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ARCHI TECTURE PORT FOLIO heather ruszczyk


RESUME EDUCATION DEGREE

University of Washington, Seattle, WA December 2012 Master of Architecture Principia College, Elsah, IL June 2007 B.A. Mathematics, Studio Art minor

ABROAD

EXPERIENCE RELATED

OTHER

VOLUNTEER

Kobe University, Kobe, Japan October 2011- September 2012 • Independent research for Master’s Thesis Architecture in Rome Design Studio, Rome, Italy Fall 2010 Cogenhagen Study Tour, Scan l Design Foundation, September 2009 Kyoto Institute of Language and Culture, Kyoto, Japan Fall 2006

Intern, Atelier Bow Wow, Tokyo, Japan February 2012-April 2012 • Constructed study and presentation models • Worked with a team on competition projects Intern, Hutchison & Maul Architecture, Seattle, WA June 2011-September 2011 • Schematic and conceptual design • Built models and completed renderings for client meetings Intern, Geise Architects, Seattle, WA June 2009-September 2009 Installation Assistant, Kinesis Construction, Inc., Seattle, WA June 2009-September 2009 Research Assistant, Gundula Proksch (UW Faculty), Seattle, WA June 2010-September 2011 • Research in integrating architectural systems with urban agriculture • Prepared case studies, documents, designed layouts and diagramming for academic papers Teacher, Empowering the Women of Nepal, Pokhara, Nepal July 2007 - October 2007 Tutor, The English Studio, Kobe, Japan November 2011-September 2012


ADDITIONAL COMPUTER SKILLS

AWARDS

OTHER

AutoCAD, Revit, Google SktechUp, Rhino3D Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign VRay, Kerkythea (rendering software) Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint Kobe Fellowship, October 2011 AIA Certificate of Merit, Student Award, May 2011 Kiyoshi Seike Endowed Fellowship, May 2011 Hermann Pundt Memorial Endowed Fellowship, May 2010 First Place, USGBC Emerging Green Builders Competition, Boston Chapter, June 2009 Merit Scholarship, Principia College, 2003 - 2007 Participant, USGBC Greenbuild Conference, Phoenix, AZ November 2009 Member, Principia College Presidential Board, Principia College, Elsah, IL


CONTENTS


01

Curating the Interstice

02

Greyhound Bus Terminal

03

Metro Station at Piazza Venezia

04

Integrated Urban Agriculture

thesis / urban intervention

structural system / tectonics

transit infrastructure / urban issues

multi-family housing / systems integration


100’-0” 100’-0”

50’-0” 50’-0”

25’-0” 25’-0” 10’-0”

Kobe Kyoto Osaka

HU NS Tokyo HO

5’-0”

10’-0”

0’-0” 6 3’-11” 235

7 1’-5” 27

1 8’-10” 740 8 8’-4” 73

2 4’-7” 453 9 17’-3” 625

22 10’-3” 81

23 7’-6” 676

17 7” 36 24 2’-5” 318

18 8’-8” 479 25 2’-4” 59

5’-0” 0’-0”

1 8’-10” 740

2 4’-7” 453

3 5’-6” 198

4 1’-1” 160

5 2’-9” 119

01 Curating the Interstice

Exploiting the urban gap phenomenon in Kobe, Japan Location: Kobe, Japan Completed: December 2012 Project focus: installation space, intervention, urban form, curation, temporality Programs used: Rhino, Sketchup, AutoCAD, VRay, Adobe This project is inspired by urban phenomena in Japan, particularly those conditions that result from a rapidly changing urban form. One of the most significant effects of this rapid rate of change is the presence of gaps in the urban fabric. This thesis engages with the gaps in the Sakaemachi neighborhood of central Kobe as representative spaces of change, addressing the issues of temporality, questioning the void as a negative space, and offering a proposal to exploit the gap. This project envisions Sakaemachi’s gaps as a collection to be curated, creating an infrastructure that supports this network of gaps as an ‘art site’, filling them with temporary site-specific installations and inviting the public to transgress the void. 17 7” 36

18 8’-8” 479

19 4’-11” 109

20 2’-10” 282

21 2’-10” 228


10’-0”

5’-0” 0’-0”

3 5’-6” 198 10 1’-9” 48

19 4’-11” 109 26 1’-3” 42

4 1’-1” 160 11 16’-10” 352

20 2’-10” 282 27 1’-3” 25

5 2’-9” 119 12 4’-10” 472

21 2’-10” 228 28 1’-0” 149

6 3’-11” 235 13 6’-8” 162

7 1’-5” 27 14 2’-11” 163

8 8’-4” 73 15 3’-11” 798

9 17’-3” 625 16 34’-1” 2353

22 10’-3” 81 29 21’-1” 218

23 7’-6” 676 30 2’-0” 146

24 2’-5” 318 31 5’-4” 308

25 2’-4” 59 32 13’-5” 240

5’-0” 1 8’-10” 740

17 10 7” 36 1’-9” 48

26 1’-3”

