be used either to present the prepositions the children will be encountering in the course or it can be used to revise prepositions at a later stage before the unit tests. The children could each take on the role of one of the animals and say the corresponding sentence in the speech bubble. Alternatively, the teacher can ask questions to elicit the prepositions such as Where is the dog? What are the ducks doing? The second poster is entitled School Timetable and features a blank timetable with the days of the week (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday) and school subjects (Art, Music, PE, English, Geography, History, Maths and Science) underneath. This poster can be used to present or revise the days of the week and the school subjects covered in Unit 1. The teacher can elicit the days of the week by asking When’s English? or the school subjects by asking What’s on Tuesday? The last poster in level 5 is entitled Grammar fun! and features all the structures presented and activated on the Let’s Learn page. The structures are the following: Why / Because; Adverbs of Frequency; Short Answers; Want to; Comparatives; Superlatives; Be going to; Simple Past of BE. This poster can be used to revise individual structures before giving the pupils the end of unit tests or it can be used to revise all the structures at the end of the course.

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Getting to know L E S S ON

9 (double page)

Objectives: Skill by skill revision of the unit content while focusing on pupils’ achievements as reflected in the Read and tick box. Pages 9 and 10: Let’s round it up! Activities to revise the unit vocabulary and the four skills: one activity per skill. A quiz to revise the unit content. Read and tick box: a self-assessment section.

Festivals In Merry Team 5, the topics of the festivals are Harvest Festivals and New Year. They are designed to be used at the appropriate time of year and the language content reflects the progress pupils should have made by then. They include texts, photos, an illustrated dictionary and hands-on activities to help pupils develop reading comprehension and cultural awareness

Cultural pages and a play There are three double pages: The Natural History Museum, Famous Food Markets and Amazing facts. Each double page is self-contained and consolidates the language learnt in the preceding units. It includes photos and different types of activities to help pupils develop reading comprehension and cultural awareness. The play Dick Whittington and his cat has been included for pupils’ enjoyment and as a springboard for additional activities such as dramatisation. It can be used at the end of the course.

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Songs Songs play an important role in the acquisition of correct rhythm, intonation and pronunciation. Moreover, their richness of language enables pupils to retain newly acquired vocabulary and structures. The songs in Merry Team 5 are adaptations of well known traditional songs.

CLIL pages (Content and Language Integrated Learning) These pages focus on different cross-curricular subjects. They feature longer reading passages and photos as well as a variety of activities to improve reading skills and develop cultural awareness.

Testing and assessment Assessment is an integral part of language-learning. Its purpose is to provide a way of seeing what progress is being made and how, and to allow modifications to be made to suit circumstances. At the end of each unit, pupils recycle and further consolidate the language they have learnt by completing the Let’s round it up! section in the Pupil’s Book and the Read and tick section in the Round up pages in the Activity Book. In addition, through the Read and tick section and the Unit Test, they are given the opportunity to assess their progress and develop their language awareness. The assessment and self-assessment activities in Merry Team follow the guidelines set out by the Common European Framework for Language Learning, as reflected in the European Language Portfolio for A1+ (Basic) users. For further information and photocopiable assessment charts, please refer to pages 135-136 (Resource File).


UniT

Can you remember?

zero

L E S S ON

1

(pp. 2-3)

Objectives: To revise vocabulary from previous courses. To revise wh-questions. To revise the alphabet. To develop spoken interaction through a game. Language (revision): What’s this? What are these? Where’s he/she from? What’s he/she doing? What’s the weather like? What’s your favourite (season)? What do you do every morning? Vocabulary (revision): Vocabulary from previous courses. Animals. Food. The weather. Nationalities. Clothes.

to complete word spiders with words from these different categories. Revise the alphabet and then hold a spelling contest with the class.

L E S S ON

2

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(pp. 2-3)

Objectives: To revise routines. To develop oral and written expression. Language (revision): Freddy gets up at 7 o’clock. He has his breakfast at 7:30. Vocabulary (revision): Vocabulary and structures from previous courses. Materials: Sheets of paper (Round-up).

Warm-up An activity to revise vocabulary. Copy the following two columns of words on the board: 1st column – horse, apple, sunny, British, dress. 2nd column: nationality, weather, animal, clothes, food. Pupils go up to the board and join each word with its category. When they finish, ask them to add more words to each category orally. Play with a friend: ask and answer. (pp. 2-3) A game to develop spoken interaction.

Warm-up An activity to talk about pupils’ routines. Describe your daily routine, saying for example: I usually get up at 7 o’clock, then I have a shower. I have breakfast at 7:30. Then I go to work at 8 o’clock… Ask pupils questions about their daily routines: What time do you get up? When do you have breakfast? etc. 1 Complete the crossword. (p. 2)

Pupils identify the items and the actions in the squares. Read out the model questions and the rules and explain that the aim of the game is to go around the board identifying objects and asking and answering wh-questions. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. When pupils finish the first round, they play again with a different partner. Pupils then write the answers to the questions in their notebooks.

Round-up

An activity to revise vocabulary and spelling. In their notebooks, pupils classify the board game vocabulary in the following categories: animals, food, weather, nationalities, clothes. Alternatively, ask them

Pupils complete the crossword. Correct the task orally. Answers: Across: 2 British; 4 singing; 5 Mexican; 7 jeans; 8 eggs; 10 cloudy; 12 basketball; 13 dress. Down: 1 hamburgers; 3 sugar, 4 swimming; 6 rainy; 7 snowy; 9 football; 10 chips; 11 Spanish. 2 Look at the pictures and write about Freddy’s daily routine. (p. 3) Point to the different pictures and elicit what Freddy is doing in each one. Pupils then complete the sentences according to the pictures. Remind them to use the rd appropriate form of the 3 person singular in each case. Correct the task orally.

13


UniT

Can you remember?

zero

Answers: 1 gets up / has a shower; 2 has breakfast / goes to school; 3 has lunch / goes swimming; 4 goes home / does his homework; 5 plays / has dinner; 6 goes to bed.

Round-up

An activity to describe routines. Hand out the sheets of paper. Tell pupils they are going to describe and illustrate their daily routine.

Hello, I'm Amy.

Hello, I'm Hanna.

14

Remind them to use exercise 2 as a model. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. If you wish, you can then ask a pupil to copy his or her text on the board and ask the class for help in correcting mistakes if there are any. When they finish, ask different pupils to tell their classmates about their daily routine. Encourage them to say: I get up at (seven) every day. I have a shower‌ etc. Collect the drawings and then display them in the room.

Hi, my name's Matt.

Hi, I'm Freddy, join us!


UniT 1

School again! L E S S ON

1

(pp. 4-5)

Objectives: To talk about school, school subjects and timetables. To revise the days of the week. To revise animals and numbers. To classify words with the help of word spiders. To write words in alphabetical order. To develop observation and memory skills. Language focus: How do you spell (Geography)? Target vocabulary: English, Science, Maths, P.E., Art, Music, History, Geography, break, careful, special. Vocabulary (revision): Days of the week. Animals. Numbers. Girl, boy, animal, teacher, glasses, favourite, Irish. Materials: Class CD.

and break. Then point to each icon and ask pupils to interpret it. Ask them questions about the timetable, for example: What day is Geography? And Art? Is P.E. before or after History? etc. Play track 2 (Class CD 1). Ask pupils to concentrate on the pronunciation of each word as they listen. Play the CD again and ask them to look at the picture and say the day on the timetable, for example: Art Wednesday. Do the same with all the subjects. Audio script

English – Monday Maths – Tuesday Art – Wednesday History – Thursday 2

3 CD 1

Warm-up An activity to revise the days of the week and present the new topic. Draw a long line on the board and divide it into seven segments. Remind pupils that in the English-speaking world, the first day of the week is Sunday. Ask a pupil: What day is it today? Elicit the correct word and say: Yes, today is (Tuesday). Write Tuesday in the appropriate segment. Then complete the line by asking: What day comes before / after Tuesday? What days do you come to school? Which is your favourite day? Copy the title and the objectives of the unit on the board. Read and explain them to the class. 1

2 CD 1

Look, listen and say the day. (p. 4) An activity to present the new vocabulary.

Focus pupils’ attention on the double page illustration and ask: Where are the children? What are they doing? Point to each room and in L1 elicit the subject being taught there (Music, Geography, Art, P.E.). Say the words in English and ask pupils to repeat. Explain that P.E. stands for Physical Education. Present the remaining four subjects: English, Science, Maths and History. Point to the timetable and present the words timetable

Geography – Friday Science – Tuesday P.E. – Thursday Music – Friday

Listen and repeat. (p. 5) An activity to practise the new vocabulary.

Point to the list of words and play track 3 (Class CD 1) again. Pupils read and repeat the vocabulary chorally and individually. Audio script

English, Maths, Science, Art, History, P.E., Geography, Music 3

4 CD 1

Listen again. Which subject is missing? (p. 5) An activity to develop attention and listening skills.

Tell pupils that in this activity, they will hear the subjects named, with one missing each time. The task is to listen carefully and identify the missing subject. Correct the exercise together. Audio script 1 English, Maths, P.E., Art, Music, History, Geography. 2 English, Science, Maths, Art, Music, History, Geography. 3 English, Science, Maths, P.E., Art, Music, Geography. 4 English, Science, Maths, P.E., Art, Music, History. 5 Science, Maths, P.E., Art, Music, History, Geography.

15


UniT 1

School again! Answers: 1 Science; 2 P.E.; 3 History; 4 Geography; 5 English. 4 Copy and complete the word spiders. Write the names in alphabetical order. (p. 5) An activity to practise the new vocabulary and revise classroom objects. Ask pupils what word spiders are used for (to classify vocabulary into lexical sets). Before starting, brainstorm classroom objects they remember from last year. Then ask them to do the activity individually and compare their answers with a partner. When they finish, they write the words they have used in alphabetical order. Correct the exercise by having two pupils write their lists on the board for everyone to check. 5 Look and answer. (p. 5) An activity to develop observation skills and practise the alphabet. Pupils work in pairs. If necessary, revise the alphabet before they start on question 5. Check the answers orally.

Extension activity: In their notebooks, pupils draw and complete their own timetables in English.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 4)

1 Find the words and label the subjects. (p. 4) Pupils find and circle the 8 subjects. With the letters that are left over, they complete the secret message. Answers: 2 Science; 3 Maths; 4 P.E.; 5 Art; 6 Music; 7 History; 8 English. 2 Use the letters left in the wordsearch to write the secret message. Draw a picture of the secret message. (p. 4) Pupils draw Freddy as they imagine him in the frame. Tell them that in the next lesson they will discover who Freddy is and why his glasses are special. Answer: I am Freddy. I am Irish. I always wear my glasses! They are really great!

L E S S ON

2

At the Museum (pp. 6-7) Answers: 1 a bird flying in Music class, a dog under a chair in Art class, a rabbit on a chair in Geography class. 2 There are 6 boys and girls in the gym. 3 There are four teachers in the picture. 4 Pupils’ own answers. 5 Pupils’ own answers.

Round-up

A memory game to consolidate the language of the lesson. Books closed, ask pupils questions about the page, for example: What colour is the rabbit? Is Maths on Monday? Where is the girl singing? Where is the boy drawing? etc. Reinforcement activity: Revise both vocabulary and the alphabet by asking pupils to name things beginning with the letter a (eg. apple, animal), b, c and so on through the alphabet.

16

Objectives: To present the new characters. To present the new vocabulary in context. To revise countries and nationalities. To develop observation skills and reading comprehension. To stimulate the imagination. Language focus: That girl looks friendly. On Friday we go to the Museum. Why are you running? Because we’re late! How do you say ‘Where is the forum?’ in Latin? Oh, no! Latin every day! Target vocabulary: Roman, Latin, South Africa, museum, forum, friendly, fun, exciting, surprised, Irish, Roman, stand. Vocabulary (revision): School subjects. Days of the week. Girl, boy, timetable, History, hall, great, late, in front of, run, wait, listen, do, go, see, speak, repeat. Materials: Class CD.


UniT 1 1

Listen and read. (pp. 6-7) CD 1 A listening activity to present the characters and practise vocabulary in context. 5

Focus pupils’ attention on the double page and present the characters Freddy, Hanna, Amy and Matt. Ask pupils to describe each one. Then ask them to describe what is going on in the frames: Matt, Amy, Hanna and Freddy meet outside the school and introduce themselves. They look at their timetable in the hall, and later in the week, they go to the Museum. Something strange happens there when Freddy takes his glasses off, and they suddenly find themselves in Ancient Rome. Ask questions about the comic, for example: What is (Matt) wearing in frame 1? Where are the children in frame 4? What is Freddy doing in Frame 7? What are they all doing in frame 8? What language are they going to learn in frame 10? etc. Play the CD. Pupils listen and follow the dialogue. Play the CD again with pauses for them to repeat, chorally or individually. Check their pronunciation and intonation.

7 TEACHER

This is the Roman Hall. We are standing in front of the Romans! Freddy! Are you listening?

8 CHILDREN

OOOOHHHHH!!!

9 AMY HANNA

What are we doing here? Oh, this is exciting! Let’s go and see the forum! Hmmm… how do you say Where is the forum? in Latin? I don’t know! I don’t speak Latin!

MATT FREDDY 10 TEACHER FREDDY

Now repeat after me… Ubi est forum? Oh, no! Latin every day!

When you finish, explain the vocabulary and make sure that pupils understand the new expressions. Point out that whenever Freddy takes his glasses off, something very special happens.

Audio script 1 HANNA MATT

That girl looks friendly … That boy looks fun.

2 MATT FREDDY

Hi! What’s your name? Hi! I’m Freddy. I’m Irish.

3 FREDDY HANNA

Hi! Where are you from? I’m Hanna and I’m from South Africa.

4 MATT

Look, our timetable!

5 AMY HANNA MATT & FREDDY

Our first lesson is History. And look, on Friday we go to the Museum. That’s great!

6 ANNOUNCER MATT AMY

Friday morning. Amy, wait! Why are you running? Because we’re late! Hanna and Freddy are waiting for us!

2 Answer the questions. (p. 7) Questions and answers to check comprehension. Pupils answer the sentences in writing, giving long answers. Check orally, or ask individual pupils to write their answers on the board. Answers: 1 She looks friendly. 2 Dark eyes. 3 Yes, he is. 4 They’re in the Roman Hall. 5 No, they can’t speak Latin. 6 They are surprised because they are in Ancient Rome.

Round-up

A memory game to consolidate the language of the lesson. Books closed, read out different sentences and questions said by the characters. Elicit the character’s name each time. Then repeat the dialogue, making deliberate mistakes. For example, in frame 1, say: happy instead of friendly, in frame 3 say French instead of Irish, etc. Ask pupils to correct you.

17


UniT 1

School again! Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 5)

1 Look at the comic on pages 6-7 in your Pupil’s Book and complete the sentences. (p. 5) Pupils complete the sentences using the words in the box.

everyone’s help, draw their common timetable on the board. Insert the subjects in the appropriate slots by asking questions such as: Do you have (P.E.) before or after lunch? Is (Geography) in the morning or in the afternoon? etc. 1

5 CD 1

Answers: 1 are going; 2 friendly, fun; 3 Irish; 4 are waiting; 5 is running; 6 isn’t listening. 2 Match the questions to the answers. (p. 5) Pupils do the exercise individually and then ask and answer the questions in pairs to check. Answers: 1-d; 2-a; 3-e; 4-b; 5-c. 3 What are they saying? (p. 5) Explain the activity first. Pupils look at what is happening in the scene and imagine the characters’ dialogue. Encourage them to use the new vocabulary and expressions.

L E S S ON

3

At the Museum (pp. 6-7) Objectives: To revise school subjects and the days of the week. To revise countries and nationalities. To act out dialogues. To learn Roman numerals and revise numbers. Target vocabulary: Roman numerals. Vocabulary (revision): School subjects. Days of the week. Countries and nationalities. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135). Warm-up A revision activity. Ask pupils questions about their timetables, for example: Do you study (Art)? What days do you have (History)? What time do you have (English)? Write the pupils’ list of subjects on the board. With

18

Listen and read. (pp. 6-7) A listening activity to revise the comic.

Play the comic again. Pupils listen and follow the text in their books. Divide the class into five groups and assign the roles of Amy, Hannah, Matt, Freddy and the teacher. If necessary, play the CD again, with pauses after each line so the groups can repeat it. Otherwise, pupils recite their lines either from the book or from memory. Encourage them to use the appropriate intonation and mime their character’s facial expressions and actions. Then swap the roles around and repeat the activity.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 5)

3 What are they saying? (p. 5) An activity to act out a dialogue. Divide the class into pairs. Pupils take out their Activity Books and read their dialogue out to their partner. Each pair then practises both dialogues, one after the other. Invite different pairs to act out their dialogues in front of the class. If you wish, these can be recorded and then played back so pupils can correct their pronunciation and intonation. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet. Roman numerals An activity to familiarise pupils with Roman numerals. Ask pupils to tell you something about the Romans: when and where they lived, what they were famous for and the monuments they left behind. Tell them that they are going to learn how to read Roman numerals. Where can they still be seen? What are they still used for? Copy the following table on the board and explain how the system works.


UniT 1 I II III

one two three

V X XX

five ten twenty

L LX LXXX C CC D M

fifty sixty eighty one hundred two hundred five hundred one thousand

L E S S ON Let’s learn! (p. 8)

Objectives: To present and practise why? questions. To develop spoken interaction and spoken production. To ask and answer information questions. Language focus: Why are you running? Because we’re late. Target vocabulary: Broom, hop. Vocabulary (revision): Actions. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135)

Then copy the following sums on the board. Pupils complete the exercise in their notebooks. Check their answers orally. 1 2 3 4 5 6

V + I = .................. L + XX = .................. CC + L + V = .................. D + CCC = .................. M + CC = .................. MM + C + XXX = ..................

Reinforcement activity: In pairs, pupils brainstorm countries and write them down on a piece of paper. Ask them to write between 8 and 10 names. When they finish, they exchange their list with another pair and write the corresponding nationality. Collect the lists and hold a spelling contest.

Warm-up A vocabulary activity to revise the present continuous. Point to different pupils and ask: Are you drawing? Are you listening? Are you writing? etc. Elicit answers. Then point to the comic strip and ask: What are the children doing? What is Liz wearing? Where is the bus going? 1

6 CD 1

Extension activity: Do a class survey to find out where your pupils come from. Draw a table on the board and write the nationality of the first child you ask on the first line and put a tick next to it. If the second child comes from a different country, write the second nationality on the second line. Otherwise, add a second tick to the first line. Do this with all the pupils. When you finish, count the ticks and offer your conclusions, for example: Two children are Chinese, three children are Polish, etc.

4

Listen and read. (p. 8) An activity to present the structures of the unit.

Establish the situation: Liz and her friend are running to catch the school bus. An old lady offers them a ride on her magic broom. Play the CD so pupils can listen to the complete text. Play it again. Pupils repeat each sentence after the pause. Make sure that they understand the use of ‘why’ and ‘because’ and that they use the correct intonation in both the question and answer. Audio script WIZ

Come on Liz!

OLD LADY WIZ AND LIZ

Why are you running? Because we’re late for the school bus.

OLD LADY WIZ AND LIZ

Oh, hop on my broom! Great!

19


UniT 1

School again! 2 Chit-chat. (p. 8) A pair activity to ask and answer information questions. Demonstrate the exchange with a pupil and ask the class to repeat chorally. In pairs, pupils ask and answer questions about the pictures. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.

Round-up

A game to revise vocabulary and develop memory. Books closed, point to different pupils and ask them the questions they have practised in exercise 2, then make up more questions. Reinforcement activity: Pupils look at the comic again. In their notebooks, they write a why-question about one of the frames. Point to different pupils and ask them to read out their questions. The rest of the class answers them. Extension activity: Ask pupils to write two whyquestions on a slip of paper and pass it on to a classmate. When all the questions have been answered, ask different pupils to read out the questions and answers.

L E S S ON

5

Let’s sing! (p. 9) Objectives: To revise the days of the week. To develop listening comprehension skills through a song. Language focus: There are seven days in a week. Vocabulary (revision): Days of the week. Materials: Class CD. Warm-up Ask pupils if they like pop songs. Who are their favourite bands and singers? What are their favourite tunes? 1

7

Listen and sing. (p. 9)

CD 1

Focus pupils’ attention on the illustrations and ask them to predict what the song is about. (The days of the week). Play the CD while they follow the text in their books. At the end, ask them how many days of the week are mentioned and what their names are. Audio script

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 6)

1 Complete the table. Then ask and answer in pairs. (p. 6) Pupils complete the table with the appropriate verbs and subjects. Check their answers orally. In pair, pupils then use the table to ask and answer questions. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.

There are seven days There are seven days, There are seven days, There are seven days in a week. Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday. There are seven days, There are seven days, There are seven days in a week. Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday.

20


UniT 1 Play the song again and encourage the pupils to sing along.

L E S S ON

6

CLIL – School life in the Arctic (p. 10)

Sound check 2

8

Listen and repeat. (p. 9)

CD 1

Remind pupils that colour-coding can help them remember how sounds are pronounced. Read the model sentence with them, stressing the sounds /aI/ and /eI/. Ask them what they represent (the names of the vowels ‘i’ and ‘a’). On the board, write the words like and Sunday and underline the sounds /aI/ and /eI/. Focus attention on the pronunciation, stressing the difference between the two sounds. Play the CD. Pupils listen and repeat the sentence. Audio script

Objectives: To listen, read and talk about school life in the Arctic. To develop reading comprehension. To develop cultural awareness. Language focus: Children who live in the small Inuit villages of Greenland or Alaska go to very small schools. In some schools there are only about 20 children! They study the same subjects as other children. Here they’re having an Art lesson in the Art lab. They do PE, too. They also learn about their culture and their traditions. In winter there’s lots of snow and children like making snowmen. Vocabulary (revision): School subjects. Seasons. Materials: Class CD. A world map or globe.

/aI/ /eI/ I like hiking on Saturday and Sunday.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k 2

35

(p. 6)

Listen and repeat. (p. 6)

CD 2

Focus pupils’ attention on the timetable and ask: Why is the boy’s timetable great? Elicit that he is happy because he has art, music and P.E. every day. Play the CD and ask them to repeat the tongue twister first chorally and then individually. Audio script /aI/ /eI/ My timetable is great! 3

36 CD 2

Warm-up An activity to locate the Arctic and the countries that share it.

Now listen and then practise with a friend. (p. 6)

Pupils listen to the sentences first and then practise them in pairs. Ask individual pupils to repeat the sentences to the class. Audio script 1 My name is James. 2 Is it rainy in Spain? 3 Ice cream is nice! 4 I like hiking. 5 Today is Friday. Great!

Pin up the map of the world or gather pupils around you and show them the globe. Ask them to locate the country they are in. Say: Here we are in (Spain). Ask: Where is the Arctic? Ask a pupil to point to the continent. Say: The Arctic is shared by several countries. What are they? Help pupils identify them: Canada, the United States, the Scandinavian countries and Russia. Ask pupils who lives in the Arctic (native people, hunters, trappers, miners, government officials, etc.). 1

9 CD 1

Listen and read. Then answer the questions. (p. 10) An activity to develop listening and reading comprehension.

Focus pupils’ attention on the photos and encourage them to describe each one. Ask: Is it this village big or small? Is it summer or winter there? How do you know? What are the children doing? What is the little girl doing in the second photo? In pairs, pupils then read the text. Refer them to the photos and the picture dictionary to help comprehension.

21


UniT 1

School again! Finally, they answer the questions in their notebooks, L E S S ON 7 either individually or in pairs. You may also wish to ask Time for writing (p. 11) the questions orally first, perhaps with books closed. Audio script

Objectives: To develop writing skills. To practise the language learnt so far. To speak and write about one’s timetable. To revise the use of capital letters. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135)

Children who live in the small Inuit villages of Greenland or Alaska go to very small schools. In some schools there are only about 20 children! They study the same subjects as other children. Here they’re having an Art lesson in the Art lab. They do PE, too. They also learn about their culture and their traditions. In winter there’s lots of snow and children like making Warm-up snowmen. An activity to revise the structures of the unit. Answers: 1 In the small Inuit villages of Greenland or Alaska. 2 Only about 20. 3 The same subjects as other Point to different pupils and ask: What is the date today? What is it going to be tomorrow? How many children. 4 There’s lots of snow. 5 They make school subjects do you have? How many breaks do snowmen. you have every day? What time is lunch? Encourage them to give long answers. Round-up An activity to practise and expand the vocabulary. 1 10 Listen and read. (p. 11) CD 1 An activity to prepare for the writing task. Ask pupils if they would like to live in the Arctic. Where would they live if they could choose? Point to the timetable and ask pupils to identify the With the help of the class, complete a word map on icons. Point to the girl and ask: What is she doing? the board. Write Life in the Arctic in the centre of the map and encourage everyone to contribute a word or (Writing an email.) Tell pupils they are going to read and hear about her favourite day. two. Play the CD. Pupils listen and follow the text in their o books. y i c (p. 7) v i k A t t B o Read page 10 in your Pupil’s Book. Now close your Pupil’s Book, look at the photos and complete the sentences. (p. 7) Pupils read page 10 in their Pupil’s Book again, look at the photos and complete the sentences. Answers: 1 Inuit; 2 village; 3 small; 4 20; 5 art; 6 lab; 7 snowy; 9 children; 10 snowman.

Audio script

I have English on Monday and Maths on Thursday. I like Maths. I also like Art because we can paint and draw. But my favourite subject is Music, so my favourite day is Tuesday. We sing and play the guitar. It’s lots of fun! 2 Copy and complete. (p. 11) A writing activity based on a model. Pupils complete the text with true information about their favourite day at school. Go round the room in

22


UniT 1 order to give any necessary help. When they finish, ask them to check the exercise in pairs.

Round-up

An activity to revise punctuation. Revise uses of capital letters with the class. Remind pupils we use them at the beginning of sentences, to write names, countries and languages, for the names of school subjects, the days of the week and the months of the year, and with the pronoun I. Ask them to provide examples of each use.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 8)

1 Rewrite the text using capitals. (p. 8)

L E S S ON

8

Speaking

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 9)

Objectives: To develop spoken interaction through a game. To revise wh-questions. To develop observation and memory skills. Language (revision): What is he/she doing? / What are they doing? Why is he/she (wearing sunglasses)? Because it’s (warm and sunny). Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary and vocabulary from preceding courses. Materials: Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135).

Pupils do the exercise individually or in pairs. Check by asking them to identify and spell the capitalised words. Warm-up An activity to revise the unit vocabulary. Answer: Hi, My name is Alissa and I live in Ireland. I’ve got a brother, Sam, and a sister, Mary. I’m eleven and Write the first letter of each subject and add dashes my birthday is in July. At school, my favourite subjects for all the missing letters. Pupils go up to the board are Science and Music. We have Music on Fridays, and complete the words. and Science on Wednesdays. I love animals. Here I am with my horse. What about you? Alissa Play with a friend: ask and answer. (p. 9) A game to develop spoken interaction. 2 Write a reply to Alissa. (p. 8) Pupils identify the items and the actions in the squares. Pupils write a similar text in their notebooks. In order Read out the model questions and the rules and explain to develop language awareness, ask a pupil to copy that the aim of the game is to go around the board his or her text on the board and ask pupils for help in asking and answering wh-questions. Go round the correcting mistakes if there are any. When they have room in order to give any necessary help. When pupils corrected their text, they copy it in the space provided finish the first round, they play again with a different in their Activity Book. partner. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking Collect the Activity Books for correction, and record skills using the Formative assessment sheet. pupils’ results on the Formative assessment sheet. Pupils then write the answers to the questions in their notebooks.

Round-up

A game to develop observation and memory skills. Pupils' books closed. Give pupils a few moments to memorise the page. Books closed, say incomplete sentences and elicit the missing information, for example: In square 3, the girl is wearing...

23


UniT 1

School again! L E S S ON

9

Let’s round it up! (pp. 12-13)

Pupils then write the answers to the questions in their notebooks. Audio script

Objectives: To revise and consolidate the vocabulary and structures of Unit 1. To revise the unit song. To do assessment and self-assessment activities. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Class CD. Tokens or scraps of paper.

7 CD 1

Warm-up Revising the unit song and vocabulary.

Begin the lesson by singing the unit song (p. 9). Encourage everyone to join in. Ask pupils to open their books at pages 12 and 13. Explain that they are going to revise what they have learnt in the unit. 1 Vocabulary. Copy the chart and classify the words. (p. 12) Pupils copy and complete the chart in their notebooks. When they finish, ask: Which subject is missing? (P.E.) Which day of the week? (Sunday.) Finally, ask them to say the days in order. Answers: School objects: pencil, ruler, notebook, pencil case, book, pen, school bag. School subjects: English, Geography, Science, History, Art, Music, Maths. Days of the week: Saturday, Wednesday, Tuesday, Monday, Thursday, Friday. 2

11 CD 1

Listen and put a token on the correct answer. (p. 12)

Point to each square and elicit the item. Tell pupils that they are going to hear short dialogues that correspond to one of the two items shown in each rectangle. The task is to identify the correct one by placing a token or a scrap of paper on the appropriate picture. Play the CD, pausing after each exchange to give pupils time to complete the task.

24

1 BOY GIRL

Who’s your brother? That one. The one who is playing tennis.

2 GIRL BOY

What’s your favourite subject? I love History, Now I’m studying the Romans.

3 MUM Hey! You can’t go out without your anorak. GIRL Why mum? I’m not cold. MUM Because it’s cold and foggy today. Look outside! 4 BOY GIRL

I have P.E. now, and you? Let me see. It’s ten o’clock, so I have Art. Great! Art is my favourite subject.

5 MUM Rosa what are you doing? GIRL I’m doing my homework in my room. MUM OK, but dinner is ready! 6 BOY GIRL BOY

I go swimming every week. Yes? When do you go swimming? On Thursdays. I go swimming on Thursday afternoon.

3 Ask and answer in pairs. Use this chart. (p. 12) Read the model exchange with the class and explain the activity. Using the chart, pupils produce the same type of dialogues in pairs. 4 Read, look and guess. (p. 13) Pupils read the two texts in pairs and deduct the correct answers. Answers: girl – 1; boy – 3. 5 Decipher the secret message. Write capital letters. (p. 13) Pupils decipher the message and write it in their notebooks. Check the answers by asking a volunteer to copy the text on the board.


UniT 1 Answer: Hello, I am Jane. I am from Britain so I speak English. My favourite day is Friday. I like swimming. On Friday afternoon I go to a swimming club. I love Fridays!

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(pp. 10-11)

1 Look at Unit 1 in your Pupil’s Book and answer the questions. (p. 10) Pupils check the unit and write the answers. Answers: 1 At 9 on Fridays. 2 No, there isn’t. 3 South Africa. 4 Ireland. 5 Because she is late. 6 In Rome. 7 Latin. 8 Because they’re late for the school bus. 9 Because he is in Ancient Rome. 10 About their culture and their traditions. 11 At the beginning of sentences, to write names, countries and languages, for the names of school subjects, the days of the week and the months of the year, and with the pronoun ‘I’.

2 Write captions for the following pictures. (p. 11) Pupils describe each picture orally and then write an appropriate sentence on the line provided. 3 Read and tick. (p. 11) Help pupils complete the self-assessment section by reading each objective aloud.

Testing and assessment Unit Test Photocopy the Unit Test, one per pupil. Pupils complete the test individually. Once you have corrected all the tests, return them to the pupils and help them check for mistakes by writing the answers on the board. Record pupils’ results on the Formative assessment sheet. Make sure they file their tests in their Language Portfolio. To consolidate the structures of the Unit, pupils complete the Let’s Revise! section. (Activity Book p. 76)

25


UniT 2

Exotic animals L E S S ON

1

(p. 14-15)

Objectives: To talk about exotic animals. To revise ‘have got’ and ‘can’. To revise pets and farm animals. To ask for and give information about some of their physical characteristics. To classify words with the help of charts. To develop observation and memory skills. Language focus: Which animals have got horns? Which animal can fly? Target vocabulary: Jaguar, butterfly, snake, condor, iguana, alligator, llama, toucan, goat, claws, wings, feathers, beak, horns, tail, mammals. Vocabulary (revision): Pets and farm animals. Materials: Class CD.

Audio script

alligator goat wings tail mammals jaguar condor horns 2

13 CD 1

claws beak butterfly llama snake iguana toucan feathers

Listen and repeat. (p. 15) An activity to practise the new vocabulary.

Point to the list of words and play the CD again. Pupils read and repeat the vocabulary chorally and individually. Audio script

Warm-up An activity to revise vocabulary and present the new topic. Write the names of the following animals on the board: dog, horse and toucan. With the help of the class, classify them into the following categories: Pet (dog) - Farm animal (horse) - Exotic animal (toucan). Ask pupils to give you more examples for all the categories. Copy the title and the objectives of the unit on the board. Read and explain them to the class. 1

12

Look, listen and say the number. (p. 14) An activity to present the new vocabulary.

1 condor 2 goat 3 horns 4 llama 5 butterfly 6 wings 7 iguana 8 alligator 3

14 CD 1

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

tail jaguar mammals claws beak toucan feathers snake

Which animal is missing? (p. 15) An activity to develop attention and listening skills.

Tell pupils that in this activity, they will hear the animals named, with one missing each time. The task is to Focus pupils’ attention on the double page illustration listen carefully and identify the missing animal. Correct and ask: What can you see in the scene? (Animals in the exercise together. the rainforest.) Point to each animal. Pupils identify it Audio script in L1. Repeat the names in English: alligator, goat, llama, etc. Then ask what each animal can do, for example: What can (goats) do? Elicit: They can jump, 1 jaguar, butterfly, snake, iguana, alligator, llama, toucan, goat. climb and run. 2 jaguar, butterfly, snake, condor, iguana, llama, Point to the numbered items on the pages and toucan, goat. present the words. Then play track 12 (Class CD 1). Ask 3 jaguar, butterfly, snake, condor, iguana, alligator, pupils to concentrate on the pronunciation as they llama, goat. listen. Play the CD again and ask them to associate 4 jaguar, snake, condor, iguana, alligator, llama, the appropriate number with each word, for example: toucan, goat. alligator - eight. They do the same with all the items. CD 1

26


UniT 2 5 jaguar, butterfly, condor, iguana, alligator, llama, toucan, goat Answers: 1 condor; 2 alligator; 3 toucan; 4 butterfly; 5 snake. 4 Copy and complete the columns. Then compare your chart with your partner. (p. 15) An activity to practise the new vocabulary and revise animals. Remind pupils what word charts are used for (to classify vocabulary into lexical sets). Before starting, brainstorm animals they remember from last year. Then they complete the activity individually (this can be done in alphabetical order) and compare their answers with a partner. Correct the exercise by having two pupils write their lists on the board for everyone to check.

