Page 1

INTER WEAVING INTER NATIONAL HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO HSIN-PEI SHEN

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF INTERIOR OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN


6 THESIS

SUMM ARY

8

CASE S

TUDIE

12

CLIENT

14

S

PROFIL

E

USER P

ROFILE

15

SITE BUILD ANALYSIS & ING AN ALYSIS

CONCE P

T

SECTIO N ELEVAT S & IONS PROGR I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 2

FLOOR AMMIM

G

24

PLANS

26

32

34


INTRODUCTION PROJECT RENDERING

38

DESIGNER

Y LOBB

44

RESOURCE

CAFE Y R AKE

B

52 RE

STO OOK

B

68

60

SING

ET

BUFF

HOU

70 OM

Y RO D U T S

74

RIOR

EXTE

78 AUTOB I

OGRAP

HY

79

E

77 BIBLIOGRAPHY

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

RESUM

3


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

4


6 THESIS

SUMM ARY

8

CASE S

TUDIE

12

CLIENT

14

S

PROFIL

E

USER P

ROFILE

15

SITE BUILD ANALYSIS & ING AN ALYSIS

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

ITRODUCTION

5


THESIS SUMMERY

INTERNATIONAL HOUSE INCEPTION My project is an International House located in South of Market area. As a foreign student, studying abroad is a unique experience. Besides gaining knowledge and a degree, I hope I can have a chance to interact with students from all over the world and learn about different cultures. We can create memories together, and learn about various cultures. That’s why I decided to live in school housing when I first arrived in San Francisco. Ultimately, I was disappointed. I found that for over two-hundred students, they provided students with a mere four-hundred square foot lounge. There was not enough adequate space for interaction. It is because the building was originally designed for residential use rather than student housing. San Francisco is racked seventeenth as a student friendly city compared to cities around the world. Students are attracted to San Francisco because of the multicultural diversity and strong desire to learn. Student enrollment in the U.S. is expected to increase from 16.5 million in 2010 to over 18.5 million in 2013. For this large amount of students, the issue of student housing become critical than ever. My project is aim to provide those student who need housing and want to experience the one and only culture impact in their life.

QS Best Student Cities 2012

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 6


THESIS SUMMERY

SAN FRANCISCO PROJECT TYPE My project is International House San Francisco (I House San Francisco). The I House San Francisco is a student housing with ideal student interacting areas, retail stores and commercial spaces for public. It is a building included a thirteen stories building and a parking basement, and locates in 680 Folsom Street at the corner of Hawthorne and Folsom Street. The building is originally a vacant office building and I resurrect it into my mix-used international housing. The total project area is 400,000 square foot, and I focus on design both residential and commercial area.

Goal As a student, I understand that living in a nice place will increase the productivity for studying and interaction with other students. I will provide a better standard of living quality for student in San Francisco. My residential units will be suitable for students to stay on a long term basis. The most important spaces in the student community are designed to promote student interactions with each other.

South of Market’s next boom:

Education

Tim Colen, executive director of the San Francisco Housing Action Coalition,

120,000 students attend colleges in San Francisco, including UC Hastings College of the Law, University of San Francisco and the Art Institute. There’s an estimated shortage of 50,000 campus-owned beds, he said. said about

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

“It seems like over the last two or three years we have been hearing about a number of higher education institutions looking to come into San Francisco’s downtown core market,”

New legislation would define the dorm room in San Francisco

7


CASE STUDIES

BIKUBEN STUDENT RESIDENCE

Archtect: aart a/s Location: Copenhagen, Denmark

2008

The Bikuben Student Residence creates the settings for student life and extends the possibility that unity can arise from a broad social network. The main shape of the building is quite clarified in its design and holds in it the fundamental idea of unity and equality. It has been the ambition to create a building with a strong and clear identity, with a direct connection to the contextual situation. The homes of the students and the common rooms are connected in a double spiral that surrounds an enlightened courtyard. That offers direct contact

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 8

and visibility between common and private space and at the same time, ensures the student’s privacy in the home. The boundaries of every college home are expanded, basically filling all parts of the building volume, giving the social interface and every single student’s latitude, maximum priority. Apart from an often poor private economy, the biggest problem for the students in our day is loneliness and the lack of social relations. In this project the main structuralizing ele-

ment is in fact, the possibility to enter the college community and the many different social relations that college life can offer. Local materials and pre-fabricated construction, façade and bathroom elements provides a both environmentally and economically sustainable structure. Architecture and the sense of social responsibility intertwine and the building is captured by the context of the site, and changes its conditions.