33 42 1’-7” 70

1:20

2 4’-7” 453

18 11 8’-8” 16’-10” 479 352

27 1’-3”

34 25 3’-0” 773

3 5’-6” 198

19 12 4’-11” 1094’-10” 472

28 1’-0”

35 149 2’-8” 130

4 1’-1” 160

20 13 2’-10” 2826’-8” 162

29 21’-1”

36 218 2’-5” 153

5 2’-9” 119

6 3’-11” 235

7 1’-5” 27

21 14 2’-10” 2282’-11” 163

22 15 10’-3” 813’-11” 798

23 16 7’-6” 67634’-1” 2353

30 2’-0” 37146 4’-0” 110

38 308 2’-11” 238

31 5’-4”

0’-0” 8 8’-4” 73

9 1 17’-3” 8’-10” 625 740

10 2 1’-9” 4’-7”48 453

11 3 16’-10” 5’-6” 352 198

12 4 4’-10” 1’-1” 472 160

24 2’-5” 318

25 172’-4” 7” 59 36

26 181’-3” 8’-8”42 479

27 191’-3” 4’-11” 25 109

28 201’-0” 2’-10” 149 282

40 12’-6” 994

41 33 7” 1’-7”61 70

42 34 6” 3’-0”25 773

43 35 5’-2” 2’-8”65 130

44 36 2’-2” 2’-5” 100 153

13 5 6’-8” 2’-9” 162 119

14 6 2’-11” 3’-11” 163 235

15 7 3’-11” 1’-5” 798 27

16 8 34’8’-4” 235 73

29 21 21’-1” 2’-10” 218 228

30 222’-0” 10’-3” 146 81

31 235’-4” 7’-6” 308 676

32 2413’2’-5” 240 318

45 37 8’-6” 4’-0” 682 110

46 38 8’-8” 2’-11” 447 238

47 39 2’-10” 1’-7” 106 64

48 40 1’-1 12’-6” 66 994

01

32 13’-5”

39 240 1’-7” 64

1:20

plan view of forty-eight gaps surveyed in kobe


fragmented rhythm space as a field

urban form in shibuya, tokyo

gaps between buildings in ueno, tokyo A solid void

regulated rhythm + scale space asspace a fieldas a field

40%

vs

space as a grid space as a grid

51%

void

solid

sectional rhythm

Japan’s Changing Urban Form

The average lifespan of a building in Japan is 26 years, roughly half of that in the United States. With a lack of long term planning strategies and a general lack of zoning and parcel regulation, urban form is constantly changing. Increasing land value and a disregard for preservation and reuse contributes to this attitude of ‘scrap and build.’ Further, a mandate requires a minimal separation between every building, rendering each structure an easily replaceable stand alone object. There are no urban party wall conditions. The most significant effect of these conditions is the appearance of gaps in the urban fabric.

B

sakaemachi’s positive space

space as a grid

17%

69%

C

negative cast of sakaemachi showing void space as positive

roads


olution

01 At the height of the ‘bubble’ years, this figure ground Large block development, reflecting the effect of early foreigners on urban form and Sakaemachi’s adjacency to 2012 pictures Sakaemachi as but visible is the growing number 1984 of gaps due to the un division of land. the ‘foreign settlement’ just east of the site.

1956

1956 1st Iteration

2012 3rd Iteration

1984 2nd Iteration

Gap Evolution (above)

Four gaps & Art Site Sakaemachi (below)

This sequence of maps demonstrates the increasing fragmentation of urban land and the growing complexity of the network of voids that separates buildings.

24

Interstitial voids are critically important to perpetuating the unique character and formation of urban space in Japan. This thesis engages with the gaps in the Sakaemachi neighborhood of central Kobe offering a proposal exploitgeneral the gapdecline throughof using as an agent ‘fill’ these Byto2012, theart economy andtoleaves its voids with temporary site-specific installation. Ofcollapse, the forty-eight gapsrecovery, surveyed and in Kobe, four marpost bubble post 1996 a growAt the height of the ‘bubble’ years, this figure ground were selected to represent Art ing Sitenumber Sakaemachi. of larger gaps due to accumulated empty lots.

16

2012 pictures Sakaemachi as but visible is the growing number of gaps due to the un division of land.