Reinforcement activity: Pupils think back to the nine animals they have learnt in this lesson and classify them according to their size, from the smallest to the biggest orally. Extension activity: In their notebooks, pupils draw two exotic animals and describe them in writing. Copy the following model on the board for them to follow: This is a toucan. Toucans can fly. They are not very big and they’ve got wings, feathers and a big beak. When they finish they compare their texts with a partner. Finally ask some volunteers to show their drawings and read out their descriptions to the class.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 12)

1 Guess the animal words and rewrite them under the pictures. (p. 12) Pupils identify each animal and rewrite the words.

Answers: Pets: cats, dogs, turtles, fish, etc. Farm animals: horses, rabbits, pigs, hens, sheep, etc. Exotic animals: jaguar, toucan, iguana, elephant etc.

Answers: 1 goat; 2 butterfly; 3 llama; 4 toucan; 5 iguana; 6 alligator; 7 leopard; 8 snake; 9 condor. 2 Answer the questions. (p. 12)

5 Look and answer. (p. 15) An activity to develop observation skills and practise the alphabet.

Answers: 1 butterfly, toucan and condor; 2 jaguar, llama and goat; 3 jaguar, llama and goat; 4 snake, iguana and alligator.

Pupils work in pairs. If necessary, revise the alphabet before they start. Check the answers orally. Answers: 1 There is a banana in the scene. (Pears, apples, oranges, grapes, melon, etc.) 2 There are ten. 3 Seven animals can fly: four butterflies, a toucan and a condor. 4 Four animals have got claws: a jaguar, a condor, an alligator and an iguana. 5 A goat has got horns. 6 Pupils’ own answers.

Round-up

A memory game to consolidate the language of the lesson. Books closed, ask pupils questions about the page, for example: What colour is the toucan? Where is the goat? Which is the biggest animal on the page? etc.

27


UniT 2

Exotic animals L E S S ON

2

Difficult homework! (pp. 16-17) Objectives: To present the new vocabulary in context. To develop observation skills and reading comprehension. To stimulate the imagination. Language focus: Can llamas run? We’re in South America. Have goats got horns? Where does a jaguar live? Target vocabulary: South America, cute. Vocabulary (revision): Vocabulary from lesson 1. Exotic animals. Materials: Class CD.

1

15 CD 1

Listen and read. (pp. 16-17) A listening activity to practise vocabulary in context.

Focus pupils’ attention on the double page and revise the characters’ names. Then ask them to describe what is going on in the frames: Our friends are in a Geography class. They are checking their homework about animals in the rainforest. Suddenly, they are transported to South America and find themselves in the middle of the rainforest. There are some exotic animals around them. Ask questions about the comic, for example: What map can you see in frame 1? Does Hanna know the lesson? Where are our friends in frame 7? What animal can you see in frame 8? etc. Play the CD. Pupils listen and follow the dialogue. Play the CD again with pauses for them to repeat chorally or individually. Check their pronunciation and intonation.

4 TEACHER Can condors fly? HANNA Uh … 5 TEACHER Hmmm, Hanna, you don’t know the answers, do you? 6 FREDDY

I can help Hanna!

7 MATT Where are we? AND AMY FREDDY We’re in South America, in the rainforest. Look at beautiful butterflies! 8 MATT HANNA AMY

What’s that? Oh, it’s an iguana. It’s cute! Cute??

9 FREDDY HANNA

And look! There’s a condor. And some mountain goats!

10 HANNA Freddy, are goats big? FREDDY Yes, they are. 11 HANNA Have they got horns? FREDDY Yes, they have. 12 HANNA Can they run and jump? FREDDY Yes, they CAN! When you finish, explain the vocabulary and make sure that pupils understand the new expressions. Explain the meaning of cute (attractive in an amusing or cuddly way). Remind them that whenever Freddy takes his glasses off, something very special happens. Ask them: What happened in unit 1? What happens in this unit?

Audio script 1 TEACHER Good morning. First, let’s see your homework. 2 TEACHER The llama and the condor live in the Andes. Where does the jaguar live? FREDDY In the Andes. 3 TEACHER Hanna, can llamas run? HANNA Uh …

28

2 Answer the questions. (p. 17) Answering questions to check comprehension. Pupils answer the questions in writing. Check orally.


UniT 2 Answers: 1 No; she doesn’t. 2 In the Andes. 3 No, they L E S S ON 3 haven’t. 4 Yes, they have. 5 They live in the mountains. Difficult homework! (pp. 16-17) 6 Yes, they can.

Round-up

A memory game to consolidate the language of the lesson. Books closed, read out different sentences and questions said by the characters. Elicit the character’s name each time. Then repeat the dialogue, making deliberate mistakes. For example, in frame 1, say toucan instead of llama, in frame 5 say North America instead of South America, etc. Ask pupils to correct you.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 13)

1 Look at the comic on pages 16-17 in your Pupil’s Book. Read the sentences and tick true or false. Correct the sentences that are false. (p. 13) Pupils correct the false sentences in their notebooks. Answers: 1 F. Hanna doesn’t know the answers. 2 F. Freddy can help her. 3 F. They are in South America. 4 T; 5 F. They live in the mountains. 6 F. They live in the jungle.

Objectives: To practice the new vocabulary in context. To develop observation skills and reading comprehension. To act out dialogues. To ask and answer information questions. Language focus: Can (llamas) run? We’re in South America. Have (goats) got horns? Where do (jaguars) live? Raul is from Mexico. He’s Mexican. Vocabulary (revision): Exotic animals, countries and nationalities. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135). Warm-up An activity to revise exotic animals and their descriptions. Brainstorm exotic animals with the class and write them on the board. Then choose one and describe it. Pupils have to guess what it is according to your description, for example: This is a small animal. It’s got wings and it can fly. It’s got a big beak and different colours. What is it? Elicit: A toucan. Ask different pupils to do the same. 1

15 CD 1

2 Match the questions to the answers. (p. 13) Pupils do the exercise individually and compare their answers in pairs. Correct by having pairs of pupils read out the questions and the answers. Answers: 1-d; 2-c; 3-a; 4-b. 3 What are they saying? (p. 13) Explain the activity first. Pupils look at what is happening in the scene and imagine the characters’ dialogue. Encourage them to use the new vocabulary and expressions.

Listen and read. (pp. 16-17) A listening activity to revise the comic.

Play the comic again. Pupils listen and follow the text in their books. Divide the class into five groups and assign the roles of Amy, Hannah, Matt, Freddy and the teacher. If necessary, play the CD again, with pauses after each line so the groups can repeat it. Otherwise, pupils recite their lines either from the book or from memory. Encourage them to use the appropriate intonation and mime their character’s facial expressions and actions. Then swap the roles around and repeat the activity.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 13)

3 What are they saying? (p. 13) An activity to act out a dialogue. Divide the class into pairs. Pupils take out their Activity

29


UniT 2

Exotic animals Books and read their dialogue out to their partner. Each pair then practises both dialogues, one after the other. Invite different pairs to act out their dialogues in front of the class. If you wish, these can be recorded and then played back so pupils can correct their pronunciation and intonation. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet. Read and say. An activity to revise countries and nationalities. Draw the following flags with the help of the class: Mexico – Brazil – Peru – Chile – Canada – United States – Spain – Britain – Poland. Write the country under each one and the name of the following person: Raul – Joao – Rosa – Amanda – Jack – Steve – Francisco – Liz – Jarek . Point to the first person and the flag and say: Raul is from Mexico. He’s Mexican. Ask pupils in pairs to do the same with the rest of the flags. Reinforcement activity: Pupils read the comic aloud with you, then they can do it in pairs. Extension activity: Pupils work in groups to prepare a questionnaire about animals. Encourage them to use the following questions: Where do (llamas) live? Have they got horns? Can they jump? etc. Then the groups exchange their questionnaires and answer the questions. Correct the task with the class orally.

L E S S ON

4

Let’s learn! (p. 18) Objectives: To revise the present simple and ‘can’. To give short answers. To ask and answer yes/no questions. To develop spoken interaction and spoken production. Language focus: Is the (monkey) a mammal? Yes, it is. Does it live on a farm? No it, doesn’t. Can it climb trees? Yes, it can. Has it got feathers? No it hasn’t. Vocabulary (revision): Animals and their physical characteristics. Animals’ abilities. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135)

Warm-up A vocabulary activity to revise animals. Start the class with a simple miming game. Say: Let’s be some animals! Mime a monkey and say: Let’s be a monkey! Pupils repeat the word monkey as they mime. Repeat this with different animals. Ask different pupils to mime an animal. The rest of the class identifies it. 1

16 CD 1

Listen and read. (p. 18) An activity to present the structures of the unit.

Establish the situation: Liz is testing Wiz on his homework, which is about animals. Wiz is sitting at a desk looking nervous. At the end, an accident happens. Play the CD so pupils can listen to the complete text and find out what the accident was (Liz has turned Wiz into a monkey by mistake). Play it again. Pupils repeat each sentences after the pause. Make sure that they understand the questions and the short answers. Audio script LIZ Is the monkey a mammal? WIZ Yes, it is.

30


UniT 2 LIZ Does it live on a farm? WIZ No, it doesn’t. LIZ Can it climb trees? WIZ Yes, it can. LIZ Has it got feathers? WIZ Erm… er… No, it hasn’t. LIZ Well done! LIZ

Sorry, Wiz!

2 Chit-chat. (p. 18) A pair activity to ask and answer information questions. Help pupils identify the animals in the photos. Demonstrate the exchange with a pupil and ask the class to repeat chorally. In pairs, pupils ask and answer questions using the information in the chart. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.

Round-up

Books closed, ask different pupils the questions they have practised in exercise 2, then make up more questions. Reinforcement activity: Pupils read the comic again and identify the frames where questions and short answers are used. Extension activity: Ask pupils to write similar dialogues as in exercise 2 using different animals.

2

(p. 14)

Complete the table. Then ask and answer in pairs. (p. 14)

Pupils complete the table with the appropriate words. Check their answers orally. In pair, pupils then use the table to ask and answer questions. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.

5

Let’s sing! (p. 19) Objectives: To learn a song about the moon. To revise the simple present. To practise the sounds /l/ and /r/. To develop listening comprehension skills through a song. Language focus: I see the moon, the moon sees me, under the shade of the old oak tree, please let the light that shines on me, shine on me and my village. Over the mountains, over the sea, the whole wide world. Vocabulary (revision): Moon, tree, village, mountain, sea, world, see, shine. Materials: Class CD. Warm-up An activity to present the theme of the song. Write the words moon and shine on the board. Ask pupils what the moon shines on at night. Elicit: On mountains, trees, village, seas. 1

A game to revise vocabulary and develop memory.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

L E S S ON

17 CD 1

Listen and sing. (p. 19) Activities to sing the unit song.

Focus pupils’ attention on the illustrations and ask them to predict what the song is about (the moon shining on all the villages in the world). Play the CD while they follow the text in their books. Make sure that everyone understands the song. Audio script

I see the moon I see the moon, The moon sees me Under the shade of the old oak tree. Please let the light that shines on me Shine on me and my village. Over the mountains, Over the sea, Under the shade of the old oak tree. Please let the light that shines on me Shine on the whole wide world.

31


UniT 2

Exotic animals Play the song again, pausing after each verse so pupils can read the lyrics in their books. Finally repeat the song and encourage everyone to sing along.

Sound check 2

18

Listen and repeat. (p. 19)

CD 1

Remind pupils that colour-coding can help them remember how sounds are pronounced. Read the model sentence with them, stressing the sounds /l/ and /r/. On the board, write the words lion and rabbit and underline the sounds /l/ and /r/. Focus attention on the pronunciation, stressing the difference between the two sounds. Play the CD. Pupils listen and repeat the sentence. Audio script /l/ /r/ The large lion is looking at the rabbit running.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k 2

37

(p. 14)

Listen and repeat. (p. 14)

CD 2

Focus pupils’ attention on the illustration and ask: What colour are the dolphins? What colour are the parrots? Play the CD and ask them to repeat the sentence first chorally and then individually. Audio script /l/ /r/ Blue dolphins and red parrots. 3

38 CD 2

Now listen and circle the sounds /l/ and /r/. Then practise with a friend. (p. 14)

Audio script

Look at the llama! Please don’t run. A brown and yellow tree house. My uncle and my grandad. Raccoons can run and climb.

L E S S ON

CLIL – The tropical rainforest (p. 20) Objectives: To read and talk about the tropical rainforest. To discover what rainforest animal is in danger of extinction. To develop reading comprehension. Language focus: Rainforest are warm and wet forests. There are rainforests in South America and Central America. There are two seasons in the rainforests. Million of animals live in the rainforests. Jaguars are in danger of extinction. They live in caves. They are 1.8 m long. They eat mammals. Target vocabulary: Waterfalls, insects, arachnids, reptiles, amphibians. Vocabulary (revision): Animals. Materials: Class CD. Warm-up An activity to locate South and Central America, Africa, Oceania and Asia. Pin up the map of the world or gather pupils around you and show them the globe. Ask them to locate South America. Say: What countries can you find here? Elicit: Brazil, Peru, Bolivia, Argentine, Chile, etc. Ask pupils to point to Central America, Africa, Oceania and Asia. Explain that in this lesson they are going to read about the rainforests located in these places. 19 CD 1

Ask pupils to take out a green pencil and a red pencil. Play the CD, pausing after each sentence to give them time to circle the appropriate letters. Correct by saying the sentences and eliciting the colour of the ‘l’ and the ‘r’ they have identified. Play the CD again so they can repeat the sentences first and then practise them in pairs. Finally, ask individual pupils to repeat them to the class.

32

6

Listen and read. Then answer the questions. (p. 20) An activity to develop listening and reading comprehension.

Focus pupils’ attention on the photos and explain what rainforests are. Say: Rainforests are warm, wet forests. Encourage pupils to identify the animals. Ask: Which is the biggest animal in the picture? (The jaguar.) Can jaguars run? (Yes, they can.) Have birds got feathers? (Yes, they have.) etc.


UniT 2 In pairs, pupils then read the text. Refer them to the photos to help comprehension. Make sure they know how to pronounce the new words. Play the CD. Pupils listen while they follow the text in their books. Finally, they answer the questions in their notebooks, either individually or in pairs. You may also wish to ask the questions orally first, perhaps with books closed.

Answers: 1 America; 2 ecosystem; 3 wet; 4 dry; 5 two; 6 waterfalls; 7 jaguar; 8 cave; 9 mammals.

L E S S ON

7

Time for writing (p. 21)

Audio script

Rainforests are warm, wet forests. There are rainforests in South and Central America, Africa, Oceania and Asia. Tropical rainforests are very important to the Earth's ecosystem. Rainforests have 2 metres of rain each year and two seasons: the wet season and the dry season. There are lots of different waterfalls in the rainforest. Millions of insects, arachnids (spiders), reptiles (snakes), amphibians, birds and mammals (jaguars) live in rainforests. Many rainforest animals are in danger of extinction. For example, jaguars. These wild cats live in caves. They are about 1.8 metres long and their tail is 2-3 metres long. They eat mammals, reptiles and birds. Answers: 1 Rainforests are warm, wet forests. 2 They are in South and Central America, Africa, Oceania and Asia. 3 They have two seasons: the wet season and the dry season. 4 Yes, it does. 5 They eat mammals, reptiles and birds.

Round-up

An activity to practise the vocabulary. Give some information about the text and ask pupils to say whether it is true or false. Tell them to correct the false ones, for example: Rainforests are dry forests. (False. They are wet forests.) There are two seasons in the rainforest. (True.) etc.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

Pupils read page 20 in their Pupil’s Book again, look at the photos and complete the sentences.

(p. 15)

Read page 20 in your Pupil’s Book. Now close your Pupil’s Book, look at the photos and complete the sentences. (p. 15)

Objectives: To develop writing skills. To practise the language learnt so far. To speak and write about animals. To revise the present simple and ‘have got’. To revise the use of full stops and commas. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135)

Warm-up An activity to revise the structures of the unit. Point to different pupils and ask: Where do jaguars live? Have they got claws? What do they eat? etc. Encourage them to give long answers. 1

20 CD 1

Listen and read about the Andes Mountain Goat. (p. 21) An activity to prepare for the writing task.

Point to the page and ask: What kind of document is this? (An article.) What is it about? (The Andes goat.) Tell pupils they are going to read and hear about the Andes goat. Play the CD. Pupils listen and follow the text in their books. Audio script

The Andes Mountain Goat The goat is a mammal. It has got four legs but it hasn’t got any claws. It has got short horns and it can have short or long hair. It can be black, grey, brown or white.

33


UniT 2

Exotic animals It lives in dry places and it eats grass and leaves. It doesn’t usually eat bugs. It gives us milk and meat. Check that everyone understands the text by asking comprehension questions. Point to the words in the box and remind pupils about the differences between the English spoken in Britain and the English spoken in other English-speaking countries (although this difference is lessening thanks to films, television, pop music, etc.) Ask pupils to find the American word ‘bugs’ in the text and give its British equivalent (insects). 2 Write your own article. (p. 21) A writing activity based on a model. Pupils write their own article about an animal. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. When they finish, ask them to check their texts in pairs.

Round-up

An activity to revise spelling and punctuation. Revise uses of full stops and commas with the class. Tell pupils that in English, as in most languages, commas are used to separate words or short sentences and full stops to end sentences.

Ac t i v i t y

B oo k

(p. 16)

1 Rewrite the text using capital letters, commas and full stops. (p. 16) Pupils do the exercise individually or in pairs. Check by asking them to read out the text sentence by sentence. Answers: Toucans live in the rainforests of South America. They eat fruit and have got large beaks and beautiful feathers. Condors live in the mountains of Peru, Bolivia and Chile. They are very large birds with black, brown and white feathers. 2 Describe an animal that you like. (p. 16) Pupils write a similar text in their notebooks. In order to develop language awareness, ask a pupil to copy

34

his or her text on the board and ask pupils for help in correcting mistakes if there are any. When they have corrected their text, they copy it in the space provided in their Activity Book. Collect the Activity Books for correction, and record pupils’ results on the Formative assessment sheet.

L E S S ON

8

Speaking

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 17)

Objectives: To develop spoken interaction through a game. To revise the simple present, ‘can’ and ‘have got’. To practise short answers. To develop observation and memory skills. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135). Warm-up An activity to revise the unit vocabulary. Write the word Rainforest on the board and elicit the names of animals that live in rainforests. Collect your points! (p. 17) A game to develop spoken interaction. Make sure pupils have the necessary material: coins, counters and a pencil and a piece of paper handy. Read the rules of the game with the class and explain its aim, which is to ‘collect’ as many points as possible. Pupils play in pairs, they go around the board identifying animals in the first level, labelling the pictures in the second level and asking and answering questions about animals in the third level Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. When pupils finish the first round, they play again with a different partner. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.


UniT 2 Round-up

A game to develop observation and memory skills. Pupils’ books closed. Give pupils a few moments to memorise the page. Books closed, ask them to name as many animals as they can. Then ask questions about the animals, for example: What do they eat? Where do they live? What can they do? etc. Pupils give short answers.

L E S S ON

9

Let’s round it up! (pp. 22-23) Objectives: To revise and consolidate the vocabulary and structures of Unit 2. To revise the unit song. To do assessment and self-assessment activities. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Class CD. Tokens or scraps of paper. 17 CD 1

Warm-up Revising the unit song and vocabulary.

Begin the lesson by singing the unit song (p. 19). Encourage everyone to join in. Ask pupils to open their books at pages 22 and 23. Tell them that they are going to revise what they have learnt in the unit. 1 Vocabulary. Identify the following animals. (p. 22) Read and explain the example: What number 1? It’s a butterfly. Pupils work in pairs asking and answering the questions. When they finish, correct the exercise orally with the class. Answers: 1 butterfly; 2 condor; 3 llama; 4 goat; 5 horse; 6 iguana; 7 jaguar; 8 alligator; 9 toucan; 10 snake; 11 rabbit; 12 cow. 2 Read and say true (T) or false (F). (p. 22) Pupils do the task and rewrite the false ones in their notebooks supplying the correct information. Check orally.

Answers: 1 True. 2 False. Monkeys have got fur. 3 True. 4 True. 5 False. They have got large beaks. 3

21 CD 1

Listen and put a token on the correct answer. (p. 22)

Point to each square and elicit the item. Tell pupils that they are going to hear short dialogues that correspond to one of the two items shown in each rectangle. The task is to identify the correct one by placing a token or a scrap of paper on the appropriate picture. Play the CD, pausing after each exchange to give pupils time to complete the task. Audio script 1 TEACHER Is the jaguar a mammal? GIRL Yes, it is. 2 GIRL BOY GIRL

Geography is my favourite subject. Yes, What are you studying now? Animals in the rainforest. I love animals!

3 TEACHER GIRL MUM GIRL

Can raccoons climb trees? Yes, they can. Have they got tails? Yes, they’ve got long tails.

4 BOY GIRL BOY GIRL BOY GIRL

I’ve got a pet. Guess what it is. Let me see. Has it got wings? No, it hasn’t. Can it run? Yes, very fast. Oh! I know. It’s a dog!

5 TEACHER Have toucans got feathers? GIRL Yes, they have. They have large beaks, too. TEACHER Correct! 6 BOY GIRL BOY GIRL

What’s your favourite animal? Dolphins. I love dolphins. Why? They’re cute and they’re very intelligent too.

35


UniT 2

Exotic animals 4 Speak. Guess my animal. Play in pairs. (p. 23) Pupils ask questions in order to guess the animal, using the language chart as a model. 5 Read and match the pieces of paper. Then write the texts in your notebook. (p. 23) Pupils reorder the texts and write them in their notebooks. Check orally. Answers: 1st text: 1, 4; 2nd text: 3, 2. 6 Write about an animal or about you and your pet. Use the texts in exercise 5 as models. Don’t forget the full stops and the commas! (p. 23) Pupils write and illustrate their compositions in their notebooks.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

Listen carefully, choose the right picture and CD 2 write the answers to the questions you hear. (p. 19) 39

Point to each square and elicit the animal. Tell pupils that they are going to hear questions. The task consists in writing the answers on the lines provided. Play the CD, pausing after each question to give pupils time to complete the task. Answers: 1 Yes, they do. 2 Yes, they have. 3 Yes, they can. 4 No, it isn’t. 5 Yes, it does. 6 No, it hasn’t. Audio script 1 Do lions live in the rainforest? 2 Have toucans got large beaks? 3 Can monkeys climb trees? 4 Is the snake a mammal? 5 Does the condor have claws? 6 Has the llama got a long tail?

(p. 18-19)

1 Look at Unit 2 in your Pupil’s Book. Fill in the gaps and answer the questions. (p. 18) Pupils check the unit and write the answers. Answers: 1 elephant; No, you can’t. 2 beak; A toucan. 3 llamas; Yes, they can; 4 He is taking his glasses off. 5 iguanas; Yes, she does; 6 He is looking at a condor. 7 running; Because an angry goat is running after him; 8 Snakes, alligators, butterflies, iguanas and toucans. 9 Snakes, alligators, butterflies, jaguars, iguanas and toucans. 10 jaguar; Yes, it does. 11 Rainforests are warm, wet forests. There are rainforests in South and Central America, Africa, Oceania and Asia. Tropical rainforests are very important to the earth’s ecosystem.

36

2

3 Read and tick. (p. 19) Help pupils complete the self-assessment section by reading each objective aloud.

Testing and assessment Unit Test Photocopy the Unit Test, one per pupil. Pupils complete the test individually. Once you have corrected all the tests, return them to the pupils and help them check for mistakes by writing the answers on the board. Record pupils’ results on the Formative assessment sheet. Make sure they file their tests in their Language Portfolio. To consolidate the structures of the Unit, pupils complete the Let’s Revise! section. (Activity Book p. 76)


The Natural History Museum Pages 24-25 Objectives: To read and learn about The Natural History Museum in London, England. To match texts and photos. To develop reading comprehension. To develop cultural awareness. Language focus: The Natural History Museum in London, England has some fantastic exhibitions. There are millions of fascinating specimens in the lab for you to look at and study. There are lots of restaurants and cafés in the museum. There’s a picnic area for packed lunches, too! You can buy souvenirs in the museum shops. They sell books, models and fossil replicas. There is a special zone where you can learn all about dinosaurs. Target vocabulary: Natural History Museum, exhibition, specimen, picnic area, packed lunch, souvenir, model, fossil replica, zone, dinosaur, fascinating. Vocabulary (revision): Lab, restaurant, café, shop, book, fantastic. Materials: Class CD.

Museum from the outside. Direct their attention to photo 1 and ask: What can you see on exhibition here? Elicit: Dinosaurs. Point to the second photo and ask What are the two people doing? Elicit: They are looking at fossils. In pairs, pupils then read the text and do the matching exercise. Then they listen to the recording to check their answers. Answers: A-3; B-2; C-5; D-4: E-1. 2 Now decide if these sentences are true or false. (p. 25) Focus pupils’ attention on the sentences and tell them to decide in pairs whether they are true or false. Then check their answers orally. Answers: 1-F; 2-T; 3-T; 4-F; 5-T. 3 Answer the questions. (p. 25) Point to the questions and tell the pupils to ask and answer the questions in pairs.

Warm-up An activity to introduce the topic of museums.

Round-up

Explain the meaning of Natural History Museum. Ask pupils if they have ever been to a Natural History Museum. Ask: What can you see at a Natural History Museum? Elicit exhibitions, specimens, fossil replicas, dinosaurs, souvenirs and tell them that they are going to read about the Natural History Museum in London, England.

With the help of the class, complete a word map on the board. Write The Natural History Museum in the centre of the map and encourage everyone to contribute a word or two.

1

22 CD 1

Read and match the paragraphs to the photos. Then listen and check. (p. 24) An activity to develop oral and reading comprehension.

Focus pupils’ attention on the photos and encourage them to describe each one. Point to photo 3 and explain that this is a shot of the Natural History

An activity to practise and expand the vocabulary.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 68)

1 Look at the photos and complete the sentences with the words in the box. Pupils read pages 24 and 25 in their Pupil’s Book again and complete the sentences. Answers: 1 exhibitions; 2 dinosaurs; 3 specimens; 4 packed lunches; 5 souvenirs.

37


UniT 3

Busy lives! L E S S ON

1

(pp. 26-27)

Objectives: To talk about food and nutrition. To revise the present continuous. To revise clothes, school subjects and animals. To classify words with the help of charts. To segment words. To develop observation and memory skills. Language focus: What are the people in the scene doing? Target vocabulary: Castle, king, queen, princess, frog, shooting star, roast beef, water, lamb chop, cheese, cabbage, mushroom, pear, peach, melon, grapes, have a bath, stargaze. Vocabulary (revision): Actions. Clothes. School subjects. Animals. Materials: Class CD. Warm-up An activity to revise vocabulary and present the new topic. With the help of the class, complete a word map on the board. Write The Middle Ages in the centre of the map and explain that in Europe they lasted from the 10th to the 15th century approximately. Ask pupils to think of words that they associate with the Middle Ages and encourage everyone to contribute one or two. Copy the title and the objectives of the unit on the board. Read and explain them to the class. 1

23 CD 1

Look, listen and say the number. (p. 26) An activity to present the new vocabulary.

listen. Play the CD again and ask them to associate the appropriate number with each word, for example: Castle – three. They do the same with all the items. Audio script

castle king queen princess frog shooting star roast beef water lamb chop 2

24 CD 1

38

Listen and repeat. (p. 27) An activity to practise the new vocabulary.

Point to the list of words and play the CD again. Pupils read and repeat the vocabulary chorally and individually. Audio script 1 stargaze 2 shooting star 3 castle 4 queen 5 king 6 roast beef 7 cheese 8 mushroom 9 water 3

25 CD 1

Focus pupils’ attention on the double page illustration and ask: Who can you see in the scene? (The King, the Queen, the princess, etc.) Point to each part of the castle. Pupils identify it in L1 and describe what is going on there. Repeat what they say in English: The King and Queen are eating; the princess is talking to a frog, etc. Then ask what a lot of people do when they see a shooting star. Elicit that they make a wish. Point to the numbered items on the pages and present the words. Then play track 23 (Class CD 1). Ask pupils to concentrate on the pronunciation as they

cabbage mushroom pear peach melon cheese grapes have a bath stargaze

10 lamb chop 11 cabbage 12 pear 13 peach 14 melon 15 grapes 16 princess 17 frog 18 have a bath

Listen again. Which item of food is missing? (p. 27) An activity to develop attention and listening skills.

Tell pupils that in this activity, they will hear the food items named, with one missing each time. The task is to listen carefully and identify the missing item. Correct the exercise together. Audio script 1 roast beef, lamb chop, mushroom, cabbage, pear, peach, melon, grapes.


UniT 3 2 roast beef, water, lamb chop, mushroom, cabbage, pear, peach, grapes. 3 water, lamb chop, mushroom, cabbage, pear, peach, melon, grapes. 4 roast beef, water, lamb chop, mushroom, pear, peach, melon, grapes. Answers: 1 water; 2 melon; 3 roast beef; 4 cabbage. 4 Copy the word chain. Then find, circle and complete the chart. (p. 27) An activity to practise the new vocabulary and revise clothes. Ask pupils what word charts are used for (to classify vocabulary into lexical sets). Before starting, brainstorm clothes they remember from last year. Then ask them to do the activity individually and compare their answers with a partner. When they finish, they write the words they have found in the chart. (This can be done in alphabetical order.) Correct the exercise by having two pupils write their lists on the board for everyone to check. Answers: Food: peach, cheese, pear, cabbage, mushroom, water, melon, grapes, roast beef. Clothes: T-shirt, jeans, dress, shoes, belt, sunhat, jacket, trainers. 5 Look and answer. (p. 27) An activity to develop observation skills and practise the alphabet. Pupils work in pairs. If necessary, revise the alphabet before they start on question 5. Check the answers orally.

Round-up

A memory game to consolidate the language of the lesson. Books closed, ask pupils questions about the page, for example: What is the princess wearing? What colour is the frog? What are the king and queen drinking? etc. Reinforcement activity: Pupils think back to the ten food items they have seen in this lesson and put them in alphabetical order orally. Extension activity: In their notebooks, pupils draw four columns and head them Breakfast – Lunch – Snack – Dinner. They complete each column with what they had for each meal the day before and compare their answers with a partner. When they finish, say: Raise your hand if you had (roast beef) yesterday. Do the same with the rest of the food items presented in this lesson.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 20)

1 Write the missing vowels. (p. 20) Pupils identify each item and complete the words. Answers: castle; king; queen; frog; shooting star; grapes. 2 Circle the odd one out and label the sets. (p. 20) Answers: 1 cabbage, fruit; 2 frog, actions; 3 mushroom, meat; 4 break, school subjects; 5 butterfly, mammals; 6 bread, drinks.

Answers: 1 She is near the wall of the castle. 2 They are eating roast beef, lamb chops, cabbage, mushrooms, pears, peaches, melon and grapes. 3 The princess is talking to a frog, the wizard is stargazing and a boy is having a bath. 4 Pupils’ own answers. 5 Pupils’ own answers.

39


UniT 3

Busy lives! L E S S ON

2

At the court of Queen Gertrude (pp. 28-29) Objectives: To present the new vocabulary in context. To develop observation skills and reading comprehension. To stimulate the imagination. Language focus: We usually have P.E. in the gym, but today we’re going to the park. We always go to bed at half past nine, but tonight we’re stargazing. Target vocabulary: Gym, lake, quick. Vocabulary (revision): Vocabulary from lesson 1. School subjects. Adverbs of frequency. Parts of the day. Materials: Class CD. 1

26 CD 1

Listen and read. (pp. 28-29) A listening activity to practise vocabulary in context.

Focus pupils’ attention on the double page and revise the characters’ names. Then ask them to describe what is going on in the frames: The class is going to the park to play football. Freddy kicks the ball into a small lake and takes his glasses off to go in and retrieve it. Suddenly, they are no longer in the park and their teacher has turned into a queen. But then she is transformed again… Ask questions about the comic, for example: Where do the children usually have P.E.? Who is sitting on the ball? What are they doing in frame 9? What do they see in frame 10? What does the teacher turn into in frame 11? etc. Play the CD. Pupils listen and follow the dialogue. Play the CD again with pauses for them to repeat, chorally or individually. Check their pronunciation and intonation. Audio script

5 FREDDY

I’ve got an idea!

6 FREDDY

Hello, Mr Frog. But… where are we?

7 HANNA FROG

Where are you going? To the Queen’s castle. Come with me!

8 CHILDREN

Ooohhh!

9 HANNA

We’re not having sandwiches today…..we’re having roast beef! I usually teach these children, but now I’m… Queen of the Castle!

QUEEN

10 MATT

FREDDY

AMY 11 CHILDREN

We always go to bed at half past nine… But tonight we’re stargazing. Look, a shooting star! Quick! Make a wish! Ah, ah, ah!!!

When you finish, explain the vocabulary and make sure that pupils understand the new expressions. Remind them that whenever Freddy takes his glasses off, something very special happens. Ask them: What happened in unit 1? And in unit 2? 2 Choose the correct option: a, b or c. (p. 29) Completing sentences to check comprehension. Pupils complete the sentences. Check orally. Answers: 1 b; 2 a; 3 b; 4 c.

Round-up

A memory game to consolidate the language of the lesson.

