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Plate 3.9 Before cleaning. Note sharpness of stone detail.

Plate 3.10 After cleaning. Loss of sharp detailing is a p p

Staining Staining arises from a variety of different causes and can be aesthetically detrimental to the appearance of cleaned buildings. Water stains in particular are often partly hidden by soiling and only become noticeable when the building is cleaned. Often, careful examination of the soiled facade of a building will reveal where underlying staining is already present. Some indication of the likely visual end result, in terms of staining, can sometimesbe made prior to cleaning (Plate 3.11). In some cases stonecleaning may reveal the extent and cause of staining and stone decay and allow for repairs to be more easily made. Much of the staining (and stone decay) revealed by stonecleaning is the result of poor building maintenance and neglect of guttering and downpipes. Decisions about the acceptability, and what, if anything, can or should be done to ameliorate the detrimental aesthetic effects of any revealed staining, needs to be considered prior to any cleaning. Orange staining, particularly on sandstone buildings, indicates the presence of iron oxides. As indicated in Chapter 2 this staining can result from natural processes occurring within the stone or be the result of chemical stonecleaning. As with water staining, stonecleaning tends to make iron staining from whatever cause more noticeable (Plate 3.12 & 3.13).

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Guide for Practitioners - Stonecleaning PLU 7545  

The original practitioners guide based on stonecleaning research includes background on sandstone characteristics, the effects of soiling ag...

Guide for Practitioners - Stonecleaning PLU 7545  

The original practitioners guide based on stonecleaning research includes background on sandstone characteristics, the effects of soiling ag...

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