Public Living Room Public Dining Room Public Kitchen

Semipublic Space Semiprivate Space Private Space

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

Public Space

9


CASE STUDIES

SIMMONS HALL

Archtect: Steven Holl Archtects Location: Massachusetts, Cambridge

2002

The Simmons Hall building, which will house 350 students in single rooms, was designed by Steven Holl as a vertical cross section of a city, ten storeys high and over 100 metres long. Just like a city organism, the residence has its own internal traffic system connecting students' rooms with common areas such as study and computer areas, a 125 seat theatre, a 24 hour coffee station, a fitness centre and a dining room with open-air seating. The unusually long, thin lot required Holl to take special measures to prevent the building from becoming a compact block which would massively shut off air flows and views over the Charles River flowing along the edge of the campus: he has designed a “porous� building which breathes and has large openings offering views out over the landscape. Conceived as a sponge, the building is characterised on the outside by walls with over 3000 small square windows alternating with larger windows in the common areas, entrance areas and open spaces.

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 10


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

11


CLIENT PROFILE

INTERNATIONAL HOUSES WORLDWIDE I

H

Ww I N T E R N AT I O N A L H O U S E S

W O R L D W I D E

Internatioanl Houses Worldwide

The International Houses Worldwide is my client for I House San Francisco. It is an affiliation of International House from across the continents, united by one mission: To provide students of different nationalities and diverse cultures with the opportunity to live and learn together in a community of mutual respect, understanding and international friendship. The client has 16 International Houses spread across the world. Most of the International Houses are independent and non-profit making institutions. Some of them are incorporated with Universities, such as Berkeley, Chicago and Washington. The houses in New York and London are independent associations. All I Houses provide both long and short-term accommodation, and is a great value. It offers a fun, friendly atmosphere in a safe environment.

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 12

I-HOUSE

START DATE

BEDS

NATIONALITIES

Philadelphia New York Paris Berkeley Chicago Washington DC Melbourne Brisbane London Sydney Auckland Wollongong Darwin San Diego Harrisburg Alberta

1910 1924 1925 1930 1932 1936 1957 1965 1965 1967 1969 1980 1985 1988 2002 2004

400 700 5700 575 450 100 275 240 700 200 170 218 270 350 152 154

80 100 140 70 50 40 35 35 100 43 30 30 44 30 94 45


INTERNATIONAL HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO I House San Francisco is an independent association which is owned by TMG Partners. As mentioned, TMG Partners has become a joint owner of 680 Folsom St with Redwood Capital since 2010. TMG Partners is a full-service real estate development company in San Francisco. It focuses exclusively on urban infill projects in the San Francisco Bay Area. The Executive Director of I House San Francisco is Michael A. Covarrubisa. Mr. Covarrubisa is the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of TMG Partners. TMG Michael A. Covarrubias, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, joined TMG in 1988. Mr. Covarrubias chairs TMG’s Investment Committee, oversees all of the company’s operations and has directed the company since 1995.

Michael A. Covarrubisa The Executive Director

ARCHITECT Skidmore Owings & Merrill : SOM Architects Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP (SOM) is one of the leading architecture, urban planning, interior design, and engineering firms in the world, with a 75-year reputation for design excellence and a portfolio that includes some of the most important architectural accomplishments of the 20th and 21st centuries. Since its inception, SOM has been a leader in the research and development of specialized technologies, new processes and innovative ideas, many of which have had a palpable and lasting impact on the design profession and the physical environment.