1 TEACHER We usually have P.E. in the gym, but today we’re going to the park. Books closed, read out different sentences and questions said by the characters. Elicit the character’s 2 TEACHER And we’re playing football! name each time. Then repeat the dialogue, making deliberate mistakes. For example, in frame 1, say: Art 3 SPLASH! instead of P.E., in frame 2 say basketball instead of football, etc. Ask pupils to correct you. 4 FREDDY I can’t get the ball, Matt!

40


UniT 3 Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 21)

1 Look at the comic on pages 28-29 in your Pupil’s Book and correct the sentences. (p. 21)

on the board. Point to one item and say: I eat (chicken) once a week. Teach the expressions once, twice, (three) times a day, a week, a month, a year. Point to different pupils and ask them how often they eat the food items listed on the board.

Pupils rewrite the correct sentences in their notebooks. 1 Answers: 1 in the gym; 2 going to the park; 3 frog by the lake; 4 castle; 5 There aren’t any oranges; 6 roast beef; 7 always; 8 at night. 2 Match the questions to the answers. (p. 21) Pupils do the exercise individually and compare their answers in pairs. Correct by having pairs of pupils read out the questions and the answers to the class. Answers: 1-d; 2-a; 3-b; 4-c. 3 What are they saying? (p. 21) Explain the activity first. Pupils look at what is happening in the scene and imagine the characters’ dialogue. Encourage them to use the new vocabulary and expressions.

L E S S ON

3

At the court of Queen Gertrude (pp. 28-29) Objectives: To talk about daily routine. To revise clock time and the parts of the day. To act out dialogues. To complete a ‘daily routine’ chart. Language focus: How often do you (eat chicken)? I eat chicken (every day), once a (week), twice a week, three times a (month). Vocabulary (revision): Clock time. Parts of the day. Routine and weekend activities. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135). Warm-up An activity to revise food items and introduce ‘How often do you…?’. Brainstorm food items with the class and write them

26 CD 1

Listen and read. (pp. 28-29) A listening activity to revise the comic.

Play the comic again. Pupils listen and follow the text in their books. Divide the class into five groups and assign the roles of Amy, Hannah, Matt, Freddy and the teacher. If necessary, play the CD again, with pauses after each line so the groups can repeat it. Otherwise, pupils recite their lines either from the book or from memory. Encourage them to use the appropriate intonation and mime their character’s facial expressions and actions. Then swap the roles around and repeat the activity. 9

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 21)

3 What are they saying? (p. 21) An activity to act out a dialogue. Divide the class into pairs. Pupils take out their Activity Books and read their dialogue out to their partner. Each pair then practises both dialogues, one after the other. Invite different pairs to act out their dialogues in front of the class. If you wish, these can be recorded and then played back so pupils can correct their pronunciation and intonation. (This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.) Say what you do. An activity to revise clock time and the parts of the day. Draw a timeline on the board and ask pupils what parts of the day it should be divided into. Elicit morning, afternoon, evening, night. Draw a clock on the board and revise time with the pupils. Present half past and tell them that half past (four) can also be expressed as (four) thirty.

41


UniT 3

Busy lives! Draw a daily routine chart on the board with five columns headed Monday – Tuesday – Wednesday – Thursday – Friday and seven lines underneath. Add a sixth column to the left where pupils can write the following activities, one per line: get up; have breakfast; go to school; have lunch; go home; do my homework, go to bed. Pupils then complete the chart with the times at which they perform each action. When they finish, ask them questions about their routine. Reinforcement activity: Brainstorm possible free time activities with the class. In their notebooks, pupils then complete a ‘weekend fun’ chart.

1

27 CD 1

Listen and read. (p. 30) An activity to present the structures of the unit.

Establish the situation: Liz and Wiz are in the castle courtyard where Wiz is trying to learn how to fly. He is not very successful at this, however. Play the CD so pupils can listen to the complete text. Play it again. Pupils repeat each sentence after the pause. Make sure that they understand the use of the present simple with adverbs of frequency, and the contrast between the present simple to express routine actions and the present continuous to point out an exception. Audio script

Extension activity: Pupils ask and answer questions about their weekend routine charts in pairs. Encourage them to use How often…?

L E S S ON

4

Let’s learn! (p. 30) Objectives: To revise adverbs of frequency. To contrast the present simple and present continuous. To develop spoken interaction and spoken production. To ask and answer information questions. Language focus: What do you usually do on Saturdays? I always help in the kitchen! Do you sometimes cook the dinner? Me? No! I never cook the dinner! Why aren’t you helping in the kitchen today? Because I’m going for a flying lesson! You need lots of flying lessons. Vocabulary (revision): Places. Activities. Seasons. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135)

LIZ What do you usually do on Saturdays? WIZ I always help in the kitchen! LIZ Do you sometimes cook the dinner? WIZ Me? No! I never cook the dinner! LIZ Why aren’t you helping in the kitchen today? WIZ Because I’m going for a flying lesson! LIZ

You need lots of flying lessons, Wiz!

2 Chit-chat. (p. 30) A pair activity to ask and answer information questions. Help pupils identify the places and activities shown in the drawings. Demonstrate the exchange with a pupil and ask the class to repeat chorally. In pairs, pupils ask and answer questions about the pictures. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.

Warm-up A vocabulary activity to revise adverbs of frequency.

Round-up

Point to different pupils and ask: What do you usually do on (Saturdays)? Do you always come to school on (Mondays)? What do you never do (at night)?

Books closed, point to different pupils and ask them the questions they have practised in exercise 2, then make up more questions.

42

A game to revise vocabulary and develop memory.


UniT 3 Reinforcement activity: Pupils read the comic again and identify the frames where the present simple and the present continuous are used for contrast (frames 1 and 10). Then ask them what Hanna means when she says: We’re not having sandwiches today, we’re having roast beef! (That they usually have sandwiches for lunch.) Extension activity: Ask pupils to write a list of things that they always, usually, sometimes or never do at the weekend. In pairs they can then compare their lists.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 22)

1 Complete the tables. Then ask and answer in pairs. (p. 22)

In L1, ask them what small and large explosions sound like. Give them the equivalent in English: Pop! bang! Have them repeat several times. 1

28

Listen and sing. (p. 31)

CD 1

Focus pupils’ attention on the illustrations and ask them to predict what the song is about (sausages frying in a pan of hot oil). Play the CD while they follow the text in their books. At the end, ask them how many sausages the cook started out with, and how many are left by the end. Explain that none is a pronoun, meaning ‘no sausages’. Audio script

Ten fat sausages Pupils complete the table with the appropriate words. Check their answers orally. In pair, pupils then use the table to ask and answer questions. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.

Ten fat sausages sizzling in a pan One goes pop! One goes bang! Eight fat sausages sizzling in a pan One goes pop! One goes bang! Six fat sausages sizzling in a pan One goes pop! One goes bang! Four fat sausages sizzling in a pan L E S S ON 5 One goes pop! One goes bang! Let’s sing! (p. 31) Two fat sausages sizzling in a pan One goes pop! One goes bang! Objectives: To learn a few onomatopoeia in English. No fat sausages sizzling in a pan! To develop listening comprehension skills through a None go pop! None go bang! song. To practise the sounds /r/ and /r/. Language focus: (Ten) fat sausages sizzling in a pan, Play the song again and encourage the pupils to sing one goes pop! One goes bang! No fat sausages along. sizzling in a pan! None go pop! None go bang! Vocabulary (revision): Numbers. Sound check Materials: Class CD. 2

Warm-up An activity to present the theme of the song.

29

Listen and repeat. (p. 31)

CD 1

Tell pupils that in English the letter ‘r’ has two sounds – a strong one which comes before a vowel and a weak Ask pupils if they know what an onomatopoeia is (a one which comes after a vowel, when it is hardly word that imitates a natural sound.) Give them a few heard. Read the model sentence with them, stressing examples: a cat meowing, a door creaking, etc. Then the sounds /r/ and /r/. Ask them which colour is the ask pupils from different backgrounds to tell the rest of strong sound and which the weak one. the class how a dog, a cow and a rooster sound in On the board, write the words rabbit and winner and their language. underline the sounds /r/ and /r/. Focus attention on

43


UniT 3

Busy lives! the pronunciation, stressing the difference between the two sounds. Play the CD. Pupils listen and repeat the sentence. Audio script /r/ /r/

Richard the rabbit is the winner of the running race!

Ac t i v i t y Boo k 2

40

(p. 22)

Listen and repeat. (p. 22)

CD 2

Focus pupils’ attention on the illustration and ask: Is the boy hungry? What is he having? Play the CD and ask them to repeat the tongue twister first chorally and then individually. Audio script /r/ /r/ 3

41 CD 2

Grapes and roast beef, water and pears. Now listen and circle the strong sound /r/ and underline the weak sound /r/. Then practise with a friend. (p. 22)

Ask pupils to take out a red pencil and a green pencil. Play the CD, pausing after each sentence to give them time to circle the appropriate letters. Correct by saying the sentences and eliciting the colour of the ‘r’s they have identified. Play the CD again so they can repeat the sentences first and then practise them in pairs. Finally, ask individual pupils to repeat them to the class. Audio script 1 Richard wears an anorak in winter. 2 Where are my trainers and my shorts? 3 Red hair and green eyes – that’s Freddy! 4 Jaguars in the rainforest. 5 Sugar, water, raisins and rice.

44

L E S S ON

6

CLIL – The food plate (p. 32) Objectives: To read and talk about nutrition. To learn about the five food groups. To discover what constitutes a healthy diet. To develop reading comprehension. Language focus: The food plate shows the food groups and proportions we need for a healthy diet. Vitamins and minerals protect the body. We need five portions of fruit and vegetables every day. Protein helps repair the body. Too much fat is bad for the body and too much sugar is bad for our teeth. Target vocabulary: Diet, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, calcium, protein, fat, portion, bone, healthy, protect, repair. Vocabulary (revision): Food. Materials: Class CD. Warm-up An activity to revise food. Draw a food pyramid on the board and ask pupils to help you label it: grain products first, then fruit & vegetables followed by proteins, with fats and sweets at the top. Tell them that in this lesson they are going to find out what constitutes a healthy diet. 30 CD 1

Listen and read. Then answer the questions. (p. 32) An activity to develop listening and reading comprehension.

Focus pupils’ attention on the food plate and encourage them to identify the foods in the different segments. Ask: Which is the biggest segment? (Carbohydrates.) What does this mean? (That a large part of our diet should consist of them.) How much sugar should we have? (Very little.) Which foods contain calcium? (Dairy products.) etc. In pairs, pupils then read the text. Refer them to the photos and the dictionary to help comprehension. Make sure they know how to pronounce the new words. Play the CD. Pupils listen while they follow the text as in the later units.


UniT 3 Finally, they answer the questions in their notebooks, day. Count the hands and write the number in the either individually or in pairs. You may also wish to ask appropriate column. Do this with all the food groups. the questions orally first, perhaps with books closed. When you finish, you can offer your conclusions, for example: Everyone drinks milk. Excellent! etc. Audio script

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 23)

The food plate shows the food groups and proportions we need for a healthy diet. There are five different Read page 32 in your Pupil’s Book. Now close your food groups: Pupil’s Book, look at the photo and complete the sentences. (p. 23) 1 Carbohydrates Carbohydrates are for energy. When we ride a bike, Pupils read page 32 in their Pupil’s Book again, look at run or play sport we use a lot of energy. the photo and complete the sentences. Carbohydrates are in potatoes, pasta, cereal, rice Answers: 1 Carbohydrates; 2 potatoes and bread; and bread. 3 Vitamins and minerals; 4 bananas; 5 Calcium; 6 cheese; 7 Protein; 8 meat; 9 Fats; 10 chocolate, crisps. 2 Vitamins and minerals Vitamins and minerals protect the body. We need five portions of fruit and vegetables every day! L E S S ON 7 Vitamins and minerals are in apples, bananas, strawberries, oranges, carrots and salad. Time for writing (p. 33) 3 Calcium Calcium is good for our bones and teeth. Calcium is in milk, cheese and yoghurt. 4 Protein Protein helps repair the body. Proteins are in chicken, beans, meat, fish and eggs. 5 Fats Fats are for energy, but too much fat is bad for the body and too much sugar is bad for our teeth. Fats are in cakes, sweets, chocolate, biscuits, ice cream, crisps, fizzy drinks and fast food.

Objectives: To develop writing skills. To practise the language learnt so far. To speak and write about freetime activities through the year. To revise the use of exclamation marks. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. The four seasons. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135) Warm-up An activity to revise the structures of the unit.

Answers: 1 It shows the food groups and proportions we Point to different pupils and ask: What do you usually need for a healthy diet. 2 There are five. 3 They give us do on Saturdays? Where do you go in summer? What energy. 4 We need five. 5 It is good for our bones and do you do in winter? When do you go hiking? etc. teeth. 6 Too much sugar is bad for our teeth. Encourage them to give long answers.

Round-up

An activity to practise and expand the vocabulary. Do a class survey to help pupils find out how healthy their diet is. Draw a table on the board and divide it into five columns: Dairy – Fish and meat – Fruit and vegetables – grains – sweets. Say: Raise your hand if you drink milk, eat cheese and/or have yoghurt every

1

31 CD 1

Listen and read about Julie’s year. (p. 33) An activity to prepare for the writing task.

Point to the page and ask: What kind of document is this? (A diary.) Whose diary is it? (Julie’s.) Tell pupils they are going to read and hear about her activities through the year.

45


UniT 3

Busy lives! Play the CD. Pupils listen and follow the text in their books. When they finish, ask them if they keep a diary. Do they show it to anyone? Audio script

My year is always very exciting! In spring, I usually go hiking. Here we’re hiking in the mountains! In summer, I always go to the beach with my family. This is my sister swimming in the sea! In autumn, I go back to school. I sometimes go riding after school. This is my horse, Thunder! He’s far out! In winter, I go skiing with my friends. This is me, my father and my friend skiing!

asking them to read out the text sentence by sentence with the appropriate intonation. Answer: What do I do on Fridays? Lots of things! I go shopping after school, then I play with my friends. We play chess, football, tennis and video games, and my mum makes pizza for dinner. I love pizza! At night, I look at the stars. I can see thousands and thousands of stars. Do I know their names? No, I don’t, but I’m learning them with my dad. 2 What do you do on Saturdays? (p. 24)

Pupils write a similar text in their notebooks. In order to develop language awareness, ask a pupil to copy his or her text on the board and ask pupils for help in correcting mistakes if there are any. When they have corrected their text, they copy it in the space provided Point to the words in the box and remind pupils about the differences in vocabulary between the English spoken in their Activity Book. Collect the Activity Books for correction, and record in Britain and the English spoken in other Englishpupils’ results on the Formative assessment sheet. speaking countries (although this difference is lessening thanks to films, television, pop music, etc.) Ask pupils to find another American expression in the text (far out) and L E S S O N 8 give its British equivalent (cool).

Speaking

2 Now write a diary about your year! (p. 33) A writing activity based on a model. Pupils write about their own activities through the year. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. When they finish, ask them to check their texts in pairs.

Round-up

An activity to revise punctuation. Revise uses of exclamation an d question marks with the class. Remind pupils that in English they are not used at the beginning of sentences, only at the end. Ask them what they are used for (exclamation marks to show our feelings and question marks to end questions.)

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 24)

1 Rewrite the text using full stops (.), question marks (?) and exclamation marks (!). (p. 24)

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 25)

Objectives: To develop spoken interaction through a game. To revise adverbs of frequency. To contrast the present simple and the present continuous. To develop observation and memory skills. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary and vocabulary from preceding lessons. Materials: Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135). Warm-up An activity to revise the unit vocabulary. Draw the outline of the food plate on the board and elicit foods from the five groups to fill it. Play with a friend: ask and answer. (p. 25) A game to develop spoken interaction.

Pupils do the exercise individually or in pairs. Check by Pupils identify the items and the actions in the squares.

46


UniT 3 Read out the model questions and the rules and explain that the aim of the game is to go around the board asking and answering questions about objects and routines, or saying sentences to contrast habitual and exceptional actions. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. When pupils finish the first round, they play again with a different partner. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet. Pupils then write the sentences and the answers to the questions in their notebooks.

Round-up

Pupils read the sentences and rewrite them in their notebooks supplying the correct information. Check orally. Answers: 1 Julie usually goes hiking in spring. 2 She sometimes goes riding after school in autumn. 3 Her sister is swimming in the sea in photo 2. 4 She goes skiing with her friends and family in winter. 3

A game to develop observation and memory skills. Pupils’ books closed. Give pupils a few moments to memorise the page. Books closed, say incomplete sentences and elicit the missing information, for example: In square 6, there is some … .

L E S S ON

2 Read about Julie and correct the sentences in your notebook. (p. 34)

9

Let’s round it up! (pp. 34-35)

32 CD 1

Listen and put a token on the correct answer. (p. 34)

Point to each square and elicit the item. Tell pupils that they are going to hear short dialogues that correspond to one of the two items shown in each rectangle. The task is to identify the correct one by placing a token or a scrap of paper on the appropriate picture. Play the CD, pausing after each exchange to give pupils time to complete the task. Audio script

Objectives: To revise and consolidate the vocabulary and structures of Unit 3. To revise the unit song. To do assessment and self-assessment activities. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Class CD. Tokens or scraps of paper.

28 CD 1

Warm-up Revising the unit song and vocabulary.

Begin the lesson by singing the unit song (p. 31). Encourage everyone to join in. Ask pupils to open their books at pages 34 and 35. Tell them that they are going to revise what they have learnt in the unit. 1 Vocabulary. Copy and complete these word spiders. (p. 34) Pupils copy and complete the word spiders in their notebooks. When they finish, ask them to compare their answers with a partner.

GIRL

Here’s some roast beef! What do you want with it, mushrooms or cabbage? Mushrooms please! I don’t like cabbage!

2 GIRL BOY GIRL

Do you always play football on Saturdays? No, not always. I sometimes play tennis. Oh! I see!

3 BOY GIRL

I always go to school at 8 o’clock. And you? I always go to school at 8:30. My classes start at 9.

4 WAITER MAN WAITER MAN WAITER

What do you prefer? Meat or fish? Meat please! Well. We’ve got roast beef and lamb chops. Can I have some lamp chops, please? Certainly, sir.

1 MUM

5 MAN What do you do in summer? WOMAN I always go to the beach. MAN Why? WOMAN Because I love swimming in the sea.

47


UniT 3

Busy lives! 6 GIRL BOY GIRL

What’s your favourite subject? P.E.! I love running and jumping and playing tennis and playing basketball and … Yes, yes, I see. How interesting!

4 Speak. Talk about Liz. Follow the example. (p. 35)

ticking the appropriate box. Play the CD, pausing after each exchange to give pupils time to complete the task. Audio script 1 A B

Read the model exchange with the class and explain the activity. Pupils look at the pictures and produce the same type of sentences in pairs. 5 Read and rewrite this letter in the correct order. (p. 35) Pupils reorder the sentences and write the letter it in their notebooks. Check orally. Answers: 4; 1; 3; 2.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

2A B

What time does your Maths lesson start? It starts at 9 0’clock.

3A B

What do you usually do in winter? We usually go skating in winter!

4A B

What does your father do on Sunday mornings? He always washes the car!

5A B

Do you usually go to the mountains in summer? I don’t usually go to the mountains, I go to the beach!

6A B

What do you usually do on Sundays? I usually have lunch with my grandparents.

(pp. 26-27)

1 Look at Unit 3 in your Pupil’s Book. Fill in the gaps and answer the questions. (p. 26)

What does your sister usually do on Saturday afternoons? She usually plays tennis.

3 Read and tick. (p. 27) Pupils check the unit and write the answers. Answers: 1 table; 2 frog; 3 P.E.; 4 They are playing football. 5 shooting star; 6 He helps in the kitchen. 7 cook; 8 running race; 9 They are in potatoes, pasta, cereal, rice and bread. 10 It helps repair the body. 11 Do you know how many portions of fruit and vegetables we need every day? We need to eat at least FIVE portions a day! 2

42

Listen and tick. (p. 27)

CD 2

Point to each square and elicit the item or situation. Tell pupils that they are going to hear short dialogues that correspond to one of the two shown in each rectangle. The task is to identify the correct one by

48

Help pupils complete the self-assessment section by reading each objective aloud.

Testing and assessment Unit Test Photocopy the Unit Test, one per pupil. Pupils complete the test individually. Once you have corrected all the tests, return them to the pupils and help them check for mistakes by writing the answers on the board. Record pupils’ results on the Formative assessment sheet. Make sure they file their tests in their Language Portfolio. To consolidate the structures of the Unit, pupils complete the Let’s Revise! section. (Activity Book p. 77)


UniT 4

What are people like? L E S S ON

1

(pp. 36-37)

Objectives: To talk about physical appearance and personality. To revise nationalities. To describe people. To develop observation and memory skills. Language focus: What are you like? What’s he/she like? Target vocabulary: Face, freckles, short, tall, young, old, fat, thin, tired, angry, bored, grumpy, happy, sad, straight, wavy, curly. Vocabulary (revision): Nationalities. Materials: Class CD.

Warm-up An activity to revise vocabulary and present the new topic.

Audio script

angry young short bored straight hair thin 2

34 CD 1

sad face old freckles tired tall

grumpy fat wavy hair happy curly hair

Listen and repeat. (p. 37) An activity to practise the new vocabulary.

Point to the list of words and play the CD again. Pupils read and repeat the vocabulary chorally and individually. Audio script 1 tall 2 short 3 old 4 young 5 fat 6 thin

7 face 8 freckles 9 tired 10 bored 11 sad 12 angry

13 grumpy 14 happy 15 curly hair 16 straight hair 17 wavy hair

Say and mime: I’m sad. Encourage pupils to do and say the same. Then change your expression and say: 3 35 Listen again. Which puppet is missing? I’m happy. Pupils do the same. Do the same with CD 1 Which mask is missing? (p. 37) bored and angry. Then present and write the following An activity to develop attention and listening skills. adjectives on the board: Sad, happy, bored, angry. Point to the different adjectives and ask pupils to mime Tell pupils that in this activity, they will hear adjectives them. describing the puppets or the masks, with one missing Copy the title and the objectives of the unit on the each time. The task is to listen carefully and identify board. Read and explain them to the class. the missing word. Correct the exercise together. 1

33 CD 1

Look, listen and say the number. (p. 36) An activity to present the new vocabulary.

Focus pupils’ attention on the double page illustration and ask: What can you see in the scene? (The tunnel at the entrance of the ‘House of Terror’ at an amusement park.) Point to each mask or puppet and ask pupils to identify the expression. Point to the numbered items on the pages and present the words. Then play track 33 (Class CD 1). Ask pupils to concentrate on the pronunciation as they listen. Play the CD again and ask them to associate the appropriate number with each word, for example: Short – two. They do the same with all the items.

Audio script

Which puppet is missing? 1 short, tall, old, fat, thin. 2 short, tall, young, old, thin. 3 short, tall, old, fat, thin. 4 tall, young, old, fat, thin. Answers: 1 young; 2 fat; 3 young; 4 short.

Which mask is missing? 1 tired, angry, bored, unhappy 2 tired, bored, grumpy, unhappy 3 angry, bored, grumpy, unhappy 4 tired, angry, bored, grumpy Answers: 1 grumpy; 2 angry; 3 tired; 4 unhappy.

49


UniT 4

What are people like? 4 Look and say. What is he/she like? (p. 37) An activity to practise the new vocabulary. Read the model aloud. Pupils then describe each person in pairs. Check the exercise orally with the class. Answers: 2 This is an old man. He is tall and fat. He’s got wavy white hair. He’s happy now. 3 This is a boy. He is short and thin. He’s got curly dark hair. He’s sad now. 4 This is a young woman. She is tall and thin. She’s got straight dark hair. She’s tired now. 5 Look and answer. (p. 37) An activity to develop observation skills and practise the alphabet.

Answers: tired; angry; bored; grumpy; happy; sad. 2 Use the letters left in the wordsearch to write the secret message. Draw a picture of the message. (p. 28) Answers: This is John’s sister. Her name’s Liz. She is tall. She has got long fair hair. She loves juice.

L E S S ON

The mystery of the missing Queen (pp. 38-39) Objectives: To present the new vocabulary in context. To use the comparative of some short adjectives. To develop observation skills and reading comprehension. To stimulate the imagination. Language focus: What does she look like? She’s short, she’s fat, she’s got grey hair… The Queen’s shorter! Target vocabulary: Wax museum, mystery, throne, century. Vocabulary (revision): Vocabulary from lesson 1. Adjectives. Queen, king, castle, museum. Materials: Class CD.

Pupils work in pairs. If necessary, revise the alphabet before they start on question 5. Check the answers orally. Answers: 1 The Brazilian and American flags. 2 tall / short; old /young; fat / thin; curly hair / straight hair. 3 Pupils’ own answers. 4 Pupils’ own answers. 5 Pupils’ own answers.

Round-up

A guessing game to consolidate the language of the lesson. Describe one of the pupils present to the class. Pupils guess who the child is according to your description. Say for example: This pupil is short and thin. He/she’s got curly short hair. His/her eyes are brown, etc.

1

36 CD 1

Reinforcement activity: Pupils draw a mask with a short nose, big blue eyes, and long curly black hair. They label the picture and write sentences to describe their mask. Extension activity: In their notebooks, pupils draw a member of their family and write his/her description under it. They compare their drawings with a partner. When they finish, ask them to read their descriptions to the class.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 28)

1 Look at your Pupil’s Book on page 36. Find the words and label the faces. (p. 28) Pupils solve the word search, label the faces and find the secret message.

50

2

Listen and read. (pp. 38-39) A listening activity to practise vocabulary in context.

Focus pupils’ attention on the double page and ask them to describe what is going on in the frames: The class is going to the wax museum. The teacher is presenting the Kings and Queens of England. Queen Victoria isn’t on her throne. Suddenly, our friends are transported to the 19th century. Freddy becomes Sherlock Holmes and starts investigating the Queen’s disappearance. Ask questions about the comic, for example: What are our friends studying in frame 1? What’s the teacher pointing to in frame 3? What does Queen Victoria look like? Who is Freddy talking to in frame 5? etc. Play the CD. Pupils listen and follow the dialogue. Play the CD again with pauses for them to repeat chorally or individually. Check their pronunciation and intonation.


UniT 4 Audio script 1 TEACHER

2 TEACHER

AMY 3 TEACHER

5 FREDDY TEACHER

6 FREDDY

When you finish, explain the vocabulary and make sure that pupils understand the new expressions. This month we’re studying English history. Remind them that whenever Freddy takes his glasses off, something very special happens. Ask them: What And today, we’re going to the wax museum! happened in unit 3? What happens in this unit? Choose two children, one taller than the other. Say: Here are the Kings and Queens of (Carlos) is tall but (Juan) is taller. Underline the ending England! Queen Elizabeth, King Edward, -er and explain that in English we add this ending to King Charles… form the comparative of short adjectives. On the board, write the positive and comparative forms He’s got beautiful curly hair! of the following adjectives: tall, fat, short, old. Pupils then But… that’s Queen Victoria’s throne, and look for comparative sentences in the dialogue. she isn’t there! 2 Choose the correct option: a, b or c. (p. 39) What does she look like? Completing sentences to check comprehension. Oh, she’s short, she’s fat, she’s got grey hair… Pupils complete the sentences in writing. Check orally.

Excuse me, ma’am, are you Queen Victoria?

7 WOMAN Don’t be silly! Do I look like Queen Victoria? 8 TEACHER The Queen’s shorter! She’s fatter… and she’s older!

I’m looking for her in the wrong place! TEACHER Let’s go to the castle!

9 FREDDY

10 AMY HANNA MATT 11 FREDDY

There she is, in front of her castle! She’s shorter than me! Uh-oh, she looks grumpy! Ah, here you are! Come back to the Museum with me, please, … and back to the 21st century!

Answers: 1 c; 2 a; 3 a; 4 c.

Round-up

A memory game to consolidate the language of the lesson. Books closed, read out different sentences and questions said by the characters. Elicit the character’s name each time. Then repeat the dialogue, making deliberate mistakes. For example, in frame 1, say Spanish instead of English, in frame 3, say Queen Elizabeth’s throne instead of Queen Victoria’s throne, etc. Ask pupils to correct you.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 29)

1 Look at the comic on pages 38-39 in your Pupil’s Book and correct the sentences. (p. 29) Pupils correct the sentences in their notebooks. Answers: 1 England; 2 wax museum; 3 blond straight hair; 4 Queen Victoria; 5 shorter; 6 a black dress and a black hat. 2 What do they look like? (p. 29) Pupils fill in the characters’ ID cards. Correct by having pairs of pupils read out the information.

51


UniT 4

What are people like? Answers: 1 Matt - eyes: dark; hair: wavy; looks: tired. 2 Hanna - eyes: dark; hair: curly; looks: happy. 3 The History teacher - eyes: blue; hair: straight looks: sad. 4 The P.E. teacher - eyes: brown; hair: wavy; looks: angry. 5 Queen Victoria - eyes: blue; hair: straight; looks: grumpy.

the book or from memory. Encourage them to use the appropriate intonation and mime their character’s facial expressions and actions. Then swap the roles around and repeat the activity.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 29)

3 What are they saying? (p. 29) Explain the activity first. Pupils look at what is happening in the scene and imagine the characters’ dialogue. Encourage them to use the new vocabulary and expressions.

3 What are they saying? (p. 29) An activity to act out a dialogue.

Divide the class into pairs. Pupils take out their Activity Books and read their dialogue out to their partner. Each pair then practises both dialogues, one after the other. Invite different pairs to act out their dialogues in front of L E S S ON 3 the class. If you wish, these can be recorded and then The mystery of the missing Queen (pp. 38-39) played back so pupils can correct their pronunciation and intonation. This is an excellent moment to assess Objectives: To practice the new vocabulary in speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet. context. To develop observation skills and reading comprehension. To act out dialogues. To describe Look and say. people. An activity to describe people. Language focus: What does she look like? She’s short, she’s fat, she’s got grey hair. The Queen’s Write the names Amy, Freddy, Hanna and Matt on the shorter! board. Tell pupils that they are going to describe the Vocabulary (revision): Vocabulary of Lessons 1 and 2. characters. In a separate box, write the language they Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet can use: Hair: curly – wavy – straight – long – short – (Resource File, p. 135). dark - blond – brown – red. Build: tall – short – fat – thin. Ask: What does Hanna look like? Elicit: She’s got short curly dark hair, she is tall and thin. Do the same with Warm-up the rest of the characters. An activity to practise adjectives. Finally choose one pupil and ask: What does (Rosa) look like? Elicit the answer. Do the same with different Draw a word spider on the board and write the word ‘Hair’ in the centre. Brainstorm adjectives connected with pupils. hair with the class and complete the word spider. Elicit: straight, curly, wavy, long, short, blond, dark, red, brown. 1

36 CD 1

Listen and read. (pp. 38-39) A listening activity to revise the comic.

Play the comic again. Pupils listen and follow the text in their books. Divide the class into seven groups and assign the roles of Amy, Hannah, Matt, Freddy, the teacher, the lady and Queen Victoria. If necessary, play the CD again, with pauses after each line so the groups can repeat it. Otherwise, pupils recite their lines either from

52

Reinforcement activity: Pupils read the comic aloud with you. Then they can do it in pairs. Extension activity: Pupils choose one classmate and write his/her description, without saying who he/she it is, ending their text with the question: Who is he/she? They exchange their descriptions with a partner in order to answer the question.


UniT 4 L E S S ON

4

Let’s learn! (p. 40) Objectives: To form the comparative of short adjectives with the help of C-V-C principle. To develop spoken interaction and spoken production. To ask and answer information questions. Language focus: Why are you running? Because we’re late. Target vocabulary: Broom, hop. Vocabulary (revision): Actions. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135)

Warm-up A vocabulary activity to revise adjectives. Write the adjective tall on the board and elicit its opposite short. Do the same with big – small, long – short; happy – unhappy; old – young; blond – dark, etc. 1

37 CD 1

Listen and read. (p. 40) An activity to present the structures of the unit.

LIZ What does she look like? WIZ Well, she’s shorter than you. She’s fatter and her hair is longer. LIZ And what is she like? WIZ She’s OK, but sometimes she’s very naughty! Write the comparatives of the adjectives short, long and fat on the board. Underline the endings and ask pupils why the consonant is doubled in fat but not in short or long. Allow them to reflect on this for a moment, and then teach the rule: adjectives whose three final letters are a consonant, a vowel and a consonant (C-V-C) double their final consonant. (This is also applicable to the present participle, past of regular verbs, etc. and is known as the C-V-C principle.) Elicit more adjectives and write them on the board. Ask different pupils to write the comparative forms. Focus attention on the last three letters of each adjective. 2 Chit-chat. (p. 40) A pair activity to ask and answer information questions. Help pupils identify Dana in the photos. Demonstrate the exchange with a pupil and ask the class to repeat chorally. In pairs, pupils ask and answer questions about Mary, Felix and Tom. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.

Establish the situation: Wiz is showing Liz his family portraits and she is asking about his little sister. At the end, an accident happens. Play the CD so pupils can listen to the complete text and find out what the 3 Now draw and write a similar dialogue in your accident was (Wizard has been changed into a frog!). notebook. (p. 40) Play it again. Pupils repeat each sentence after the An activity to ask and answer written questions. pause. Make sure that they understand the questions and the Pupils write similar dialogues in their notebooks using answers. Focus pupils’ attention on the difference information about their best friend. between: What does she look like? (physical appearance) and What’s she like? (personality). Round-up Audio script LIZ Have you got any brothers or sisters? WIZ Yes, I’ve got a sister. Her name’s Wendy.

A game to revise vocabulary and develop memory.

Books closed, ask different pupils the questions they have practised in exercise 2, then make up more questions.

53


UniT 4

What are people like? Reinforcement activity: Pupils read the comic again and identify the frames where questions and short answers are used. Extension activity: Ask pupils to write similar dialogues as in exercise 2 using members of their families.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 30)

1 Look at the table and make six sentences. (p. 30) Pupils make up sentences using the language of the table. Check these orally.

