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in the studio

Hostel | Detroit Pipe All Building Analysis Young Professionals Campus Seed Bank | Detroit

architecture of objects

Flex Chair Profile Lights Paper Masonry Units


in the studio


Hostel | Detroit Course: Fabrications in Architecture Instructor: Joshua Bard Date: Spring 2011 Collaborators: Student Team of 10 Fabrications in Architecture was a digital fabrication + design build seminar that partnered with Hostel Detroit, a nonprofit youth hostel located in southwest Detroit. The main objective of the studio was to develop a full-scale built project which augments the hostel’s current facilities with a “shed” to provide bike storage, a secure enclosure for the hostel’s outdoor equipment and an integrated, covered performance space.


Within the 10 person project team, my chief task was to lead in the fabrication effort. Shown here is the fabrication of steel gusset plates utilizing flowpath software to run the in-house waterjet cutter. After steel plates are cut they are welded together and then bolt holes are drilled.


After Fabrication is complete, the steel gusset plates are installed on-site along with pre-cut 2x10’s and 2x6’s to create the structural frame of the shed.


In order to allow for the bike shed to transform into a concert and event space, fold-up doors were installed on the facade facing the yard.

The doors work on a pulley system which allows for each of the (3) 8x8 door segments to be lifted with ease from inside of the shed.


Pipe All Course: Instructor: Date:

Studio 3G3 Josh Bard Winter 2011

Pipe All can be seen as a re-imagining of the classic picture palace of the 1950’s. The motifs and formal qualities of these cinemas still remain as iconic images of the golden age of the movie theater. Yet with the evolution of the cineplex and alternative modes of entertainment, these forms have been lost in the architecture of the theater. Pipe All attempts to reclaim these classic forms by re-purposing them to give them new life. Here, forms such as the marquee and the banner are given new functionality.


early vignette sketches


early study models


mid semester massing models


final diagram showing theaters dispursed around central circulation core


Thid Floor Plan


Fifth Floor Plan


Building Analysis Course: Construction 3G Instructor: David Moon Date: Winter 2011 Collaborators: Catie Truong Shown here is a focused investigation on the inherent and tangible materiality of the built artifact. Through a semester long research project students were asked, in teams of two, to analyze an existing building in terms of its formal properties and construction methods. The result of this study is a set of drawings and diagrams which fetishizes the banal aspects of the buildings construction means and methods. In the second half of the studio, each team was asked to take the knowledge learned through their research to develop a small building project. The goal here was to design a building which demonstrated an expertise in the construction language of their researched built work.


Paspels School Valerio Olgiati Switzerland


Paspels School was simple in concept but elaborate in execution. The idea of a building with a simple facade which when peeled away shows complexity is one that was carried through into our building design. In Paspels School concrete was used as both structure and finish, we wanted to replace the concrete with a different structural system, while still maintaining a feeling of solidity in the internal and external facades. To do this a steel frame was used as the primary structural system with an 8 x 4 wood panel system hung from it to serve as both internal and external finishes.


1 2

Reclaimed and Treated wood paneling Waterproofing

3

Gypsum Board

4

Metal Framing

5

Batt Insulation

6

Vapor Barrier

7

Interior Finish wood paneling

8

Tongue & Groove floor board paneling Thermal Rigid Insulation

9 10

Concrete slab on deck

11

Wood Panel drop ceiling


Young Professionals Campus Course: Instructor: Date:

Architect as Developer Kit McCullough Winter 2011

The goal of this course was to focus on the role of the developer and to cultivate the skills and knowledge associated with working on the real estate developement side of building projects. Located south of Ann Arbor lies the remains of what was once the Georgetown Mall. This deadmall has become a blight on the community and is in need of redevelopment. Unlike many other mall retrofits, shown here is an attempt to transform the site without destroying the existing built artifacts.


By utilizing strategies of “wrapping the box� the ground level is turned into a bustling retail shopping street while the rest of the existing mall space is used for artist studios, community activities and e-mall warehouse space.


All of these new uses are supported by a dense collection of residential and collaborative office spaces aimed at Ann Arbor’s emerging young professionals. The existing roof is retrofit as a greenroof and campus for these young professionals.


