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Living Derwent Project Report

developingopportunity


Introduction This report is an evaluation of Living Derwent, a three year arts in regeneration programme in the Derwent area of Derby. The report outlines the strategy, aspects of delivery and an analysis of the impact. The evaluation was carried out in partnership with Derby University. As well as evaluating the Living Derwent programme of work the intention of this report is to promote the Derwent area and those involved in the programme as well as highlighting the potential role of the arts in relation to social regeneration and provide a useful resource for organisations involved in this type of work. Hub Agency would like to thank all of the residents, organisations and freelance practitioners who were involved in the Living Derwent programme and contributed towards its success.

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Content

Section 1 - Context

1. 2. 3.

Section 2 - Project overview

1. 2. 3. 4.

Section 3 - Evaluation

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

New Deal for Communities Making the case Consultation

Derwent Community Team objectives Living Derwent - core aims and working principles Strategy Strands of support

Resources and timescales Overview of support Case studies Impact against project aims Challenges and constraints Lessons learned

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context

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“Cultural projects have played an increasingly important role in British urban regeneration since the mid-1980’s.” (The Art of Regeneration - Urban Renewal Through Cultural Activity Comedia 1996).


Section Summary

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1.

New Deal for Communities (NDC) is a government funded initiative targeted at deprived neighbourhoods.

2.

Various studies and reports support the case that arts and cultural provision play an important role in regeneration.

3.

Hub Agency was commissioned by Derwent Community Team to manage a consultation relating to arts development and to make recommendations for future development. The outcome of the consultation was a 3 year arts and cultural development programme called Living Derwent.


1. New Deal for Communities New Deal for Communities (NDC) is a key programme in the Government’s strategy to tackle multiple deprivation in the most deprived neighbourhoods in the country, giving some of our poorest communities the resources to tackle their problems in an intensive and co-ordinated way. The aim is to bridge the gap between these neighbourhoods and the rest of England. The problems of each NDC neighbourhood are unique, but all the partnerships are tackling five key themes: poor job prospects; high levels of crime; educational underachievement; poor health; and problems with housing and the physical environment. (www.neighbourhood.gov.uk/page.asp?id=617) Derwent is recognised by the Derby City Partnership to be one of Derby’s poorest communities with extremely high levels of social exclusion and disadvantage. Derwent comprises of three distinct estates: Cowsley, St Mark’s and Roe Farm. The Derwent NDC programme is managed under the name of Derwent Community Team.

Derwent Community Team main aims: •

to improve health and reduce inequality

to create a community of lifelong learning

to create a safer community

to improve the quality of life

to build local community capacity

to create a vibrant local economy

to improve housing and neighbourhood management

(www.goem.gov.uk/goem/psc/nr/ndc/316662)

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2. Making the case “Cultural projects have played an increasingly important role in British urban regeneration since the mid-1980’s.” (The Art of Regeneration - Urban Renewal Through Cultural Activity - Comedia 1996).

PAT 10 Report An action team led by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) produced the PAT 10 report highlighting best practice in using arts, sport and leisure to engage people in poor neighbourhoods, particularly those who may feel most excluded, such as disaffected young people and people from ethnic minorities. Participation, and the provision of services to support participation, in arts and sport, can help address neighborhood renewal by improving communities’ ‘performance’ on the four key indicators of more jobs, less crime, better health and improved educational attainment. Key principles which help to exploit the potential of arts/sport in regenerating communities include: valuing diversity, embedding local control, supporting local commitment, promoting equitable partnerships, defining common objectives in relation to actual needs, working flexibly with change, securing sustainability, pursuing quality across the spectrum, connecting with the mainstream, The PAT has identified a number of area-based schemes which would particularly benefit from closer links with arts and sport. These are: European Social Fund and Regional Development Fund grants; SRBs; NDC Pathfinder Areas; Health Action Zones; Employment Zones; and Education Action Zones. (Policy Action Team 10. a report to the social exclusion unit DCMS)

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SCOTTISH EXECUTIVE Research into The Role of the Arts in Regeneration Main findings The arts could have a pivotal role to play in regenerating areas of social and economic exclusion. They are seen to be able to operate in a number of different ways. They can: attract people who otherwise might not be attracted to participate in arts activities; increase individuals' personal development; improve an area's image; attract economic investment; they can help in the process of community development; and they can lead to training and employment.

The report states the Arts can contribute to: Personal Development • • • • • • • • • •

Increase people’s confidence and sense of self–worth Extended involvement in social activity Give people influence over how they are seen by others Stimulate interest and confidence in the arts Provide a forum to explore personal rights and responsibilities Contribute to the educational development of children Encourage adults to take up education and training opportunities Help build new skills and work experience Contribute to people’s employability Help people take up or develop careers in the arts

Social Cohesion • • • • • • • • •

Reduce isolation by helping people to make friends Develop community networks and sociability Promote tolerance and contribute to conflict resolution Provide a forum for intercultural understanding and friendship Help validate the contribution of a whole community Promote intellectual contact and co-operation Develop contact between the generations Help offenders and victims address issues of crime Provide a route to rehabilitation and integration for offenders

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Community Empowerment and Self Determination • • • • • • • • •

Build community organisational capacity Encourage local self-reliance and project management Help people extend control over their own lives Be a means of gaining insight into political and social ideas Facilitate effective public consultation and participation Help involve local people in the regeneration process Facilitate the development of partnership Build support for community projects Strengthen community co-operation and networking

Local Image and Identity • • • • • • • •

Develop pride in local traditions and cultures Help people feel a sense of belonging and involvement Create community traditions in new towns or neighbourhoods Involve residents in environmental improvements Provide reasons for people to develop community activities Improve perceptions of marginalised groups Help transform the image of public bodies Make people feel better about where they live

Imagination and Vision • • • • • • • • •

Help people develop their creativity Erode the distinction between consumer and creator Allow people to explore their values, meanings and dreams Enrich the practice of professionals in the public and voluntary sectors Transform the responsiveness of public service organisations Encourage people to accept risk positively Help community group raise their vision beyond the immediate Challenge conventional service delivery Raise expectations about what is possible and desirable.

Health and Wellbeing • • • • •

Have a positive impact on how people feel Be an effective means of health education Contribute to a more relaxed atmosphere in health centres Help improve the quality of life of people with poor health Provide a unique and deep source of enjoyment

(Scottish Executive - Central Research Unit - The role of Arts and Regeneration.) 10


“Through the development of more and sustainable arts and cultural activities in the area, quality of life, education, safety, employment, the environment, community identity, health and well-being will improve.� (Living Derwent consultation project brief.)