1

38

Listen and sing. (p. 41)

CD 1

Focus pupils’ attention on the illustrations and ask them to predict what the song is about (about a girl and a boy who have built a building and a house out of LEGO blocks). Play the CD while they follow the text in their books. Make sure that everyone understands the song. Audio script

The more we play together Oh, the more we play together, Together, together, Oh, the more we play together, The happier we can be.

2 Use your table. Ask and answer in pairs. (p. 30) In pair, pupils then use the table to ask and answer questions. Read out the model, then go round the room in order to give any necessary help. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.

L E S S ON

5

Let’s sing! (p. 41) Objectives: To learn a song about shared activities. To revise comparatives and ‘can’. To practise the comparative ending /er/ of short adjectives. To develop listening comprehension skills through a song. Language focus: The more we play together, the happier we can be. The higher we build the tower, the happier we can be. Vocabulary (revision): Adjectives. Materials: Class CD.

Warm-up An activity to revise the verb ‘can’. Point to different pupils and ask: Can you swim? Elicit the answer: Yes, I can or No, I can’t. Do the same with the following actions: sing, jump, run, play football, play basketball, speak French, etc.

54

The higher we build the tower, The tower, the tower, The higher we build the tower, The happier we can be! Oh, the more we play together, Together, together, Oh, the more we play together, The happier we can be. Ask pupils to look for comparatives in the text and explain their use if necessary. Play the song again, pausing after every verse so that pupils can sing it while reading the lyrics. Finally repeat the song and encourage the pupils to sing along.

Sound check 2

39

Listen and repeat. (p. 41)

CD 1

Remind pupils that colour-coding can help them remember how sounds are pronounced. Read the model sentence with them, stressing the sound /er/ in shorter and fatter. On the board, write the words taller, bigger, smaller and easier and underline the sound /er/. Focus attention on the pronunciation, stressing the ending of each comparative. Play the CD. Pupils listen and repeat the sentence.


UniT 4 Audio script e

//

Queen is shorter and fatter than Sarah!

Ac t i v i t y Boo k 3

L E S S ON

43

Listen and repeat. (p. 30)

Focus pupils’ attention on the illustration and ask: Which is bigger, the iguana or the alligator? Play the CD and ask them to repeat the question first chorally and then individually. Audio script

Which is bigger, the iguana or the alligator? 44 CD 2

e

e

4

CLIL – From potatoes to French fries to crisps (p. 42)

(p. 30)

CD 2

//

6

Now listen and underline the / / sound. Then practise with a friend. (p. 30)

Ask pupils to take out a red pencil. Play the CD, pausing after each sentence to give them time to circle the appropriate letters. Correct by saying the sentences and eliciting the words that contain the sound. Play the CD again so they can repeat the sentences first and then practise them in pairs. Finally, ask individual pupils to repeat them to the class. Audio script

Which is easier, Maths or Art? Which is larger, the school or the sports centre? Which is smaller, the toucan or the jaguar? Which is shorter, January or September? Which is longer, June or December?

Objectives: To read and talk about the potato. To discover how French fries and crisps were invented. To practise present simple. To develop reading comprehension. Language focus: Sir Walter Raleigh, an English explorer, takes the potato to Ireland. A chef in France fries potatoes in hot oil and French fries become a popular snack. Today Americans eat about six million pounds of potatoes every year! Target vocabulary: Conquistador, chemist, bouquet, slice (v). Vocabulary (revision): Countries. Materials: Class CD. A world map or globe. Warm-up An activity to locate the countries mentioned in the text. Pin up the map of the world or gather pupils around you and show them the globe. Ask them to locate Spain, Peru, Ireland, France and the U.S.A. Tell them that in this lesson they are going to read about the potato and they are going to discover the connection between potatoes and these countries. 40 CD 1

Listen and read. The answer the questions. (p. 42) An activity to develop listening and reading comprehension.

Focus pupils’ attention on the photos and ask them to identify the following items: potatoes, French fries, crisps. Ask: Where do potatoes come from? Encourage them to read the first paragraph and find the answer. (From Peru.) In pairs, pupils then listen and read the whole text. Refer them to the photos to help comprehension and make sure they know how to pronounce the new words. Finally, they answer the questions in their notebooks, either individually or in pairs. You may also wish to ask the questions orally first, perhaps with books closed.

55


UniT 4

What are people like? Answers: 1 In the Andean village of Socorota, in Peru. 2 Sir Walter Raleigh, an English explorer. 3 A French chemist who takes a bouquet of potato flowers to King Louis XVI’s birthday party. 4 He plants the first potatoes in Idaho, USA. 5 French fries. 6 Cornelius Vanderbilt asks for French fries in a restaurant, but he doesn’t like them. The Chef is very angry and so he slices the potatoes very thin, fries them, and covers them with salt.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 31)

Read page 42 in your Pupil’s Book. Now close your Pupil’s Book, write the dates and put the sentences in the correct order. (p. 31) Pupils reorder the sentences according to the dates. For extra practice, they can write out the long forms and then say them aloud.

Audio script 1537 The Spanish Conquistadors first see potatoes in the Andean village of Sorocota, in Peru and take them to Spain. 1589 Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618), an English explorer, takes potatoes to Ireland. 1773 Antoine August Parmentier, a French Chemist, takes a bouquet of potato flowers to King Louis XVI’s birthday party. 1836 Henry Harmon Spalding (1804-1874) plants the first potatoes in Idaho, USA. 1850s A chef in France fries potatoes in hot oil and French fries become a popular snack.

Answers: c - 1537; e – 1589; b - 1773; f – 1836; d – 1850s; a – 1853.

L E S S ON

7

Time for writing (p. 43) Objectives: To develop writing skills. To practise the language learnt so far. To speak and write about a mystery character. To revise the present simple, ‘have got’ and adjectives. To revise the use of the connectors and, or, but. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135)

1853 Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt asks for French fries in a restaurant, but he doesn’t like them. The Chef, George Crum, is very angry and Warm-up An activity to revise the structures of the unit. he slices the potato very thin, fries them, and covers them with salt. Vanderbilt loves them Point to different pupils and ask: Who is you favourite and the crisp is born! actor or actress? What does he/she look like? What is he/she like? Encourage them to give long answers. Today Americans eat about six million pounds of potatoes every year! 1 41 Listen and read about a mystery character. CD 1 (p. 43) Round-up An activity to prepare for the writing task. An activity to practise vocabulary. Pupils read the texts again and close their books. Then they make up true or false statements about the page for their classmates, for example: The Spanish Conquistadors first see potatoes in Brazil. (False. They see them in Peru.) In 1589 Sir Walter Raleigh takes potatoes to Ireland. (True).

56

Point to the page and ask: What kind of document is this? (A description.) Who does it describe? (A mystery character.) Tell pupils they are going to read and hear about this character and find out who she is. Play the CD. Pupils listen and follow the text in their books.


UniT 4 Audio script

My character has got brown eyes and long brown wavy hair. She’s also got two large front teeth. She is a very clever girl. She’s very friendly but sometimes she can be grumpy. She doesn’t watch TV or play video games but she loves books and she reads hundreds of them… she’s always reading! She also loves studying and she is an ace student. Her birthday is in September. Her best buddies are two boys, Harry and Ron. She also likes a girl called Ginny. They are all at school together. Who is it? Confirm that the mystery character is Hermione, Harry Potter’s friend. Check that everyone understands the text by asking comprehension questions. Point to the words in the box and remind pupils about the differences between British and American English. Ask pupils to find the American words ace and buddies in the text and give their British equivalents (very good and friends). Finally focus pupils’ attention on the connectors and, but, or. Read the sentences and explain their uses. 2 Now write about your own mystery character. Illustrate your text. (p. 43) A writing activity based on a model. Pupils write about their own mystery character. Encourage them to use and, but and or as connectors. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. When they finish, ask them to check their texts in pairs.

Round-up

An activity to revise spelling and punctuation. Revise uses of and, but and or with the class. Write sentences on the board, then join them using one of the connectors, for example: I can swim. I can dive. I can swim and dive, etc.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 32)

1 Read the riddle and fill in the gaps with and, or, but. (p. 32) Pupils do the exercise individually or in pairs. Check by asking them to read out the text sentence by sentence.

Answers: My character has got red hair, green eyes and freckles. He’s very nice and friendly. He’s never angry or grumpy! He goes to a very special school called Hogwarts but he isn’t very good at magic! His best friends are Harry and Hermione. Who is it? 2 Write a ‘Who is it?’ riddle for your friends to guess. (p. 32) Pupils write a similar text in their notebooks. In order to develop language awareness, ask a pupil to copy his or her text on the board and ask pupils for help in correcting mistakes if there are any. When they have corrected their text, they copy it in the space provided in their Activity Book. Collect the Activity Books for correction, and record pupils’ results on the Formative assessment sheet.

L E S S ON

8

Speaking

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 33)

Objectives: To develop spoken interaction through a game. To revise information questions. To practise the possessive and the comparative. To develop observation and memory skills. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135).

Warm-up An activity to revise animals and comparatives. Write pairs of animals on the board and ask pupils to compare them. Give them an example first: A parrot / a toucan. A parrot is smaller than a toucan. Collect your points! (p. 33) A game to develop spoken interaction. Make sure pupils have the necessary material: coins,

57


UniT 4

What are people like? counters and a pencil and a piece of paper handy. Read the rules of the game with the class and explain its aim, which is to ‘collect’ as many points as possible. Pupils play in pairs, going around the board in order to identify objects and their owners in the first level, comparing animals in the second level and asking and answering personal questions in the third level. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. When pupils finish the first round, they play again with a different partner. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.

1 Vocabulary. Say what she is like. (p. 44) Read and explain the exercise. Point to the first face and say: What’s she like? Elicit: She’s bored. Pupils work in pairs asking and answering the questions. When they finish, revise the exercise orally with the whole class. Answers: 1 She’s bored; 2 She’s sad; 3 She’s tired; 4 She’s grumpy; 5 She’s angry. 2 Read and correct the following sentences in your notebook. (p. 44)

Round-up

Pupils rewrite the sentences in their notebooks supplying the correct information. Check orally.

Give pupils a few moments to memorise the page. Books closed, ask them to name as many items as they can. Then ask questions about them, for example: Is a parrot smaller than a condor? Whose is the radio? Is the King younger than the Queen? etc.

Answers: 1 Felix is fatter than Tom. 2 She has got straight blond dark hair. 3 He is shorter than her. 4 Mandy has got freckles.

A game to develop observation and memory skills.

L E S S ON

9

Let’s round it up! (pp. 44-45) Objectives: To revise and consolidate the vocabulary and structures of Unit 4. To revise the unit song. To do assessment and self-assessment activities. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Class CD. Tokens or scraps of paper.

38 CD 1

Warm-up Revising the unit song and vocabulary.

Begin the lesson by singing the unit song (p. 41). Encourage everyone to join in. Ask pupils to open their books at pages 44 and 45. Tell them that they are going to revise what they have learnt in the unit.

58

3

42 CD 1

Listen and put a token on the correct answer. (p. 44)

Point to each square and elicit the item. Tell pupils that they are going to hear short dialogues that correspond to one of the two items shown in each rectangle. The task is to identify the correct one by placing a token or a scrap of paper on the appropriate picture. Play the CD, pausing after each exchange to give pupils time to complete the task. Audio script 1 A B A B

Who is your sister? The girl with the blond hair. Is her hair straight or curly? It’s curly.

2A B A

Condors are big birds. Yes, that’s right, condors are bigger than parrots. Yes, but parrots can talk.

3A B A B

What is your best friend’s name? It’s Carlos. What does he look like? He’s tall and he’s got long curly hair. It’s black.


UniT 4 4A B A B

What’s your brother like? He’s tall and he’s got blond hair. Has he got short hair like you? No, his hair is longer than mine.

5A B A

What do you prefer, meat or fish? I always have fish. I don’t like meat. Oh! I see.

6A B

What’s your mother’s name? Ann. My mum’s name is Ann.

4 Speak. Spot the differences in pairs. (p. 45)

Straight, curly and wavy hair. 3 King Charles II / He’s got long dark curly hair. 4 Queen Victoria / No, she isn’t 5 Freddy / He is in London, in the past (the 19th century). 6 He is speaking to a lady. 7 She looks grumpy. 8 She’s Wiz’s sister. 9 She is shorter than Liz, she is fatter and her hair is longer. She is naughty. 10 The Queen is shorter. 11 In 1537. 12 Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt.13 Wendy is Freddy’s sister. She is shorter and fatter than Amy. Her hair isn’t curly or straight, it’s wavy! She is nice but sometimes she’s very naughty. 2

45

Listen and tick. (p. 35)

CD 2

Pupils spot the differences in pairs and write them in their notebooks in sentence form. Check the exercise orally with the class. Answers: In picture B, Ann has got straight hair. She is wearing a pair of green shorts. Tom is wearing a pair of red shorts and a green T-shirt. Jane has got curly hair. She is wearing yellow trainers. Jack has got short hair. He is wearing a pair of blue shorts. There are four trees in the scene and six birds flying in the sky.

Point to each square and elicit the item or situation. Tell pupils that they are going to hear short dialogues that correspond to one of the two shown in each rectangle. The task is to identify the correct one by ticking the appropriate box. Play the CD, pausing after each exchange to give pupils time to complete the task. Answers: 1 Tick on 2nd picture. 2 Tick on 2nd picture. 3 Tick on 1st picture. 4 Tick on 2nd picture. Audio script

5 Read and match the pieces of paper. Then write the texts in your notebook. (p. 45) Pupils reorder the texts and write them in their notebooks. Check orally.

1 A B A B

Answers: 1st text: 1, 4; 2nd text: 3, 2.

2A B Choose picture A or B in exercise 4 and write a A 6 description of it using and, or, but. (p. 45) 3A Pupils write and illustrate their compositions. B

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(pp. 34-35)

1 Look at Unit 4 in your Pupil’s Book. Fill in the gaps and answer the questions. (p. 34)

A 4A B

What does your sister look like? She’s got long red hair and green eyes. Is her hair curly or straight? It’s curly. My brother is thinner than me. Is he taller than you, too? No, he isn’t. He’s shorter than me. What’s your Maths teacher like? I don’t like him very much. He’s never happy. He’s always grumpy. Oh dear! Is your sister older or younger than you? She’s older than me. She goes to university!

Pupils check the unit and write the answers. Answers: 1 puppets / There are six puppets. 2 hair /

59


UniT 4

What are people like?

Testing and assessment

complete the test individually. Once you have corrected all the tests, return them to the pupils and help them check for mistakes by writing the answers on the board. Record pupils’ results on the Formative assessment sheet. Make sure they file their tests in their Language Portfolio.

Unit Test Photocopy the Unit Test, one per pupil. Pupils

To consolidate the structures of the Unit, pupils complete the Let’s Revise! section. (Activity Book p. 77)

3 Read and tick. (p. 35) Help pupils complete the self-assessment section by reading each objective aloud.

60


Famous Food Markets Pages 46-47 Objectives: To read and learn about Famous Food Markets. To match texts and photos. To develop reading comprehension. To develop cultural awareness. Language focus: La Boqueria is the most famous food market in Barcelona. It dates back to 1200. It is one of the most beautiful markets in the world with hundreds of food stalls. You can buy lots of different products including olives which are very popular. Borough Market is a food market near London Bridge in South London. People love drinking glasses of fresh orange juice when they shop at the market. It is one of the largest food markets in the world and dates back to 1860. Target vocabulary: La Boqueria, hundreds, stall, product, olives, Borough Market, London Bridge. Vocabulary (revision): Food, market, people, glasses, orange, juice, world, famous, beautiful, fresh, largest. Materials: Class CD. Warm-up An activity to introduce the topic of famous food markets. Explain the meaning of Famous Food Markets. Ask pupils if they have one in their town? Ask: What can you see at a food market? Elicit food stalls, products, olives, oranges, and tell them that they are going to read about two famous food markets, one in Barcelona and the other in London. 1

43 CD 1

Read and match the sentences to the photos. Then listen and check. (p. 46) An activity to develop oral and reading comprehension.

Focus pupils’ attention on the photos and encourage them to describe each one. Point to the first photo on page 46 and say that it shows what one of the markets looked like in 1860. Direct their attention to the photos of the food stalls and ask: What fruit and vegetables can

you see on these stalls? Elicit the names of the fruit and vegetables on display (apples, oranges, pineapples, potatoes, kiwi, cherries, strawberries, lemons, plums). Point to the photograph of the girl and ask What is she doing? (She’s drinking a glass of orange juice). Point to the photograph of the olives and ask: What are these? (Olives) Do you like them? In pairs, pupils then read the text and do the matching exercise. Then they listen to the recording to check their answers. Answers: A-2; B-1. 2 Now decide if these sentences are true or false. (p. 47) Focus pupils’ attention on the sentences and tell them to decide in pairs whether they are true or false. Then check their answers orally. Answers: 1 T; 2 F; 3 T; 4 F; 5 T; 6 T. 3 Answer the questions. (p. 47) Point to the questions and tell the pupils to ask and answer the questions in pairs.

Round-up

An activity to practise and expand the vocabulary. With the help of the class, complete a word map on the board. Write Famous Food Markets in the centre of the map and encourage everyone to contribute a word or two.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 69)

Look at the photos and complete the sentences with the words in the box. (p. 69) Pupils read pages 46 and 47 in their Pupil’s Book again and complete the sentences. Answers: 1 market; 2 food stalls; 3 orange juice; 4 London Bridge; 5 olives.

61


UniT 5

That’s amazing! L E S S ON

1

(pp. 48-49)

Objectives: To talk about famous races and racing. To learn the names of some geographical features. To revise adjectives. To classify words with the help of charts. To develop observation and memory skills. Target vocabulary: River, island, hot air balloon, ocean, whale, mountain, city, lake, building, fast, slow, large, small. Vocabulary (revision): Adjectives. School subjects. Animals. Food. Materials: Class CD. Warm-up An activity to revise vocabulary and present the new topic. Write the word race on the board and ask pupils what a race is (an event in which the winner is the fastest person to do something). Then draw three columns and write the headings: Person – Person and animal – Person and machine. With the help of the class, complete the table with activities such as running and swimming in the first column, horse and camel racing in the second, aeroplane and car races in the third. Copy the title and the objectives of the unit on the board. Read and explain them to the class. 1

44 CD 1

Look, listen and say the number. (p. 48) An activity to present the new vocabulary.

Audio script

slow river island fast hot air balloon ocean whale 2

45 CD 1

small mountain city large lake building

Listen and repeat. (p. 49) An activity to practise the new vocabulary.

Point to the list of words and play the CD again. Pupils read and repeat the vocabulary chorally and individually. Audio script 1 mountain 2 city 3 building 4 river 5 ocean 6 whale 7 lake 3

46 CD 1

8 hot air balloon 9 island 10 fast 11 slow 12 large 13 small

Listen again. Which item is missing? Which adjective is missing? (p. 49) An activity to develop attention and listening skills.

Tell pupils that in this activity, they will hear the Focus pupils’ attention on the double page illustration geographical features and the adjectives named, with and ask: What can you see in the middle of the water? one missing each time. The task is to listen carefully (An island.) Point to the different geographical features and identify the missing word. Correct the exercise together. on the island and elicit the words in L1 or in English. Then ask them to identify the animal in the illustration Audio script (a whale) and the means of transport (a hot air balloon). Which item is missing? Point to the numbered items on the pages and 1 mountain, lake, ocean, island, city, building present the words. Then play track 44 (Class CD 1). Ask pupils to concentrate on the pronunciation as they 2 river, lake, ocean, island, city, building 3 mountain, river, ocean, island, city, building listen. Play the CD again and ask them to associate the appropriate number with each word, for example: 4 mountain, river, lake, ocean, city, building 5 mountain, river, lake, island, city, building hot air balloon – one. They do the same with all the items.

62


UniT 5 Which adjective is missing? 1 fast, slow, small 2 fast, large, small 3 slow, large, small 4 fast, slow, large Answers: 1 river; 2 mountain; 3 lake; 4 world; 5 ocean. 1 large; 2 slow; 3 fast; 4 small. 4 Rewrite the mirror words in your notebook. (p. 49) An activity to practise the new vocabulary. Ask pupils what mirror words are (words that are written right to left). Pupils complete the activity individually and compare their answers with a partner. Then they illustrate each word. Correct the exercise by having pupils write their words on the board for everyone to check. Answers: 1 world; 2 country; 3 river; 4 city; 5 lake; 6 island; 7 building; 8 race; 9 ocean; 10 large; 11 whale; 12 mountain. 5 Look and answer. (p. 49) An activity to develop observation skills and practise the alphabet. Pupils work in pairs. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. When they finish, check the answers orally. Answers: 1 The book is in the sky and the pilot has got the camera. 2 The camera is smaller than the book. 3 Slow, small, short. 4 An ocean is bigger. 5 Pupils’ own answers.

Round-up

A memory game to consolidate the language of the lesson. Books closed, invite different pupils to ask the class questions about the page, for example: What colour is the whale? Is it large or small? etc.

geographical features. Encourage them to add important buildings such as castles, cathedrals, forts, etc.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 36)

1 Classify the words. Can you add any more? (p. 36) Pupils classify the vocabulary in the appropriate columns and complete them with more words that they know. Answers: School subjects: P.E., History, Art, Maths; Animals: snake, condor, iguana; Food: peach, lamb chop, cabbage, melon; Geographical features: lake, river, ocean, island. 2 Join the opposites and write the words. (p. 36) Pupils identify the words represented in the pictures and write them down. Then they join the opposites. Answers: 1 sad; 2 slow; 3 fat; 4 young.

L E S S ON

2

Higher! Faster! (pp. 50-51) Objectives: To present the new vocabulary in context. To develop observation skills and reading comprehension. To stimulate the imagination. Language focus: The best! That’s amazing! It’s got the largest clock in Britain. Is it the biggest ocean in the world? No, the Pacific Ocean is the biggest ocean! You’re the smartest girl! Surfing on the whale is the coolest way to win this race! Target vocabulary: Race, clock, Big Ben, Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, Mount Everest, Nile, life jacket, super, amazing, cool, cross, go down, race (v). Vocabulary (revision): Vocabulary from lesson 1. Adjectives. Materials: Class CD.

Reinforcement activity: Pupils classify the geographical features they have learnt (and others they know) under the headings Land and Water.

Warm-up An activity to present the topic of races.

Extension activity: In their notebooks, pupils draw a simple map of their area and label the main

Pupils brainstorm the names of films they have seen that deal with the subject of races. Write the titles on the

63


UniT 5

That’s amazing! board in English or in L1. Ask them what the races are 7 HANNA usually for (to be the first to reach a given finish or to find something, e.g. a treasure, before anyone else does). MATT 1

47 CD 1

Listen and read. (pp. 50-51) A listening activity to practise vocabulary in context. 8 HANNA

Focus pupils’ attention on the double page and ask FREDDY them to describe what is going on in the frames: Our friends are talking about a film they have just seen 9 AMY about a race from London to New York in a hot air FREDDY balloon. Suddenly they find themselves taking part in MATT the race, which they win thanks to a very unusual means of transport. 11FREDDY Ask questions about the comic, for example: Did Freddy and Matt like the film? Where does the race start? Where does it end? Which ocean do they cross? etc. Play the CD. Pupils listen and follow the dialogue. Play the CD again with pauses for them to repeat, chorally or individually. Check their pronunciation and intonation.

Oh, no! We’re going down! Where are the life jackets? Hanna, is that the smallest island in the world? Ah, a whale! The whale is the largest mammal in the world… Shut up, Hanna. We’ve got a problem! Freddy, what are we doing? We’re racing to New York! To New York? Sure, Matt! Surfing on a whale is the coolest way to win this race!

Audio script 1 FREDDY MATT

That film was super! The best!

2 HANNA

Well? Tell me about the film! What’s it about? A race from London to New York in a hot air balloon! In a hot air balloon! That’s amazing!

FREDDY AMY 3 FREDDY

First we cross England, then we cross Ireland, then the Atlantic Ocean…

4 HANNA FREDDY

Oh, we’re flying over London! That’s Big Ben. It’s got the largest clock in Britain. Listen!

5 AMY

There’s the Atlantic Ocean! Is it the biggest ocean in the world, Matt? Uh, no, I think it’s uh…

MATT 6 HANNA

FREDDY

64

When you finish, explain the vocabulary and make sure that pupils understand the new expressions. 2 Answer the questions. (p. 51) Answering questions to check comprehension. Pupils answer the questions and check their answers with a partner. Correct orally. Answers: 1 Higher! Faster! 2 England and Ireland. 3 They are taking part in a race. 4 Hanna does. 5 The whale is the largest mammal in the world. 6 Surfing is the coolest way to win the race.

Round-up

An activity to consolidate the language of the lesson.

Books closed, read out different sentences and questions said by the characters. Elicit the character’s name each time. Then repeat the dialogue, making No, the Pacific Ocean is the biggest deliberate mistakes. For example, in frame 1, say boring ocean! Mount Everest is the highest mountain, the Nile is the longest river and… instead of super, in frame 3, say London to Paris instead of London to New York, etc. Ask pupils to correct you. ... and you’re the smartest girl!


UniT 5 Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 37)

1 Look at the comic on pages 50-51 in your Pupil’s Book and reorder the questions. (p. 37)

L E S S ON

Higher! Faster! (pp. 50-51) Objectives: To describe location. To revise prepositions of place. To act out dialogues. To develop observation skills. Language focus: The red frog is (near) the door. The blue frog is (next to) the green frog. Vocabulary (revision): Prepositions of place. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135).

Pupils rewrite the questions in their notebooks. Point out that the verbs are colour-coded for extra help. Answers: 1 Where are our friends going? 2 Are they running or flying to New York? 3 Is London a city in France? 4 Are they crossing the Pacific Ocean? 5 Have they got life jackets? 6 What is the largest clock in Britain? 7 What is the highest mountain in the world? Is the whale a mammal? 2 In pairs, ask and answer the questions in ex. 1. (p. 37) Pupils work in pairs and give short answers where applicable. Correct by having them read out the questions and the answers to the class. Answers: 1 To New York. 2 They are flying. 3 No, it isn’t. 4 No, they aren’t. 5 Yes, they have. 6 It’s Big Ben. 7 Mount Everest. 8 Yes, it is.

3

Warm-up An activity to revise geographical location. Ask pupils: Where is (Ireland)? Elicit: In Europe. Ask: Is it near (Poland)? (No, it isn’t.) Revise countries around the world in this way. 1

47 CD 1

Listen and read. (pp. 50-51) A listening activity to revise the comic.

Play the comic again. Pupils listen and follow the text 3 Where are they? Write in, on, from, to or over. in their books. Divide the class into four groups and assign the roles (p. 37) of Amy, Hannah, Matt and Freddy. If necessary, play Pupils look at the pictures and write the corresponding the CD again, with pauses after each line so the groups can repeat it. Otherwise, pupils recite their preposition in the space provided. lines either from the book or from memory. Encourage them to use the appropriate intonation and mime their Answers: 1 in; 2 over; 3 to; 4 on; 5 from. character’s facial expressions and actions. Then swap the roles around and repeat the activity. 4 What are they saying? (p. 37) Explain the activity first. Pupils look at what is happening in the scene and imagine the characters’ dialogue. Encourage them to use the new vocabulary and expressions.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 37)

4 What are they saying? (p. 37) An activity to act out a dialogue. Divide the class into pairs. Pupils take out their Activity Books and read their dialogue out to their partner. Each pair then practises both dialogues, one after the other. Invite different pairs to act out their dialogues in front of the class. If you wish, these can be recorded and then played back so pupils can correct their

65


UniT 5

That’s amazing! pronunciation and intonation. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.

L E S S ON

4

Let’s learn! (p. 52)

Find the differences. (p. 37) A picture dictation to revise prepositions.

Objectives: To present the C-V-C principle for the formation of the superlative. To develop spoken interaction and spoken production. Language focus: What’s the biggest animal in this forest? The fox is the biggest animal here. Is the fox the fastest animal? Target vocabulary: Fox, squirrel, turtle, forest, fast. Vocabulary (revision): Geographical features. Animals. Adjectives. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135)

Draw the following picture on the board (or prepare it beforehand and photocopy it): a room with a table, a half open door, a window, a TV, a basket and a shelf with two books on it, one at each end. Add frogs to the scene: in the basket, on the table, under the table, behind the door, in front of the TV, next to the TV, near the window, between two books on the shelf. Under the drawing, add the following table: in on under behind in front of between near next to

Warm-up A vocabulary activity to revise adjectives.

If necessary, revise the meaning of the prepositions. Hand out the sheets of paper and ask pupils to take out the following colour pencils: red, green, yellow, blue, brown, pink, purple, orange. Tell pupils to copy the drawing and colour each frog using a different colour. They do this individually. In pairs, pupils then ask yes/no questions to discover the location of their partners’ frogs, for example: Is the red frog (between the books)? When they locate the frog, they write the colour in the appropriate space in the table. The game ends when both players have completed their table. Reinforcement activity: In their notebooks, pupils write complete sentences to indicate the location of their partner’s frogs, for example: The red frog is in front of the TV.

Write the following adjectives on the board with a few letters missing: short, tall, angry, bored, naughty, etc. Pupils spell them out and then give the comparative of each one. 1

48 CD 1

Establish the situation: Liz and Wiz are in the forest. They have met a troll and they are asking him questions about the forest. However, Wiz has a little accident… Play the CD so pupils can listen to the complete text. Play it again. Pupils repeat each sentence after the pause. Make sure that they understand the use of the superlative. Point out the onomatopoeia argh! as an expression of disgust. Audio script

Extension activity: Pupils research, write and illustrate a short text about frogs, describing their appearance, LIZ habitat and distribution around the world. Display their TROLL work in the classroom. LIZ TROLL

66

Listen and read. (p. 52) An activity to present the structures of the unit.

What’s the biggest animal in this forest? It’s the fox. The fox is the biggest animal here. Is the fox the fastest animal? No, the fastest animal is the frog. There he goes!


UniT 5 LIZ TROLL WIZ

Is this Blue Lake? Yes, it’s the biggest lake in the forest! Argh!

On the board, write the positive, comparative and superlative of the following adjectives: big, large, small. Underline the endings and ask pupils why the consonant is doubled in big but not in large or small. Allow them to reflect on this for a moment, and then teach the rule: adjectives whose three final letters are a consonant, a vowel and a consonant (C-V-C) double their final consonant. (This is also applicable to the comparative, present participle, past of regular verbs, etc. and is known as the C-V-C principle.) 2 Chit-chat. (p. 52) A pair activity to ask and answer information questions. Help pupils identify the animals shown in the drawings. Demonstrate the exchange with a pupil and ask the class to repeat chorally. In pairs, pupils ask and answer questions about the pictures. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.

Round-up

A game to revise vocabulary and develop memory. Books closed, point to different pupils and ask them the questions they have practised in exercise 2, then make up more questions about animals in nature. Reinforcement activity: On the board, draw a table with three columns and the following headings: Positive – Comparative – Superlative. Pupils read the comic again, write down the short adjectives they find in the appropriate column and add the two missing forms, for example: high – higher – highest. Teach them the positive and comparative of best: good, better. (Adjectives: higher, faster, best, largest, biggest, longest, smartest, smallest, coolest.) Extension activity: Pupils find more short adjectives in their books, colour-code the last three letters and apply the C-V-C principle to form the comparative and superlative of each one.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 38)

1 Complete the table. Then ask and answer in pairs. (p. 38) Pupils complete the table with the appropriate superlatives. Check their answers by asking them to spell the words. In pair, pupils then use the table to ask and answer questions. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.

L E S S ON

5

Let’s sing! (p. 53) Objectives: To revise and extend the vocabulary of friendship. To develop listening comprehension skills through a song. To revise ‘can’. To practise the /st/ ending. Language focus: Friends are special when they sing / laugh / dream together, They can sing / laugh / dream the whole day. Target vocabulary: whole, together, away, sing, laugh, dream. Vocabulary (revision): The vocabulary of Nature. Materials: Class CD.

Warm-up An activity to present the theme of the song. Ask the children if they have a special friend. Invite them to say what sort of things special friends can do together. Elicit: sing, laugh and dream. Tell them that the song they are about to hear is about friendship and how important friendship is. 1

49

Listen and sing. (p. 53)

CD 1

Focus pupils’ attention on the illustrations and ask them to name the things they recognise. Elicit: Children, trees, roses, the sky, clouds, the sun, a rainbow. Ask them: Are the boy and girl laughing? Play the CD while they follow the text in their books.

67


UniT 5

That’s amazing! Play the song again and encourage the pupils to sing along. Audio script

Friends are special Friends are special when they sing together. They can sing the whole day, They can sing the night away, They can sing together, they can sing.

3

47 CD 2

Listen and circle the sound /st/. Then practise with a friend. (p. 38)

Ask pupils to take out a red pencil. Play the CD, pausing after each sentence to give them time to circle the appropriate letters. Correct by saying the sentences and eliciting the endings they have circled. Play the CD again so they can repeat the sentences first and then practise them in pairs. Finally, ask individual pupils to repeat them to the class. Audio script

Friends are special when they laugh together, They can laugh the whole day, They can laugh the night away, They can laugh together, they can laugh. Friends are special when they dream together, They can dream the whole day, They can dream the night away, They can dream together, they can dream.

Sound check 2

50

Audio script

The highest mountain is Mount Everest.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k 46

6

Listen and repeat. (p. 53)

Practice pronouncing the ending -st with pupils, then read the sentence with them, stressing the sounds. Play the CD. Pupils listen and repeat the sentence.

2

L E S S ON

CLIL – The America’s Cup (p. 54)

CD 1

/st/

1 Is your sister’s name Stella? 2 Do you study before breakfast? 3 Have you got a swimming costume? 4 Is the Nile the longest river in the world? 5 What is the first letter of the alphabet? And the last?

(p. 38)

Listen and repeat. (p. 38)

Objectives: To read and talk about a famous boat race. To revise countries and nationalities. To develop reading comprehension. Language focus: The America’s Cup is the most famous boat race or regatta in the sport of sailing. It is nine races between two boats. The oldest trophy goes back to a race around the Isle of Wight. Target vocabulary: Cup, race, regatta, sailing, maximum, crew, trophy, win (n). Vocabulary (revision): Countries and nationalities. Materials: Class CD.