Rent

SF/Unit

# of Units

Total SF

Rent Per Mo

NNN Rent/SF

Annual Ren

A - Walkout/Garden/office live work units

800

20

16,000

1,100

$

B - Smaller 1 bedroom on 2nd & 3rd floor

650

62

40,300

850

$

C - 2 Bedroom apartments

845

28

23,660

1,100

$

D - 3 Bedroom apartments

1,000

21

21,000

1,300

$

800

39

31,200

1,000

$

F - Commercial Office Space (Large Units)

8,000

2

16,000

10

$

G - Commercial Office Space (Medium Units)

4,000

4

16,000

10

$

H - Commercial Office Space (Small Units)

2,000

4

8,000

10

$

18,500

1

18,500

4

$

210

20

4,200

K - e-Mall Showrooms

7,500

2

15,000

10

$

L - First Floor Retail

3,450

8

27,600

15

$

M - Restaurant Spaces

2,000

4

8,000

15

$

215

245,460

E - Small 2 bedroom with loft

I - Community Space in Existing Mall J - Artist Studios in Existing Mall

TOTALS

600

$

Ave Mo Ren


l Rent per Unit 13,200 10,200 13,200 15,600 12,000 160,000 160,000 80,000 74,000 7,200 150,000 414,000 120,000

o Rent 215 units

All Units

Per SF

$ $ $ $ $

264,000 632,400 369,600 327,600 468,000

$ $ $ $ $

16.50 15.69 15.62 15.60 15.00

$ $ $

320,000 $ 10.00 640,000 $ 10.00 320,000 $ 10.00

$ $ $

74,000 $ 4.00 144,000 $ 34.29 300,000 $ 10.00

$ $

3,312,000 $ 15.00 480,000 $ 15.00

Young Professionals Campus on Packard Rd. - Cost of Construction Estimate Property Location: Approximate Parcel Size: Ann Arbor Cost Modifier:

Site of former Georgetown Mall, Packard Rd Ann Arbor 6.5 Acres = 283,140 Square Feet 103.9

Development Data (User Input)

$

7,651,600.00

$

2,965.74

Total SF

Condos / Apartments (Low Rise 1 to 3 Stories) Condos / Apartments (Mid Rise 4 to 7 Stories) Condos / Apartments (High Rise 8 to 24 Stories) Public Housing (Low Rise 1 to 3 Stories) Public Housing (Mid Rise 4 to 7 Stories) Offices (Low Rise 1 to 4 Stories) Offices (Mid Rise 5 to 10 Stories) Offices (High Rise 11 to 20 Stories) Hotel / Inn (57,000 SF to 150,000 SF Total Area) Hotel / Inn (Over 150,000 SF Total Area) Community Centers / Health Clubs (Minimum 30,000 SF) Department Stores Retail Stores (Individual) Resturants Banks Greenspace (Landscpaing) Hard Scape (Landscaping) Parking Decks (Under 150,000 SF Total Area / Above Grade) Parking Decks (Under 150,000 SF Total Area / Below Grade) Parking Decks (Over 150,000 SF Total Area / Above Grade) Parking Decks (Over 150,000 SF Total Area / Below Grade)

59,400 SF 112,560 SF SF SF SF SF 55,000 SF SF SF SF 42,000 SF SF 37,000 SF 10,000 SF SF 50,000 SF 15,000 SF 72,000 SF SF SF SF

Total Development Area Floor Area Ratio

452,960 SF 160%

Base Cost of Construction Estimate Condos / Apartments (Low Rise 1 to 3 Stories) Condos / Apartments (Mid Rise 4 to 7 Stories) Condos / Apartments (High Rise 8 to 24 Stories) Public Housing (Low Rise 1 to 3 Stories) Public Housing (Mid Rise 4 to 7 Stories) Offices (Low Rise 1 to 4 Stories) Offices (Mid Rise 5 to 10 Stories) Offices (High Rise 11 to 20 Stories) Hotel / Inn (57,000 SF to 150,000 SF Total Area) Hotel / Inn (Over 150,000 SF Total Area) Community Centers / Health Clubs Department Stores Retail Stores (Individual) Resturants Banks Greenspace (Landscpaing) Hard Scape (Landscaping) Parking Decks (Under 150,000 SF Total Area / Above Grade) Parking Decks (Under 150,000 SF Total Area / Below Grade) Parking Decks (Over 150,000 SF Total Area / Above Grade) Parking Decks (Over 150,000 SF Total Area / Below Grade) Base Construction Cost Estimate

Final Cost of Construction Estimate Total Base Cost of Construction Estimate Demolition of Existing Parking Structure (Fixed at $5.95 / SF of Structure) Site Work and Underground Utility Work ($2 / SF of Parcel)

Base Cost / SF $74.50 $86.00 $102.85 $79.75 $96.60 $80.15 $88.00 $112.15 $101.35 $98.75 $20.00 $66.50 $72.50 $141.00 $157.45 $15.00 $7.45 $48.50 $61.85 $40.50 $51.65