3. Consultation Derwent Community Team, in partnership with local residents and the Derby City Council Arts Development Team, commissioned a consultation to establish a strategy for the future development of the arts in Derwent. The commission was awarded to Hub Agency. Hub Agency is a Derby based organisation developing opportunity for social, organisational and personal change through the arts and broader creative industries. The core strengths of the organisation in relation to this commission are: • Over 30 years collective experience managing arts projects • The ability to work with diverse agendas and to respond to need • Contacts, networks and partnerships • An ability to work at both strategic and delivery levels • Broad knowledge of different sector agendas, policy and practice The consultation directly involved over 1,000 residents providing opportunities to say what they would like to see happen in the area as well as get involved in a variety of arts activities. At the same time organisations and projects based in Derwent were consulted to establish their current levels of involvement in arts activity and their development needs. Artists and arts organisations across Derby were also engaged in the consultation. The results of the consultation can be summed up in two statements: • There was limited arts and cultural activity in Derwent • There was widespread demand from local residents The outcome of the consultation was the development of a three year arts in regeneration programme called Living Derwent.

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"Quiet, committed community development work" (Derwent Community Team Theme Group Leader refering to Hub Agency.)

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project overview

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2. Making the case “Cultural projects have played an increasingly important role in British urban regeneration since the mid-1980’s.” The Art of Regeneration – Urban Renewal Through Cultural Activity (Comedia 1996).

PAT 10 Report An action team led by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) produced the PAT 10 report highlighting best practice in using arts, sport and leisure to engage people in poor neighbourhoods, particularly those who may feel most excluded, such as disaffected young people and people from ethnic minorities. Participation, and the provision of services to support participation, in arts and sport, can help address neigh"The central principle of the Living Derwent project was to produce borhood renewal by a sustainable infrastructure for arts and cultural development in the improving communiarea by forming strategic links with arts organisations in Derby and ties’ ‘perincreasing the capacity of local people and organisations to provide formance’ on the and participate in arts activities." four key indicators (Hub Agency 2007) of more 4


Section Summary

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1.

The Living Derwent project was developed in the context of Derwent Community Team objectives.

2.

A set of core aims and working principles were identified in the original project application.

3.

Hub Agency produced a strategic framework for the Living Derwent Project that split the work into 4 key areas of development; • Local Activity • Local Organisations • Arts Organisations • Artists/Arts Spaces Hub Agency also produced a strategic framework that reflected the need to build local capacity by changing individual and organisational roles from passive to active.

4.

All support offered by the Living Derwent project could be categorised into 4 stands: Funding, Project Management, Strategic Development, Personal & Professional Development


1. Derwent Commumity Team Objectives The Living Derwent project was developed in the context of the following Derwent Community Team objectives:

Improve Quality of Life • • •

Improve facilities for children, young people and their families Improve the quality and appearance of the natural and built environment Tackle racial disadvantage

Improve health and reduce inequalities in health • • •

Provision of enhanced support for children in their early years Increased levels of confidence and self-esteem through the promotion of good mental health services Promotion of quality health and social care services

Create a community of life long learning • •

Raise the education entertainment of pupils at all key stages Reduce the number of adults with low literacy and numeracy and the percentage of adults with no qualifications

Create a safer community • •

Reduce the numbers of young people involved in crime by 50% Reduce the fear of crime to the national average

Build the capacity of the local community • •

Support the community development approach to the whole programme Encourage social enterprise and develop a robust voluntary and community sector

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2. Living Derwent: Core aims and working principles The central principal of the Living Derwent project was to produce a sustainable infrastructure or arts and cultural development in the area by forming strategic links with arts organisations in Derby and increasing the capacity of local people and organisations to provide and participate in arts activities.

The core aims identified in the original project application:

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1

Increased opportunities for local residents to be involved in arts and cultural activities on a personal or professional basis.

2

Making local residents and organisations more aware of the diversity of arts and culture.

3

Making organisations working in the area aware of how the arts can be used to meet their agendas, how to commission artists and broker contacts with local arts organisations.

4

Increasing the capacity for local people and organisations to provide arts and cultural activities.

5

Strategic links with city-wide arts organisations and more presence in the area by these organisations.

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Increased access to arts funding for the area.

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The development of spaces for arts and cultural activity - artist studios, venues and performance/exhibition spaces.

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Creating opportunities for artists to work in the area.

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Developing Derwent as a model of good practice for arts and cultural regeneration work.


Wherever possible, local resources and labour were used: hiring local venues, employing local people, providing and accessing training and development opportunities for those people, and purchasing workshop materials and project resources from local businesses wherever possible.

Creating employment 2 posts were created within the project that were filled by local residents:

Activator - to assist with the management and evaluation of the project and to help promote the activities in the area

Administrator - assisting with all administrative aspects of the project Both posts were set up as Derby City Council employees providing all of the advantages of being employed by a Local Authority (employment rights, pension contributions, holiday and sickness entitlement, insurance, access to training and development opportunities).

Accessibility Support costs were included in the programme budget to allow for particular groups in the community to access activities and for those on low income or receiving benefits to be involved. This included paying for support costs such as interpreters, child care, transport costs ..etc. and offering subsidies. The project sought to ensure accessibility to information for all groups ensuring that information was widely available throughout the community. Wherever feasible the project used accessible venues for activities.

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3. Strategy Hub Agency identified two strategic frameworks that underpinned the work of the project:

Four key areas of work This provided the framework and starting points for development work. It was acknowledged that most of the development would work across more than one of the identified key areas.

Living Derwent - 4 key areas of work

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Passive to Active This strategy was based on the principal that in order to sustain an initiative or concept there is a need to take the recipients of the development work from a passive to active role. The table below details the broad passive and active roles:

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Example: You are working with a group of teachers to explore how drama can be used across their school curriculum. Assuming the school have had no experience of this type of work a logical first development stage would be to commission a drama practitioner to work with the teachers to plan and deliver a session for a particular curriculum area - e.g. History. The teachers would observe how it worked in practice and some of the techniques that were used. The teachers may be encouraged to get involved in the session either as fellow participants to their pupils or as co-deliverers guided by the drama practitioner. If the concept of cross-curricular drama is going to be sustainable in the school at some point they are going to have to organise and either commission or deliver the drama work.

Using the Passive/Active table to evaluate progress and sustainability The Passive/Active table can be used as a means of evaluating progress within a developmental programme. If you want the work to be sustainable you will need to see clear signs that the recipients are moving into the 'Active' areas that are required for the work to continue without the development input.