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 13


USER PROFILE

USER I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 14

Students and the locals San Francisco has more than a dozen colleges and universities with about twelve thousand students. There are five higher education institutes, and nearly ten English language schools in San Francisco downtown area. Besides student housing, retail stores and commercial spaces will serve for both locals and students.


SITE ANALYSIS

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

15


SITE ANALYSIS 680 Folsom is located in the South of Market (SoMa) neighborhood of San Francisco. The SoMa community was developed during the mid-19th century. SoMa encompasses many smaller neighborhoods, such as South Park, Yerba Buena, South Beach and the Financial District South and has become one of the fast growing areas in San Francisco. The numerous warehouses, auto repair shops, night clubs, residential hotels, art spaces, loft apartments, furniture showrooms, condominiums and technology companies make SoMa a multi-development neighborhood. The location is the main factor for my building selection. SoMa has a convenient mass transportation system, and well vital function. Moreover, educational institutions such as the Academy of Art University, Golden Gate University and Kaplan International College which have large quantity of international students are situated in the SoMa area. For an international student who may like to get the full-understandings of this city, SoMa provides the most completed aspects of San Francisco.

SOUTH OF MARKET

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 16


SITE ANALYSIS Business and Art

Transportation

Living Condition

Folsom Street is one of the main streets in SoMa, and my project, 680 Folsom, is situated near the Third Street. This area is the trade show and art center of San Francisco. Moscone Center, which includes Moscone South, North, West part are occupies three blocks. SFMOMA, Yerba Buena Center of Arts and the Contemporary Jewish Museum are famous museums that are also located in the area. Yerba Buena Gardens, the Metreon and a children’s park attract people visiting who wish to spend their days in green public spaces.

There are three blocks from 680 Folsom to Market Street, and it is a ten minutes walk to arrive at the Montgomery Bart Station as well as numerous of Muni lines which can reach the whole Bay Area. The new Transbay Transit Center which is less than one mile from my project building is scheduled to be completed in 2017. In addition, the Downtown Rail Extension will be done in 2018, and it will also serve High Speed Rail service to Los Angeles.

There are numerous of newer loftstyle condominiums located in the SoMa area, and extensive rental apartments also. These apartments have large numbers of student tenants. The living condition is more convenient for people than most other communities in San Francisco because of location, and will become better because of the redevelopment plan at Sixth Street.

Transit Center C-3-O(SD) Commercial SUD Transbay C3 SUD

Folsom and Main Residential Commercial SUD

Waterfront SUD 1

Northeast China Basin SUD SUD - Special Use Districts

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

Waterfront SUD 3

17


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 18

33% With student housing 67% Without student housing The University of San Francisco’s decision to buy the Folger Coffee Building shows that tech-heavy South of Market is rapidly becoming home to another growth industry: higher education.

Map of Higher Education Institutions in San Francisco 680 Folsom Englidh language schools


San Francisco Citywide Zoning Map Jan 2013 The building location is zoned of C-3-O (SD) meaning Commercial Downtown Office Special Development districts, which means building can be mix-used. And the surroundind area are downtown residential districts, South Market mixed use districts, industrial districts and public space.

To build some new student housing in the downtown area is a difficult task. Also, new legislation would define the dorm room in the San Francisco city. It may prohibit converting residential units to student housing. So it is possible that more and more student housing will be constructed in the SoMa area.

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

Conclusion

19


BUILDING ANALYSIS

62

20

Built

Sold

The Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 20

07

19

Mayor Christopher with the CEO of Pacific Telephone & Telegraph at groundbreaking for new telephone building at Folsom and Hawthorne streets.