CD 2

Focus pupils’ attention on the illustration and ask: What country is this? Is it the biggest country in the world? Play the CD and ask them to repeat the sentence first chorally and then individually. Audio script /st/

68

Is Australia the largest country in the world?

Warm-up An activity to introduce the topic. Explain the words regatta (boat race) cup (trophy), crew (team) and yach’ (sailboat) to the class. Tell pupils that not only is the America’s cup the most famous regatta in the sport of sailing, but the prize


UniT 5 (the America’s cup) is the oldest active trophy in international sport – it was established 45 years before the modern Olympics. Ask pupils if they are interested in sailing, whether they have ever sailed a boat and where. 51 CD 1

Listen and read. Then answer the questions. (p. 54) An activity to develop listening and reading comprehension.

Focus attention on the table of wins (victories). Point out that not only has the USA won the most races, but also that they had an unbroken streak of 25 wins that lasted over 113 years and has never been equalled in any other sport. Ask pupils to describe the illustrations. In pairs, they then listen and read the text. Refer them to the photos to help comprehension. Make sure they know how to pronounce the new words. Finally, they answer the questions in their notebooks, either individually or in pairs. You may also wish to ask the questions orally first, perhaps with books closed. Audio script

The America’s Cup is the most famous boat race or regatta in the sport of sailing. It is nine races between two boats which are a maximum of 90 feet long with a crew of 20 people! The oldest trophy goes back to a race around the Isle of Wight in 1851 and is named after the winner of that race, Yacht America. Inside the cup there are all the names of the yachts that take part in the regatta. Answers: 1 It is the most famous regatta in the sport of sailing. 2 There are nine races. 3 They are 90 feet long. 4 There are 20 crew members. 5 It goes back to the Isle of Wight in 1851. 6 On the inside of the trophy, there are the names of all the yachts that take part in the regatta. The USA has the most wins. 8 England has the most losses.

Round-up

An activity to practise vocabulary. Pupils close their books and brainstorm the names of the ten countries in the table of wins. Write them on the board and check the answers with the class. Ask pupils to calculate their percentage of ‘wins’ (by multiplying the number of names they got right by ten.)

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 39)

Read page 54 in your Pupil’s Book. Now close your Pupil’s Book, look at the photos and complete the sentences. (p. 39) Pupils read page 54 in their Pupil’s Book again, look at the photos and complete the sentences. Answers: 1 boat race; 2 sailing; 3 nine; 4 twenty people; 5 trophy; 6 1851; 7 winner; 8 yachts.

L E S S ON

7

Time for writing (p. 55) Objectives: To develop writing skills. To practise the language learnt so far. To speak and write about a holiday. To revise the use of parentheses. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135)

Warm-up An activity to revise the structures of the unit. Ask different pupils: What is the nicest place you have ever visited on a holiday? What is the coolest thing you did there? What is the best dish you ever tasted? etc. Pupils can give short answers.

69


UniT 5

That’s amazing! 1

Listen and read about a special CD 1 place. (p. 55) An activity to prepare for the writing task. 52

Point to the page and ask: What kind of document is this? (A postcard.) Who is sending it? (Jim.) Who is going to receive it? (Sally). Tell pupils they are going to read and hear about Jim’s holiday in Mexico. Play the CD. Pupils listen and follow the text in their books. When they finish, ask them if they write postcards during their holidays. Who do they send them to? Audio script

Hi Sally! I’m on vacation in Mexico. This is Mexico City. It’s the capital of Mexico and the largest city, too. The guide is a whiz at mountain climbing. He’s taking me to see the highest mountain in Mexico, the Citlaaltepelt! The biggest wild animals are the jaguar and the cougar (they’re like very big cats) and there are many beautiful birds. ¡Hasta la vista! (That’s Spanish for ‘see you soon’.) Love, Jim

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 40)

Writing 1 Rewrite the text using parentheses. (p. 40) Pupils do the exercise individually or in pairs. Check by asking them to read out the text stopping before and after the parentheses. Answer: I love St. Ives in Cornwall! It’s got the warmest water (I hate cold water), the whitest beaches, the nicest people (they are always smiling!), the food is the best (great burgers and fantastic fruit)… it’s the coolest place in the world! 2 Choose a postcard in ex. 1 and write to your friend. (p. 40)

Pupils write a similar text in their notebooks. In order to develop language awareness, ask a pupil to copy his or her text on the board and ask pupils for help in correcting mistakes if there are any. When they have corrected their text, they copy it in the space provided in their Activity Book. Point to the words in the box and present the words Collect the Activity Books for correction, and record vacation and whiz. Ask pupils to brainstorm the American words they have learnt in previous units and pupils’ results on the Formative assessment sheet. others they might know. 2 Now choose a postcard and write about it. (p. 55) A writing activity based on a model. Pupils choose a postcard and write to a friend or family member about their holiday activities. Encourage them to use superlatives. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. When they finish, ask them to check their texts in pairs.

Round-up

An activity to revise punctuation. Present the use of parentheses. Tell pupils that in English they are used to add more information to a sentence or enlarge on an idea. Ask them to find the two examples of parentheses in the text.

70

is Hi Sally! in Mexico. This I'm on vacation 's the capital of Mexico It . Mexico City t city, too. The guide is a and the larges ain climbing. He's taking whiz at mounthighest mountain in me to see the tlaaltepelt! Mexico, the Ciild animals are the jaguar The biggest w (they are like very big and the cougar e are many beautiful cats) and ther vista! (That’s Spanish birds. Hasta laon’). for ‘see you so Love, Jim

Sally Smith 550 First Avenue6 NY 1001 USA


UniT 5 L E S S ON

8

L E S S ON

Let’s round it up! (pp. 56-57)

Speaking

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

9

(p. 41)

Objectives: To develop spoken interaction through a game. To revise prepositions of place. To revise the comparative and the superlative. To develop observation and memory skills. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135).

Objectives: To revise and consolidate the vocabulary and structures of Unit 5. To revise the unit song. To do assessment and self-assessment activities. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Class CD. Tokens or scraps of paper.

49 CD 1

Warm-up An activity to revise prepositions. Ask different pupils to describe the position of their classmates in the room, for example: (Gala) is between (Sarah) and (Mariam). Play with a friend: ask and answer. (p. 41) A game to develop spoken interaction. Pupils identify the animals and items in the squares. Read out the model questions and the rules and explain that the aim of the game is to go around the board asking and answering questions and making comparisons. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. When pupils finish the first round, they play again with a different partner. (This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.) Pupils then write the sentences and the answers to the questions in their notebooks.

Round-up

A game to develop observation and memory skills. Pupils’ books closed. Give pupils a few moments to memorise the page. Books closed, say incomplete sentences and elicit the missing information, for example: The elephant is slower than the … .

Warm-up Revising the unit song and vocabulary.

Begin the lesson by singing the unit song (p. 53). Encourage everyone to join in. Ask pupils to open their books at pages 56 and 57. Tell them that they are going to revise what they have learnt in the unit. 1 Vocabulary. Copy and match the columns in your notebook. (p. 56) Pupils copy and complete the exercise in their notebooks. When they finish, ask them to compare their answers with a partner. Answers: 1 Easter – It’s an island; 2 Amazon – It’s a river; 3 Pacific – It’s an ocean; 4 Rio de Janeiro – It’s a city; 5 Empire State – It’s a building; 6 Titicaca – It’s a lake; 7 Kilimanjaro – It’s a mountain; 8 Paraguay – It’s a country. 2 Read and say true or false. Then correct the false sentences in your notebook. (p. 56) Pupils read the sentences in pairs and give oral answers. Then they rewrite the false sentences in their notebooks supplying the correct information. Check orally. Answers: 1 True. 2 True. 3 False. The jaguar is the fastest animal in the world. 4 True. 5 False. Australia is the largest island in the world. 6 False. The Nile is the longest river in the world.

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UniT 5

That’s amazing! 3

53 CD 1

Listen and put a token on the correct answer. (p. 56)

Point to each square and elicit the item. Tell pupils that they are going to hear short dialogues that correspond to one of the two items shown in each rectangle. The task is to identify the correct one by placing a token or a scrap of paper on the appropriate picture. Play the CD, pausing after each exchange to give pupils time to complete the task. Audio script 1 A B A 2A B A

Is a dolphin bigger than a whale? No, a whale is bigger than a dolphin. The whale is the largest mammal in the world. Oh! I see. Who’s the oldest person in your family? The oldest person in my family … It’s my grandad. He’s 99 years old. Wow. Almost 100!

3A B A B

Who’s the youngest girl in your class? Sophie. What does she look like? She’s got straight brown hair and she’s very tall.

4A B A B

Where do you spend your holidays? We usually go to the beach. What do you do there? A lot of things… I love swimming in the sea.

5A B

Is Argentina bigger than Brazil? I don’t think so, Brazil is the biggest country in South America. Oh! I see.

A

they finish, they report their findings to the class. Make sure they use the possessive as in the example. 5 Match the titles, the photos and the texts. Then copy them in your notebook. (p. 57) Pupils complete the exercise in their notebooks and compare their answers with a partner. Check orally. Answers: The Blue Whale – photo 3, second text; The River Nile – photo 2, third text; The New York Marathon – photo 1, first text.) 6 Write about your family, using ideas from exercise 4. (p. 57) Pupils think back to their answers in question 4 and write a short paragraph to describe their family.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

1 Look at Unit 5 in your Pupil’s Book and answer the questions. (p. 42) Pupils check the unit and write the answers. Answers: 1 fast; 2 A whale. 3 A piece of land surrounded by water. 4 First we cross England, then we cross Ireland, then the Atlantic Ocean… 5 They are flying over London. 6 The Pacific Ocean. 7 On the whale. 8 New York City. 9 A fox and a frog 10 The frog. 11 Mount Everest. 12 The America’s cup. 13 Yacht America. 14 This is London, the capital of the UK! I love riding on the double-decker buses (buses with two floors) and seeing the guards outside Buckingham Palace (the home of the Royal Family)! 2

6A B

Is your scooter faster than your father’s car? Oh, no! His car is a lot faster than my scooter.

4 Ask your partner, take notes and then report back to the class. (p. 57) Read the model exchange with the class and explain the activity. Pupils look at the pictures and produce the same type of questions and answers in pairs. When

72

(pp. 42-53)

48 CD 2

Listen, number the pictures and then complete the sentences. (p. 43)

Point to each square and elicit the geographical feature or animal. Tell pupils that they are going to hear short dialogues that correspond to one of the two shown in each rectangle. The task is to identify the correct one by ticking the appropriate box. Play the CD, pausing after each exchange to give pupils time to complete the task.


UniT 5 Audio script

3 Read and tick. (p. 43)

1 The Pacific Ocean is the largest ocean in the world. It covers one third of the earth’s surface.

Help pupils complete the self-assessment section by reading each objective aloud.

2 The tortoise is one of the slowest animals in the world. It walks about a kilometre an hour!

Testing and assessment

4 The largest mammal in the world is the whale. It is about 100 feet long.

Unit Test Photocopy the Unit Test, one per pupil. Pupils complete the test individually. Once you have corrected all the tests, return them to the pupils and help them check for mistakes by writing the answers on the board. Record pupils’ results on the Formative assessment sheet. Make sure they file their tests in their Language Portfolio.

5 The River Nile is the longest river in the world. It is four thousand, one hundred and sixty miles long!

To consolidate the structures of the Unit, pupils complete the Let’s Revise! section. (Activity Book p. 78)

3 Mount Everest is the highest mountain in the world. It is eight thousand, eight hundred and fifty metres high.

73


UniT 6

Working world L E S S ON

1

Audio script

(pp. 58-59)

Objectives: To talk about professions. To learn more adjectives. To complete words. To develop observation and memory skills. Target vocabulary: Explorer, firefighter, pilot, police officer, computer programmer, office worker, doctor, dentist, scientist, teacher, diver, boring, exciting, interesting, difficult. Vocabulary (revision): Adjectives. Food. Materials: Class CD.

Warm-up A game to revise vocabulary and present the new topic.

difficult pilot explorer interesting police officer doctor diver boring 2

3 CD 2

firefighter office worker teacher computer programmer exciting scientist dentist

Listen and repeat. (p. 59) An activity to practise the new vocabulary.

Point to the list of words and play the CD again. Pupils read and repeat the vocabulary chorally and individually. Audio script

1 pilot 9 firefighter 2 scientist 10 diver 3 dentist 11 police officer Play ‘Hangman’ with the class. Write six dashes 4 computer programmer 12 interesting on the board (one for every letter in the word doctor): 13 boring _ _ _ _ _ _ . Ask: Can you guess this profession? Pupils 5 doctor 6 explorer 14 exciting say letters in order to complete the word. When they 15 difficult guess, confirm their answer by saying: A doctor works 7 teacher 8 office worker in a hospital and looks after people’s health. Copy the title and the objectives of the unit on the board. Read and explain them to the class. 3 4 Listen again. Which occupation is missing? CD 2 Which adjective is missing? (p. 59) An activity to develop attention and listening 1 2 Look, listen and say the number. (p. 58) skills. CD 2 An activity to present the new vocabulary. Focus pupils’ attention on the double page illustration and ask: What can you see in the picture? (A lot of people working in a building.) Point to the different persons and elicit the jobs in L1 or in English. Then ask them to identify the food in the illustration (a cabbage and a melon). Point to the numbered items on the pages and present the words. Then play track 2 (Class CD 2). Ask pupils to concentrate on the pronunciation as they listen. Play the CD again and ask them to associate the appropriate number with each word, for example: pilot – one. They do the same with all the occupations and adjectives.

74

Tell pupils that in this activity, they will hear the occupations and the adjectives named, with one missing each time. The task is to listen carefully and identify the missing word. Correct the exercise together. Audio script

Which occupation missing? 1 explorer, firefighter, computer programmer, office worker, doctor, dentist, scientist, teacher, diver, pilot. 2 explorer, firefighter, pilot, police officer, office worker, doctor, dentist, scientist, teacher, diver. 3 explorer, firefighter, pilot, police officer, computer programmer, office worker, dentist, scientist, teacher, diver. 4 explorer, pilot, police officer, computer programmer, office worker, doctor, dentist, scientist, teacher, diver.


UniT 61 5 explorer, firefighter, pilot, police officer, computer programmer, office worker, doctor, dentist, scientist, diver.

Which adjective is missing? 1 boring, exciting, interesting 2 boring, difficult, interesting 3 difficult, boring, exciting 4 exciting, interesting, difficult Answers: 1 police officer; 2 computer programmer; 3 doctor; 4 firefighter; 5 teacher. 1 difficult; 2 exciting; 3 interesting; 4 boring. 4 Copy and complete the professions with the vowels: a, e, i, o, u. (p. 59) An activity to practise the new vocabulary. Pupils complete the activity individually and compare their answers with a partner. Correct the exercise by having pupils write their words on the board for everyone to check. Answers: 1 explorer; 2 dentist; 3 firefighter; 4 police officer; 5 pilot; 6 doctor; 7 computer programmer; 8 teacher; 9 office worker; 10 scientist; 11 diver. 5 Look and answer. (p. 59) An activity to develop observation skills and practise the alphabet. Pupils work in pairs. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. When they finish, check the answers orally. Answers: 1 The cabbage is in frame 2 and the melon is in frame 5. Other foods: Pear, apple, banana, grape, milk, biscuit etc. 2, 3, 4 and 5: Pupils’ own answers.

Round-up

Reinforcement activity: Pupils classify the occupations and adjectives they have learnt in alphabetical order under the headings Occupations and adjectives. Extension activity: In their notebooks, pupils draw the occupations and write a simple definition under each one, for example: A dentist takes care of our teeth.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 44)

1 Read the clues, do the crossword and find the secret job. (p. 44) Pupils do the cross word individually and find the secret job. Answers: 1 scientist; 2 office worker; 3 police officer; 4 firefighter; 5 doctor; 6 pilot; 7 explorer; 8 teacher; 9 dentist; 10 diver. Secret job: computer programmer.

L E S S ON

2

I want to be… (pp. 60-61) Objectives: To present the new vocabulary in context. To revise the superlative. To develop observation skills and reading comprehension. To stimulate the imagination. Language focus: What do you want to be when you grow up? I want to be a computer programmer. What about you? Here we can see the oldest turtles in the world, and the biggest iguanas. What’s that? It looks like a pirate ship. I don’t want to be an explorer. Target vocabulary: Island, pirate, grow up, run away. Vocabulary (revision): Vocabulary from lesson 1. Adjectives. Materials: Class CD.

A memory game to consolidate the language of the lesson.

Warm-up An activity to revise occupations.

Books closed, invite different pupils to ask the class questions about the page, for example: Is the firefighter a man or a woman? What does the dentist look like? etc.

Pupils brainstorm the people who help them in their everyday lives. Write them on the board, for example: police officer, bus driver, teacher, doctor, dentist, firefighter etc.

75


UniT 6

Working world 1

5 CD 2

Listen and read. (pp. 60-61) A listening activity to practise vocabulary in context.

Focus pupils’ attention on the double page and ask them to describe what is going on in the frames: Our friends are talking about the professions they want to have when they grow up. Suddenly they find themselves in the Galápagos Island: Freddy is a scientist and Matt is an explorer. But something happens, and Matt no longer wants to be an explorer…. Ask questions about the comic, for example: What does Hanna want to be? What does Freddy want to be? What animals can you see in the Galápagos Island? What is Hanna drawing? etc. Play the CD. Pupils listen and follow the dialogue. Play the CD again with pauses for them to repeat, chorally or individually. Check their pronunciation and intonation. Audio script 1 AMY MATT AMY

Matt, what do you want to be when you grow up? An explorer! What about you? Hmm, I don’t know!

2 HANNA I want to be a computer programmer. FREDDY Naah, that’s boring! I want to be… a scientist! 3 FREDDY The Galápagos Islands! How exciting! HANNA Here we can see the oldest tortoises in the world, and the biggest iguanas. 4 MATT What are you doing, Hanna? HANNA I’m drawing that dolphin. Dolphins are mammals, you know, and… 5 AMY MATT

What’s that, Matt? What is it? It looks like a ship…

6 MATT

Oh no, it looks like a pirate ship… it’s coming this way.

7 FREDDY Is there a flag? Can you see their flag? MATT No, I can’t! It’s too foggy! 8 FREDDY Matt, what are you doing?

76

9 FREDDY Hey, you can’t run away if you want to be an explorer! 10 MATT Who wants to be an explorer! I don’t want to be an explorer! I want to be a diver!

When you finish, explain the vocabulary and make sure that pupils understand the new expressions. Ask them to look for two superlative forms (oldest and biggest). Remind them of the C-V-C principle. 2 Answer the questions. (p. 61) Answering questions to check comprehension. Pupils answer the questions and check their answers with a partner. Correct orally. Answers: 1 At the park. 2 A computer programmer. 3 They are sailing towards the Galápagos Islands. 4 She is drawing a dolphin. 5 A pirate ship. 6 Matt.

Round-up

A game to consolidate the language of the lesson. Books closed, revise the information given in the text. Ask pupils: Who wants to be an explorer? Who wants to be a computer programmer? Are the tortoises big in the Galápagos Island? etc. Then ask: What do you want to be when you grow up? Do a class survey to find out which is the most popular profession with the pupils. Draw columns on the board and say: Raise your hand if you want to be (an explorer). Count the hands and write the number in the appropriate column. Do this with all the professions. When you finish, you can offer your conclusions, for example: Five students want to be explorers when they grow up. The most popular profession is…


UniT 6 Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 45)

1 Look at the comic on pages 60-61 in your Pupil’s Book and reorder the questions. (p. 45)

interesting. Students give more examples and complete the word spiders. 1

5 CD 2

Listen and read. (pp. 60-61) A listening activity to revise the comic.

Pupils rewrite the questions in their notebooks. Point out that the verbs are colour-coded for extra help.

Play the comic again. Pupils listen and follow the text in their books. Divide the class into four groups and assign the roles Answers: 1 Who wants to be a computer programmer? 2 Does Freddy want to be an explorer? of Amy, Hannah, Matt and Freddy. If necessary, play the CD again, with a pause after each line so the 3 What does Matt want to be? 4 Where can you see groups can repeat it. Otherwise, pupils recite their iguanas and tortoises? 5 What is Hanna drawing? 6 Are dolphins mammals or fish? 7 Where do dolphins lines either from the book or from memory. Encourage them to use the appropriate intonation and mime their live? 8 Can Matt see a pirate ship? character’s facial expressions and actions. Then swap the roles around and repeat the activity. 2 In pairs, ask and answer the questions in exercise 1. (p. 45)

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

Pupils work in pairs and give short answers where applicable. Correct by having them read out the questions and the answers to the class. Answers: 1 Hanna. 2 Yes, He does. 3 An explorer. 4 In the Galapagos Island. 5 A dolphin. 6 Mammals. 7 In the sea. 8 Yes, He can.

L E S S ON

3

I want to be… (pp. 60-61) Objectives: To learn the rules of formation for the comparative and superlative of long adjectives. To revise adjectives. To act out dialogues. To develop observation skills. Language focus: Is science more difficult than English? Yes, It is. No it isn’t. Which is the most difficult subject? It’s Maths. Vocabulary (revision): Vocabulary of lessons 1 and 2. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135). Warm-up An activity to revise adjectives. Draw two word spiders on the board with the following headings: Short adjectives and Long adjectives. Write one example in each spider: big and

(p. 45)

3 Complete each sentence with the correct form of the adjective. (p. 45) An activity to learn the comparative and superlative forms of long adjectives. On the board, write the positive, comparative and superlative of the following adjectives: difficult, interesting, beautiful. Explain that all these are long adjectives: they have two or more syllables and they do not end in ‘y’. Underline more and most in the comparative and the superlative forms. Explain their uses giving one example of each case, for example: Science is more difficult than language. Maths is the most difficult subject of all. Give additional examples. Focus the children’s attention on ex. 3 and tell them to fill the gaps with the correct form of the adjectives in the box. Correct by having them read out the complete sentences to the class. Answers: 1 more difficult; 2 the most interesting; 3 more boring; 4 more beautiful; 5 most exciting; 6 more famous. 4 What are they saying? (p. 45) An activity to act out a dialogue. Divide the class into pairs. Pupils take out their Activity Books and read their dialogue out to their partner. Each

77


UniT 6

Working world pair then practises both dialogues, one after the other. Invite different pairs to act out their dialogues in front of the class. If you wish, these can be recorded and then played back so pupils can correct their pronunciation and intonation. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.

L E S S ON

Let’s learn! (p. 62) Objectives: To ask wh-questions. To form nouns from verbs by adding -er. To develop spoken interaction and spoken production. To ask and answer information questions. Language focus: What do you want to be when you grow up? I want to be a famous ballet dancer! Who wants to be a basketball player? Is China bigger than Brazil? What’s the nicest present for you? What do you like doing on Saturday? Are you a good hiker? Target vocabulary: Ballet dancer, basketball player, singer, runner, diver, teacher, surfer, writer, painter, singer. Vocabulary (revision): Professions. Adjectives. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135)

Copy and complete the table in your notebook. Then ask and answer in pairs. An activity to practise the comparative and superlative forms of long adjectives. Copy the following table and dialogue on the board:

difficult (Subject)

Science

English

Maths

exciting (Film)

……….

……….

……….

interesting (Band)

……….

……….

……….

A: Is Science more difficult than English? B: Yes, it is! A: Which is the most difficult subject? A: It’s Maths! Pupils copy the exercise in their notebooks. Read the dialogue with a volunteer and explain it to the class. Underline the comparative and superlative forms. In pairs, pupils write in the names of three films and bands in the chart. Then they tick the most interesting and exciting one out of the three according to their partner’s replies, using the given dialogue as a model. Reinforcement activity: In their notebooks, pupils write complete answers to exercise 4, for example: Science is more difficult than English. The most difficult subject is Maths . Extension activity: Pupils change the dialogue of exercise 4 using boring or interesting.

78

4

Warm-up A vocabulary activity to revise professions. Write the following professions on the board with a few letters missing: explorer, doctor, dentist, diver, teacher, etc. Pupils spell them out and then say what they want to be when they grow up. 1

6 CD 2

Listen and read. (p. 62) An activity to present the structures of the unit.

Establish the situation: Liz and Wiz are sitting under a tree in the garden discussing what they want to be when they grow up. Suddenly Liz becomes a famous ballet dancer… Play the CD so pupils can listen to the complete text. Play it again. Pupils repeat each sentence after the pause. Make sure that they understand the questions and the answers. Audio script WIZ What do you want to be when you grow up? LIZ Come with me and see! Abracadabra!


UniT 6 LIZ I want to be a famous ballet dancer! WIZ And I want to be… WIZ … a great basketball player! WIZ Ouch! LIZ

Who wants to be a basketball player?

Ask different pupils: What do you want to be when you grow up? And Why? Encourage them to use because, for example: I want to be a doctor because I want to help people. 2 Chit-chat. (p. 62) A pair activity to ask and answer information questions. Help pupils identify the verbs shown in the drawings. Write them on the board: dance, run, dive, teach, surf, write, paint, and sing. Read the exchange and explain how the verb sing changes to a noun by adding the ending -er. Point out that nouns ending in -e only add -r. Ask different pupils to come to the board and write the corresponding noun next to the verb. Remind them of the C-V-C principle. Demonstrate the exchange with a pupil and ask the class to repeat chorally. In pairs, pupils ask and answer questions about the pictures. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.

Round-up

A game to revise vocabulary and develop memory. Books closed, point to different pupils and ask them the question they have practised in exercise 2. Pupils can answer using different occupations.

people. Who is it? Elicit: A police officer. In groups, pupils write three similar definitions using different professions. Then they exchange their definitions and find the answers.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 46)

1 Complete the tables. (p. 46) Pupils complete the tables with the appropriate forms. Remind them the use of C-V-C principle. Check their answers by asking them to spell the words. 2 Use your tables. Ask and answer questions in pairs. (p. 46) In pair, pupils then use the tables to ask and answer questions, using the examples as models. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.

L E S S ON

5

Let’s sing! (p. 63) Objectives: To revise and extend the vocabulary of the unit. To practise the sounds /oU/ and /u:/. To develop listening comprehension skills through a song. Language focus: firefighters / postmen (mail carriers) / teachers help in many ways, putting out the fires, picking up our mail, reading with children, to keep us safe throughout the day, sending our letters on their way, teaching students throughout each day. Target vocabulary: Mail carriers, every day, put out (fires), pick up (letters), keep (us) safe. Vocabulary (revision): The vocabulary of the unit. Materials: Class CD.

Reinforcement activity: On the board, draw a table with two columns and the following headings: Verb – Noun. Pupils read the comic again, write down the professions they find, ending in -er in the appropriate column and add the missing form of the verb, for example: dance – dancer. Finally pupils complete the columns with more examples.

Warm-up An activity to present the theme of the song.

Extension activity: Write the following description on the board: This person works on the street and helps

Ask the children the following questions to elicit firefighters, postmen, teachers. Who puts out fires?

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UniT 6

Working world Who sends letters? Who reads to you at school? Explain that the song they are going to hear is about people who do jobs that help us such as firefighters, postmen and teachers and for that reason it is called Community helpers song.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 46) /oU/ /u:/ shoe in my soup!

3

Oh, no! An old

49 CD 2

Listen and repeat. (p. 46) 1

7

Listen and sing. (p. 63)

CD 2

Focus attention on the page and play the CD while they follow the text in their books.

Focus pupils’ attention on the illustration and ask: What’s for lunch? Play the CD and ask them to repeat the sentence first chorally and then individually.

Audio script

Audio script

Community helpers song

4

50 CD 2

Firefighters help in many ways, Putting out the fires every day, To keep us safe throughout the day Firefighters help us every day! Postmen help in many ways, Picking up our mail every day, Sending our letters on their way. Mail carriers help us every day! Teachers help in many ways, Reading with children every day, Teaching students throughout each day. Teachers help us every day!

/oU/ /u:/ Roast beef, noodles and mushrooms for lunch.

Fill in the gaps. Listen and then practise with a friend. (p. 46) Ask pupils to read the sentences first. Play the CD, pausing after each sentence to give them time to fill the gaps with the missing letters. Correct by asking them to spell the completed words in each sentence. Play the CD again so they can repeat the sentences first and then practise them in pairs. Finally, ask individual pupils to repeat them to the class. Audio script

Play the song again, pausing after each stanza so that 1 Goats and raccoon are mammals. pupils can read the lyrics in their books. Finally repeat the song and encourage them to sing along.

Sound check 2

8

Listen and repeat. (p. 63)

CD 2

Practice pronouncing the sounds /oU/ (old) and /u:/ (shoe) with pupils, then read the sentence with them, stressing the sounds. Play the CD. Pupils listen and repeat the sentence. Audio script

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UniT 6 L E S S ON

6

CLIL page – The Galápagos Tortoise (p. 64) Objectives: To read and talk about the Galápagos Tortoise. To revise superlatives. To develop reading comprehension. Language focus: The Galápagos tortoise is the world’s largest tortoise. It grows to about 5 feet and can weigh up to 550 pounds. It lives on a diet of grass, leaves and cactus and it can survive a year without eating or drinking. It lies in the sun and sleeps about 16 hours a day. The Galápagos archipelago gets its name from the Giant Tortoise. Target vocabulary: Galápagos tortoise, grow, weigh, grass, leaves, cactus, survive, without, lie, get. Vocabulary (revision): endangered species, islands, types, live, diet, eating, drinking, sun, sleep, Spanish. Materials: Class CD.

Audio script

The Galápagos Tortoise is the world’s largest tortoise. It grows to about 5 feet (1.5 metres) long and can weigh up to 550 pounds (250 kilograms). The Galápagos Tortoise is an endangered species and there are only 11 types in the Galápagos islands. Today the 3,000 to 5,000 tortoises that live on Volcano Alcedo on Isabela Island are the largest group of giant tortoises in the Galápagos. The Galápagos Tortoise lives on a diet of grass, leaves, and cactus and can survive a year without eating or drinking. It lies in the sun and sleeps about 16 hours a day. The Galápagos archipelago gets its name from the Giant Tortoise – galápago is the Spanish word for tortoise. Answers: 1 550 pounds (250 kilograms); 2 11; 3 on Isabela Island; 4 a diet of grass, leaves and cactus; 5 16 hours a day; 6 tortoise in Spanish.

Warm-up An activity to introduce the topic.

Round-up

Write the name Galápagos Tortoise on the board and elicit its meaning. Explain that this is the name of the largest tortoise in the world which lives on the Galápagos Islands. Tell them that they are going to listen and read about the Galápagos Tortoise.

Draw a word map on the board and write the heading The Galápagos Tortoise. Pupils close their books and complete the word map with words that appear in the text, for example: endangered species, diet, grass, leaves, cactus, survive, Spanish, etc. Then they read the text to check their spelling.

1

9 CD 2

Listen and read. Then answer the questions. (p. 64) An activity to develop listening and reading comprehension.

Focus attention on the photograph of the tortoise. Ask them how large they think the tortoise is and how much it weighs. Explain that it grows to approximately 1.5 metres long and can weigh up to 250 kilograms. They then listen and read the text. Refer them to the photos to help comprehension. Ask them to find an example of the superlative in the text: the largest tortoise, the largest group. Finally, they answer the questions in their notebooks, either individually or in pairs. You may also wish to ask the questions orally first, perhaps with books closed.

An activity to practise vocabulary.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 47)

Read page 64 in your Pupil’s Book. Now close your Pupil’s Book, look at the photos and complete the sentences. (p. 47) Pupils read page 64 in their Pupil’s Book again, look at the photos and complete the sentences. Answers: 1 largest; 2 5 feet; 3 species; 4 11; 5 5,000; 6 Isabela; 7 survive; 8 lies; 9 archipelago; 10 Spanish.

81


UniT 6

Working world L E S S ON

7

Time for writing (p. 65) Objectives: To develop writing skills. To practise the language learnt so far. To write an interview and a report. To revise the use of long forms. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135)

Warm-up An activity to revise the structures of the unit.

Ted wants to be a police officer when he grows up. He does not want to live in a small town because that is boring. He wants to live in an apartment in New York City because it is awesome and because he has got lots of cousins there. Good luck, Ted! Point to the words in the box and remind pupils about the differences between British and American English. Ask pupils to find the American words ‘apartment’ and ‘awesome’ in the text and give their British equivalents (flat and exciting). Ask pupils to brainstorm the American words they have learnt in previous units and others they might know.

2 Now invent your own interview. Then write a Ask pupils the following questions about their future report about it. (p. 65) plans. Ask for example: What do you want to be when A writing activity based on a model. you grow up? Where do you want to live and why? Pupils can give short answers. Pupils choose a classmate to interview about his/her plans. Encourage them to write the interview and then 1 10 Listen and read about Ted’s plans. (p. 65) the report. Remind them of the use of long forms. Go CD 2 An activity to prepare for the writing task. round the room in order to give any necessary help. When they finish, ask them to check their texts in Point to the page and ask: What kind of document is pairs. this? (An interview.) Who is the interviewer? (Me.) Who is answering? (Ted). Tell pupils they are going to read and Round-up hear about Ted’s plans. An activity to revise long forms. Play the CD. Pupils listen and follow the text in their books. When they finish, ask them to compare the Write contractions on the board and ask different interview with the paragraph. There are contractions in pupils to give the long forms. the interview while there aren’t any in the report. Explain that when we speak, we normally use contractions but Ac t i v i t y Boo k (p. 48) we don’t use them in formal written works. Audio script ME TED ME TED ME TED ME TED

82

Ted, what do you want to be when you grow up? I want to be a police officer. Where do you want to live? Well, I don’t want to live in a small town. That’s boring! So where do you want to live? I want to live in an apartment in New York City. Why do you want to live there? Because it’s awesome and because I’ve got lots of cousins there!

1 Rewrite the text using long forms. (p. 48) Pupils do the exercise individually or in pairs. Check by asking them to write the text with the long forms on the board. Answer: Matt does not want to be a pilot: he thinks that is too dangerous. He cannot be a doctor because he is not very good at Science. He has got lots of friends in Brazil so he can study Portuguese there. Then he can be a teacher!


