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Halima Shehu Portfolio of Work 2011-2016


TABLE OF CONTENTS

SELECTED WORKS

The contents of this portfolio chronicle four and a half years of curiosity, questions, confusion, discovery, reflection, and learning in the realm of design. Architecture, to me, has always been about the people that we serve and the activity that changes a space to a place. Architecture is a physical manifestation of not only the activity within it, but also what goes on around it. The following work examples display my discoveries about the space architecture creates due to the place it inhabits. I seek to continue to explore, make discoveries, and expand my abilities in the realm of design within every scale.


Stavanger Marketplace

3-10

Sunset Funerary Chapel

11-14

Kansas City Recycling Vision Study

15-22

Meeting Ground

23-30

Other Selected Works

31-40

Resume/Contact

41-42


Stavanger Marketplace Spring 2014 group project

Stavanger is the third largest city in Norway. Its official history as a city began in 1125 with the founding of the Stavanger Cathedral. The cathedral faces Stavanger’s main harbor and the marketplace that abuts it. The industry and the history of Stavanger marry in that marketplace from its time as a fishing hub, to the rise of its canning industry, to its recent status as an oil hub in Europe. Our task was to examine the marketplace in order to begin to understand why its history has not been a driver enough to create a thriving urban space.


STAVANGER MARKETPLACE Strategies

The strategies used to examine the marketplace are as important to the project as the physical proposals. These strategies allowed us to have a cohesive method in approaching the revitalization of the marketplace.

Permeability

Theater of Everyday Life

Urban Floor

Harmony

Imagination

Diversity

Adaptability

We began to think of the final project as a physical manifestation of multiplicity; the idea that 1+1=3. This concept is found in the summation of the parts of a system which combine to create a synergy that activates an environment. In turn, the whole then becomes greater than the sum of its parts. We then thought of the characteristic of light as being both a wave and a particle. We applied these ideologies to examine the marketplace and how to design for it by using the characteristics of permeability, harmony, imagination, diversity, and adaptability to add value to the overall system. Through these ideologies, we examined the urban floor and its various strata in order to find opportunities for stitches that connect activity nodes that can begin to create relationships that enhance the theater of everyday life. Increased life and energy are paramount to the success of the marketplace. These concepts are at the core of the response to that lack of life.


Context

Stavanger Stavanger Stavanger

Hinna Hinna Hinna

Sola Sola Sola Sandnes Sandnes Sandnes

Transportation

Cultural Nodes

Major Harbor

Existing Edges

Green Spaces

Existing Nodes

Circulation

Net Income

Immigrant Map

Out Migration

After we understood the strategies that we intended to use, we began to explore the site and the constraints and opportunities that it provides. Within the region, Stavanger is the largest city and the anchor. The harbor is the largest in the region and acts as an entry point for visitors and tourists. Stavanger is the cultural node in the region with the cathedral and harbor at the core. Due to its recent growth as an oil hub, it’s also a draw for immigrants as the city becomes much more diverse. At the site level, the marketplace presents opportunities. The marketplace is not a node in the city but rather a major circulation path to reach other nodes. However, the open space could become a connection between the cathedral and the harbor. In order to create a successful marketplace, its boundaries need clarity so that the space does not just spill out into its surroundings. The market also lacks constant activity due to a lack of programmed uses. In order to make it successful, we have to increase the program.


STAVANGER MARKETPLACE Response

We uncovered a few issues with the marketplace that we addressed in three parts. At the largest scale is the urban floor itself: the marketplace lacked ongoing activity. Next we tackled the lack of an edge to contain and create a visual node for the marketplace. Lastly, we tackled the lack of a navigational device for the city and a connection between the various strata.


Urban Floor The urban floor is the fabric that connects the public realm in Stavanger. The marketplace is currently lacking nodes of activity to activate it. The urban floor’s purpose is to activate the marketplace from underground in order to generate a multitude of diverse activities that provide opportunities to stitch the various strata. The urban floor uses a strategy of water and light to direct the flows of activity. Cultural Armature The cultural armature begins to solve the lack of definition and containment present in the marketplace. The marketplace also needs a space that which can contain large events. The cultural armature is an adaptable structure which creates the space for activities to occur. Due to its connection to the cathedral, the armature draws from the history of Stavanger to create a modern cultural space. Urban Compass The urban compass came to as we explored other successful plazas and places of gathering that have been successful throughout history. We noticed that plazas have a structure that signifies its presence and also tells time. The urban compass gives Stavanger a landmark that is reminiscent of its history as an oil hub and can also be seen as visitors enter its docks from the cruise ships.