Delaware Limited Liability Company

10

20

Joint Owner

er

b 1 ovem 1 20 N Reskinning

TMG Partners Redwood Capital

680 FOLSOM


The building of I House San Francisco, 680 Folsom, was built in 1962, and was owned by the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company until 2007. The 404,940 square foot office building includes thirteen stories, a basement and a circulation bridge to 50 Hawthorne Street. The property now belongs to TMG Partners, which has worked on reuse and redesigning obsolete buildings for a long time. TMG Partners plans to rehabilitate the building into a brand new office building by replacing a clear glass curtain wall skin and renovating the interior spaces.

HAWTHORNE STREET

However, I believe rather than becoming a commercial building, 680 Folsom could be changed into a better and more interesting use. The efficient 35,000 square foot floor plates and 24 foot column spacing would allow me to configure the residential units, and various types of public spaces. Furthermore, the existing 1960’s concrete exterior could be easily removed and I could give the building a more vivid façade to light up the surrounding.

ORIGINAL FLOOR PLAN - 1st FLOOR

NOT ON SCALE

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

FOLSOM STREET

21


INTER NATIONAL HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 22


CONCE P

T

SECTIO N ELEVAT S & IONS PROGR

FLOOR AMMIM

G

24

PLANS

34

32

26

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

PROJECT

23


PROGRAMMING

PROGRAMMING

ROOF TOP

COMMUNICATION

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 24

RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL RETAIL

RETAIL

PARKING

12th FLOOR

4th - 11th FLOOR

3rd FLOOR 2nd FLOOR 1st FLOOR


PROGRAMMING

HOUSING- PUBLIC SERVICE PUBLIC

HOUSING- PRIVATE HOUSING- SEMIPRIVATE HOUSING- PUBLIC SERVICE PUBLIC

SERVICE

RETAIL PUBLIC

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

HOUSING

25


FLOOR PLANS

SITE PLAN

PARKING GARAGE 7 STORIES

CLEMENTINA STREET

HAWTHORNE STREET

A’

B’ I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 26

B

A

PROPERTY LINE

FOLSOM STREET

NOT ON SCALE


FLOOR PLANS

1st FLOOR 1

2

1 3

2 4

3 5

4 6

5 7

6 8

240' - 0" 24' - 0"

24' - 0"

24' - 0"24' - 0"

24' - 0"24' - 0"

24' - 0"24' - 0"

7 9

8 10

9 11

10

240' - 0"

24' - 0"24' - 0"

24' - 0" 24' - 0"

24' - 0"24' - 0"

24' - 0" 24' - 0"

24' - 0"24' - 0"

24' - 0"

24' - 0"

A UP

14

13

11

12

24' - 0"

B

UP

10

6

7

24' - 0"

120' - 0"

C

3

5

D 24' - 0"

8

1

2

9

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT -

3

4

UP

UP

UP

-

4

5

1

2

6

7

8

9

10

11

24' - 0"

E UP

UP

UP

UP

F

NOT ON SCALE

1

Level 1 1/16" = 1'-0"

2588 SF 1368 SF 298 SF 2735 SF 350 SF 256 SF 389 SF 311 SF 314SF 7120 SF 721 SF 775 SF 690 SF 1156 SF

UP

UP

UP UP

UP

UP

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

1. RETAIL STORE LOBBY 2. STUDENT HOUSING LOBBY Level 1 1 1/16" = 1'-0" 3. LEASING OFFICE 4. BAKERY CAFE 5. KITCHEN 6. BAKERY CAFE STORAGE 7. BAKERY CAFE STAFF BREAK ROOM 8. FREIGHT ELEVATOR LOADING AREA 9. MECHANICAL ROOM 10. BOOKSTORE 11. LECTURE ROOM 12. BOOKSTORE OFFICE AND STORAGE 13. TRASH ROOM 14. DELIVERY LOADING ROOM

UP

27 -


FLOOR PLANS

2nd FLOOR 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

Bridge to 50 Hawthorne

UP

15

14

13 12

7

6

16 11

1

10

8

2

9

5

3

4

NOT ON SCALE 1

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 28

Level 2 1/16" = 1'-0"