UniT 6 2 Choose a job and write your report. (p. 48)

answering personal and general questions in the third level. Pupils write a similar report in their notebooks. In order Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. When pupils finish the first round, they play to develop language awareness, ask a pupil to copy his or her text on the board and ask pupils for help in again with a different partner. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative correcting mistakes if there are any. When they have corrected their text, they copy it in the space provided assessment sheet. in their Activity Book. Round-up Collect the Activity Books for correction, and record A game to develop observation and memory skills. pupils’ results on the Formative assessment sheet.

L E S S ON

8

Speaking

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 49)

Objectives: To develop spoken interaction through a game. To revise information questions. To practise the comparative and superlatives. To develop observation and memory skills. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135).

Warm-up An activity to revise superlatives. Ask the following questions: Who is the tallest person in the class? What is the most difficult subject at this level? What is the most dangerous animal in the rainforest? etc. Encourage pupils to give long answers. Collect your points! (p. 49) A game to develop spoken interaction. Make sure pupils have the necessary material: coins, counters and a pencil and a piece of paper handy. Read the rules of the game with the class and explain its aim, which is to ‘collect’ as many points as possible. Pupils play in pairs, going around the board in order to identify professions in the first level, using superlatives in the second level and asking and

Give pupils a few moments to memorise the page. Books closed, ask them to name as many professions as they can. Then say incomplete sentences and elicit the missing information, for example: A doctor works in a… A firefighter is one of the most… job. The fastest animal in the world is… , etc

L E S S ON

9

Let’s round it up! (pp. 66-67) Objectives: To revise and consolidate the vocabulary and structures of Unit 6. To revise the unit song. To do assessment and self-assessment activities. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Class CD. Tokens or scraps of paper.

7 CD 2

Warm-up Revising the unit song and vocabulary.

Begin the lesson by singing the unit song (p. 63). Encourage everyone to join in. Ask pupils to open their books at pages 66 and 67. Tell them that they are going to revise what they have learnt in the unit. 1 Vocabulary. Identify the following jobs. (p. 66) Read the model aloud. In pairs, pupils ask and answer questions with the help of the illustrations. Check the exercise orally.

83


UniT 6

Working world Answers: 2 Number two is a policeman; 3 Number three is a diver; 4 Number four is a doctor; 5 Number five is an explorer; 6 Number six is a pilot; 7 Number seven is a teacher; 8 Number eight is a scientist; 9 Number nine is a dentist; 10 Number ten is a computer programmer; 11 Number eleven is an office worker. 2 Read and say true or false. Then correct the false sentences in your notebook. (p. 66) Pupils read the sentences in pairs and give oral answers. Then they rewrite the false sentences in their notebooks supplying the correct information. Check orally. Answers: 1 False. They work in the streets. 2 True. 3 True. 4 False. They dive in the sea. 5 False. They patrol the streets. 6 True. 3

11 CD 2

Listen and put a token on the correct answer. (p. 66)

Point to each square and elicit the person or item. Tell pupils that they are going to hear short dialogues that correspond to one of the two person or items shown in each rectangle. The task is to identify the correct one by placing a token or a scrap of paper on the appropriate picture. Play the CD, pausing after each exchange to give pupils time to complete the task. Audio script 1 A B A B 2A B A B

What do you want to be when you grow up? I’m not sure! I want to be a pilot. I love planes. Oh! How interesting! What are your favourite animals? Whales. I love whales. Why? They’re the biggest mammals in the sea.

4A B A B

What do you want, fish or meat? Meat, please! Do you want roast beef? Yes, the roast beef, please.

5A B A B

Who’s the oldest boy in your class? Daniel. What does he look like? He’s got straight blond hair and he’s very thin.

6A

Where do you go swimming? In the sea or in a river? In the sea.

B

4 Find out. Ask your partner, take notes and then report back to the class. (p. 67) Read the model exchange with the class and explain the activity. Pupils look at the chart and produce the same type of questions and answers in pairs. When they finish, they report their findings to the class. 5 Read and find out who’s who? Match the texts with the photos. (p. 67) Pupils complete the exercise in their notebooks and compare their answers with a partner. Check orally. Answers: Oliver is the firefighter – photo 2; Harry is the diver – photo 3. 6 Write about the third person in exercise 5. Use the texts as models. (p. 67) Pupils write about the scientist in photo 1 using the text as a model.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 50-51)

1 Look at Unit 6 in your Pupil’s Book. Fill in the gaps and answer the questions. (p. 50) Pupils check the unit and write the answers.

3A B A B

84

What does you mother do? She’s a teacher. What does she teach? Maths. She teaches Maths.

Answers: 1 11; 2 Melon / frame 5; 3 boring / interesting. 4 Computer programmer / No, he doesn’t. He wants to be an explorer. 5 A scientist. 6 alligator /


UniT 6 No, she isn’t. She is drawing a dolphin. 7 Ship / Yes, they are. 8 Because a pirate ship is coming. 9 A famous ballet dancer. 10 Painter / A basketball player. 11 Soup / A shoe. 12 5 feet / 1.5 metres. 13 3,500 – 5,000. 13 He is not good at Maths. She does not want to be a diver. They cannot swim. We have not got our books. Susie has not got a pet. I have got a new video game. 2

51

Listen and tick. (p. 51)

CD 2

Point to each square and elicit the profession or subject. Tell pupils that they are going to hear short dialogues that correspond to one of the two shown in each rectangle. The task is to identify the correct one by ticking the appropriate box. Play the CD, pausing after each exchange to give pupils time to complete the task. Audio script

A B A A B 5A B A B

6A B A B

Guess. He works with nature and he uses special equipment. Is he a scientist? No… He works underwater. I know! He’s a diver! That’s right! Tim wants to be a computer programmer when he grows up. What a boring job! It’s not that bad. It’s better than an office worker! You’re right! An officer worker is the most boring job! Lucy’s really good at singing. I know! She’s got a great voice! Does she want to be a singer when she grows up? No, she doesn’t. She wants to be a dancer.

1 A B A B

What do you want to be when you grow up? I want a job where I can help people. Do you want to be a doctor? No, I want to be a policeman actually.

2A B A B

My father’s got a very dangerous job! Really? Is he a pilot? No, he’s not a pilot! He’s a firefighter. Oh! I see! Now that is dangerous!

3A B

I think Geography’s the most difficult subject. I don’t. History’s much more difficult than Geography! Really? Why’s that? All those dates! I can never remember them!

Unit Test Photocopy the Unit Test, one per pupil. Pupils complete the test individually. Once you have corrected all the tests, return them to the pupils and help them check for mistakes by writing the answers on the board. Record pupils’ results on the Formative assessment sheet. Make sure they file their tests in their Language Portfolio.

My dad’s got a really interesting job. What does he do?

To consolidate the structures of the Unit, pupils complete the Let’s Revise! section. (Activity Book p. 78)

A B 4A B

3 Read and tick. (p. 51) Help pupils complete the self-assessment section by reading each objective aloud.

Testing and assessment

85


Amazing facts! Pages 68-69 Objectives: To read and learn amazing facts about places in different parts of the world. To match texts and photos. To develop reading comprehension. To develop cultural awareness. Language Focus: It is 8,850 metres high and is the highest mountain in the world. January is the coldest month with temperatures between -36°C and -60°C. The longest river in the world is the River Nile in Egypt. It is 4,160 miles long and flows into the Mediterranean Sea. At 1,637 metres deep, Lake Baikal is the deepest freshwater lake in the world. The tallest tree in the world is the Coast Redwood, the smallest island in the world is Bishop Rock, San Marino dates back to 310 AD and is the oldest Republic. Target vocabulary: Everest, border, temperature, Nile, Mediterranean Sea, site, Ancient Egypt, bank, Lake Baikal, Russia, seal, Redwood National Park, California, Isles of Scilly, lighthouse, San Marino, Republic, Apennine, stamp, coin, historical, deepest, freshwater, located, flows (v). Vocabulary (revision): Mountain, river, world, tree, Big Ben, Statue of Liberty, island, highest, coldest, longest, tallest, smallest. Materials: Class CD. Warm-up An activity to introduce the topic. Explain the meaning of Amazing facts and ask the pupils if they know any. Tell them that they are going to read about amazing facts in places in different parts of the world. 1

12 CD 2

Read and match the paragraphs to the photos. Then listen and check. (p. 68) An activity to develop reading comprehension.

Focus pupils’ attention on the photos and encourage them to describe each one. Then ask the following questions. Photo 1. What’s the name of the highest mountain in the world? (Mount Everest). Photo 2. This is the Republic of San Marino. Do you know where it is? (Italy). Photo 3. Is this a river or a lake? (Lake). Photo 4. What’s this? (A lighthouse). Photo 5 Is this tree taller than Big Ben and the Statue of Liberty? Photo 6. This is the longest river in the world. What’s it called? (The Nile).

86

In pairs, pupils then read the text and do the matching exercise. Then they listen to the recording to check their answers. Answers: A 1; B 6; C 3; D 5; E 4; F 2. 2 Now decide if these sentences are true or false. (p. 69) Focus pupils’ attention on the sentences and tell them to decide in pairs whether they are true or false. Then check their answers orally. Answers: 1 T; 2 F; 3 F; 4 T; 5 F; 6 T. 3 Answer the questions about your country. (p. 69) Point to the questions and tell the pupils to ask and answer the questions in pairs.

Round-up

An activity to practise and expand the vocabulary. With the help of the class, complete a word map on the board. Write Amazing facts in the centre of the map and encourage everyone to contribute a word or two.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(pp. 70-71)

Look at the photos and complete the sentences with the words in the box. (p. 70) Pupils read pages 46 and 47 in their Pupil’s Book again and complete the sentences. Answers: 1 mountain; 2 river; 3 lake; 4 tree; 5 island; 6 Republic. Write the answers to the questions. (p. 71) Focus pupils’ attention on the photograph of the two children and explain that they are doing the culture quiz. Point to the questions and tell the pupils to ask and answer them in pairs. Answers: 1 London, England; 2 dinosaurs; 3 fascinating specimens; 4 in the picnic area; 5 books, models and fossil replicas; 6 Barcelona; 7 hundreds; 8 drink fresh orange juice; 9 No, it’s in South London; 10 It dates back to 1860; 11 olives; 12 8,850 metres high; 13 4,160 miles long; 14 14m long by 16m wide; 15 115,55 metres tall; 16 It dates back to 310 AD; 17 1,637 metres deep.


UniT 7

Where were you? L E S S ON

1

(pp. 70-71)

Objectives: To talk about special dates. To ask for and say the date and the time. To revise the months and the four seasons. To develop observation and memory skills. Target vocabulary: Calendar, date, time, clock, o’clock, first, second, third, fourth, fifth, eighth, ninth, twelfth, twentieth, twenty-first, (five) past seven, quarter past (one), half past (ten), quarter to (three), five to (nine). Vocabulary (revision): The months and the seasons. Geographical features. Materials: A calendar. A large clock. Class CD. Warm-up An activity to revise vocabulary and present the new topic. Show pupils the calendar and say: This is a calendar. Ask them what we use calendars for (to know the day, date and month; to check past and future dates; to know which day a special feast, holiday or birthday is going to be celebrated.) Brainstorm the names of important feast days and celebrations with the class. Write them on the board in English. Copy the title and the objectives of the unit on the board. Read and explain them to the class.

the CD again and ask them to associate the appropriate number with each picture or clock, for example: New Year’s Day – one. When they finish, tell them that dates can be said in two ways: either April the eighth or the eighth of April. Audio script

Easter is usually in March or April. Summer holidays are in June, July and August. New Year’s Eve is on the thirty-first of January. Halloween is on the thirty-first of October. May Day is on the first of May. Bonfire Night is on the fifth of November. Christmas is on the twenty-fifth of December. Valentine’s Day is on the fourteenth of February. quarter past one five to nine twelve o’clock 2

14 CD 2

half past ten five past seven quarter to three

Listen and repeat. (p. 71) An activity to practise the new vocabulary.

Point to the list of words and play the CD again. Pupils read and repeat the vocabulary chorally and individually. Audio script

Look, listen and say the number. (p. 70) The date: first; second; third; fourth; fifth; eighth; ninth; An activity to present the new vocabulary and twelfth; twentieth; twenty-first. revise the months of the year. The time: twelve o’clock; five past seven; a quarter past one; half past ten; a quarter to three; Focus pupils’ attention on the double page illustration five to nine. and point to the numbered pictures. Elicit the names of the different feasts and holidays in L1 or in English: 3 15 Listen again. Which month is missing? New Year’s Day, Valentine, Easter, May Day, Bonfire CD 2 Which number is missing? (p. 71) Night, the Summer Holidays, Halloween, Christmas. An activity to develop attention and listening Pupils then say the month in what each feast is skills. celebrated. Point to the numbered pictures on the pages and Tell pupils that in this activity, they will hear the months present the dates. Show the different times on the of the year and the ordinal numbers named, with one large clock or point to the clocks on the page. Say the missing each time. The task is to listen carefully and times. Then play track 13 (Class CD 2). Ask pupils to identify the missing word. Correct the exercise concentrate on the pronunciation as they listen. Play together. 1

13

CD 2

87


UniT 7

Where were you? Audio script

Which month is missing? 1 January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, December. 2 January, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December. 3 January, February, March, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December. 4 January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, October, November, December. 5 January, February, March, April, May, June, August, September, October, November, December. Which number is missing? 1 first, second, fourth, fifth, sixth. 2 first, second, third, fourth, sixth. 3 first, third, fourth, fifth, sixth. 4 first, second, third, fourth, fifth. Answers: 1 November; 2 February; 3 April; 4 September; 5 July; 1 third; 2 fifth; 3 second; 4 sixth. 4 Rewrite the mirror words in your notebook. (p. 71) An activity to practise the months of the year.

Answers: 1 The river is in picture 2 and the mountain in picture 7. 2 May. 3 March. 4 Second, third, twelfth, twentieth, thirty-first. 5 Pupils’ own answers.

Round-up

An oral activity to consolidate the language of the lesson. Books closed, ask different pupils: When’s your birthday? Elicit the complete date (day and month). Reinforcement activity: Pupils ask four different pupils when their birthday is and write the answers in their notebooks, for example: Linda’s birthday is on the thirty-first of May. Extension activity: Do a class survey to help pupils find out which is the month with most birthdays in the class. Draw a table on the board and divide it into twelve columns, one for each month. Say: Raise your hand if you were born in (January). Count the hands and write the number in the appropriate column. Go through the twelve months in this way. When you finish, you can offer your conclusions, for example: (Three) pupils have a birthday in (January). etc.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 52)

1 Complete the tables with the months of the year. (p. 52) Pupils complete the activity individually and compare their answers with a partner. Correct the exercise by Pupils distribute the months in the tables. having pupils write their words on the board for everyone to check. Remind them that the days of the week and the months are always written with capitals. Answers: Spring: March, April, May; Summer: June, July, August; Autumn: September, October, November; Winter: December, January, February. Answers: 1 January; 2 March; 3 February; 4 June; 5 September; 6 July; 7 April; 8 May; 9 August; 10 November; 11 October; 12 December. 2 Read and draw the hands on the clocks. (p. 52) Pupils then reorder the months and say them chorally. 5 Look and answer. (p. 71) An activity to develop observation skills and practise the alphabet. Pupils work in pairs. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. When they finish, check the answers orally.

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Pupils draw the missing hands on the clocks. Correct the exercise by asking them to show the time on the large clock or draw clocks on the board. 3 Write the numbers. (p. 52) Correct the exercise by asking pupils to spell the words. Answers: first; second; third; fourth; fifth.


UniT 7 L E S S ON

2

Freddy and the dragon (pp. 72-73) Objectives: To present the new vocabulary in context. To revise the present continuous. To present the past of ‘to be’. To develop observation skills and reading comprehension. To stimulate the imagination. Language focus: Who is the patron saint of England? What was he? He was a famous knight. There was a terrible dragon. I’m coming! Target vocabulary: Patron saint, knight, dragon, mobile phone, pocket, kill. Vocabulary (revision): Vocabulary from lesson 1. Adjectives. Materials: Class CD.

Warm-up An activity to present the topic of mythical creatures.

Audio script 1 TEACHER

Today we’re studying History.

2 TEACHER

Freddy, who is the patron saint of England? Saint George.

FREDDY 3 TEACHER FREDDY FREDDY

What was he? He was… … a famous knight.

4 CAPTION

There was a terrible dragon. Everyone was afraid of him.

5 KING FREDDY

George, go and kill the dragon! At once, Your Majesty!

6 CAPTION

The dragon was by the river.

8

RING! RING!

9 FREDDY In L1, ask pupils to name mythical creatures and describe their powers. Teach the word dragon. Explain 10 MUM that dragons lived in caves and were sometimes FREDDY hunted and killed by valiant knights. The St George in this story is the patron saint of England. His feast is the 23rd of April. 1

16 CD 2

Ha, it’s mum! Freddy, dinner is ready! OK, I’m coming!

Listen and read. (pp. 72-73) A listening activity to practise vocabulary in context.

Focus pupils’ attention on the double page and ask them to describe what is going on in the frames: Our friends are in History class and the teacher is asking Freddy about St George. Suddenly, Freddy finds himself at Court, and is sent on a very important mission by the King. But his mobile phone rings … Ask questions about the comic, for example: What is the class studying? Who is St George? What does the King order St George to do? Where does Freddy look for the dragon? Where is his mobile phone? Who is calling Freddy? Why? Play the CD. Pupils listen and follow the dialogue. Play the CD again with pauses for them to repeat, chorally or individually. Check their pronunciation and intonation.

When you finish, explain the vocabulary and make sure that pupils understand the new expressions. 2 Correct the sentences. (p. 73) Presentation of the past of ‘to be’; answering questions to check comprehension. Write the present of the verb ‘to be’ on the board. Next to it write the past. Point out that you, we, they take the same form, as occurs in the present tense, while I, he, she, it vary.

89


UniT 7

Where were you? Pupils then rewrite correct sentences in their notebooks and check their answers with a partner. Correct orally.

December; 4 the twelfth of April; 5 the third of June; 6 the fifteenth of August; 7 the nineteenth of September; 8 the twenty-first of October.

Answers: 1 The children are studying History. 2 Saint George is the patron saint of England. 3 There was a 3 Complete the sentences with dates in the long terrible dragon in the story. 4 Freddy wasn’t afraid of the form. (p. 53) dragon. 5 In frame 7 the dragon was by the river. 6 At the end of the story Freddy’s mum is calling him on the phone. Pupils complete the exercise individually. They then ask and answer the questions in pairs. Answers: 1 Pupils’ own answers. 2 Pupils’ own Round-up answers. 3 the twenty-fifth of December. 4 the first of An activity to extend the language of the lesson. January; 5 Pupils’ own answers. 6 the fourteenth of Tell the class the legend of St George and the dragon: February. 7 Pupils’ own answers.

In the Middle Ages, the dragon was a symbol of evil. In Lybia, there was a dragon who terrorized a whole city. St George, a famous knight, arrived in the city on the day that a beautiful princess was going to be sacrificed to the dragon. Everyone was very sad, but everyone was also terribly afraid of it. St George decided to save the princess. He went looking for the dragon, who lived in a cave by the river. When the dragon saw St George, it ran roaring out of its cave and attacked him. After a long fight, St George wounded the dragon under its wing and then killed it.

Ac t i v i t y

B oo k

(p. 53)

1 Look at the comic on pages 72-73 in your Pupil’s Book. Write questions using was or were. Then write the answers. (p. 53)

4 What are they saying? (p. 53) Explain the activity first. Pupils look at what is happening in the scene and imagine the characters’ dialogue. Encourage them to use the new vocabulary and expressions.

L E S S ON

3

Freddy and the dragon (pp. 72-73) Objectives: To revise dates and the time. To act out dialogues. To tell a story. Language focus: Vocabulary (revision): Special feasts and holidays. Animals. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135).

Revise the past of ‘to be’ with the class. Pupils then complete the exercise and check their answers with a partner. Correct by having them read out the questions Warm-up An activity to revise the story of St George. and the answers to the class. Answers: 1 was; He was a famous knight. 2 were; They were afraid of a terrible dragon. 3 were; They were in the King’s castle. 4 were; They were by the river. 5 was; He was afraid of Freddy’s mobile phone. 6 was; His mother was on the phone. 7 was; Dinner was ready.

Help pupils retell the story of St George and the dragon. Point to a pupil and say: In the Middle Ages, the dragon was a symbol of … Elicit: evil. Then continue: St George was a famous… (knight). In Lybia, there was a terrible… (dragon) etc. Retell the whole story with the class in this way.

2 Write the dates in the long form. (p. 53) 1 Pupils write out the dates. Correct by asking different pupils to write them on the board. Answers: 2 the second of November; 3 the fourth of

90

16 CD 2

Listen and read. (pp. 72-73) A listening activity to revise the comic.

Play the comic again. Pupils listen and follow the text in their books.


UniT 7 Divide the class into five groups and assign the roles L E S S ON 4 of the teacher, Freddy, the King, the dragon, Freddy’s mum. The last group recites the captions. If necessary, Let’s learn! (p. 74) play the CD again, with pauses after each line so the groups can repeat it. Otherwise, pupils recite their Objectives: To practise the past of to be. To revise lines either from the book or from memory. Encourage the time and the date. To develop spoken them to use the appropriate intonation and mime their interaction and spoken production. To ask and character’s facial expressions and actions. Then swap answer information questions. the roles around and repeat the activity. Language focus: Where were you at twelve o’ clock? I was at the market. No, you weren’t! You Ac t i v i t y Boo k (p. 53) were here in the kitchen! Target vocabulary: Market, till (until). 4 What are they saying? (p. 53) Vocabulary (revision): Places. Activities and daily An activity to act out a dialogue. routine. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet Divide the class into pairs. Pupils take out their Activity (Resource File, p. 135) Books and read their dialogue out to their partner. Each pair then practises both dialogues, one after the other. Invite different pairs to act out their dialogues in front of Warm-up the class. If you wish, these can be recorded and then A vocabulary activity to revise the past of ‘to be’. played back so pupils can correct their pronunciation and intonation. This is an excellent moment to assess Ask different pupils: Where were you yesterday at (ten) speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet. o’clock? Pupils answer: I was at (home), in (school), Ask and say the dates. An activity to revise dates and the time.

with (my parents), etc. 1

17 CD 2

Pupils write down five dates and/or times that are important for them. In pairs they exchange their lists. Practise the following model with them: Why is (the seventh of July) important? Because it’s (my sister’s birthday). Why is (quarter to three) important? Because I finish school at quarter to three. Pupils then ask and answer similar questions. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. Reinforcement activity: In their notebooks, pupils write a short text to describe their daily routine. Ask them to share their texts with the class. Extension activity: Pupils research and illustrate an animal that is also the symbol of a state or quality, for example the dove (peace), the lion (courage), the owl (wisdom), etc. Encourage them to represent their animal in context: the dove flying over a burning city, the owl next to a child studying hard, etc. Display their work in the classroom.

Listen and read. (p. 74) An activity to present the structures of the unit.

Establish the situation: Liz is asking Wiz why he isn’t hungry. Wiz doesn’t tell the truth but Liz quickly discovers what he was up to. Play the CD so pupils can listen to the complete text. Play it again. Pupils repeat each sentence after the pause. Point out the onomatopoeia er… to indicate that someone is not sure what to say. Audio script LIZ Lunch is ready. WIZ I’m not hungry! LIZ Where were you at twelve o’ clock? WIZ I was… er… I was at the market till one o’clock. LIZ No, you weren’t! You were here in the kitchen! WIZ OK! You’re right! I wasn’t at the market. I’m sorry Liz, I was hungry!

91


UniT 7

Where were you? Explain the formation of the contractions wasn’t and weren’t. Tell pupils that till is a contraction of until and explain that this preposition is used to indicate a limit in time and means ‘not after’ or ‘not later than’. 2 Chit-chat. (p. 74) A pair activity to ask and answer information questions. Help pupils identify the times and places shown in the drawings. Demonstrate the exchange with a pupil and ask the class to repeat chorally. In pairs, pupils ask and answer questions about the pictures. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.

Round-up

A game to revise vocabulary and develop memory. Books closed, point to different pupils and ask them the questions they have practised in exercise 2, using different times and days of the week. Reinforcement activity: Pupils write negative sentences to state where they were not present at a given time or on a given date, for example: I wasn’t at the football match yesterday. We weren’t at the beach on the 15th of August. Extension activity: Pupils make up two or three-frame strips to illustrate more excuses with Sorry, I was / we were… for example an angry mum looking at an empty bottle and the caption: Sorry, Mum, we were thirsty!

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 54)

1 Complete the table. Then ask and answer in pairs. (p. 54)

L E S S ON

5

Let’s sing! (p. 75) Objectives: To revise the time. To develop listening comprehension skills through a song. To practise the sounds /e/ and /ø/. Language focus: Boys and girls, come out to play, the moon is shining as bright as day, leave your supper, and leave your sleep, and join your friends in the street. Is it midday or is it midnight? Look at the stars shining so bright! Listen to friends as they call, a good time for one and all. Target vocabulary: Supper, shining, bright, come out, join, call. Vocabulary (revision): Moon, day, friend, street, midday, midnight, star, play, sleep. come out, shining, bright, supper, join, call. Materials: Class CD. Warm-up An activity to present the theme of the song. Ask pupils if they know Boys and girls, come out to play. Tell them that it is a traditional English nursery rhyme. Focus their attention on the illustrations and ask them to name the things they recognise. Elicit: moon, starts, clouds, boy, girl, midnight. Write the words on the board in English. 1

18 CD 2

Listen and sing. (p. 75) Activities to sing the unit song.

Play the CD while pupils follow the text in their books. Ask them: Is it midday or midnight? (Midnight.) How do you know? (Because we can see the moon and the stars.) Audio script

Boys and girls, come out to play

Boys and girls, come out to play, The moon is shining as bright as day. Pupils complete the table with the appropriate parts of Leave your supper, and leave your sleep, speech. Check their answers orally. In pair, pupils then And join your friends in the street. use the table to ask and answer questions. Go round Is it midday or is it midnight? the room in order to give any necessary help. This is Look at the stars shining so bright! an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using Listen to friends as they call the Formative assessment sheet. A good time for one and all!

92


UniT 7 Play the song again and encourage the pupils to sing along.

L E S S ON

6

CLIL – Calendars (p. 76)

Sound check 2

19

Listen and repeat. (p. 75)

CD 2

Practice pronouncing and contrasting the sounds /e/ and /ø/ with pupils, then read the sentence with them, stressing the sounds. Play the CD. Pupils listen and repeat the sentence. Audio script /e/ /ø/

There’s a funny elephant under my bed.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k 2

52

(p. 54)

Objectives: To read and talk about calendars. To revise dates and numbers. To develop reading comprehension. Language focus: Calendars were based on the cycles of the sun and the moon. A year was based on the motion of the earth around the sun. There are 12 months, 52 weeks and 7 days in each week. There is a leap year every four years. A leap year is when there is an extra day in the month which is the 29th February. Target vocabulary: Calendar, cycle, sun, moon, earth, motion, leap year, extra. Vocabulary (revision): Ordinal and cardinal numbers. Time divisions. Materials: Class CD. A Chinese calendar (round-up).

Listen and repeat. (p. 54)

CD 1

Warm-up Focus pupils’ attention on the illustration and ask: An activity to introduce the topic. What vegetable is this? Where is it? Play the CD and ask them to repeat the sentence first chorally and then Ask pupils if they know calendars different from their individually. own. Suggest the Chinese calendar and ask what is special about it (each year is named after an animal). Audio script Point out that all the dominant cultures of the world had (and in some cases still have) their own calendar: /e/ /ø/ A mushroom under the bed! the Romans, the Aztecs, the Mayans, the Muslims, the Hebrews, the Hindus, etc. 3 53 Fill in the gaps. Listen and then practise with a friend. (p. 54) CD 1 20 Listen and read. Then answer the questions. Ask pupils to read the sentences first. Play the CD, CD 2 (p. 76) An activity to develop listening and reading pausing after each sentence to give them time to fill in comprehension. the gaps with the missing letters. Correct by asking them to spell the complete words in each sentence. Focus attention on the illustrated dictionary and read Play the CD again so they can repeat the sentences the words with the pupils. Say: If 2008 was a leap first and then practise them in pairs. Finally, ask year, what is going to be the next one? (2012) When individual pupils to repeat them to the class. was the last one? (2004) Ask pupils to describe the illustrations. In pairs, they Audio script then listen and read the text. Refer them to the photos to help comprehension. 1 The last Wednesday in February was very sunny. Finally, they answer the questions in their notebooks, 2 I get up at seven every day and have a cup of tea. either individually or in pairs. You may also wish to ask 3 I need a dress, a belt and a sunhat. the questions orally first, perhaps with books closed. 4 My pet elephant is hungry!

93


UniT 7

Where were you? Audio script

L E S S ON

Calendars were based on the cycles of the sun and the moon. A year was based on the motion of the earth around the sun and a month was based on the motion of the moon around the earth. The calendar we use today is called the Gregorian calendar. It is based on the motion of the earth around the sun and has 365 or 366 days. There are 12 months, 52 weeks and 7 days in each week. There is a leap year every four years. A leap year is when there is an extra day in the month which is the 29th February. Answers: 1 They were based on the cycles of the moon and sun. 2 It is the Gregorian Calendar. 3 It is based on the motion of the earth around the sun. 4 There are 12 months, 52 weeks and 365 or 366 days in each year. 5 There is a leap year every four years. 6 It is the 29th of February.

An activity to practise the vocabulary. Show pupils the Chinese calendar and ask them what year they were born in, then say: You were born in the year of the (rabbit)!

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

Time for writing (p. 77) Objectives: To develop writing skills. To practise the language learnt so far. To write one’s diary. To learn the abbreviations for ordinal numbers and months. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135) Warm-up An activity to present the topic of diaries. Ask different pupils: What is a diary? Do you write in a diary? Do other people usually read private diaries? Why are diaries useful? etc. Pupils can give short answers. 1

Round-up

(p. 55)

Read page 76 in your Pupil’s Book. Now close your Pupil’s Book and complete the sentences. (p. 55) Pupils read page 76 in their Pupil’s Book again, look at the photos and complete the sentences. Answers: 1 moon; 2 sun; 3 earth; 4 calendar; 5 motion; 6 days; 7 weeks; 8 four; 9 leap; 10 February.

7

21 CD 2

Listen and read Sally’s diary. (p. 77) An activity to prepare for the writing task.

Point to the page and ask: What kind of document is this? (A diary.) Who is writing it? (Sally.) Who is going to read it? Tell pupils they are going to read and hear a short section of Sally’s diary. Play the CD. Pupils listen and follow the text in their books. When they finish, ask them if they keep a diary. Is anyone else allowed to read it? Point to the words in the box and present the words movies, beat and mad. 2 Now write notes on Sally’s diary. (p. 77) A writing activity based on a model. Focus attention on the example and tell pupils to write notes on Sally’s diary in the same way. Encourage them to use superlatives. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. When they finish, ask them to check their texts in pairs.

Round-up

An activity to revise punctuation. Point to the box and explain the use of the

94


UniT 7 abbreviations. In ordinal numbers, we use the cardinal L E S S ON 8 numeral + the ending of the ordinal number. Days of Speaking the week are shortened to three letters (four for Tuesday and Thursday). Months are shortened to Ac t i v i t y Boo k (p. 57) three letters except for September which has four. May is not abbreviated. Objectives: To develop spoken interaction through Ac t i v i t y Boo k (p. 56) a game. To revise the structures seen so far. To develop observation and memory skills. Rewrite the following dates using long forms. Language (revision): Structures of the unit and of 1 (p. 56) previous units. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Pupils do the exercise individually or in pairs. Check by Materials: Formative assessment sheet (Resource asking them to write out the long forms on the board. File, p. 135). Answers: 1 Monday, January the seventh; 2 Tuesday, March the thirtieth; 3 Wednesday, April the first; 4 Thursday, September the tenth; 5 Friday, November the twenty-sixth; 6 Saturday, December the fifteenth; 7 Sunday, August the third. 2 Read Sally’s diary on p. 77 of your Pupil’s Book. Then write your diary for last week. (p. 56) Pupils write a similar text in their notebooks. In order to develop language awareness, ask a pupil to copy his or her text on the board and ask pupils for help in correcting mistakes if there are any. When they have corrected their text, they copy it in the space provided in their Activity Book. Collect the Activity Books for correction, and record pupils’ results on the Formative assessment sheet.

Warm-up An activity to revise the unit vocabulary. Draw a clock with the hands pointing at 12 o’clock. Next to it write incomplete times, for example + 1 hour and fifteen minutes; - twenty minutes, etc. Elicit the correct times starting from 12 o’clock: A quarter past one; twenty to twelve, etc. Play with a friend: ask and answer. (p. 57) A game to develop spoken interaction. Read out the model questions and the rules and explain that the aim of the game is to go around the board asking and answering questions and make comparisons. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. When pupils finish the first round, they play again with a different partner. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.

Round-up

An activity to revise structures. Pupils write the answers to the questions in their notebooks.

95


UniT 7

Where were you? L E S S ON

9

Let’s round it up! (pp. 78-79) Objectives: To revise and consolidate the vocabulary and structures of Unit 7. To revise the unit song. To do assessment and self-assessment activities. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Class CD. Tokens or scraps of paper.

18 CD 2

Warm-up Revising the unit song and vocabulary.

Begin the lesson by singing the unit song (p. 75). Encourage everyone to join in. Ask pupils to open their books at pages 78 and 79. Tell them that they are going to revise what they have learnt in the unit. 1 Vocabulary. Copy and write the words in order in your notebook. (p. 78) Pupils reorder the words in their notebooks. When they finish, ask them to compare their answers with a partner. Answers: the months from January to December; the ordinal numbers from first to tenth. 2 What time is it? (p. 78) In pairs, pupils look at the clocks and say the time on each. When they finish, ask them to write the times out for extra practice. Answers: 1 A quarter to six. 2 Ten past nine. 3 A quarter past twelve. 4 Twenty past six. 5 Three o’clock. 6 Half past five. Listen and put a token on the correct answer. (p. 78)

correspond to one of the two items shown in each rectangle. The task is to identify the correct one by placing a token or a scrap of paper on the appropriate picture. Play the CD, pausing after each exchange to give pupils time to complete the task. Audio script 1 A B A B

What time is it? It’s a quarter to five. Sorry. A quarter to … A quarter to five.