STAVANGER MARKETPLACE Urban Compass

The Urban Compass serves as a navigation device and a needle that releases the energy of the urban flow in service of the idea of urban acupuncture. Its thirty-six meter above ground height establishes its presence as a navigation device within the city, and creates a triangulation with other tall structures in the city. The structure of the campanile brings to mind the structure of an oil rig. The primary connection with the strata of the city happens at the point where the tower engages the Urban Floor. The soaring height of the tower guides the populous to its point through an innovative combination of structure, sustainability, and experience. The twelve rings that surround the structure signify time; their horizontal windmills that generate energy. During good weather, the cladding of the upper levels of the campanile fold out to allow a different type of experience: engagement though perceptively “dangerous� architecture.


Sunset Funerary Chapel Fall 2012 individual project


SUNSET FUNERARY CHAPEL

The Sunset Funerary Chapel is a proposed project located in Manhattan, KS. The project’s purpose is to serve as social infrastructure for the increasing permanent population of Manhattan. The design is based on the idea of an electromagnetic spectrum which is reflected in the openings of the chapel. The process of entering the chapel is on 2 main axes that creates a ceremonious entry for the funeral goers. As the visitor moves towards the individual chapel, the most spiritual space, they are drawn by increased light. It’s organized in spaces and voids, with the spaces as the most private areas for self reflection. The view from the individual chapel is of a forest of trees that allows for a moment of reflection in a very personal space.

Space vs Void

Electromagnetic Spectrum


Downtown KC Recycles

Fall 2015 (in progress) capstone project

Kansas City currently offers curbside recycling services to residents of single family homes free of charge. For all other homes and businesses, recycling is provided at the discretion of property owners. Therefore, recycling rates in Kansas City are low, especially in the Greater Downtown Area. Our task is to design a vision study that brings recycling to the public realm that could become a catalyst for increased recycling around the city.

This project was completed in collaboration with 13 other students at the Kansas City Design Center.


DOWNTOWN KC RECYCLING STUDY Background Case Studies

Diversion Rates

San Francisco

Vancouver, BC

Portland

We began by comparing the recycling systems of cities with high diversion rates to that of Kansas City’s. The first step was looking at how much waste they divert from landfills as an achievable goal in order to determine what progressive cities are achieving today.

Kansas City

Overall System We then examined the recycling systems in these cities. What we discovered is that these cities all offer organics disposal. That instantly reduces 40% of the waste that is sent to landfills. Some case studies like Vancouver also incinerate trash before it is sent to landfills to reduce the volume. While incineration may not be an option for Kansas City, an efficient system which is sorted at the source and collects more materials is a lesson Kansas City could learn from.

Policy Interventions Kansas City San Francisco

41 years

Vancouver

16 years

Portland

1960

30 years 1965

1970

Recycling is available to all residents

1975

1980

1985

1990

1995

2000

2005

2010

2015

Recycling is mandated by the city

2020

As we examined these cities and their recycling systems, we noticed differences between Kansas City’s policies and the case study city’s policies. We especially examined recycling mandates that banned the disposal of certain recyclable materials. We then examined the preliminary policies that lead to the mandate and how they influences the diversion rates. Kansas City only recently began providing recycling for single family homes. Therefore, Kansas City is not ready for a recycling mandate.


Public Involvement

As a studio, we’re looking at integrating design into the recycling system. Recycling can become the norm by bringing it into the public realm. In order to learn about the realm of possibility, we researched innovative design examples that brought awareness about recycling and waste while also creating well-designed spaces. The examples think creatively about how to handle waste while also enhancing the public realm. They also educate the public on the possibilities of recycling.

Government Organization Individuals

Education Government Organization Individuals

Involvement

LA River Art Bridge

Freshkills Park

Portland

Vancouver San Francisco Portland

Awareness

Vancouver

Innovative Design

Government Organization Individuals

San Francisco

Kansas City

Design

Kansas City

Government Organization Individuals

Another large factor in the success of a city’s recycling system is public involvement. The intent of the project is to address recycling in the public realm. Therefore, the way that cities engaged the public was crucial for us to examine in order to understand measures that have worked in other cities. Cities such as San Francisco, Vancouver, and Portland bring recycling to the forefront of design from city bins to recycling arts festivals that bring awareness to the public. These interventions are very important for Kansas City in order to We then quantified the public engagement in the case studies by putting events in 4 categories: Design, Awareness, Education, and Involvement. After comparing Kansas City to those cities, Kansas City scored considerably lower in all 4 categories. By tackling public engagement, we can improve participation rates and then diversion rate in Kansas City.