1. BUFFRT 2. RETAIL STORE 202 3. RETAIL STORE 203 4. RETAIL STORE 204 5. RETAIL STORE 205 6. RETAIL STORE 207 7. CAMPUS BOOKSTORE 8. STUDENT HOUSING ELEVATOR HALL 9. MECHANICAL ROOM 10. RETAIL STORE STORAGES 11. FREIGHT ELEVATOR LOADING AREA 12. RETAIL STORES STAFF BREAK ROOM 13. TRASH ROOM 14. BUFFET STORAGE 15. BUFFET KITCHEN 16. BUFFET STAFF BREAK ROOM

4230 SF 731 SF 903 SF 1968 SF 1196 SF 873 SF 2102 SF 215 SF 314SF 298 SF 311 SF 678 SF 132 SF 288 SF 1056 SF 210 SF


1'-0"

FLOOR PLANS -

4th - 11th FLOOR -

1

2

3

4

3

5

6

7

8

9

4

10

11

UP

UP

5

2

1

6

UP

UP

UP

UP

7

3

NOR ON SCALE 1. PUBLIC LIVING ROOM 2. LAUNDRY 3. PUBLIC KITCHEN 4. TRASH ROOM 5. FREIGHT ELEVATOR LOADING AREA 6. MECHANICAL ROOM 7. STORAGE

772 SF 350 SF 320 SF 114 SF 315 SF 314 SF 85 SF I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 29


FLOOR PLANS

UNIT TYPE

2B1

2B2

S1

S3

S2 S2

S3

S1

S2 S2 S2 3B

SR1 SR2 SR2 SR1

SR1 SR2 SR2 SR1 S3

3B S2 S2 S2

S1

S3 S2 S2

S1

2B2 2B1

SR1 4@ 461 SF

3B 2@ 766 SF SR2 4@ 443 SF

S1 4@ 338 SF 2B1 2@ 713 SF

S2 10@ 313 SF

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 30

2B2 2@ 636 SF

S3 4@ 371 SF


FLOOR PLANS -

1

2

3

4

13

5

6

7

12 th FLOOR 8

9

10

20

14

UP

11 8

7

11

6 UP

12 18

10

1

9

UP

19

5

UP

copy center

15

16

17

2

3

4

NOR ON SCALE 687 SF 5395 SF 501 SF 5287 SF 294 SF 698 SF 764 SF 751 SF 314SF 311 SF 133 SF 3754 SF 363 SF 557 SF 898 SF 1167 SF 524 SF

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

1. RECEPTION 2. TV LOUNGE AND PUBLIC SPACE 3. STORAGE 4. STUDY ROOM & LAB 5. COPY CENTER 6. PIANO ROOM 7. PRIVATE STUDY ROOM 8. PRIVATE STUDY ROOM 9. MECHANICAL ROOM 10. FREIGHT ELEVATOR LOADING AREA 11. TRASH ROOM 12. GYM 13. MEN LOCKER ROOM AND SHOWER 14. WOMEN LOCKER ROOM AND SHOWER 15. YOGA CLASSROOM 16. MULTIFUNCTION ROOM 17. - 20. OUTDOOR SPACES

31


SECTION

A-A’

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

32


SECTION

B-B’

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 33 NOR ON SCALE


DESIGN CONCEPT

INTERWEAVING Interweaving is my main concept for this project. My main goal is to bring the connection between people and culture into my project; therefore, I chose interweaving as my design concept for I House San Francisco. International student housing can be seen as a small global village, especially in San Francisco, which is the city includes over twenty thousand international students. Students come from all over the world and spend their time living in this building. Through the interaction between each other, they share their lives and create memories together. Besides the residential units, the retail and commercial spaces will embrace both locals and students. It is a place where human contact happens spontaneously, and is both inevitable and desired. Through collision with each other, people interact and influence one another. Finally, they spin a web of social life. Although the idea of interweaving of people is somewhat abstract, the term also relates to design decisions related to scale. From large to small can be separated in three levels. Firstly, I restructure the configuration of the floor plan to improve the flexibility of the space. Second, I can provide changeable spatial perspectives so the experience of the space can be interlaced. Third, in each single space, I tried to find out a specific element that can be connected with interweaving, and converted it into my focal point for spaces and also sub-concept. Interweaving may allow people to think about wires, strings composed nets and patterns. However, I avoid working on a visible interweaving. What I am interested in is invisible interweaving. I hope my design can influence human behavior. Not only by creating a safe and cozy place, but increasing people‘s perception of space. Moreover, I want my project to break the existing impression of student housing which only provides for student use. Through the program and design, I will expect 680 Folsom to become a nexus point for students, locals, and the public. I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 34