Using the Passive/Active table to identify capacity requirements Once you have identified the 'Active' roles required for sustainability they can be used to identify capacity needs. If the role is a delivery role skills related to delivery will need to be developed - e.g. art-form skills, planning and facilitating. If the sustainability relies more on commissioning skills and knowledge relating to identifying, briefing and managing artists will be required. Capacity can also relate to resources - time, money, people ..etc. Within the 'Active' status these resources should be provided or sourced by the recipients.

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4. Strands of support The support offered by the Living Derwent project could be categorised into four distinct strands: • Funding • Project management • Strategic development • Personal and professional development The table below provides examples of the types of interventions within each of these strands.

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Funding

o o o o o o

Providing full funding for work Contributing funding to pay for arts/creative input Assisting with writing funding bids Providing matched funding for funding applications Providing money for capacity building (i.e. not related to specific project or area of work) Providing money for feasibility studies

Project management

o o o o o o

Developing ideas for projects Sourcing, briefing, contracting and managing artists Budget management and finance Event management Negotiation between partners Managing projects for or in partnership with organisations

Strategic development

o o o o o

Helping organisations understand how the arts can help them deliver their aims Assisting writing an arts strategy - organisational development Strategic work across the City - networking, input into strategy forums Signposting Feasibility Studies

Personal & professional development

o o o o o o o

Increasing opportunities to access arts Developing personal skills Mentoring Facilitating professional development sessions Advice and guidance Signposting Networking


“Hub Agency produced a strategic framework for the Living Derwent Project that split the work into 4 key areas of development; Local Activity, Local Organisations, Arts Organisations and Artists/Arts Spaces. Hub Agency also produced a strategic framework that reflected the need to build local capacity by changing roles from passive to active”

2. Making the case

(Hub Agency 2007)

“Cultural projects have played an increasingly important role in British urban regeneration since the mid-1980’s.” The Art of Regeneration – Urban Renewal Through Cultural Activity (Comedia 1996).

PAT 10 Report An action team led by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) produced the PAT 10 report highlighting best practice in using arts, sport and leisure to engage people in poor neighbourhoods, particularly those who may feel most excluded, such as disaffected young people and people from ethnic minorities. Participation, and the provision of services to support participation, in arts and sport, can help address neighborhood renewal by improving communities’ ‘performance’ on the four key indicators of more jobs, less crime, better health and improved educational attainment. Key principles which help to exploit the potential of arts/sport in regenerating communities include: valuing diversity, embedding local control, supporting local commitment, promoting equitable partnerships, defining common objectives in relation to actual needs, working flexibly with change, securing sustainability, pursuing quality across the spectrum, connecting with the mainstream, The PAT has identified a number of area-based schemes which would particularly benefit from closer links with arts and sport. These are: European Social Fund and Regional Development 4


evaluation

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2. Making the case “Cultural projects have played an increasingly important role in British urban regeneration since the mid-1980’s.” The Art of Regeneration – Urban Renewal Through Cultural Activity (Comedia 1996).

PAT 10 Report An action team led by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) produced the PAT 10 report highlighting best practice in using arts, sport and leisure to engage people in poor neighbourhoods, particularly those who may feel most excluded, such as disaffected young people and people from ethnic minorities. Participation, and the provision of services to support participation, in arts and sport, can help address neighborhood renewal by improving communities’ ‘performance’ on the four key indicators of more jobs, less crime, better health and improved educational attainment. Key principles which help to exploit the potential of arts/sport in regenerating

"A lone worker working in isolation has a limited capability; however, a lone worker who associates with a whole team of people and organisations in order to deliver has infinate possibilities for development" (Arts Organisation Development Worker 2007) 4


Section Summary

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Resources and timescales Overview of support Case Studies Impact against the project aims Challenges and constraints Lessons learnt

The • • • •

evidence for the evaluation has been gathered in a variety of ways including: Monitoring - New Deal Quarterly returns, artist sessional data. Interviews - Derby University has been employed to gather data The activator role within the project had responsibility for collecting data and evaluation Documentary evidence - photography and creative products e.g. textile banners, documentaries, etc


1. Resources and timescales Living Derwent was a three year project that took place between September 2003 and October 2006. Derwent Community Team provided £310,000 of funding towards the project and an additional £80,000 was brought in over it’s duration. Derby City Council was named as the accountable body and committed £30,000 of in-kind funding to provide overall project and financial management. The project budget paid for Hub Agency’s management and development time, the project running costs, the local resident posts and a programme budget. Over the lifetime of Living Derwent the project commissioned over 800 workshops and events that were delivered by over 50 different creative organisations and practitioners. The delivery directly benefited over 70 different existing community groups and organisations through projects and activity at events. In addition Living Derwent organised a further 20 stand-alone projects and events as well as establishing new arts focused community groups. The provision varied from 2 hour workshops and whole day events to long term programmes of work over a period of one or two years. The project also supported groups by paying for venue costs, insurance for local practioners, equipment, organisational development, providing matched funding and commissioning feasibility studies.

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2. Overview of support The previous section outlined four distinct strands of support offered by the Living Derwent project and gave broad examples of the types of interventions made. Detailed here are a range of interventions that took place to demonstrate the scope of the project and how these worked in practice.

Provided £15,000 matched funding for Revive Grants for the Arts bid

Provided strategic guidance and funding for a resident to set up a local arts organisation (Pear Tree Arts - Derwent)

Sourced and managed artists for a young people’s holiday activity programme Commissioned graphic designers to produce logos and marketing material for local groups

Paid for local people to attend training

Organised mentoring for local people

Set up and funded Craft and Line Dancing clubs

Provided a budget for a number of local arts organisations to develop work in the area, these included Q Arts, Derby Dance Centre, Derby Playhouse, Fifth Word and Dartworks

Organised and paid for trips to cultural venues for local residents

Paid for room hire for emerging local arts groups 28

Paid for child care, access support costs and transport for local residents Supported Revive Healthy Living centre to write a successful £60,000 Arts Council Grants for the Arts funding bid


Commissioned an oral historian to produce a book with local residents

Supported Stepping Stones to write an Arts Council Grants for the Arts funding bid

Project managed and obtained additional funding from the British Film Council to make a film with young people which won 2 national awards

Organised and paid for a multi arts event at a local school with the aim of broadening people’s experience of the arts

Worked in partnership with a local school to develop it’s arts centre funded through the Spaces for Sports and Arts initiative

Gave money to local arts groups to provide stability

Commissioned and funded artists for various projects in local schools, youth club, Youth Inclusion Project, Live at Home Scheme, Revive Healthy Living Centre

Paid for room hire and tickets for performances by local amateur dramatics company

Provided funding, project management and commissioned artists to re-established a local carnival procession

Project managed, commissioned and funded arts activities at a number of local events

Paid for the repair of a kiln at a local school

Purchased equipment for the project for the use of the local community - digital camera, projector and screen, DVD player, video camera and mini PA

Commissioned and funded feasibility studies for dance and music development in the area

Facilitated strategic arts development sessions for local groups

Commissioned and provided funding for participatory projects that produced public art - murals, banners and paintings

Paid for insurance for local people delivering arts activity

Paid for the renovation of a disused building to use as the project base

Founder members of Arts in Regeneration group that included Derby Arts Organisations and Derby City Council

Assisted Revive Healthy Living Centre to develop an arts strategy - included working with Derby City Council Arts team and providing funding for a freelance consultant 29


3. Case Studies We have selected six case studies to demonstrate how the support of the Living Derwent project instigated a shift from a passive to active role resulting in localised commissioning, organising and delivery of arts and cultural activity.