DOWNTOWN KC RECYCLING STUDY Regional System

Research into the regional recycling system led to many discoveries and also left many questions unanswered. We looked at a broad view of Kansas City’s recycling system outside of its borders. We followed waste in Kansas City from the source to its final resting place. We also looked at the waste haulers in the region and where they operated. It was a step in understanding the model in which haulers operate. DISPOSAL OPTIONS

WASTE CATEGORIES

SPECIFIC MATERIALS

INTERMEDIARY STAGE

FINAL DESTINATION

LANDFILL

TRANSFER STATION

PLASTICS

CURBSIDE

METAL

SINGLE FAMILY HOME

CONSUMER

SUBSCRIPTION

PAPER

DROP-OFF

PLASTICS

MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING/ BUSINESS

NEW PRODUCT

TRASH

CONSUMER TYPE

RESIN CODES: #1 - #7

ALUMINUM - FOIL / CANS TIN - CANS OFFICE PAPER NEWSPAPER MAGAZINES MANILA FOLDERS CORRUGATED CARDBOARD PRESS BOARD

MRF

BROKER

REFINERY

MANUFACTURER

RESIN CODES:#1 & #2 INK CARTRIDGES STORE

RECYCLABLES

1ST STAGE

Republic

CLEAR GREEN BROWN

METROPOLITAN AREA

RIPPLE GLASS FACILITY

YARD WASTE

COMPOST SITE

MULCH

FOOD WASTE

MISSOURI ORGANIC

TOP SOIL / FERTILIZER

COMPOST

GLASS

FOOD WASTE

Deffenbaugh

Ted’s

Superior

AAA

A1


Greater Downtown Needs Downtown Kansas City is currently least served by the current recycling system. Recycling downtown is mainly private contracts with haulers. Therefore, we began to explore the amount of trash and recycling currently available in the public realm. In order to integrate recycling infrastructure into the public realm, we looked at available space that could become opportunities later on. We also looked at where development is currently occurring to understand current trends.


DOWNTOWN KC RECYCLING STUDY Vision

The vision for Kansas City encompasses policy scenarios and physical interventions in the form of links, clusters, and nodes. The policy scenarios are a way at tackling some of the larger issues in Kansas City that we identified through our research such as the lack of data and inefficiencies in the region. The physical interventions bring recycling to the public realm in order to bring awareness to the public.

VISION FRAMEWORK FOR DOWNTOWN KANSAS CITY'S WASTE PROGRAM Links

Clusters

Nodes

Overall System

[CONCEPTUAL SCENARIOS]

[INTENT]