Base Cost $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

4,597,887 10,057,686 5,028,760 872,760 2,787,118 1,464,990 779,250 116,108 3,628,188 -

$

29,332,747

Development Description Residential Units in back of Dev. (first 3 floors) Residential Units surrounding greenway

Single Use/Shared Office spaces

Community Center and others within existing mall First Floor Retail Mixed in with Retail spaces Greenroof/Greenway New Roads/Repair Existing Roads New Parking Garage on Northwest Corner

Upgrade % Applied 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

Total Base Cost $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

4,597,887 10,057,686 5,028,760 872,760 2,787,118 1,464,990 779,250 116,108 3,628,188 -

$

29,332,747

$ $ $

29,332,747 59,200

Cost / SF Dev. Type $ $

$

$ $ $ $ $ $

$ $ $

77.41 89.35 NA NA NA NA 91.43 NA NA NA 20.78 NA 75.33 146.50 NA 15.59 7.74 50.39 NA NA NA

Cost / SF Total $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

10.15 22.20 11.10 1.93 6.15 3.23 1.72 0.26 8.01 -

$

64.76

64.76 per SF Total per SF Total 0.13 per SF Total


Seed Bank | Detroit Course: Instructor: Date:

Studio 3G2 Craig Borum Fall 2010

This project represents a desire to merge form and function by completely integrating a greywater collection and filtration system into the formal design logic of the project. Often when dealing with a design problem, performance and form can be at odds. In looking at how these elements could run parallel to each other, the buildings form is generated. The generator for this form is the environmental systems needed for a complete greywater collection and filtration system.


Early massing models showing the desire for a large public realm flanked by programmatic spaces


Diagram showing greywater collection and filtration systems under the buildings main public realm


Flow diagrams


The main public realm of the building is generated by the needs of the systems which it houses. The space is sub-divided by a grand stair which hides the greywater filtration systems underneath. As the water gradually becomes purified, it is revealed to the public through openings in the stair. The walls of the space push in and flex out in order to hide the large water tanks and mechanical systems needed for water collection and storage located behind them.

Diagrams of final greywater and rainwater collection flows


final model lighting studies


All of the forms generated by a need to hide mechanical and storage equipment create a unique and experiential space for the the public to occupy


architecture of objects


Flex Chair Course: Instructor: Date: Collaborators:

Interior Landscapes Thomas Moran Spring 2011 Nate Van Wylen

Flex Chair meets at the intersection of chair, bench and table. The project both seeks to define what these objects are independently, while at the same time challenging their potential to exist collectively. Influenced by the inherit need for flexibility in the lifestyle of today’s nomadic generation, Flex Chair offers the ability to meet the demands of any living space at any time. Made of half-inch plywood profiles cut with a CNC router the project is able to transform from bench to chair to table in order to meet the current needs of its environment.


The profiles are held together with wooden dowels which are countersunk to conceal their existence. Another dowel is placed where the two sides overlap and acts as an axis for one side to rotate. By countersinking the dowels, the project’s construction is concealed and there is an added mystery of how, if at all, the transformation takes place.


Each of the 35 plywood profiles has a different radius that changes incrementally throughout the project, creating a feeling of movement within the singular object. This is expressed in the chair position by an inward movement in the backrest to create a comfortable seating condition. The inverse is true on the base where the movement is outwards to allow for greater support. The seat itself is a place of intersection where the profiles of both backrest and base meet.


Profile Lights Course: Instructor: Date:

Interior Landscapes Thomas Moran Spring 2011

Seen in the next few pages are examples of a study conducted into the light transmission capabilities of stacked basswood profiles. These lights represent different strategies to both contain and transmit light. Stacking methods are gradually exaggerated in each light in the series.


Paper Masonry Units (PMU’s) Course: Interior Landscapes Instructor: Thomas Moran Date: Spring 2011 Collaborators: Nate Van Wylen The ambition of this project was to repurpose a discarded material in a way which would provide new meaning and potential avenues for new use. The subject for the project was discarded newspaper which, by turning it into paper pulp, we were able to create a structural element (PMU bricks). The bricks were embedded with a variety of notches which allowed for them to aggregate in three dimensions. The end product was an installation comprised of an aggregation of over 80 units.


The three step process for making paper pulp included blending up newspaper and other types of paper with water, packing the mixture into a specially designed press and then squeezing out as much water as possible before letting each piece dry in the sun for several days.



M.Arch Portfolio_Year 1