CASE STUDY 1 Tweegs Puppet Group and Kerry Cygan Background This project grew from the ambition of a local person and was a partnership between Living Derwent and Best Beginnings, a local family support agency. A local person had the idea that she wanted to raise the awareness of certain issues in the local community through puppet shows to young people. Best Beginnings then approached Living Derwent for advice on how to develop the project. From the initial meeting certain developmental needs were identified relating to her puppet making skills, story telling and script writing. It was also identified that she would benefit from mentoring and a team of people to work with.

Work undertaken An agreement was made to run a 1 day taster session to recruit local people to explore the feasibility of running a training course in puppet making and performance skills. 12 local people took part in a day long taster workshop, facilitated by artist’s collective Red Ted. From this a core group of 3 people were identified to go through the training and mentoring programme that would culminate in the formation of a puppet performance group (Tweegs) that would perform to the local community. In addition to the training programme and mentoring Living Derwent also assisted with business development that included advice on marketing, legal status and funding opportunities as well as promoting the group to organisations in the area. Tweegs gave several performances and ran a number of workshops but due to a number of factors including changes in personal circumstances the group decided to disband. One member of the group decided to continue delivering arts workshops on her own. Living Derwent provided ongoing support by signposting her to an arts worker training course, assisting her with her application (CV and interview) and paying for course fees. In addition to this the project paid for public liability insurance, sourced and employed a graphic designer to produce marketing material and provided access to office resources.

Key impacts and the future The support to the local people involved in the puppet group through the training programme and the mentoring provided by Hub Agency and the artist allowed those people developed their interest and skills. The package of support allowed them to develop their personal interest in the arts and explore the potential. The support led to a local arts organisation being set up and despite this organisation no longer being in existence one member of the group is now a practicing arts worker. 30


‘This was a dream come true for me, Living Derwent offered the opportunity for this dream to be achieved’ Local Resident Tweegs member

‘I gained confidence and a chance for a career change’ Local Resident and group member

‘I had always wanted to do it.....I felt valued, someone had listened to me. Now I’m more confident and will give things a go’ Local Resident Tweegs member

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CASE STUDY 2 Local arts clubs and groups Background Through the initial consultation with residents it was clear that there was a demand for regular arts activity in the form of clubs and groups. In the first year Living Derwent set up and funded a craft club and a line dancing club. The main intention was to provide regular activity reacting to particular demands from the community. These clubs were well attended but ultimately unsustainable due to the cost of the artists commissioned to facilitate them, however, they played an important role in paving the way for future clubs and groups.

Work undertaken Here are a few examples of how Living Derwent supported the development of sustainable arts groups in the area:

Derwent Art Group

A local resident who attended a Living Derwent event expressed interest in setting up an arts group in the area. Living Derwent helped coordinate and market the group and paid for room hire. The group became constituted and sustainable through collecting subs from members. For future stability Living Derwent also gave the group a cash lump sum to provide them with reserve funds. To help raise the local profile of the group a project was also funded with artist Lyne Hollingsworth resulting in an exhibition and the production of artworks that are permanently displayed in a variety of public buildings in the area. In the future the group will be working with the artist to create artwork for a major new shopping centre that is being built in the city.

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‘if we had been told this was going to happen years ago we would never have thought it possible’

‘It (art) makes people’s lives better, it lifts you when you walk into a room and it sets the mood.’

Art Group Member

Art Group Member

‘The art group will keep going as it is constituted and they want it to work, they now have the confidence to manage the group themselves’ Artist


Derwent Tai Chi Group A local resident who had been involved with the line dancing club wanted to set up Tai Chi group. Living Derwent funded room hire, helped with development and paid for insurance and promotional materials including the production of a logo. The club went from strength to strength ending up with a membership of over 100 people. Living Derwent provided funding for training a local resident to support running the group.

‘A big thanks to Living Derwent for everything you have done for me - you have always been there! You have empowered me to do my own thing as I wanted to remain independent.’ Tai Chi Group Leader

Derwent Youth Theatre Living Derwent became aware that an amateur dramatics society, The Locko Players, based in a neighbouring ward was looking for a temporary performance venue. Living Derwent negotiated and funded the use of a local church hall for two performances, funded marketing materials and provided discounted tickets for local residents. At the end of the temporary residency one of the members of the society set up a drama club a local school. Living Derwent paid for the room hire for two years to enable the group could establish itself.

Derwent into Gardening The Derwent into Gardening group was established by a local resident. The group had a strong interest in the arts. Living Derwent facilitated initial development sessions to help establish the group and subsequently provided funding for the production of a mural at the group’s community garden, paid for artists at events and marketing material for the group including a logo.

Revive Healthy Living Centre The Revive Healthy Living Centre arts strategy incorporates the development of regular arts activity. This includes an ambition to develop a ‘creative crèche’ specialising in providing arts based activities. The building has a variety of rooms suitable for arts activity including wet and dry areas and two rooms with sprung floors.

Derwent Story-telling Group Living Derwent provided matched funding for a successful application submitted by Derbybased story teller Martin King, a member of Flying Donkeys. The funding will enable local young people to attend a regular group centred on story-telling and utilising other arts based activities.

Key impacts and the future The Living Derwent project provided a safety net to allow groups to become established by committing staff time, help, advice and support, funding, input from creative professionals, marketing and resources. There are now 5 new groups continuing to run in the area that provide diverse opportunities for local people. 33


CASE STUDY 3 Carnival Background The Carnival on Chaddesden Park is an annual event that is funded and coordinated by Derby City Council’s Arts Team. Unfortunately the carnival procession that had historically started from Roe Farm Community Centre (a venue in the heart of the regeneration area) had ceased to run. This was due to a number of factors including; • A key individual no longer participating in the organisation of the parade • Insurance and health and safety issues • Teachers being unable/unwilling to work at weekends • Lack of funding • Limited contacts with individuals and artists able to make processional puppets • The capacity of Derby City Council to organise the procession.