PRIVATE REQUIRED/PUBLIC ACCESS

PROPERTY OWNER COOPERATION

ACCESS BY STANDARDS

COLLECTION LAYOUT/COLORS

EFFICIENCY

SINGLE HAULER

FOOD DISTRIBUTOR REQUIRED

COLLECTION OF ORGANICS

PUBLIC ACCESS

COMPOST LIFE CYCLE

SUSTAINABILITY

STORM WATER MANAGEMENT

PRIVATE REQUIRED/PUBLIC ACCESS

CLOUD STORAGE

DATA COLLECTION

THIRD PARTY MANAGEMENT

INFRASTRUCTURE

HIGH-TECH COLLECTION

PUBLIC USE

RIGHT OF WAY

ACCESS

MATERIAL COLLECTION

AWARENESS

ACTIVATE GROUND PLANE/SIGNAGE

PRIVATE - LOW-MID RISE

PARKING LOTS/ALLEY WAYS

COLLECTION EFFICIENCY

COLLECTION LOCATION/ACCESS CONTROL

FUNCTIONALITY

PUBLIC USE

LARGE SCALE MATERIAL COLLECTION

OF NEW INFRASTRUCTURE

NEW INFRASTRUCTURE

URBAN AGRICULTURE/SMRF

MULTIPLICITY

PUBLIC USE

MATERIAL COLLECTION

OF PROGRAMS + PEOPLE

LAYERING ACCESS

MULTIPLE USES

SHOWCASE

PUBLIC USE

MATERIAL COLLECTION

RE-PURPOSED WASTE

AWARENESS

TEMPORARY INSTALLATIONS/PLAYFUL OBJECTS

ORGANICS

PUBLIC USE

MATERIAL COLLECTION

EDUCATION

TACTICAL URBANISM/URBAN AGRICULTURE

MUNICIPAL

RE-PRIORITIZATION

VISION THE VISION IS TO CREATE A MORE LIVABLE DOWNTOWN KC THROUGH A THRIVING MATERIAL WASTE SYSTEM, KNOWN FOR EFFICIENT, DATA DRIVEN, INNOVATIVE DESIGN.

ORGANIC

INCORPORATION LOCAL NEEDS REGIONAL SYSTEM BEST PRACTICES

[TARGETS]

TECHNOLOGICAL REINFORCEMENT

INVESTIGATION LINKS

GOALS AWARENESS INFRASTRUCTURE ACCESS MEASUREMENT PARTICIPATION STANDARDS

CONTINUAL LOADS INTERMITTENT LOADS ORGANIC LOADS

TO ENGAGE

CLUSTERS TO COLLECT

NODES

TO ACTIVATE

AS NEW FOCUS

Vision Framework

[SYSTEM STRATEGIES]


After determining our focus areas, we then focused on the types of waste and the methodologies that they require to select and program sites. We focused on pedestrian counts, vehicle counts, public transportation routes and lane counts. We then determined corridors based on those criteria to generate a network of highly trafficked routes. The composite of those corridors and their proximity to opportunity lots determine the network which will ultimately become recycling centered spaces to benefit downtown Kansas City. We then worked on a system of organizing these spaces in order to determine the kinds of activities that occur in each space. The nodes were further divided into functional, multiplicity, showcase, and organic nodes based on the types of recycling activities that need to occur in these spaces.

Functional Node

Multiplicity Node

Showcase Node

Organic Node


Meeting Ground Winter 2016 competition

The ULI Hines Student Competition is an international urban design and development competition. Teams of five from three disciplines work to design a development plan for a real, largescale site. The challenge was to create a transit oriented development, identity and increase walkability in an area located on the southern edge of Midtown Atlanta that lacks an identity.

This project was completed in collaboration with 4 other students.


MEETING GROUND Concept

5

ile

m

0.5

Georgia Institute of Technology

Arts Center

Vehicular + Public Transit Flows Midtown Core

Existing Street Circulations Proposed Street Diets Planned Streetcar Route Existing Tech Trolley Route Proposed Tech Trolley Route Existing Bus Stop Proposed Network Station for MARTA Rail and Bus Stops Proposed Streetcar Stop

Piedmont Park

Midtown

le mi

le mi

MEETING GROUND

Beltline

MEETING GREEN

Atlanta

0.2 5

1.

Downtown Connector

The site is located in Midtown Atlanta at the meeting point of a lot different communities. The core of midtown is located just north on the MARTA line. North Avenue, a major east-west thoroughfare, is located on the southern end of the site and the I-75/I-85 downtown connector is the western edge of the site. Its location allows it to become a nexus for a variety of diverse communities. However, the most prominent of these communities is the Georgia Institute of Technology.

NETWORK STATION Old Fourth Ward

Downtown

Pedestrian + Bicycle Flows Existing Bike Lane Planned Bike Lanes Proposed Bike Share Proposed Bike Storage / Share Proposed Primary Bike and Pedestrian Lanes Proposed Secondary Bike Lanes


Accessibility and Transit 1. Campus Pedestrian Bridge 2. Second Story Walk/Bike Way 3. North Avenue Bridge Improvement 4. Network Station

Innovative Opportunities 5. University Facilities 6. Collaborative Offices 7. Adaptive Start Up Business Space 8. Bank of America Building Expansion

5 9

Sustainable Environments

20 1

9. Rooftop Garden 10. Pocket Park 11. Street improvements

2 12

14

20

6

7

13 15 19 10

11

Community Needs

18

22

16

17 9 4

21

22

3

8

12. Meeting Green 13. Outdoor Cultural Venue 14. Victory Torch 15. Midtown Hotel 16. The Commons Plaza 17. Connection Cafe 18. Fitness Center 19. Grocery and Prepared Food Market 20. Second Level Retail 21. Varsity Restaurant 22. Mixed-Income Housing

N


MEETING GROUND Proposal

Georgia Tech has a strong emphasis on engineering and other technology driven professions. The university is currently bounded on its east side by the highway. However, they’ve began to cross over and are looking for opportunities to allow that. Our proposal is to create a mixed-use development that supplies office space for new start up companies in order to foster the sharing of ideas. The development also utilizes its location next to a MARTA stop to create a transit-oriented development that attracts young professionals to the area.