2 A Where were you at a quarter past eight yesterday? B I was in bed! A That’s not true! You were at the bank. 3A B A B

You weren’t at school yesterday morning? You’re right. We were at the Science Museum. Was it fun? It was great!

4A B A B A

When is winter in your country? June, July and August is winter in my country. Where are you from? I’m from Argentina. Oh! I see!

5 A Were you at home or at the office at a quarter to six? B I wasn’t at home. I was at the office till seven o’clock. A Oh! I see. 6 A When is your birthday? B On the eighteenth of July. A Really? My birthday is on the seventeenth! 4 Ask your partner, take notes and then report back to the class. (p. 79)

Read the model exchange with the class and explain the activity. Pupils look at the table and produce the same type of questions and answers in pairs. When Point to each square and elicit the item. Tell pupils that they finish, they report their findings to the class. Make they are going to hear short dialogues that sure they use the possessive. 3

22

CD 2

96


UniT 7 5 Match the questions to the answers and write the interview in your notebook. (p. 79) Pupils complete the exercise in their notebooks and compare their answers with a partner. Check orally. Answers: 1-d; 2-e; 3-b; 4-f; 5-c; 6-a. 6 Now write about your family. (p. 79) Pupils think back to their answers in question 4 and write a short paragraph to talk about their family’s birthdays.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(pp. 58-59)

1 Look at Unit 7 in your Pupil’s Book. Fill in the gaps and answer the questions. (p. 58) Pupils check the unit and write the answers. Answers: 1 July; 2 clocks, six; 3 summer; pupils own answers; 4 England, St George; 5 A famous knight; 6 Everyone; 7 He is talking to the King; 8 Because he is afraid of the mobile phone. 9 twelve o’clock, He was in the kitchen. 10 a quarter to ten, She was at the station/library 11 a funny elephant; 12 calendar, It is called the Gregorian calendar. 13 It is a year that has 366 days. 14 Jan, Feb, Aug, Tues, 1st, 2nd, 3rd . 2

54

Listen and tick. (p. 59)

CD 2

Point to each square and elicit the item. Tell pupils that they are going to hear short dialogues that correspond to one of the two shown in each rectangle. The task is to identify the correct one by ticking the appropriate box. Play the CD, pausing after

each exchange to give pupils time to complete the task. Audio script 1 What’s the time? It’s a quarter to six. 2 Is your mother’s birthday on the 1st of February? No, it’s on the 3rd of February. 3 Was John at school yesterday morning? No, he wasn’t. He was at home in bed! 4 Is the party at eight o’clock or half past eight on Saturday? It’s at half past eight. 5 Were you at the beach on Sunday? No, we weren’t. We were in the mountains. 6 Which season do you prefer, spring or summer? My favourite months are June, July and August!

Testing and assessment Unit Test Photocopy the Unit Test, one per pupil. Pupils complete the test individually. Once you have corrected all the tests, return them to the pupils and help them check for mistakes by writing the answers on the board. Record pupils’ results on the Formative assessment sheet. Make sure they file their tests in their Language Portfolio. To consolidate the structures of the Unit, pupils complete the Let’s Revise! section. (Activity Book p. 79)

97


UniT 8

Travel time L E S S ON

1

(pp. 80-81)

Objectives: To talk about travel and means of transport. To learn some compound verbs. To classify words. To develop observation and memory skills. Target vocabulary: Bus, train, plane, boat, car, bike, airport, summer camp, parachute, on foot, get on, get off, by car. Vocabulary (revision): Means of transport. Clothes. Food. Geographical features. Materials: Class CD.

Warm-up An activity to revise vocabulary and present the new topic. Write the word summer on the board and ask pupils to brainstorm words connected with it. Encourage them to say places (beach, country, camp, etc.), clothes (sandals, T-shirt, sunglasses, etc.) and activities (swimming, surfing, fishing, etc.) Copy the title and the objectives of the unit on the board. Read and explain them to the class. 1

23 CD 2

Look, listen and say the number. (p. 80) An activity to present the new vocabulary.

Focus pupils’ attention on the double page illustration and ask: What can you see in the scene? (Our friends looking at a travel agency.) Point to Amy, Hanna, Matt and Freddy and elicit the clothes they are wearing in English. Then ask them to identify the means of transport in the illustration (a car, a plane, a boat, a bus, a bike, a train) and the verbs (get on and get off). Point to the numbered items on the pages and present the words. Then play track 23 (Class CD 2). Ask pupils to concentrate on the pronunciation as they listen. Play the CD again and ask them to associate the appropriate number with each word, for example: bus – one. They do the same with all the items.

Audio script

boat airport parachute bus get on bike by car 2

24 CD 2

train get off summer camp plane on foot by car

Listen and repeat. (p. 81) An activity to practise the new vocabulary.

Point to the list of words and play the CD again. Pupils read and repeat the vocabulary chorally and individually. Audio script 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

train plane airport summer camp boat parachute car

3

25 CD 2

8 bike 9 on foot 10 by car 11 bus 12 get on 13 get off

Listen again. Which means of transport is missing? (p. 81) An activity to develop attention and listening skills.

Tell pupils that in this activity, they will hear the means of transport named, with one missing each time. The task is to listen carefully and identify the missing word. Correct the exercise together. Audio script

Which means of transport is missing? 1 bus, plane, boat, car, bike. 2 bus, train, boat, car, bike. 3 bus, train, plane, car, bike. 4 bus, train, plane, boat, bike. 5 bus, train, plane, boat, car. Answers: 1 train; 2 plane; 3 boat; 4 car; 5 bike.

98


UniT 8 4 Copy the word chain. Then find, circle and complete the chart. (p. 81) An activity to practise the new vocabulary. Pupils complete the activity individually and compare their answers with a partner. Correct the exercise by having pupils write their words on the board for everyone to check. Answers: Holidays: Train, plane, boat, car, summer, bike, airport, summer camp, parachute, beach. Clothes: Shorts, sandals, hat, T-shirt, sunglasses. 5 Look and answer. (p. 81) An activity to develop observation skills and practise the alphabet. Pupils work in pairs. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. When they finish, check the answers orally. Answers: 1 T-shirt, shorts, sandals, sunglasses, cap. 2, 3 and 4 Pupils’ own answers.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 60)

1 Classify the words. Can you add any more? (p. 60) Pupils classify the vocabulary in the appropriate columns and complete them with more words that they know. Answers: Means of transport: boat, car, bus, bike, plane, train; Clothes: trainers, jeans, boots, T-shirt, dress, trousers, coat; Food: melon, roast beef, grapes, peach, lamb chop; Geographical features: river, ocean, island, lake. 2 Circle the odd one out. (p. 60) Pupils circle the odd one out and identify the lexical set. Answers: 1 airport; 2 milk; 3 thin; 4 awful; 5 angry; 6 March.

L E S S ON

2

Holiday fun (pp. 82-83)

Round-up

A memory game to consolidate the language of the lesson. Books closed, invite different pupils to ask the class questions about the page, for example: What colour is the car? How many people are there on the page? What colour is the parachute? etc. Reinforcement activity: Ask different pupils to mime words from the new vocabulary. The rest of the class tries to guess what they are. Extension activity: Write the following anagrams on the board and see if pupils can solve them. Tell them they are words learnt in this lesson: ikeb (bike), atbo (boat), pratiro (airport), cuhapraet (parachute), etc. Pupils write the words in their notebooks.

Objectives: To present the new vocabulary in context. To speak about future plans. To develop observation skills and reading comprehension. To stimulate the imagination. Language focus: What are we going to do this summer? I’m going to learn how to fly. You can’t fly. I’m going to go surfing. How can we go? We get a bus to the train station. Come with me! See you next year! Target vocabulary: Next, kid (v). Vocabulary (revision): Vocabulary from lesson 1. Materials: Class CD. Warm-up An activity to present the topic of holidays. In English or L1, pupils brainstorm places where they go on holiday. Write the words on the board, for example mountain, beach, countryside, lake, camp, etc. Ask them how they can reach these places (by car, by bus, by train, by plane).

99


UniT 8

Travel time 1

26 CD 2

Listen and read. (pp. 82-83) A listening activity to practise vocabulary in context.

Focus pupils’ attention on the double page and ask them to describe what is going on in the frames: Our friends are talking about their plans for their holidays. Suddenly they find themselves on a beach in California. Ask questions about the comic, for example: What is Matt going to do this summer? Who wants to learn how to fly? What is Amy going to do? etc. Play the CD. Pupils listen and follow the dialogue. Play the CD again with pauses for them to repeat, chorally or individually. Check their pronunciation and intonation.

When you finish, explain the vocabulary and make sure that pupils understand the new expressions. 2 Correct the sentences. (p. 83) Correcting information to check comprehension. Pupils correct the sentences in their notebooks and check their answers with a partner. Correct orally. Answers: 1 Matt is going to learn how to fly. 2 Amy is going to go camping with her family. 3 Hanna is going to learn French and Spanish. 4 Hanna is going to go to a summer school. 5 He is going to America by plane. 6 They are going to go to America.

Round-up

A class survey to find out about summer plans. Audio script 1 AMY

What are we going to do this summer?

2 MATT I’m going to learn how to fly! FREDDY Oh! And I’m going to learn how to jump! Where’s my parachute? 3 HANNA Don’t be silly, you can’t fly and you can’t jump! You’re too young! MATT I know! I’m only kidding! 4 HANNA I’m going to go camping with my family. It’sgoing to be fun! AMY I’m going to learn French and Spanish in a summer school.

Do a class survey. Say: Raise your hand if you want to go (to the beach) this summer. Count the number of hands and write the information on the board. Do the same with the following places: mountain, countryside, summer camp, lake. When you finish, you can offer your conclusions, for example: TEN pupils want to go to the beach this summer. The most popular holiday place is…

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 61)

1 Look at the comic on pages 82-83 in your Pupil’s Book. Write questions using ‘going to’. Then write the answers. (p. 61) Pupils complete the questions in their notebooks. Before doing this exercise focus attention on the questions formulated with the going to structure in the comic.

5 FREDDY I’m going to go surfing! MATT & HANNA Can we come too?

Answers: 1 Who is going to learn how to fly? Matt. 2 Is Matt going to go camping? No, he isn’t. 3 Who is going to learn languages? Hanna. 4 Is Freddy going to go to a 6 HANNA First we get a bus to the train station, then summer school? No, he isn’t. 5 What is he going to do? He is going to go surfing. 6 Are his friends going to go, the train to the airport. After that, we get on a plane and fly to America, then we get too? Yes, they are. 7 Where are they going to go? To California. 8 Is it going to be fun? Yes, it is. off the plane, and on to another bus… 7 FREDDY No, it’s easy. Come with me. 8 CHILDREN We’re going to have a fantastic time! Goodbye! See you next year!

100

2 Match the questions to the answers. (p. 61) Pupils work in pairs and complete the exercise in their notebooks. Correct by having them read out the


UniT 8 questions and the answers to the class. Finally ask pupils to give true answers to the questions orally. Answers: 1-f ; 2-e; 3-g; 4-a; 5-b; 6-d; 7-c; 8-h. 3 What are they saying? (p. 61) Explain the activity first. Pupils look at what is happening in the scene and imagine the characters’ dialogue. Encourage them to use the new vocabulary and expressions.

L E S S ON

3

Holiday fun (pp. 82-83) Objectives: To revise information questions and short answers. To act out dialogues. To develop observation skills. Language focus: Where are you going to be? At the beach. When are you going to go? On Monday. Vocabulary (revision): Vocabulary of the unit. Months and days of the week. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135). Warm-up An activity to revise wh-questions. Ask pupils: Where are you going to be this summer? Elicit, for example: At the beach. Then ask: When are you going to go? In August. Revise the months and the days of the week. 1

26 CD 2

Listen and read. (pp. 82-83) A listening activity to revise the comic.

Play the comic again. Pupils listen and follow the text in their books. Divide the class into four groups and assign the roles of Amy, Hanna, Matt and Freddy. If necessary, play the CD again, with a pause after each line so the groups can repeat it. Otherwise, pupils recite their lines either from the book or from memory. Encourage them to use the appropriate intonation and mime their character’s facial expressions and actions. Then swap the roles around and repeat the activity.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 61)

3 What are they saying? (p. 61) An activity to act out a dialogue. Divide the class into pairs. Pupils take out their Activity Books and read their dialogue out to their partner. Each pair then practises both dialogues, one after the other. Invite different pairs to act out their dialogues in front of the class. If you wish, these can be recorded and then played back so pupils can correct their pronunciation and intonation. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet. Look at the chart and ask questions. An activity to ask and answer information questions. Copy the following chart and dialogue on the board. beach

Monday

cinema

9.00 pm

Big Ben

Saturday

a sports centre

5.30 pm

a summer camp

July

the Eiffel Tower

January

A Where are you going to go? B To the beach. A When are you going to go? B On Monday. Explain and demonstrate the exchange with a pupil and ask the class to repeat chorally. In pairs, pupils ask and answer questions using the information of the chart. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet. Reinforcement activity: In their notebooks, pupils write the questions and answers to exercise 3. Extension activity: Pupils write and illustrate a short text about what are they going to do this summer. They have to say where, how and when they are going to go. Display their work in the classroom.

101


UniT 8

Travel time 4

DRAGON

I’m going to go to China.

Let’s learn! (p. 84)

WIZ DRAGON

Are you going to go there by train? No, I’m not! Guess again!

LIZ DRAGON

Are you going to go there by plane? I am going to fly there… but not by plane! Whoosh!

L E S S ON

Objectives: To present the future using ‘going to’. To review short answers. To develop spoken interaction and spoken production. To ask and answer information questions. Language focus: Where are you going to go this summer? I’m going to go to China. Are you going to go by train? No, I’m not. Are you going to go by plane? Yes, I am. Target vocabulary: China, Africa. Vocabulary (revision): On foot, on my bike, by (plane). Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135)

Warm-up A vocabulary activity to revise some expressions.

Explain the formation of the future with going to. Tell pupils that we use this tense to talk about plans or intentions in the immediate future. 2 Chit-chat. (p. 84) A pair activity to ask and answer questions about future plans. Help pupils identify the places and the means of transport shown in the drawings. Demonstrate the exchange with a pupil and ask the class to repeat chorally. In pairs, pupils ask and answer questions about the pictures. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.

Write the following places on the board: school, park, cinema, hospital, beach, supermarket, post office. Then revise the expressions on foot, on my bike, by bus, by car, by train, by plane. Round-up Ask pupils how they go to these places from their A game to revise vocabulary and develop memory. house, for example: How do you come to school? Elicit complete answers for example: I come to school by Books closed, point to different pupils and ask them bus. the questions they have practised in exercise 2. Encourage them to use short answers. Then make 1 27 Listen and read. (p. 84) up more questions about places and means of CD 2 An activity to present the structures of the unit. transport. Establish the situation: Liz and Wiz are interviewing a dragon who wants to go to China. They want to know how he is going to go there. Ask pupils if they know the answer. (He is going to fly there… but not by plane!) Play the CD so pupils can listen to the complete text. Play it again. Pupils repeat each sentence after the pause. Audio script LIZ AND WIZ

102

Where are you going to go this summer?

Reinforcement activity: Write jumbled sentences on the board using going to. Pupils then unscramble them and write them in their notebooks, for example: going – am – go fishing – I – to- summer – this (I’m going to go fishing this summer). Extension activity: Pupils write and illustrate their plans for this coming weekend using going to. When they finish, ask them to read their plans to the class.


UniT 8 Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 62)

1 Complete the table. (p. 62)

shells, sand castle. Elicit the names of the other items shown in the illustrations kite, boat, bucket, spade, fork, sun, ship, fish, rubber ring. Play the CD while they follow the text in their books.

Pupils complete the table with the appropriate missing words. Check their answers by asking them to read Audio script the words in each column. To the beach Use your table. Ask and answer questions in 2 pairs. (p. 62) We are going to the beach, to the beach, to the beach. We are going to the beach In pair, pupils then use the table to ask and answer in our swimming suits. questions. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. This is an excellent moment to assess We are going to find rocks and shells, speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet. rocks and shells, rocks and shells. We are going to find rocks and shells, to gather by the water. L E S S ON 5 We are going to build a sand castle, Let’s sing! (p. 85) sand castle, sand castle, we are going to build a sand castle, with bridges and a tower. Objectives: To revise and extend the vocabulary of holidays. To develop listening comprehension skills Play the song again and encourage the pupils to sing through a song. To practise and contrast the along. sounds /I/ and /i:/. Language focus: We are going to the beach, in Sound check our swimming suits, we are going to find rocks and shells, to gather by the water, we are going to 2 29 Listen and repeat. (p. 85) build a sand castle, with bridges and a tower. CD 2 Target vocabulary: Swimming suit, rock, shell, Practice pronouncing the sounds /I/ and /i:/ with pupils, sand castle, bridges, tower, kite, boat, bucket, then read the sentence with them, stressing the new spade, fork, sun, ship, fish, rubber ring. sounds. Play the CD. Pupils listen and repeat the Vocabulary (revision): Holidays. sentence. Materials: Class CD. Audio script Warm-up /I/ /i:/ Are you kidding? No tea for me! Ask pupils when they go to the beach and what they do there. Tell them that the song they are about to hear is about things children do at the beach.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k 3

1

28

Listen and sing. (p. 85)

CD 2

Focus pupils’ attention on the illustrations and ask them: What are the boy and girl doing? (They’re playing with a ball.) Explain the vocabulary connected with the beach, for example swimming suits, rocks,

55

(p. 62)

Listen and repeat. (p. 62)

CD 2

Focus pupils’ attention on the sentence and ask: What is the difference between the red and green sound? (Green represents the long sound /i:/) Play the CD and ask them to repeat the sentence first chorally and then individually.

103


UniT 8

Travel time Audio script /I/ /i:/ If you go to Italy, send me a postcard, please! 4

56 CD 2

Fill in the gaps. Listen and then practise with a friend. (p. 62)

Ask pupils to fill the gaps. Play the CD, pausing after each sentence to give them time to check their answers. Then ask them to take out a red and a blue pencil and circle the sounds /I/ and /i:/. Correct by saying the sentences and eliciting the sounds they have circled. Play the CD again so they can repeat the sentences first and then practise them in pairs. Finally, ask individual pupils to repeat them to the class. Audio script 1 2 3 4

It takes eleven hours and fifteen minutes. I need jeans and a T-shirt. We don’t go swimming in winter! I’m having tea and cheese biscuits.

L E S S ON

6

CLIL – The Hot Air Balloon (p. 86) Objectives: To read and talk about hot air balloons. To revise means of transport and superlatives. To develop reading comprehension. Language focus: The hot air balloon is the oldest flight technology dating back to 1783. The first flight was on November 21, 1783. You can see a model of the Montgolfier brothers’ balloon at the London Science Museum. A hot air balloon has three parts: Envelope, burner and a basket. Target vocabulary: Technology, envelope, burner, basket, heat (v), lift (v), passenger. Vocabulary (revision): Vocabulary of the unit. Materials: Class CD.

Antoinette, her husband and the French court. Ask pupils: Are you interested in flying in a balloon? Is it possible to do this in your town? 30 CD 2

Listen and read. Then answer the questions. (p. 86) An activity to develop listening and reading comprehension.

Focus attention on the illustrations and ask pupils to locate the three main parts of a balloon. In pairs, they then listen and read the text. Refer them to the photos and the glossary to help comprehension, and make sure they know how to pronounce the new words. Finally, they answer the questions in their notebooks, either individually or in pairs. You may also wish to ask the questions orally first, perhaps with books closed. Answers: 1 It is the oldest flight technology dating back to 1783. 2 The Montgolfier brothers. 3 On November 21st, 1783 in Paris. 4 At the London Science Museum. 5 The envelope, the burner and the basket. 6 The envelope contains the hot air, the burner heats the air to lift the hot air balloon and the basket carries the passengers.

Round-up

An activity to practise the vocabulary. Pupils close their books and complete sentences about the reading, for example: The hot air balloon was invented in… (1783). Its inventors were… (the Montgolfier brothers). The first flight was in… (Paris.) etc.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 63)

Read page 86 in your Pupil’s Book. Now close your Pupil’s Book and complete the sentences. (p. 63)

Warm-up An activity to introduce the topic.

Pupils read page 84 in their Pupil’s Book again, look at the photos and complete the sentences.

Explain the words ‘hot air balloon’ to the class. Tell pupils that the first hot air balloon carrying living creatures (a sheep, a rooster and a duck) was launched at Versailles in the presence of Marie

Answers: 1 oldest; 2 inventors; 3 Paris; 4 Science; 5 three; 6 hot; 7 air; 8 passengers; 9 different; 10 funny.

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UniT 8 L E S S ON

7

Time for writing (p. 87) Objectives: To develop writing skills. To practise the language learnt so far. To speak about summer camp and write an advert for a summer camp. To revise the use of adjectives. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Class CD. Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135)

Warm-up An activity to revise the structures of the unit. Ask different pupils: What are you going to do this summer? Who is going to go to summer camp? Where is it? How can you get there? What can you do there? etc. Pupils can give short answers. 1

31 CD 2

Listen and read about a summer camp in the Rockies. (p. 87) An activity to prepare for the writing task.

Point to the page and ask: What kind of document is this? (An advert.) What is it about? (About a summer camp) Where is the camp? (In the Rockies). Tell pupils they are going to read and hear about this summer camp. Play the CD. Pupils listen and follow the text in their books. When they finish, ask them: Do you like this summer camp? Why? Audio script

What are you going to do this summer? Are you going to do something exciting or just sit around? Come to Camp Bar-B-Y!!! It’s a fantastic place! It’s not going to be a drag! There’s going to be lots of action! We’re going to take you camping, climbing, riding and rafting in our wonderful mountains. So don’t forget your galoshes! You’re going to learn how to build a fire, cook a meal, sleep in the woods.

You’re going to learn about nature and wild animals. It’s going to be great. You’re going to love it! Point to the words in the box and remind pupils about the differences between British and American English. Ask pupils to find the American words ‘galoshes’ and ‘a drag’ in the text and give their British equivalents (Wellington boots and boring). Ask pupils to brainstorm the American words they have learnt in previous units and others they might know. Finally focus pupils’ attention on the positive adjectives that appear in the text: exciting, fantastic, wonderful, great. Explain that we use adjectives to make texts more interesting. 2 Now write your own advert for a summer camp. Use adjectives to make your text more interesting. (p. 87) A writing activity based on a model. Pupils choose a summer camp and write an advert about it. Focus their attention on the list of positive and negative adjectives at the bottom of the page and encourage them to use these and other adjectives to make their advert more interesting. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. When they finish, ask them to check their texts in pairs.

Round-up

An activity to revise adjectives. Remind pupils that in English, an adjective always precedes the word it modifies, for example an exciting book, a boring film. Point out that adjectives have no gender or plural. Ask them to find and read the sentences with adjectives in the text. Then they give more examples using both positive and negative adjectives.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 64)

1 Write the adjectives in the table. (p. 64) Pupils classify the adjectives with the help of a table. Check by asking them to read each column. Answers: 1 Positive adjectives: good, fantastic, exciting, happy, friendly, interesting. 2 Negative adjectives: boring, difficult, horrible, grumpy, sad, awful.

105


UniT 8

Travel time 2 Read the advert for the summer camp on p. 87 of your Pupil’s Book. Then write an advert for an exciting winter camp! (p. 64) Pupils write a similar text in their notebooks. In order to develop language awareness, ask a pupil to copy his or her text on the board and ask pupils for help in correcting mistakes if there are any. When they have corrected their text, they copy it in the space provided in their Activity Book. Collect the Activity Books for correction, and record pupils’ results on the Formative assessment sheet.

L E S S ON

Round-up

A game to develop observation and memory skills. Give pupils a few moments to memorise the page. Books closed, ask questions, for example: What places appear in the game? What means of transport do you remember? etc.

8

Speaking

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

explain that the aim of the game is to go around the board asking and answering questions in order to write a report about their partner’s holiday plans. Encourage them to use long forms in the report. Pupils then read their texts to the class. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. When pupils finish the first round, they play again with a different partner. This is an excellent moment to assess speaking skills using the Formative assessment sheet.

(p. 65)

Objectives: To develop spoken interaction through a game. To revise information questions and short answers. To write a report about another person’s holiday plans. To develop observation and memory skills. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Formative assessment sheet (Resource File, p. 135). Warm-up An activity to revise vocabulary of the unit.

L E S S ON

Let’s round it up! (pp. 88-89) Objectives: To revise and consolidate the vocabulary and structures of Unit 8. To revise the unit song. To do assessment and self-assessment activities. Language (revision): Structures of the unit. Vocabulary (revision): Unit vocabulary. Materials: Class CD. Tokens or scraps of paper.

28 CD 2

Write the heading Holidays on the board. Then draw three word spiders with the following rubrics: places, means of transport and activities. In pairs, pupils copy and complete the word spiders in their notebooks. Check the task orally. Play with a friend. Find out about your partner’s plans for this summer. (p. 65) A game to develop spoken interaction.

9

Warm-up Revising the unit song and vocabulary.

Begin the lesson by singing the unit song (p. 85). Encourage everyone to join in. Ask pupils to open their books at pages 88 and 89. Tell them that they are going to revise what they have learnt in the unit. 1 Vocabulary. Copy and complete the sets of words in your notebook. (p. 88)

Pupils identify the places, means of transport, activities Pupils copy and complete the exercise in their and travel items in the squares. notebooks. When they finish, ask them to compare Read out the model questions and the rules and their answers with a partner.

106


UniT 8 Answers: Means of transport: car, bus, bike, boat, ship, plane, air hot balloon, etc. Months of the year: January, February, March, etc. Food: roast beef, pork chop, meat, chicken, fish, cabbage, pear, peach etc. Wild animals: iguana, jaguar, snake, condor, alligator, llama, toucan, goat, etc. 2 Ask your classmates, take notes and then report back to the class. (p. 88) Read the model exchange with the class and explain the activity. Pupils produce the same type of questions and ask their partners. When they finish, they report their findings to the class. 3

32 CD 2

Listen and put a token on the correct answer. (p. 89)

Point to each square and elicit the item. Tell pupils that they are going to hear short dialogues that correspond to one of the two items shown in each rectangle. The task is to identify the correct one by placing a token or a scrap of paper on the appropriate picture. Play the CD, pausing after each exchange to give pupils time to complete the task. Audio script 1 A Where are you going to go this summer? B To an island. A How exciting! Are you going to go by boat or by plane? B By plane. It is faster than by boat. 2 A Where are you going to be this Saturday afternoon? B I’m going to be at home. There’s a great tennis match on TV. A Oh, right, it’s the final, isn’t it?

4A B A B A

Where are you going to go this summer? We are going to go to the beach. When are you going to go? On the third of August. Oh! I’m going to go to the beach on the same day.

5 A Were you at the beach last summer? B No, we weren’t. We’re going to go to the beach this summer. A Oh! I see. 6A B A B

What are you going to have, madam? Meat please! What would you like, roast beef or lamb chops? Mmm! Lamb chops, please!

4 Match the pieces of paper and write the texts in your notebook. (p. 89) Pupils complete the exercise in their notebooks and compare their answers with a partner. Check orally. Answers: 1st text: Dear aunt Charlotte, I hope you’re well. I’m going to finish school in July. I have excellent marks so I’m very happy. This year I’m going to go to summer camp with my brother. The camp is near a river. We’re going to go swimming, fishing and rafting. Rafting is one of my favourite sports. I love summer camp – it’s fantastic! There are children from different places and we’re going to make lots of new friends! Write soon! Love, Chris. 2nd text: Dear Thomas, How are you? I’m very happy. School’s over and I’m going to fly to London next week to learn some more English. I love London! I have a friend there and we’re going to visit the Science Museum, Buckingham Palace and the Tower of London. I’m going to buy some books, too. Books are cheaper there and I need to read a lot of English books! Have a great summer! Love, Eliza.

3 A What are you going to do at summer camp? 5 Write about your holiday plans. Use the texts B All kinds of things. We’re going to learn how to of exercise 4 as models. Remember to use climb, fish, cook a meal, and sleep in the woods. adjectives to make your text more interesting! A What’s your favourite? (p. 89) B Climbing. We’re going to go climbing in the mountains. Pupils write about their holiday plans using the texts A That’s really exciting! as models. In order to develop language awareness,

107


UniT 8

Travel time ask a pupil to copy his or her text on the board and 3 A Are you going to get up early tomorrow? ask pupils for help in correcting mistakes if there are B No way! It’s Sunday! I’m going to stay in bed till any. Collect the works for correction, and record pupils’ twelve! results on the Formative assessment sheet. 4 A What are you going to do this afternoon? B I’m not going to watch TV! That’s for sure! Ac t i v i t y Boo k (pp. 66-67) A Why not? There’s a good film on. B I can’t! I’ve got a Maths test tomorrow, so I’m 1 Look at Unit 8 in your Pupil’s Book and answer going to study. the questions. (p. 66) Pupils check the unit and write the answers. Answers: 1 get on / get off; 2 bus, train, plane, boat, car, bike. 3 swimming, fishing, surfing, water skiing, etc. 4 He is going to learn how to fly. 5 She is going to learn French and Spanish. 6 He is going to go surfing. 7 By bus, train and plane. 8 They’re on the beach (in America). 9 China, London, Africa, country, beach, lake and mountain. 10 Africa. 11 No, he doesn’t. 12 The inventors of the Hot Air Balloon. 13 They are very funny. 14 fabulous, great, interesting, beautiful. Sad, horrible, boring, awful. 2

57

Listen and tick. (p. 67)

CD 2

Point to each square and elicit the places and items. Tell pupils that they are going to hear short dialogues that correspond to one of the two shown in each rectangle. The task is to identify the correct one by ticking the appropriate box. Play the CD, pausing after each exchange to give pupils time to complete the task. Audio script 1 A Are you going to fly to Paris? B No, we’re going to go by train. 2 A I’m going to go shopping this afternoon. Do you want to come? B No, thanks. I’m going to go to the cinema.

108

5 A Are you going to go to a summer camp again this year? B Yes, but we’re not going to go to the one on the beach. A No? Where are you going to go? B We’re going to go to a summer camp in the mountains. 6 A Are you going to visit the Science Museum when you go to London next week? B No, but I’m going to go to the Natural History Museum! 3 Read and tick. (p. 67) Help pupils complete the self-assessment section by reading each objective aloud.

Testing and assessment Unit Test Photocopy the Unit Test, one per pupil. Pupils complete the test individually. Once you have corrected all the tests, return them to the pupils and help them check for mistakes by writing the answers on the board. Record pupils’ results on the Formative assessment sheet. Make sure they file their tests in their Language Portfolio. To consolidate the structures of the Unit, pupils complete the Let’s Revise! section. (Activity Book p. 79)


Play

Dick Whittington and his cat Pages 90-91

33 CD 2

Read and listen to the play. (pp. 90-91) An activity to develop oral and reading comprehension.

Objectives: To read a traditional English play. To match texts and drawings. To develop listening and reading comprehension. To develop cultural awareness. Language focus: I want to go to London to seek my fortune. Dick walks all the way to London, Wake up! What are you doing here? Can I have some bread, please? That night Dick can’t sleep. His room is cold. I need a cat! But I’ve only got my cat! Dick doesn’t sleep for weeks! The next day Dick is leaving the house when he hears the church bells. What are we going to do? Here is some gold and jewels! They all live happily ever after. Target vocabulary : Fortune, step, daughter, rat, merchant, ship, mice, church bells, Lord Mayor, land, Captain, King, Queen, dining room, gold, jewels, lazy, kind, rich, impossible. Vocabulary (revision): House, cook, bread, job, kitchen, floor, night, bedroom, cat, market, week, day, dinner, man, box, hungry, tired, cold. Materials: Class CD.

Focus pupils’ attention on the pictures and explain that they depict what is happening in each scene. Encourage them to describe each one and ask the following questions. Picture 1: Where is Dick going? What is he doing on the step? Picture 2: Who is angry in the picture? Is Dick afraid. Picture 3: What is Dick doing? Is the cook horrible to Dick? Who is the girl? Picture 4: What is the cat doing? Is Dick sleeping? Picture 5: What is Dick giving Mr Fitzgerald? Picture 6: What does Dick hear when he is leaving the house? Picture 7: What is Mr Fitzgerald giving the King? How does the King pay for the cat? Picture 8: What are Dick and Alice doing? Pupils then read the play while they listen to the CD. When they finish, ask the following questions to check how much they have understood. Why does Dick go to London? Why does he fall asleep on the steps? Who finds him the next morning? Who gives him a job? Who is cruel to him? Is Alice kind to him? Why can’t Dick sleep at night? What does he decide to buy? Why does Dick give Mr Fitzgerald his cat? Why does Dick decide to leave? What Warm-up makes him change his mind? What problem do the King and An activity to introduce the play. Queen in the distant land have? What does the captain of the ship do? How does Dick become a rich man? Who does he Ask the pupils if they have heard of Dick Whittington. marry? What does he become? Who lives happily ever after? Explain that he was made Lord Mayor of London in 1397 Divide the class into eight groups and assign the roles of and is the most famous Lord Mayor because he held office Narrator, Dick, Cook, Mr Fitzgerald, Alice, the King, the Queen three times. Ask the pupils who their Lord Mayor is. Tell the and Bells. If necessary, play the CD again, with a pause after pupils that they are going to read and listen to a play each line so the groups can repeat it. Otherwise, pupils recite about Dick Whittington and his cat. their lines either from the book or from memory. Encourage Dick Whittington goes to London to seek his fortune, but them to use the appropriate intonation and mime their when he gets there he is so tired that he falls asleep on character’s facial expressions and actions. Then swap the the steps of a large house. This house happens to belong roles around and repeat the activity. to Mr Fitzgerald, a rich merchant who offers Dick a job helping the cook in the kitchen. The cook is very cruel and Round-up treats Dick badly. However, Mr Fitzgerald’s daughter, Alice, An activity to practise and expand the vocabulary. is very kind to him. Dick is happy but he can’t sleep at night With the help of the class, complete a word map on the because his room is full of rats so he buys a cat. board. Write Dick Whittington and his cat in the centre of the Unfortunately he has to give his cat to Mr Fitzgerald who is map and encourage everyone to contribute a word or two. about to set sail on a ship for a distant land and doesn’t sleep for several weeks. Dick can’t bear it any longer and Ac t i v i t y Boo k (pp. 72-73) decides to leave. On his way out, he hears the church bells tell him to go back as he will one day become Lord Mayor Look at the pictures and match them to the sentences. (p. 72) of London. Dick returns and does in fact become a very rich man because the captain of Mr Fitzgerald’s ship sells Pupils read each sentence and find the corresponding his cat for a box of gold and jewels. Dick marries Alice, picture. becomes Lord Mayor of London and they all live happily Answers: 1-c; 2-b; 3-d; 4-a; 5-f; 6-h; 7-e; 8-g. ever after.