Work undertaken As part of the strategy for engaging local people and increasing opportunities for individuals to participate in arts and cultural activity Living Derwent made a decision to try to re-establish the carnival parade as a local calendar event. Living Derwent committed resources in the form of development time and a ring-fenced a budget over 4 years. Through negotiation with the carnival planning committee Living Derwent instigated the following. • Provided funding for workshops to produce processional objects, materials, workshops on the day of the carnival, transport costs, publicity and mentoring for local artists • Identified and recruited local groups to participate in the procession • Worked in partnership with Derby City Council events and projects coordinator to plan and develop this strand of work • Commissioned an artists collective to deliver and assist in the project management of the parade • Introduced a competitive element for the best home made costume • Organised and paid for mentoring and training of a local person • Worked with groups and projects in the area to embed the organisation of the parade in their annual programme • Developed a strategy to try to ensure that the parade continues in future years • Developed and managed a training and development programme at a local organisation so that they could take over the organisation of the carnival parade • Developed artistic and organisational skills in local people • Employed a fundraiser to source funding and write applications to continue the parade until 2008. The application was successful. • Negotiated with Pear Tree Arts to take over the organisation of the carnival parade

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Key impacts and the future The project re-instigated the Chaddesden Carnival Parade. Through working with a number of partners, providing funding and management a series of workshops and events took place that culminated in the carnival procession. The last 4 years of activity have re-established the carnival procession as a regular calendar event. Employing a fund raiser to write a successful Grants for the Arts bid for the next 2 years activity, work with the Derby City Council Events and Projects team, increasing the capacity of local people and organisations to produce processional puppets as well as the involvement of Pear Tree Arts have put in place a package that gives the Carnival parade the best possible chance of continuing in the long term.

“Local residents can get involved on lots of different levels - from making enormous processional puppets to decorating a pram. The important thing is that they take part.” Artist

“This area needs things like this so that people don’t think it’s all bad” Local resident


CASE STUDY 4 Pear Tree Arts - Derwent Background Over the life time of the project it became clear that there was a lack of expertise and capacity within the community and local organisations to continue developing the diverse range of work that Living Derwent had established. During the project several organisations had been identified as partners who could potentially fulfil that role but unfortunately issues such as lack of capacity, staff absence and operational demands from the organisation including providing face to face services, and concentrating on setting up a new build presented barriers that proved insurmountable. The opportunity that was presented through Pear Tree Arts removed many of these barriers as the focus of the organisation is to provide arts and cultural activities. Living Derwent provided funding to Pear Tree Arts to give the organisation the capacity to source project funding and to develop relationships in the area. Pear Tree Arts is a community arts organisation based in the Normanton area of Derby. Living Derwent had been working with a development worker for the Spaces for Sports and Arts initiative and local arts organisation Fifth Word who were both involved with Pear Tree Arts. Living Derwent met with Pear Tree Arts as part of a process of investigating the feasibility of setting up a similar organisation in Derwent. A Derwent resident was also involved with Pear Tree Arts in a voluntary capacity.

Work undertaken The local resident asked how she could get involved in the arts in Derwent; she had heard of the Living Derwent project but didn’t know what it did. After spending some time with the project the resident asked about the possibility of her setting up an arts organisation in Derwent modelled on Pear Tree Arts. The Living Derwent project facilitated initial visioning sessions and then provided funding to commission the local resident to carry out further feasibility and development work. As well as ongoing strategic advice the project also provided use of the office, commissioned and funded local design organisation 23 Skidoo to produce promotional material for the new organisation and provided a £5,000 budget to aid future development. Hub Agency will maintain links with the organisation in a mentoring and advisory capacity.

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Key impacts and the future The outcome of this development work was the affiliation of Pear Tree Arts Derwent with Pear Tree Arts Normanton. The work with Pear Tree Arts is one example of how the Living Derwent project has increased the Derwent Community’s access to Derby Arts Organisations. Through the provision of funding, support and resources Living Derwent helped Pear Tree Arts to develop a vision, strategic direction and partnerships.

‘I feel very grateful to Living Derwent for giving me this opportunity and believing I had the capacity, to take this work forward. They put their faith in the project and me to explore what local people want the future of arts to be. They have given me the opportunity to help make a difference, to develop things in my community with my community.’ Local Resident (Pear Tree Arts Co-ordinator)

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CASE STUDY 5 Revive Healthy Living Centre Background The Revive Healthy Living Centre programme is a £5 million Central and Greater Derby Primary Care Trusts flagship health project for the Breadsall, Chaddesden and Derwent area of Derby. It is a community centred and community driven programme focussed around the development and construction of a new centre, a new way of delivering services, developing social enterprise and promoting health through community projects. Living Derwent recognised the potential for Revive to be an important cultural venue in Derwent and across Derby from the beginning of the programme and acknowledged that the focus of the organisation would be in developing the new building and that any partnership work needed to be in preparation for future activity. Consultation with local residents throughout the development stages of the Revive programme highlighted a strong desire for arts activity. This vision has stayed throughout the development of Revive and as a consequence the new building has a wealth of arts facilities including: • 3 artist studios • dedicated wall and floor exhibition space • workshop areas (including 2 with sprung floors, performance areas and rooms suitable for both ‘wet’ and ‘dry’ arts activities) • a photography dark room • an outdoor mini amphitheatre • a children’s development facility that will specialise in creative work with children and families

Work undertaken Initially Living Derwent’s relationship with Revive centred on assisting with the community consultation for the new building and services. This included: • Managing and funding a project making large fabric wall hangings with local residents exploring health issues • Developing and funding a programme of work with young people in the area in partnership with a development worker employed by Revive • Funding, project managing and facilitating a project exploring building design with local residents which this fed into the brief for the architect designing the new building. The project was called The Good, The Bad & The Ugly. As the partnership developed, the nature of Living Derwent’s work focused more on assisting with the strategic development of the arts within Revive. The beginning of this strategic

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work was the establishment of an Arts and Health focus group with Derby City Council Arts Development Team and two of the larger arts organisations in Derby; Q Arts and Derby Dance Centre, who were both interested in developing long term strategic partnerships with Revive. Living Derwent provided a project budget for Q Arts and Derby Dance Centre to develop work in Derwent, some of which was used to fund community health work. The project also provided funding for an external consultant to facilitate the visioning process and then assisted with writing a number of funding applications. A £60,000 application to Arts Council England Grants for the Arts scheme was successful for which Living Derwent contributed an additional £15,000 matched funding.