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MEETING GROUND Proposal

The proposal calls for a mix of office, commercial, and residential uses. The amount of open space proposed, creates space for programmed activities that enliven the area as well as create a customer base for technology companies. It also allows for the retail and commercial spaces to stay active throughout the day; especially with the addition of the second story bike path that connects across the freeway.

10,000 124,600 sf 17.8 ac 6,373,894 sf 8 79 16.9% $25,096,450 $2,294,892,034

12.8% Unleveraged IRR

Local Jobs Open Space Amenities Developable Land Total Buildout Average F.A.R. DU per Acre Leveraged IRR Current Site Value Projected Site Value

Stormwater management will integrate into complete street strategies. Street trees will cleanse the city air and create enjoyable pedestrian experiences. Public health will be promoted by increasing walkability, bikeability, and urban outdoor spaces. Wider sidewalks will slow down vehicular traffic and improve the pedestrian realm. Bike lanes will be widened and separated from vehicular traffic to facilitate traffic flows. The streetcar will ease traffic and increase activity near this multimodal transit hub.


Current Site Dilemmas Low Density Development No Sense of Urbanism High Vacancy Rates Lack of Retail Options Unlocked Potential to Develop

Phase 1: Establish Anchors

Phase 2: Foster Connections

Office/Commercial Retail

Retail Residential

Parking Hotel

Phase 3: Infill + Expansion

Office/Commercial

Office/Commercial Retail

Residential

Residential Parking


Other Selected Works


OTHER SELECTED WORKS Photography


OTHER SELECTED WORKS Photography


OTHER SELECTED WORKS Photography


OTHER SELECTED WORKS Academic Internship Work

During my time at CannonDesign I had the opportunity to work mainly on 2 projects. The first project is a trio of Veterans Association outpatient clinics. I worked on all 3 clinics The clinics in the Schematic Design stage and I was responsible for the renderings and site design for the project. The second project is the Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM). CHUM is a two phase project encompassing 1m sqft project, 2 city blocks, and 6 buildings. CHUM required a lot of coordination and synchronization between teams internationally. My task was to generate equipment drawings for 3 of the buildings as they were coordinated between the client and health planners.

Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM)


Veterans’ Association Outpatient Clinic


Halima Shehu 816.839.3399 hshehu@ksu.edu NCARB & IDP enrolled


RESUME Education

Affiliations

Interests

Kansas City Design Center Fifth Year Urban Design studio August 2015

Women In Design Events Coordinator Jan 2012- Dec 2014

Kansas State University 4.0 graduate GPA NAAB Accredited Program

AIAS Events Officer Aug 2012- May 2013

Urban Design Creative Placemaking Urbanism Sustainability

Hartnackschule Berlin Certified Language School

CAPD Ambassador, Mentor Aug 2012-Dec 2014

M.Arch |May 2016 (expected)

B1 German Language Course|July 2011

Raymore-Peculiar High

Skills

Experience

2d/3d modeling Revit Rhino Sketchup Autocad

May 2010

Kansas City Design Center Graduate Assistant Aug 2015 to present

CannonDesign Student Architecture Intern Jan-Aug 2015

K-State Office of Admissions Office Assistant Aug 2013-Dec 2014

Rendering/Editing VRay 3ds Max Adobe Creative Suite Other Adobe Muse Ecotect

Online Publications Kansas City Design Center kcdesigncenter.org/blog/

Utepils

http://issuu.com/hshehu/docs/utepils2

References Vladimir Krstic

vkrstic@kcdesigncenter.org|785.313.2278

Torgeir Norheim

norheim@mimirinc.com|785.317.9940

Gary Coates

norheim@mimirinc.com|785.532.5953


Thank You

Profile for Halima

Academic Portfolio_2011-2016  

Academic Portfolio of works completed while at Kansas State University. 2011 - 2016

Academic Portfolio_2011-2016  

Academic Portfolio of works completed while at Kansas State University. 2011 - 2016

Profile for hshehu
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