DESIGN CONCEPT

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

35


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

LOBBY BAKERY CAFE BOOKSTORE BUFFET HOUSING STUDY & LAB EXTERIOR 36


38 Y LOBB

44 FE

A RY C E K A B

52 TORE

KS BOO

60

ET BUFF

68 ING

S HOU

70 OM

Y RO D U T S

74 IOR

R EXTE

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

RENDERING

37


LOBBY

LOBBY The lobby is divided into two areas. One side is for private access for student residents, Housing Lobby. The other is for public access to the commercial retail space, the Retail Lobby. In my design, the lobby becomes the main hub that connects different floors across different building. For the public lobby, rather than designing an enclosed lobby, I designed it to have an open, multifunctional layout. There is a corridor that goes directly from the front to the back of building. This corridor connects the Retail Lobby with the Housing Lobby, 1 2 3 but it is still part of the Retail Lobby. In order to connect these two lobbies, I designed an iron frame parti24' - 0" 24' - 0" tion board with some black opaque glasses.

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 38

4

5

6

7

8

10

240' - 0" 24' - 0"

24' - 0"

24' - 0"

24' - 0"

24' - 0"

The lobby can be seen as a station or a transportation hub. The interweaving item relates with transportation reminds me of a transportation network. Therefore, the sub-concept for lobby is “transportation network.” When the users come to my building, they go through different transportation network. For example, International students come by flights; domestic student may come by freeway or railway. Even the locals may take MUNI or BART to come. Based on the graphic of transportation network, I created an irregular patterns from those lines and hubs on the lobby wall. The line between the patterns with different height and angle just like walking through a journey, and you will never know what’s going to happen at the next fork.

9

24' - 0"

24' - 0"

24' - 0"

UP

UP

UP

UP UP


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

39


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 40

Student housing lobby decorated with a wood map of International Houses Worldwide locations.


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO “Hello” in different languages

41


1 2 1. View from student housing lobby to outside 2. Corridor view from the front to the back of the building. 3. Corridor view from the back to the front of the building.

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 42


3

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

43


BAKERY CAFE The bakery café is located on the first floor next to the Retail Lobby. The name of the bakery café is ZÜPFE. ZÜPFE, pronounced Zopf is a type of bread that comes from the Emmental region of Switzerland. The name is derived from the shape of the bread, and literally means “braid”. I started to trace the pattern of the ZÜPFE, and finally created a structure from the floor to the top of the wall then across the ceiling. In order to emphasize the concept, I chose a herringbone floor for this space. 1

For the atmosphere of this space, I hope to create a cozy and simple feeling. Wood tone furniture and the green color wall paint work nicely with each other. The bakery is a place that serves students and office workers in the morning rush A and also provide the locals a relaxing afternoon.

24' - 0"

24' - 0"

24' - 0"

B

24' - 0"

120' - 0"

C

24' - 0"

D

E 24' - 0"

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 44

F

2

3

24' - 0"

4

24' - 0"

5

24' - 0"

24' - 0"


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

45


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 46

“ZOUFE” in gaint letter .


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

47


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

48


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

49


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

50


Structures have different heights.