Key impacts and the future Living Derwent then facilitated a process of partnering the members of the Arts and Health Focus Group with Revive to develop a long term vision and strategy for arts development in Revive. This funding will pay for dedicated development worker time and a programme budget for a one year period which incorporates the crucial time when the Revive building opens to the public in April 2007. Two further funding applications have been submitted for a three year, £300,000 programme of work. Revive now has funding for a development worker and a programme budget. The development worker is employed through Q arts and this brings added value in terms of expertise, resources and increased connections across the City. Living Derwent has also commissioned other arts organisations and artists to work with Revive, many of who are now being commissioned by Revive directly.

‘The PCT brought the health and well being perspective to the project, but working with partners from an Arts background really added depth to it and helped me see the potential of the roles the future project workers would have.’ Primary Care Trust - manager

‘The Arts-Revive bid is a legacy of Living Derwent that Revive can develop....., we hope to establish a partnership that will be sustainable and build on activity and developments that Living Derwent was able to get started.’ Primary Care Trust - manager


CASE STUDY 6 da Vinci College Background At the beginning of the Living Derwent project the school was under Special Measures and this had a knock-on effect on the capacity and ability to engage in new projects and initiatives. The school has recently come out of special measures and has moved to a Private Finance Initiative new build. Living Derwent has run numerous projects for, and in partnership with, da Vinci College including those outlined below.

Work undertaken Living Derwent secured funding from First Light, the junior wing of the British Film Council, to work with a group of young people from the area to produce a film that in some way reflected their aspirations. Through work with da Vinci College’s Vocational Coordinator a group of young people at risk of exclusion and attending a programme delivered by the Derwent Youth Inclusion Project were recruited. Living Derwent then sourced a director, script developer and crew to work with the young people to take them through the process of film making, teach them new skills and gain accreditation. On its completion the film won 2 National awards and was screened at the UCI in Derby. The project has also been heavily involved in the development of enterprise work at the school. Initially this work was part of the Young Enterprise initiative where groups of young people develop a product and enter into a national competition. da Vinci came up with the concept of selling book marks with the aim of raising awareness of issues relating to literacy. Living Derwent suggested that this presented the opportunity for the young people to learn new skills. We sourced and paid for a graphic designer to work with the young people and funded the print costs. From this project it became clear that there was the potential to develop similar initiatives within the school and Living Derwent paid for the purchase of a specialised printer. Due to the interest in Enterprise and the positive relationships that had been fostered through previous projects and the potential from the school being part of the Creative Partnerships initiative Living Derwent ring fenced a budget and brought together a group of organisations to develop an events management company, run by young people, within the school. Partners’ agendas include; the14-19 Educational Reform and the Creative and Media Diploma, links to 40


curriculum Enterprise work – building on previous work in the school, equipping young people with the skills for work in the creative industries, the extended schools agenda, use of School building, Show Casing for local talent and crime prevention. A training package has now been agreed with Creative Partnerships providing £15,000. The training package included artistic development, events management, and graphic design and will contribute to the development of key skills.

Key impacts and the future The work with da Vinci College was intended to increase the school’s understanding and experience of interventions through arts and cultural activity. The numerous projects and interventions with the school led to excellent working relationships which have in turn led to larger initiatives and an increased commitment from the school. Over the lifetime of the project feed back from parents and students as well as observations from teachers’ endorsed the argument that creative activities are a good platform for engaging students and provide a vehicle for achieving positive change. This was particularly true in the work with the school with the young people at risk of exclusion where parents and staff explicitly stated that participation in projects had had a positive impact on the young people both in educational environments and at home. The school now has established relationships with a number of arts organisations across the City. Though this work the school is now aware of who can provide arts and creative activities, how much those activities cost and the needs of those organisations in terms of space, support staff, facilities, etc. Hub Agency will continue to develop the relationship with da Vinci and source opportunities for future project work.

'Strong dialogue with convincing central performances' Amma Asante Writer and Director of Bafta winning film A way of Life (commenting on the first light film)

‘From start to finish the whole experience has been so positive. It has helped the young people not only in terms of learning how to make films but has also had an impact on their self confidence and life skills. It has given them memories that will last a lifetime.’ Project Manager Derwent Youth Inclusion Project

‘Pupils wrote the script, did the filming, acting, everything. The young people gained so much in confidence and skills through the process....Parents came to the screening of the film at the UCI cinema. This project did a lot to improve relations between parents and the school.’ School vocational opportunities worker 41


4. Impact against 4 areas of work In this section we have examined the extent to which the project addressed the four key areas of work outlined in the original strategy. The project has contributed to the cultural change in Derwent. Views and opinions of those consulted endorsed the premise that Derwent is now a place that has developed and is developing a culturally active community and is no longer seen as a place that this does not happen.

Increasing the involvement of Derwent residents in arts and cultural activities Living Derwent was responsible for or helped create opportunities for local people including the following; • Five ongoing clubs in the area • The Chaddesden Carnival parade • Local arts festival • Access to City Centre arts venues • Access to National venues • 3 trained artist deliverers • City Centre art exhibition • Participation in the Westfield art project • Numerous workshops and events The project has supported groups and individuals to explore how they can participate in arts and cultural activity. The project provided a package of support that allowed individuals, groups and initiatives to develop to a point that they could become self sustaining or move in a new direction. Living Derwent has increased the number and diversity of opportunities that people in the Derwent area can access on a personal and professional basis, and as an audience member or practicing artist.

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Assisting organisations working in the Derwent area to explore the role the arts could play in delivering their agendas Living Derwent was responsible for or helped organisations in the area develop their understanding of the arts in the following areas; • Developing arts spaces • Working in partnership with other Derwent Community Team projects • Establishing a local arts organisation • Staff development to commission and deliver activity • Understanding the commissioning process • The requirements of creative activity • The value of arts and cultural activity in achieving their agendas • Providing participatory activity at events • Advice and guidance • Funding and resources The project has supported over 70 different groups and events by formulating and implementing creative interventions that served the needs of those organisations. Through a developmental process Living Derwent has assisted organisations in the area to develop from passive recipients of arts and cultural activity to active providers.

Developing strategies with arts and cultural organisations working in Derby to work in the Derwent area and improving access to City centre arts and cultural facilities Living Derwent was responsible for or helped established networks and relationships including; • Ongoing links with regularly funded organisations such as Q arts and the Derby Dance Centre • Links with smaller East Midland based arts organisations such as On the One and 23 Skidoo Most of these relationships are ongoing and are continuing to provide opportunities. Through a combination of project funding and support the project has facilitated opportunities for organisations to explore how they can work with each other and the potential outcomes of collaborations.

