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your mid-south home and garden magazine May / June, 2011 | www.memphisfixmagazine.com


Artist Spotlight

HugheyBurchfield By Holly Whitfield • Photo by Joey Miller

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ughey Burchfield admits he spent most of his childhood in study hall, looking at National Geographic magazines and daydreaming about traveling the world with a camera. “I wasn’t a great student,” he laughs. At 69 years old, the retired banker and educator has turned his early interest in photography into a professional career. “I’m inspired by places and things that most people would drive by and ignore,” he shares. Mr. Burchfield’s work focuses mostly on local landscapes and architecture, and he uses a special method of digital photography to give his images their characteristic punch. Rather than capture a single image of a particular scene, he snaps a series of photos at different exposures. Then, he uses computer software to digitally combine the shots for a final product that shows every aspect in high definition and saturated hues. The strong use of color and detail can turn a nondescript rural scene into a vibrant image that draws the eye, such as in his piece “A Road Less Travelled.”

"A Train Bound to Nowhere" Collierville

You can view Hughey’s work or purchase a photo that speaks to you at The Art Vault, 14 N Main St, Collierville, TN, 38017 or on his website www.mindsphotoeye.com.

"The Mothership of Delta Blues" Clarksdale

"A Road Less Traveled" Tate County

When he’s not out searching for the hidden beauty of the everyday, he is involved with numerous community arts organizations, including the Arts Councils of Desoto, Sycamore, and Olive Branch, as well as the Desoto Camera Club and the recently formed Midsouth Art nonprofit. “It’s about changing ideas, promoting arts and art scholarships in schools, and networking among local artists,” he explains. “My biggest payday does not come from photos I sell, but the communication I have with people who look at my pictures and like what they see,” describes the photographer. His work resonates with locals who see familiar places in his photos, and many out of town patrons who appreciate the Southern scenes and references to the blues culture of north Mississippi. He has some wonderful advice for would-be photographers (or anyone for that matter): “Don’t speed down the highway, and don’t ever be afraid to turn around and go back.”


Captivating Garden Design by Holly Whitfield • Photos by Nathan Berry

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rlington homeowner Scott Pavelec has always enjoyed landscaping and gardening as a hobby, and the retired Naval officer certainly doesn’t mind getting his hands dirty. However, when it came time for a complete makeover of his yard, he enlisted the help of local expert Tracy Chapman of Chapman Landscaping. “Scott and I worked very well together on this project,” Mr. Chapman shares. “He knew specifically what he was looking for, and we were able to make that happen for him.” The first step was to remove the enormous but sickly tree from the center of the front yard, in the crux of the horseshoe driveway. Then, Chapman Landscaping coordinated a total restructuring from the ground up, including fresh sod, retaining walls, beds, and an irrigation system. The concrete retaining walls in the front were artfully formed to match the home’s existing stone and add height and interest to the lawn. Authentic capstones add a rustic look to the walls, and wrought iron fencing completes the French-New Orleans style. In the backyard, a large arbor and ceiling fan were installed over the existing patio. “We love to entertain here,” Scott shares. The perimeter of the yard is filled with flowers and shrubs, including several varieties of Japanese maples, daylilies, purple coneflowers, fragrant herbs and climbing clematis on the beams of the arbor. Mr. Pavelec has added personal design touches to the beds as well, with a collection of fountains, rock gardens, Buddha and even a gargoyle for fun and luck. By the end of the summer, he explains, the front and back yards will be full of color and bright scents of flowers and herbs. “Chapman and I worked hand in hand to create this,” he explains. The end result of the collaboration between an enthusiast and a professional is a structured, colorful, and personalized lawn and garden.

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Fix May/June 2011