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 51


BOOKSTORE The bookstore is also located on the first floor on the corner of Folsom Street and Hawthorne Street. The element I used to develop for the sub-concept is Folded Book Art. Artist Isaac Salazar recycled old books and folded in the pages to make words and shapes visible on the edges of the book. 2

"

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 52

3 4 5 “I see my work as a way to display a meaningful piece of art onto a book that would otherwise sit on a 24' - 0" - 0" - 0" shelf and collect24'dust; it’s also 24'my way of recycling a book that might otherwise end up in a landfill.” [1]

6

7

8

9

10

11

240' - 0" 24' - 0"

24' - 0"

24' - 0"

Looking at these Folded Book Art pieces, the shape and the crease show how they were folded. It inspired me on the bookshelf and the pathway. Different from the traditional bookstore layout, I arranged each bookshelf in different levels of height. And the pathway has ramps with slopes which start from the floor to eleven foot height. I want to make the bookshelves and the ramps interweaving with each other. Two giant bookshelves are also based on the folded book idea. The gap between the ceiling bookshelves and the floor bookshelves can be seen as a shape created by the folded book.

24' - 0"

24' - 0"

24' - 0"

UP

UP

UP

UP UP


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

53


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 54

Bookshelfs in different levels of height, and with orange red chusions on it.


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

55


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

56


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

57


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

58


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

59


BUFFET The Oasis Buffet is located on the second floor. Besides this dining place there are six retail stores. An Oasis is an isolated area in the desert that provides water and food in the desert. The restaurant is a place for people to gain energy after a long day. Food, energy and nutrition are organic things, so I start to find out an element that is able to interlace with the nature. Finally, I decided to use Voronoi diagram as my concept for this space. “A Voronoi diagram is created from a set of points by dividing the plane into regions, where each region consists of the area closest to one of the points. To create a fractal, first create a Voronoi diagram from some points. Next, add more points and create new Voronoi diagrams inside each original Voronoi region and repeat the process recursively.� [2] I repeat Voronoi diagram in this space by using different materials and elements. Wood frame ceiling with LED light inside the gap, metal frame wrap the column with glass, mirror wall and wood flooring. The color theme for the space creates neutral atmosphere. The white laminated marble food bar become the oasis of the space.

1

2

A

B

C

D

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

E

F

60 1

Level 2 1/16" = 1'-0"

3

4

5


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

61


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

62


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

63


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

64


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

65


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

66


1

2

1. Semi-outdoor dining 2. The shape of food bars is same with the diagram of the ceiling.

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 67


HOUSING From the third to the eleventh floors are residential units. I House San Francisco provides five types of housing units. There are three bedrooms, two bedrooms, studios, single rooms with balcony, and single rooms without balcony. Besides the nice living units, I also designed a public living room and a laundry room on each floor. My idea for this public space in residential area comes from a nest. Rather than a complex structure, I used wood boards with curve of the wall to represent the protection and the warmth of a nest.

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 68


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

69


STUDY ROOM The Study Room area are located on the twelfth floor. I designed the twelfth floor as a student community center. There are also a gym, TV lounge and study rooms in this floor. The concept for my study room was a mind gear. When students study or do research here, their brain is working like a moving gear. Therefore, I created a big ceiling structure to represent the idea about the movement of the gear. The stair seat is a connection between study room and TV lounge. Students can sit on the stairs reading, chatting or having an informal lecture. Using the adjustable door on the top of the stair seat can isolate the noise from the TV lounge to the reading and lab room.