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Encouraging artists to work in the Derwent area and developing venues for arts and cultural activities Living Derwent was responsible for or helped bring more artists into the area and developed venues in the following areas including; • Supporting work on venue design (including contracting consultants) • Working with emerging and established artists and creative practitioners to develop projects and working relationships in the area • Business development support • Access to equipment • Public art commissions • Reallocating budget that was ring-fenced for rent to refurbish part of the Blue Boy pub for use as project office As with the previous areas of work the project funding and support offered has facilitated opportunities for individuals to explore how they can work with organisations and the potential outcomes of collaborations. Work to develop venues has been designed to respond specifically to the needs of the organisation and has generally taken the form of advice and guidance.

Legacy summary In terms of long-term legacy listed below are the initiatives that are likely to have the most impact; • • • • • • • • • • • •

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Strategic work with Revive and the Grants for the Arts da Vinci Colleges Enterprise work Public art in venues across Derwent produced by the Derwent Art group The Clubs and groups that have been established and continue to thrive The refurbishment of part of the Blue Boy as offices The ‘Life Journey’s’ Book The ‘Loneliness of the Spot Kick Penalty Taker’ Film Re-establishing the Chaddesden Carnival procession Strategic links with city based organisations Pear Tree Arts, Derwent Training local artists Improved networks and relationships with creative industry organisations


“Living Derwent has raised expectations of the community� (Artist)


4. Impact against core aims This section of the report analyses the impact of the project against the core aims identified in the original project application. These are detailed in the context section at the beginning of this report.

1 - Increased opportunities for local residents to be involved in arts and cultural activities on a personal and professional basis As stated previously over the lifetime of Living Derwent the project commissioned over 800 workshops and events that were delivered by over 50 different creative organisations and practitioners. The delivery directly benefited over 70 different existing community groups through projects and activity at events. In addition Living Derwent organised a further 20 stand-alone projects and events as well as establishing new arts focused community groups.

2 - Making local residents and organisations more aware of diversity of arts and culture The • • • • • • • • • • •

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project provided opportunities in the following areas; Visual art 2 and 3 D Music Film and video Creative writing and story telling Dance and creative movement Interior Design Graphic design Drama Craft New media Carnival


3 - Making organisations working in the area aware of how arts can be used to meet their agendas, how to commission artists and brokering contacts with local arts organisations. Through a developmental process, Living Derwent developed local groups, organisations and individuals’ ability to commission arts activity. Depending on their understanding of the issues faced when organising arts activity and the capacity of the organisations worked with, the project provided the following types of support including; • Funding • Establishing relationships with arts organisations and practioners • Raising awareness of issues such as child protection and health and safety • Advice on how to contract creative professionals and rates of pay • Requirements from the artist in terms of support required • Suitable space Groups and organisations in the area are now sourcing funding and commissioning artists and creative professionals and there is a raised awareness of how the Arts can be used to address their agendas and experience of how it works in practice.

4 - Increasing the capacity of local people and organisations to provide arts and cultural activity There are a number of examples of how the project has increased the capacity of the local groups and individuals to provide arts activity. These included; Revive, Pear Tree Arts, Local artists, Puppet group, Carnival, Tai Chi, Art Group. The support varied and included; advice and guidance, funding (for insurance, room hire, equipment, branding and logo development, trips, conference fees, start-up costs, consultancy and development costs, transport, child care and other support costs, advertising, materials), use of resources and equipment. While the Living Derwent project cannot take sole credit for the sustainability of these groups interviews with residents involved leave no doubt that the project has contributed to their sustainability.

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5 - Strategic links with city-wide arts organisations and more presence in area by these organisations Derby City Council was the accountable body for the project and regular meetings with the project manager and work with other members of the Arts Team ensured that strong links with the council were forged and sustained. Living Derwent ring-fenced part of the project budget to allow Regularly Funded Organisations (RFO’s) working in the arts to develop relationships with local organisations and develop their audience in the area. The 3 RFO’s the project funded approached the development in very different ways; • Q Arts; focused on developing a relationship with Revive Healthy Living Centre. As stated in the case-study, Q Arts now has a worker based at Revive, the building has been designed with arts and cultural activity in mind. • Derby Dance Centre; focused on developing relationships and awareness of dance. Groups in the area are now directly commissioning the Dance Centre to provide activity. • Derby Playhouse; focused on audience development through its Hot Tickets scheme which a large number of people in the area accessed. Pear Tree Arts, 23 Skidoo, Fifth Word Theatre, Dartworks, Flying Donkeys, Red Ted, and On the One (all Derby based Arts organisations) now have continuing relationships in the area. The project supported them in various ways to develop and promote their practice and networks in the area including; commissioning work, funding feasibility studies, distributing advertising material, promoting their work at meetings and events, negotiation with local organisations, business planning and development, advice and guidance.

6 - Increased access to arts funding for the area Although the Living Derwent project, for New Deal for Communities monitoring purposes, only brought a limited amount of funding to the area directly into the project it was responsible for bringing money into other organisations and initiatives. The project worked with Q Arts to write the Arts Council Revive bid, negotiated with Derby Playhouse to bring the Hot Ticket scheme to the Derwent Area, sourced matched funding from Creative Partnerships for the Enterprise project at da Vinci College, provided matched funding for a the Flying Donkeys to set up a story telling group in the area and employed a fundraiser to write a successful bid to the Arts Council on behalf of Pear Tree Arts. Living Derwent brought in money from First Light, Derwent Holiday activities programme and Architecture week. Value was also added to the project through matched funding and resources that organisations brought into the area. In kind contributions from Derby City Council, Derby Dance Centre and Q Arts significantly added value to the whole project. Hub Agency is still looking for opportunities to bring funding to the Derwent area and to continue the work. There is currently a bid to Media Box for £80,000 being assessed that if successful will provide the opportunity to continue the film work from previous years. 48


7 - Development of spaces for arts and cultural activity - artists’ studios, venues and performance/exhibition spaces The project was involved in the development of spaces for workshops, performances and exhibitions. The most intensive example of this was the work with Revive where in addition to the advice from the project an external consultant was bought in. Other examples include; advice and guidance for new builds, commissioning artwork for temporary and permanent exhibitions, organising exhibitions and events, funding equipment and equipment repair. The project saw the opportunity to add value to the project by renovating rooms for use as a project base at the Blue Boy Pub (run by Derwent Delivers, a social enterprise associated with Derwent Community Team) rather than paying rent. The project provided funding to renovate the annex in return for rent free accommodation for the duration of the project. The space is now being used by another Derwent Community Team project and has the potential to generate more income for Derwent Delivers once the regeneration project has finished.