109


Festivals L E S S ON

Harvest Festivals 1

Pages 92-93 Objectives: To read and talk about harvest festivals in the UK, Canada and Africa. To use an illustrated dictionary. To develop reading comprehension. To develop cultural awareness. Language focus: Harvest Festival is a celebration of the food we grow on the land. There are many thanksgiving ceremonies and celebrations all over the world. Children celebrate Harvest Festival by decorating their schools. They go hiking and fishing and then they eat their Thanksgiving meal. They sing and dance happily. The dancers wear beautiful costumes and masks. Target vocabulary: Harvest, Thanksgiving, festival, celebration, land, ceremony, people, meal, turkey, corn, yam, pumpkin pie, corn dolly, costume, mask, feast, second, grow, celebrate, decorate, bring. Vocabulary (revision): UK, Canada, Africa, food, Sunday, Monday, September, October, world, moon, children, school, basket, fruit, egg, food, home, table, luck, family, country, picnic, hiking, fishing, good, beautiful, big, happily, go, eat, sing, dance, wear, end. Materials: A world map or globe.

Note: This lesson is optional. It is designed to be taught during the autumn. Warm-up An activity to locate the UK, Canada and Africa. Pin up the map of the world or gather pupils around you and show them the globe. Ask them to locate the country they are in. Say: Here we are in (Italy). Ask: Where is the UK? Ask a pupil to point to the correct country. Then help them locate Canada and Africa on the map. Explain the meaning of the word Thanksgiving. Point out that celebration, festival and feast all mean the same in this context. Ask pupils what we all have to be thankful about.

110

1 Read about Harvest Festival in the UK and answer the questions. (p. 92) An activity to develop reading comprehension. Focus pupils’ attention on the photos and encourage them to describe each one. Ask them to name the fruit in the first photo. Point to the second photo and explain that a ‘corn dolly’ is a doll made out of straw and scraps of material, now used for decoration. In pairs, pupils then read the text. Refer them to the photos and the picture dictionary to help comprehension. Finally, they answer the questions in their notebooks, either individually or in pairs. You may also wish to ask the questions orally first, perhaps with books closed. Answers: 1 It is a celebration of the food we grow on the land. 2 On the Sunday of the Harvest Moon, about September 23rd. 3 They decorate their schools with baskets of fruit and food. 4 They usually bring the food from home. 5 They are there for good luck.


Festivals 2 Look, read and match the texts to the photos. (p. 93)

again and say ‘true’ or ‘false’. Ask them to correct the sentences that are false.

Focus pupils’ attention on the photos and ask: In which photo are people dancing? Where can you see pumpkins? In which photo is there a big turkey? In pairs, pupils then read the texts and do the matching exercise. (Answers: A-2; B-1.)

Answers: 1 False. They celebrate Thanksgiving in April. 2 They go to the country. 3 They eat a typical meal of turkey, corn and pumpkin pie. 4 They sing and dance. 5 True. 6 They eat yams, eggs and corn.

Round-up

Round-up

An activity to practise and expand the vocabulary.

An activity to illustrate thanksgiving celebrations.

With the help of the class, complete a word map on the board. Write Thanksgiving in the centre of the map and encourage everyone to contribute a word or two.

Hand out the sheets of paper and tell pupils that they can illustrate either a thanksgiving celebration that they know about or reasons they have to be thankful generally. Ask them to write an explanatory sentence or two. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. Collect the drawings and display them in the room.

L E S S ON

2

Objectives: To talk about harvest festivals. To illustrate a harvest festival or other feast. To develop oral expression. To develop cultural awareness. Vocabulary (revision): Vocabulary from lesson 1. Materials: Sheets of paper (round-up). Warm-up An activity to talk about Harvest Festivals and similar celebrations. Ask pupils from different backgrounds to describe thanksgiving celebrations in their country of origin.

Ac t i v i t y Boo k

(p. 74)

1 Identify each picture. (p. 74) Pupils read pages 92 and 93 in their Pupil’s Book again and identify the pictures. Answers: corn dolly, turkey, corn, pumpkin pie, mask, yam, costume, egg. 2 Tick true or false. (p. 74) Pupils read pages 92 and 93 in their Pupil’s Book

111


Festivals L E S S ON

New Year 1

Page 94 Objectives: To read and talk about New Year in the West. To develop reading comprehension. To develop cultural awareness. Language focus: In the West, the New Year begins on 1st January. People usually go to parties on New Year’s Eve. They have a special tradition called ‘first footing’. The coal is for warmth and the cake is for food. Spanish people eat twelve grapes one by one. This is for good luck during the next 12 months. Target vocabulary: West, parties, New Year’s Eve, tradition, ‘first footing’, good luck, midnight, coal, warmth, strike (v). Vocabulary (revision): January, people, friend, relatives, square, Big Ben, Piccadilly Circus, Trafalgar Square, everyone, house, hair, cake, food, clock, grape, month, dark, celebrate, eat. Materials: A world map or globe.

Note: This lesson is optional. It is designed to be taught before the Christmas break. Warm-up An activity to locate Spain, Great Britain and Scotland.

‘skirt’ worn by Scottish men is called a kilt. In pairs, pupils then read the texts and do the matching exercise. Answers: A-3; B-1; C-2. Ask pupils if they are familiar with any of these customs.

Round-up

A memory game to consolidate the language of the lesson. Give pupils a few moments to memorise the page. Books closed, say incomplete sentences and elicit the missing information, for example: In the West, the New Year starts on … (January 1st). London, people meet in… (Trafalgar Square) or … (Piccadilly Circus), etc. Ask pupils how they celebrate New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day .

L E S S ON

2

Page 95 Pin up the map of the world or gather pupils around you and show them the globe. Ask them to locate the country they are in. Say: Here we are in (Italy). Objectives: To talk about the Chinese New Year. Ask: Where is Spain? Ask a pupil to point to the correct To complete a quiz. To make a New Year card. country. Then help them locate Great Britain and To develop oral expression. To develop cultural Scotland on the map. awareness. Explain that they are going to read and talk about Target vocabulary: Rat, ox, rooster. New Year celebrations in these countries. Vocabulary (revision): Tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, goat, monkey, dog, pig. 1 Look, read and match the texts to the photos. Materials: Sheets of paper (Round-up). (p. 94) An activity to develop reading comprehension. Warm-up An activity to find one’s animal in the Chinese calendar. Focus pupils’ attention on the photos and encourage them to describe each one. Ask them to identify the Tell pupils that the Chinese (and other Oriental people) three countries (1 – Spain; 2 – England; 3 – Scotland) divide time into 12-year cycles, with each year Point to the third photo and explain that the special

112


Festivals dedicated to a different animal. The cycle starts with the rat, followed by the ox, tiger, rabbit, etc. as represented in the 2nd illustration. Thus, by finding out when there was a ‘year of the Rat’ and adding or subtracting 12 to it, we can determine what the animal for any given year is going to be. (For example, 1984 was a year of the Rat, as were 1996 and 2008, therefore 1985 and 1997 were years of the Ox, etc.). 2 Look at the pictures and read. (p. 95) An activity to develop reading comprehension. Focus pupils’ attention on the photos and encourage them to describe each one. Point to the second photo and explain that this is the Chinese horoscope. Ask pupils to identify the animals. Teach the words rat, ox and rooster. Explain that the 3rd and 4th photo show a typical Chinese dragon in a street parade. In the 5th photo, we can see what Chinese people decorate their houses with. In pairs, pupils then read the texts. Refer them to the photos to help comprehension. When they finish, ask question to check comprehension, for example: What is ‘Yuan Tan’? When do Chinese people celebrate the New Year? etc. Finally say: 2005 was the year of the Rooster, 2006 was the year of the Dog. What are the next years going to be? (2007- Pig, 2008 – Rat, etc.)

1 Answer the following questions. What do you know about New Year around the world? Pupils read pages 94 and 95 in their Pupil’s Book again and answer the quiz either individually or in pairs. You may also wish to ask the questions orally first, perhaps with books closed. Answers: 1 On 1st January. 2 They meet in Trafalgar Square or Piccadilly Circus. 3 They visit each other’s houses. They have a special tradition called ‘first footing’. 4 Coal is for warmth and cake is for food. 5 This is for good luck during the next 12 months. 6 It is celebrated when there is a new moon, between 21st January and 20th February. There are a lot of feasts and people visit family and friends. 7, 8, 9 and 10: Pupils’ own answers.

Round-up 2 Make a New Year’s card for your family. (p. 75) An activity to make a New Year card. Hand out the sheets of paper and tell pupils that they are going to prepare a New Year card. After folding the sheet in two, they illustrate the cover and write a message inside to wish a relative or friend a happy New Year. Go round the room in order to give any necessary help. If you have prepared a card, show it to the pupils. Collect the cards and display them in the room.

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Resource File INTRODUCTION

Props: • Sack for Dick • Box full of gold and jewels In this Resource File you will find the following • Bells made out of cardboard for pupils to stand behind material: • Rolling pin for cook Putting on a play: Plays are very useful to consolidate • Crowns for the king and queen language learnt in previous lessons. Children enjoy reading, listening to and acting out the different roles. Costumes: • Ragged trousers and shirt for Dick In this section you will find ideas on how you put on • Masks for the cat and mice the play in the Pupil’s Book. • Dress for Alice • Apron and chef’s hat for Cook Photocopiable instruments for assessment: Assessment is an integral part of the learning process • Long coat and hat for Mr Fitzgerald • Cloaks for the King and Queen and it is most successful when done through the • Hat, boots and tunic for the Captain systematic observation of pupils during the course. The Unit Tests, the Formative assessment chart and the End of unit assessment chart will help you in this task.

PUTTING ON A PLAY General indications Assign roles to pupils. It is a good idea to build up gradually, by rehearsing in class a few lines at a time. This can be done by listening, pausing and repeating. You can also ask pupils to listen to the play on their Pupil’s CD at home and rehearse their lines on their own. When working with the group, make sure that you correct the rhythm and intonation. Encourage pupils to speak slowly rather than too fast. In the following lessons, pupils act out their lines in groups. If there are more children than parts, any ‘extra’ pupils can act as parts of the scenery (e.g. trees) or as an ‘echo’ to the important lines.

DICK WHITTINGTON AND HIS CAT Cast Two Narrators (They can either take it in turns or alternate acts) Dick Whittington Mr Fitzgerald Cook Cat King

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Mice / Rats (6) Alice Queen Captain Bells (2)

Scenery: • A finger-painted backdrop of the outside of Mr Fitzgerald’s house • A finger-painted backdrop of the kitchen in Mr Fitzgerald’s house • A finger-painted backdrop of Tom’s bedroom • A finger-painted backdrop of the King and Queen’s palace

Scene 1 Scenery: Backdrop of Mr Fitzgerald’s house on the outside. Curtains open or lights come on. From the left enter both narrators. They cross the stage and stand at the front on the right hand corner. From the right enters Dick Whittington, a sack slung over his shoulder. Narrator: Dick: Narrator:

This is the story of Dick Whittington. Hello, I’m Dick. I want to go to London to seek my fortune! Dick walks all the way to London and is so tired that he sits down on the steps of a large house and falls asleep.

From the left enters Cook. Narrator: Cook:

The next morning the Cook finds Dick and shouts at him. Wake up! What are you doing here? Go away at once!


Dick:

Can I have some bread, please? I’m so hungry!

Exit Dick and Cat to the left. Curtains close or lights dim.

From the left enters Mr Fitzgerald.

Scene 3

Mr Fitzgerald arrives and invites Dick into the house. Mr Fitzgerald: I’m Mr Fitzgerald. How can I help you? Dick: Can you give me a job? Mr Fitzgerald: Sure! You can help Cook in the kitchen!

Curtains open or lights come back on. Enter Mr Fitzgerald, Dick and Cat from the left.

Narrator:

Cook, Mr Fitzgerald and Dick exit to the left. Curtains close or lights dim.

Scene 2 Scenery: Add backdrop of Mr Fitzgerald’s kitchen on the left of the stage and Dick’s bedroom on the right. Curtains open or lights come back on. From the left enter Dick and Cook. Cook: Hurry up and finish that floor, you lazy boy!

Mr Fitzgerald is a rich merchant with lots of ships. Mr Fitzgerald: Give me something to sell on my ship, Dick! Dick: But I’ve only got my cat! Narrator: Dick gives Mr Fitzgerald his cat, but the mice come back and Dick doesn’t sleep for weeks!

Narrator:

From Fitzgerald exits to the left with the cat. Dick wanders up and down stage shaking his head desperately. Dick: Narrator:

Bells ring Bells:

From the right enters Alice. Narrator: Alice: Dick:

Alice, Mr Fitzgerald’s daughter, arrives. She is very kind and she feels sorry for Dick. Stop that at once! Thanks Miss Alice.

Exit Alice and Cook to the right. Backdrop. Enter Rats from the right. Narrator: Dick: Narrator:

That night Dick can’t sleep. His bedroom is cold and it’s full of rats! I need a cat! The next day Dick goes to the market and buys a cat.

That night the cat catches all the rats and Dick can go to sleep!

The Cat runs around chasing the rats off stage to the left. Rats exit to the left. Dick: Cat:

You’re so clever! Drink this milk! [Purring]

Turn again, Whittington, Lord Mayor of London, Turn again, Whittington, Thrice Mayor of London.

Dick speaks to the audience Dick:

Me? Lord Mayor of London?

Dick exits to the left. Curtains close or lights dim.

Scene 4 Curtains open or lights come back on. Enter Captain, King and Queen from the right. Narrator:

From the right enters the Cat. Narrator:

This is impossible! I can’t stay here! The next day Dick is leaving the house when he hears the church bells.

King:

Mr Fitzgerald’s ship arrives in a distance land and the Captain goes to see the King and Queen. Welcome! Please stay and have dinner.

Enter mice. Narrator: Queen:

Dinner is served but suddenly the dining room is full of mice! Oh no! What are we going to do?

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Resource File Captain exits to the left and re-enter with cat. Narrator:

The Captain returns to the ship and comes back with Dick’s cat who chases all the mice away!

The King gives the Captain the box full of gold and jewels and they all exit to the right. King:

I want to buy the cat! Here is some gold and jewels!

Mr Fitzgerald enters from the left carrying the box. Narrator:

The ships returns to England and Mr Fitzgerald gives Dick the box full of gold and jewels.

TESTING AND ASSESSMENT Assessment is an integral part of the learning process and it is most successful when done through the systematic observation of pupils during the course. It cannot be seen through isolated events like exams or tests. The Unit Tests, the Formative assessment chart and the End of unit assessment chart will help you in this task. There are three types of assessment: entry, summative and formative.

Mr Fitzgerald gives Dick the box. Mr Fitzgerald: This is for your cat, Dick! You are now a very rich man. Dick: I can’t believe it! Thank you so much! Dick and Alice enter from the right hand in hand smiling. Narrator:

Dick marries Alice and becomes Lord Mayor of London and they all live happily ever after.

Rest of the cast come back on stage, take a bow and wave to the audience. Curtain closes or lights dim.

Photocopiable assessment material (tests and charts) catering for these different types of assessment is provided in this section. Unit Tests. Photocopy the Unit Test, one per pupil. Pupils complete the test individually. Once you have corrected all the tests, return them to the pupils and help them check their performance by writing the answers on the board. Make sure they file their tests in their Language Portfolio.

Formative assessment should be carried out on a daily basis using the Formative assessment chart (p. 135). Photocopy this chart and write the pupils’ names in the first column. The chart can be used to record pupils results in both oral activities (games, pair work, etc.) and written work (compositions, project work, etc.). Give each child a mark according to the Formative assessment is performed during the whole marking criteria. Write any comments in the right-hand of the period. It is an ongoing process of gathering information on the extent of learning, on strengths and column. weaknesses, which the teacher can feed back into Summative assessment can be performed at the end of their course planning and the actual feedback they 1 each unit after you have marked the Unit tests. give to learners . Photocopy the End of unit assessment chart (p. 136) and write the pupils’ names across the top. Write the Summative assessment is performed at the end of a specific period. It sums up attainment at the end of the objectives of the unit you wish to evaluate and put a grade according to the assessment scale provided. course with a grade2.

Entry assessment is done at the beginning of the course in order to find out how much the pupils know and to provide a starting point. In Merry Team, it is carried out in unit 0 of each level.

1 Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: learning, teaching, assessment. 9.3.5 Formative assessment/summative assessment, p. 186. 2 Ibid.

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Test audio scripts Unit 1 1

58

Listen and tick.

2 A Do you always go to the beach in summer? B Not always, I sometimes go to the mountains.

CD 1

1 A What’s John doing? B He’s playing tennis with Lucy.

3 A Is the Maths lesson at 9 o’clock? B No, it isn’t. It’s at 9.30.

2 A Do you like History? B No, not really. My favourite subject is Maths.

4 A Can I have the lamb chops, please? B Certainly. Do you want some mushrooms with your lamb chops? A No, thanks. I don’t like mushrooms.

3 A Why are you wearing a swimming costume? B Because I’m going to the beach. 4 A What lesson have you got now? B I’ve got History! We’re studying the Romans.

5 A Do you go skating in winter? B No, I usually go skiing.

5 A Have you got swimming on Tuesday? B No, I haven’t. I’ve got swimming on Thursday.

6 A Are you good at Science? B No, but I’m good at History. It’s my favourite subject.

6 A What are you doing? B I’m drawing a picture for my Art lesson tomorrow.

Unit 2 1

59

Listen and tick.

CD 2

1 A Is the whale a mammal? B Yes, it is. 2 A What is your favourite subject? B Geography. We’re studying the rainforest. 3 A Can elephants swim? B Yes, they can. They’re very good swimmers. 4 A Have you got a pet? B Yes, I’ve got an iguana. 5 A Which animal has a long beak? B A toucan. 6 A What’s got short horns and a short tail? B I know! A goat.

Unit 3 1

60

Listen and tick.

CD 2

Unit 4 1

61

Listen and tick.

CD 2

1 A B A B

Who is your brother? The boy with the dark hair. Is his hair curly? No, it’s straight.

2 A Are you taller than your brother? B No, I’m not. I’m shorter. 3 A B A B

What does your Maths teacher look like? She’s tall and thin. Has she got long hair? Yes, she’s got long dark wavy hair.

4 A What’s Sally’s brother like? B I don’t like him very much. He’s really grumpy. 5 A Is your sister naughty? B Yes, she is. She’s very naughty. 6 A Is Mary shorter than Tom? B Yes, she is shorter and fatter than him.

1 A Can I have a peach, please? B Sorry, I haven’t got any peaches, but you can have a pear.

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Test audio scripts Unit 5 1

62

Listen and tick.

Unit 7 1

CD 2

64

Listen and tick.

CD 2

1 A Is the dolphin the largest mammal in the world? B No, it isn’t. The whale is the largest.

1 A Is the History lesson at a quarter to ten? B No, it isn’t. It’s at a quarter past ten.

2 A Who is the tallest person in your family? B My brother. He’s taller than my father, my mother and me!

2 A Were you at school yesterday? B No, I was at home.

3 A What’s the new girl in your class like? B She never smiles. She’s really grumpy. 4 A Is a tortoise slower than a rabbit? B Yes, it’s the slowest animal in the forest. 5 A Which is bigger, Argentina or Brazil? B Brazil. It’s the biggest country in South America. 6 A Do you usually stay at home on Saturday afternoons? B No, I don’t. I always play tennis with Susie.

3 A Was the film exciting? B No, it wasn’t. It was really boring! 4 A Is your favourite season winter? B No, it isn’t. It’s summer. 5 A Is your birthday on the 3rd of March? B No, it isn’t. It’s on the 1st of March 6 A Where were you on Sunday? B I was at the beach with my friends.

Unit 8 1

Unit 6 1

63

Listen and tick.

CD 2

1 A Do you want to be a computer programmer when you grow up? B No, that’s boring! I want to be a scientist! 2 A What’s the fastest animal in the jungle? B It’s the jaguar. They can run really fast. 3 A What does your father do? B He’s a pilot. He flies all over the world. A Wow! How exciting! 4 A What does your sister look like? B She’s short and she’s got long dark curly hair.

65

Listen and tick.

CD 2

1 A Are you going to travel to Italy by plane? B No, we’re going by car. Dad’s going to drive there. 2 A Where are you going to go at the weekend? B I’m going to go camping in the mountains. 3 A Are you going to do anything exciting on Saturday? B No, I’m going to have a really boring day at home in front of the TV. 4 A You’re face looks red. Were you at the beach yesterday? B Yes, I was. I was there all day.

5 A Who’s the tallest person in your class? B Simon. He’s taller than the teacher, too!

5 A Are we going to have lamb chops for lunch today? B No, we are not. We’re going to have roast beef.

6 A Where do you spend your holidays? B On a beautiful island in the middle of the ocean.

6 A Is Paul getting on the bus? B No, he’s getting off it.

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UniT 1

Unit Test 1 Name: ................................................................ Surname: .......................................................... Class: ........................... Date: ...........................

Listening 1

Listen and tick.

1

2

3

4

5

6

Thursday Tue sday Vocabulary 2

Fill in the blanks in the timetable. Monday

...............................

Wednesday

...............................

Friday

...............................

Maths

...............................

History

...............................

English

...............................

BREAK

Art

...............................

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UniT 1

Unit Test Communication 3

Complete the dialogues.

1

2

A: Why are you ................................. ?

A: .................................’s your favourite day

B: ................................. I’ve got a Maths Test.

at school?

A: Really? .................................’s the test?

B: My favourite day ............................ Friday.

B: ................................. Thursday.

A: What do you ............................ on Friday?

A: Well. Good luck in your test!

B: We have Art and Music.

Writing 4

Complete the text with the words in the box. study

is

live

like

learn

Inuit children (1) ...................... in Greenland or Alaska. Some of the schools in the villages only (2) ...................... about 20 children. They (3) ...................... the same subjects as other children and they (4) ...................... about their culture and their traditions. In winter, there (5) ...................... lots of snow and children (6) ...................... making snowmen.

Excellent

Circle your results!

Very good Fine 120

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have


UniT 2

Unit Test 2 Name: ................................................................ Surname: .......................................................... Class: ........................... Date: ...........................

Listening 1

Listen and tick.

1

2

3

4

5

6

Vocabulary 2

Look at the pictures and label the animal parts.

1

....................................................

3

....................................................

2

....................................................

4

....................................................

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121


UniT 2

Unit Test 2 Communication 3

Read the dialogue and fill in the gaps.

A: ...................... it a mammal?

B: Yes, it is.

A: Does it live in the rainforest?

B: No, it ...................... . It lives in the jungle.

A: ...................... it climb trees?

B: Yes, it can.

A: Has it ...................... wings?

B: No, it hasn’t. It’s got black eyes.

A: Is it a panda?

B: Yes, it ...................... .

Writing 4

Complete the text with the words in the box. waterfalls

caves

tail

rain

reptiles

seasons

Rainforest are warm, wet forests in South and Central America, Africa, Oceania and Asia. They have 2 metres of (1) ...................... each year and two (2) ...................... . There are lots of different (3) ...................... in the forest and there are millions of insects, (4) ...................... , amphibians, birds and mammals.

The jaguar, which is in danger of extinction, lives there in

(5) ...................... . Jaguars are about 1.8 metres long and

their (6) ...................... is 2-3 metres long. They eat mammals, reptiles and birds.

Circle your results!

Excellent Very good Fine 122

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UniT 3

Unit Test 3 Name: ................................................................ Surname: .......................................................... Class: ........................... Date: ...........................

Listening 1

Listen and tick.

1

2

3

4

5

6

Vocabulary 2

Look at the pictures and circle the words in the wordsearch. Q G R A P E S B

W U O A E J X L

E I A S A K C A

M U S H R O O M

W A T E R L M B

C A B B A G E C

C H E E S E L H

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T P E A C H O O

Y P F F H Z N P

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UniT 3

Unit Test 3 Communication 3

Read the dialogue and fill in the gaps.

A: What do you do in summer?

B: I ...................... go to the beach. I go every morning!

A: Do you go skating in winter?

B: I ...................... go skating, but not always.

A: Do you go hiking in autumn?

B: No, I ...................... go hiking. I don’t like it.

A: What do you do in spring?

B: I ...................... play tennis. It’s my favourite sport.

Writing 4

Complete the text with the words in the box. bad

energy

repairs

teeth

There are five food groups on the food (1) ...................... . Carbohydrates are for (2) ...................... and are in potatoes, pasta and bread. Vitamins and minerals (3) ...................... the body and are in fruit and vegetables. Calcium is good for the bones and (4) ...................... and is in milk and cheese. Protein (5) ....................... the body and is in chicken, beans, meat, fish and eggs. Fats are for energy too, but too much fat is (6) ........................ for you. Fats are in cakes, biscuits and sweets.

Circle your results!

Excellent Very good Fine 124

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protect

plate


UniT 4

Unit Test 4 Name: ................................................................ Surname: .......................................................... Class: ........................... Date: ...........................

Listening 1

Listen and tick.

1

2

3

4

5

6

Vocabulary 2

Look at the pictures and solve the anagrams.

1

eorbd .......................................

4

ditre

.......................................

2

yarng .......................................

5

dsa

.......................................

3

phayp .......................................

6

mgyrpu

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.......................................

125


UniT 4

Unit Test 4 Communication 3

Look at the pictures, read the dialogue and fill in the gaps.

1

2 A: What does Jane ................

A: What does Lucy look

like?

................?

B: She’s ................ and she’s

B: She’s thin and she’s

got ................ short hair.

got ................ long hair.

A: Is she taller ................ Lucy?

A: Is she ................ than Jane?

B: No, she isn’t. She’s ................ .

B: No, she isn’t. She’s taller.

A: ................ is she like?

A: What ................ she like?

B: She’s ................ .

B: She’s ................ .

Writing 4

Complete the text with the words in the box. become

slices

loves

asks

covers

fries

A chef in France (1) ...................... potatoes in hot oil in the 1850s and French fries (2) ...................... a popular snack. Then in 1853 Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt (3) ...................... for French fries in a restaurant, but he doesn’t like them. The chef, George Crum, is very angry and he (4) ...................... the potatoes very thin, fries them and (5) ...................... them with salt. Vanderbilt (6) ...................... them and the crisp is born!

Circle your results!

Excellent Very good Fine 126

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UniT 5

Unit Test 5 Name: ................................................................ Surname: .......................................................... Class: ........................... Date: ...........................

Listening 1

Listen and tick.

1

2

3

4

5

6

Argentina Brazil Vocabulary 2

Look at the picture and complete the crossword. 1 1

2 3

2

4

3

8

5 6 7 8

4

7 6

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5

127


UniT 5

Unit Test 5 Communication 3

Read the prompts and complete the dialogues.

big / mammal

A What’s ........ ................ ................ in the ocean? B It’s the whale.

fast / animal

A What’s ........ ................ ................ in the jungle? B It’s the jaguar.

slow / animal

A What’s ........ ................ ................ in the forest? B It’s the tortoise.

high / building

A What’s ........ ................ ................ in the city?

long / river

B It’s the Empire State Building.

A What’s ........ ................ ................ in the world? B It’s the River Nile in Egypt.

Writing 4

Complete the text with the words in the box. has

between

most

oldest

take part

The America’s Cup is the (1) ..................... famous boat race or regatta in the sport of sailing. It is nine races (2) ..................... two boats. Each boat is a maximum of 90 feet long and (3) ..................... a crew of 20 people. The (4) ..................... trophy goes back to a race around the Isle of Wight in 1851 and is named after the (5) ..................... of that race, Yacht America. You can see all the names of the yachts that (6) .....................in the regatta on the inside of the cup.

Circle your results!

Excellent Very good Fine 128

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winner


UniT 6

Unit Test 6 Name: ................................................................ Surname: .......................................................... Class: ........................... Date: ...........................

Listening 1

Listen and tick.

1

2

3

4

5

6

Vocabulary 2

Look at the pictures and name the jobs.

1

.........................................

4

.........................................

2

.........................................

5

.........................................

3

.........................................

6

.........................................

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129


UniT 6

Unit Test 6 Communication 3

Look at the pictures and complete the sentences. What do you want to be when you grow up?

1

I want to be ..... ......................... .

4

I want to be ..... ......................... .

I like .......................... .

I like .......................... .

I want to be ..... ......................... .

2

I want to be ..... ......................... .

5

I like .......................... .

I like .......................... .

I want to be ..... ......................... .

3

I want to be ..... ......................... .

6

I like .......................... .

I like .......................... .

Writing 4

Complete the text with the words in the box. weighs

lives

sleeps

gets

grows

lies

The Galápagos Tortoise is the world’s largest tortoise. It (1) ...................... to about 1.5 metres long and (2) ......................up to 250 kilograms. It is an endangered species and there are only 11 types in the Galápagos islands. It (3) ...................... on a diet of grass, leaves, and cactus and can survive a year without eating or drinking. It (4) ...................... in the sun and (5) ...................... about 16 hours a day. The Galápagos archipelago (6) ...................... its name from the Giant Tortoise – galápago is the Spanish word for tortoise.

Circle your results!

Excellent Very good Fine 130

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UniT 7

Unit Test 7 Name: ................................................................ Surname: .......................................................... Class: ........................... Date: ...........................

Listening 1

Listen and tick.

1

MARCH

2

3

4

5

6

MARCH

Vocabulary 2

Write the dates in the long form.

1

Oct 1st

...................................................

6

Aug 8th

...................................................

2

Jan 2nd ...................................................

7

Jul 9th

...................................................

3

Apr 3rd ...................................................

8

Feb 12th

...................................................

4

Jun 4th ...................................................

9

Mar 20th ...................................................

5

Sept 5th ...................................................

10

Dec 21st

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...................................................

131


UniT 7

Unit Test 7 Communication 3

Look at the pictures and complete the dialogues.

1 A: Where ......... you at ..............

2 A: Where ......... you ?

B: I ......... at the ............ A: No, you ............ .

at ..............

3 A: Where ......... you ?

. B: I ....... at the ...............

at ..............

. B: I ......... at the ...............

A: No, you ............ . You .........

You ......... at the station!

at the .......................

!

at the ....................

Complete the text with the words in the box. was

has

is

were

are

Calendars (1) …..……… based on the cycles of the sun and the moon. A year (2) …..……… based on the motion of the earth around the sun and a month was based on the motion of the moon around the earth. The calendar we (3) …..……… today is called the Gregorian calendar. It is based on the motion of the earth around the sun and (4) …..……… 365 or 366 days. There (5) …..……… 12 months, 52 weeks and 7 days in each week. There (6) …..……… a leap year every four years. A leap year is when there is an extra day in the month which is the 29th February.

Circle your results!

Excellent Very good Fine 132

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.

A: No, you ............ . You .........

Writing 4

?

use

!


UniT 8

Unit Test 8 Name: ................................................................ Surname: .......................................................... Class: ........................... Date: ...........................

Listening 1

Listen and tick.

1

2

3

4

5

6

Vocabulary 2

Look at the pictures. How do the people travel?

1

........... ..............................

4

........... ..............................

2

........... ..............................

5

........... ..............................

3

........... ..............................

6

........... ..............................

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133


UniT 8

Unit Test 8 Communication 3

Look at the pictures and complete the dialogues.

1 A: Where ........ you ...............

2 A: What ....... you going ....... ...........

to go this summer?

3 A: Is Sam .................. ........

this weekend?

the bus?

B: I’...... ........... to go to London. B: I’m going ...... ...... my grandma. A: ........ you ............... to go there by ...............

A: Are you going to go there ...... ?

B: No, I’m not. I’...... ............... to go by ...............

B: No, he isn’t.

bike?

He’s .................. ........

A: No, I’m not. I’m going to go ......

.

the bus.

foot.

Writing 4

Complete the text with the words in the box. were

can

first

heats

oldest

funny

was

contains

The hot air balloon is the (1) ...................... flight technology dating back to 1783. Its inventors (2) ...................... the Montgolfier brothers from Annonay, in France. The (3) ...................... flight with humans (4) ...................... on November 21st, 1783, in Paris. You (5) ...................... see a model of the Montgolfier brothers’ balloon at the London Science Museum. A hot air balloon has three important parts: a bag called the envelope that (6) ...................... hot air, a burner which (7) ...................... the air to lift the hot air balloon and a basket for the passengers. Today you can see lots of different hot air balloons. Some are really (8) ...................... .

Circle your results!

Excellent Very good Fine 134

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Formative assessment Name of activities: ......................................................................................................................................... Aim of activities: ............................................................................................................................................. Unit: ............................... Lesson: ............................... Course: ...................................................................

Pupils’ names

The pupil is able to...

Marks

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Marking criteria: 1 excellent

2 good

3 with certain difficulties

4 with a lot of difficulties

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5 not at all

135


136

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9

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

The pupil is able to...

Objectives:

.......................................

Course:

.......................................

Date:

.......................................

Unit:

Pupils’ names

2

3

Marking criteria:

1 4

6

1 excellent

5 7

8

2 good

3 with certain difficulties

4 with a lot of difficulties

5 not at all

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

End of unit assessment


Merry Team Teacher's Guide 5