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 70


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

71


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

72


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

73


EXTERIOR

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

74


I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

75


78 AUTOB I

OGRAP

HY

79

RESUM

E

77 BIBLIOGRAPHY

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 76

RESOURCE DESIGNER


BIBLIOGRAPHY

ONLINE REFERENCE THESIS SUMMARY QS TOPUNIVERSITIES < http://www.topuniversities.com/> INTERNATIONAL NETWORK NEWZEALAND < http://www.innz.net.nz/you-hadme-at-hello> “New legislation would define the dorm room in San Francisco“ < http://blog.sfgate.com/cityinsider/2012/02/27/new-legislation-would-definethe-dorm-room-in-san-francisco/> “South of Market’s next boom: Education“ < http://www.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/print-edition/2011/08/05/south-ofmarkets-next-boom-education.html?page=all> CASE STUDIES “BIKUBEN STUDENT RESIDENCE ANALYSIS”< http://miklpikl.com/index.php?/ architecture/bikuben-workshop/> CLIENT PROFILES International Houses Worldwide < http://ihousesworldwide.org/> TMG PARTNERS < http://www.tmgpartners.com/> SOM < https://www.som.com/> SITE ANALYSIS & BUILDING ANALYSIS Google Map San Francisco Planning Department Map Library < http://www.sf-planning.org/ index.aspx?page=2426> FOUNDSF < http://foundsf.org/index.php?title=Main_Page> RENDERINGS [1] Isaac G. Salazar < http://www.isaacgsalazar.com/#/home> [2] Wikioedia Google Image I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 77


AUTOBIOGRAPHY

HW 02-01 Self Portrait Logo

HP SHEN HSIN PEI SHEN

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO 78

DESIGN

Since I was a child growing up in Taiwan, I have always been interested in different types of art and design. My family moved from a house to an apartment when I was six. I never forgot the feeling as I stood in the living room, the white clean walls, dark hardwood floors and new furniture. All of this made me feel so excited. At that moment, I realized what an interior designer can achieve. At the same time, I started to attend painting classes with my primary schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art teacher until I was thirteen. Both activities affected me a lot, and helped me develop my sense of space and aesthetics. The summer after my junior high school graduation, I spent two weeks traveling through Europe with my family. The trip truly opened my eyes to the world of architecture. The mix of ancient and modern designs of the buildings truly inspired me.

The buildings andsurround ing landscape architecture of each city I visited represented different cultures and histories. Architecture is a vital part of the environment, and it also creates the first impression of each country. Similarly, back home in Taiwan, there is a lot of rich history in architecture, but there is no real emphasis on historic preservation, along with the new. After returning from the trip, I made up my mind about choosing architecture as my major area of study in college. During my five years of undergraduate study in Taiwan, I worked in many different kinds of architecture styles, and had two internships during summer vacations. After graduation, I spent about two months working with my professor on the renovation of a historical site in central Taiwan, and went traveling around Taiwan and Japan also. Those ex-

periences helped me to realize that I was still unready to be a spatial designer. There was a lot of knowledge andskills I still needed to learn, especially about interior design, so I decided to go to graduate school in the United States. I looked forward to studying with students from different backgrounds andexperiences in all areas of design. The Academy of Art University is a comprehensive art school, and has a wide mix of students. It has been beneficial for me to share ideas and experiences with students from all over the world. The courses are focused on both basic skills and practical training, connecting the school courses with the design professions. For all these reasons, I enrolled at he Academy of Art University to study interior architecture and design.


RESUME

HSIN-PEI SHEN

bethshen@gmail.com 415.939.8468

Education Background

Internship

Exhibition

Academy of Art University, San Francisco CA, U.S.A Master of Fine Art in Interior Architecture and Design 06/2010~

Q-Lab, Tainan, Taiwan 06/2007~09/2007 -Hotel and University design projects Site model. Discussed design with project managers. Supported study model. Construction document drawing.

Dolic Vita by Liou, Guo-Tsang, Moca Taipei, Taiwan 11/13/2004~01/16/2005 Participant

National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan Bachelor of Science in Architecture 2003~2008

Software Photoshop Illustrator CorelDraw AutoCAD Autodesk Revit Autodesk 3ds Max SketchUP Language English Mandarin / Chinese, Taiwanese Basic Japanese conversations Photography Digital Manual

I HOUSE SAN FRANCISCO

Hung, Kuo-Feng Architecture Studio, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 07/2006~09/2006 -Primary Schools Green Enclosure Design Competitions Discussed design with architects. Supported study models. Construction of document drawings.

Skills/Interests

79


THESIS BOOK  

International House SF

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you