8 - Creating opportunities for artists to work in the area Living Derwent encouraged artists to work in the area in a number ways. As well as directly funding and commissioning work, the project sign-posted local organisations who were looking for creative practitioners. The project was also proactive in promoting groups in the area to city based arts organisations, some of whom had project funding in place. By providing funding and support for development, consultancy, training and advertising, the project help both emerging and established organisations to ascertain the demand for their work in the area, develop networks, create business plans and develop practice within a regeneration setting.

9 - Developing Derwent as a model of good practice for arts and cultural regeneration work Living Derwent has promoted Derwent in the following ways; producing the final report, producing models of ways of working, setting up the Arts in Health development group, producing an award winning short film, City centre exhibitions, taking part in National Initiatives, presentations to organisations such as the Arts Council, enterprise work and developing links with the local authority.

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5. Challenges and constraints There are a number of issues that arise from working on an arts and cultural regeneration project. Some of these are specific to Derwent while others are related to delivering regeneration through the New Deal for Community’s scheme, working in the arts and cultural field and some are related to the practice and strategic approach of the Living Derwent project. The list below identifies some of the issues faced.

1. There is often a lack of capacity in organisations to commission, manage, and deliver arts and cultural activity. The demands placed on organisations, particularly those associated with the time limited regeneration projects, to deliver their aims and objectives meant that many organisations had limited or no capacity to take on extra work.

2. Among some groups, individuals and members of the Derwent Community Team, arts and cultural activities were seen as a ‘nice thing to do’ rather than an essential and useful tool for regeneration. The project would have been more successful if it had been part of a central integrated strategy rather than a separate initiative. Valuable time was spent negotiating and trying to convince partners to engage with the project.

3. The project tried to establish a steering group but was unable to do this for a number of factors including; • There were a small number of people in the area with the skills and knowledge to influence the delivery of the project and that generally these people had already committed themselves to other groups and committees. • There are issues around placing unpaid local people in positions of responsibility, these include liability, capacity, etc • The project needed to be clearer in it’s communication of the purpose of the group • People who were originally involved in the development group tended to be there for a single agenda, eg. they want more drama in the area or an arts centre and as such were not interested in other developmental issues

4. The 3 year time scale of the project was not long enough to achieve cultural change. It was never the intention to try to achieve this and the project should have been explicit that the intention was to begin the process of putting in place the foundations for sustainable arts and cultural activity in the area.

5. There was limited capacity within the Living Derwent team. The project could not respond to all the demands and opportunities in the area and possibilities generated by the diversity of arts and cultural provision. The project suffered by trying to be ‘all things to all men’. 50


6. Some local organisations believed that arts provision should be offered ‘on a plate’, free or cheap and organised by external organisations. The developmental process of initially organising and commissioning work that Living Derwent employed may have reinforced this view. Some organisations in the area saw Living Derwent as the solution to providing arts and cultural activity and not the development programme that it was intended to be.

7. In some cases there was a lack of understanding of how to establish arts and cultural activity. Some organisations believed that there was a formula for developing activity and wanted to replicate projects and initiatives from other areas without acknowledging the uniqueness of the Derwent area.

8. There was a view among some organisations and funding streams that as Derwent was receiving regeneration funding the area was catered for. This along with the funding available from the Derwent Community Team led to groups from the area not actively seeking funding from elsewhere.

9. The Living Derwent project community development strategy was two pronged, firstly to work through the activator role employed by the project and secondly through the Derwent Community Teams Community Outreach Officers. The complexity of community development and the relationships between Living Derwent, the activator and the community outreach team should have been given more consideration.

10. In some cases members of the community that engaged with Derwent Community Team suffered from ‘initiative overload’ as they were offered so many opportunities from different organisations.

11. Conversations with participants revealed that the opportunities and demands placed on them often left people with little time to become more heavily involved in particular projects. Another effect was that there was often high uptake in activity initially as people tried out new activities and group sizes decreased as participants moved on to other activities.

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6. Lessons learned and areas for development 1. The communication of the project should have been more effective. Many individuals and organisations in the area were unaware of the extent and breadth of the programme of work. Although Living Derwent sought opportunities to publicise its work through the local press, Derwent Together magazine, etc this only promoted a small proportion of the work actually undertaken.

2. Over the lifetime of the project there were changes in the project direction and approach. More effort to communicate the intention of the work and changes in thinking would have increased the understanding of why Living Derwent was supporting particular strands of work.

3. The importance of being explicit with project partners and participants was often over looked. The time and attention needed to establish the aims and objectives of the piece of work and set up partnership agreements, stating expectations, input required, resources needed and evaluation and monitoring requirements should not be underestimated.

4. Although the project was designed to be strategic and develop arts practice in the area, more emphasis should have been placed on community development. In hind-sight the project should have taken more time to establish where a community development worker would be best placed. Options such as placing a dedicated arts community development worker based in the Community Outreach Team and employing an experienced worker, who could then be shadowed by a local person, needed to be considered to insure that the project had maximum impact.

5. The project needed to define a role for the Steering Group. The group was established to develop the bid to Derwent Community Team for an Arts Project. Once the project managers were in place it would have been useful to redefine the role of the group. Although there was a process that tried to establish what the role and the capacity of members was to lead on and develop ideas, this was in the context of the already existing group and it might have been better to pose the question ‘How can local people promote arts and cultural activity in the area?’

6. In trying to respond to demands and opportunities, Living Derwent may have tried to cover too much ground. It was always the intention to work with large numbers of groups and individuals but if the project had worked more intensively with fewer groups and individuals this may have raised the platform for arts development in the area higher than was actually achieved.

7. Some projects and initiatives should have been reviewed and stopped sooner than they were. Some strands of work drained resources from other areas of project delivery and this combined with analysing the chance of sustainability beyond the life of the Living Derwent project should have led to ending of some strands of work. 52


“Living Derwent has has put Derwent on the map; it works inclusively and has opened up new avenues for people� (Artist)

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Studio 3.3 - Banks’ Mill - 71 Bridge Street - Derby - DE1 3LB 01332 299 778 - www.hubagency.com - contact@hubagency.com

Design By: www.23skidooltd.com

Living Derwent report  

Final report for the Living Derwent arts in regeneraton project managed by Hub Agency. The project was part of teh New Deal for Communities...

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