1984

4

2’-

4”

32

” ’-2

70

’-1

4’

24

46

12

0

The urban form displayed in this mapping is best described

16

32’

4 7” 6’-1 0 3’-

By m ing Th

16

22’

16

12

8’-

” ’-7

10

46

8’-

24

10

2’-

10

4”

24

” ’-7 43 2’4”

46

’-1 -7” 46’0’ 10 43 4’

24

16

22’

22’

32

’-1

4’

24

’-5 72

” ’-7

2’-

4”

43 4”

2’-

46 ” 46 ’-7 ’-1 0 3’- 10 416

4’

32

4’

four gaps and art site sakaemachi

’-1

0

32

” ’-2

70

’-1

0

0

” ’-2

32

70

’-1

0

32’

” ’-2

70

16

32’

’-5

10

8’-

46

72

8’-

46

’-5

72

32’

22’

22’ 44’

72

43

44’

44’

7

0

44’

” ’-7 432’ -4”

4”

24

43

4”

’-5

2

-7”

” ’-7

46

2’-

Th an wi ‘sc ga pr

2” 0’-

’-1

2’-

8’24 10

” ’-2

70

32’

32

4’

46

’-5

72

44’

12

32’

2012

By 2012, general decline of the economy and leaves its marpost bubble collapse, post 1996 recovery, and a grow” 46’2” ’-7 10 32 of larger gaps due70’-to accumulated empty lots. 43 number ’-1 2’- ing 16 0 16 4” 4’ The urban form displayed in this mapping is best described 32’

12

The overlay of the figure ground maps from 1956, 1984, and 2012 demonstrates the evolution of gap development within 26 year increments, the average length of one ‘scrap and build’ cycle. Notable is the growing number of gaps, the increasing division of space and smallness of property, and the amount of empty space by 2012.


the curator 1 identify existing gap

2a install artist’s studio

3a prepare space through

2b artist occupies studio

3b site-speciďŹ c installation

in gap

minimal intervention

the artist

art site components

in gap

5 construction materials

stored and partially assembled in storehouse

1 identify the gap

the visitor

4 public transgression

2 construction system prepare the gap Art Site Process

This project creates an infrastructure that supports a network of voids, providing a collaborative platform

throughfor curator and artist. The curator selects the voids and prepares the space through minimal architectural ention intervention. A resident artist is invited to respond through impregnating the void with a temporary

3

site-specific work. Prior to installation, the artist is invited to occupy their gap, developing an intimate relationship with the space in order to respond accordingly. Finally, the public is invited to transgress into these gaps. While this process is happening in a number of gaps, a central facility, located in a larger gap, is a vital element in this process, working to maintain and perpetuate the art site. Scaffolding was employed as a tectonic expression that could be repeated throughout each phase of constructing the art site. This gap and for its system was chosen because of its ability to create and adapt to a variety ofoccupy spaces,the reuseability, expression of temporality.

standard ring-lock scaolding pieces

plywood

coated polyethylene mesh netting


01 24

46

16

32’

22’

12

’-5

44’

72

7”

2’-

4”

’43

8’-

10

” ’-7

2’-

4”

43

46

’-1 0 4’

32

” ’-2

’-1

0

70

plan of gap #12 with intervention

section

Experiencing the Gap

This rendering displays the final realized product of the curator’s intervention and the artist’s installation. In gap #12, the intervention was a simple ramp built from scaffolding which brings the visitor up into the space, suspending them 4’ above the ground plane. A mirrored surface covers the ground allowing the visitor to experience a reflected image of the sky above and the installation. The curator has invited a hanging installation artist to create a work for this space, which is here represented as a glowing pink orb. The projected length of any one installation is 6 months. visitor’s experience of gap #12 with curator’s intervention and artist’s installation


4’

32’

16

32

” ’-2

’-1

0

70

central facility and storehouse in gap #16


4 3

b

4

1

a

4 3 4

4 3

a

5

5

4 2

1

1

5

2

workshop storage welcome center / archive public restrooms curator’s studio

b

2

1 2 3 4 5

site plan of gap #16

curator’s loft (above)

section a

section b

Maintaining the Gap

This facility provides the basic infrastructure to maintain the Art Site. It is located in a larger gap, a typical infill site, measuring 34’ x 70’. Programmatically, it includes public restrooms and a welcome center for visitors coming to Sakaemachi, but most importantly, it acts as a storehouse and workshop. The scaffolding and other materials for the in-situ interventions are stored and staged here by the curator and artists.

01


detailed section perspective of central facility


01

coated polyethylene netting

2 x 4 studs @ 3’ o.c. attached to scaffold 2 x 12 floor joists @ 3’ o.c. attached to scaffold 2” plywood sheet attached to interior of studs

standard 43 mm tube steel ring lock scaffolding system

standard scaffolding base

exploded tectonic axonometric This building demonstrates the use of scaffolding to a higher degree of permanency with a lifespan of 3-6 years. The scaffolding acts as an exterior structure to shelter the unconditioned space of the workshop. The conditioned space, a simple box constructed of plywood and 2x4s, is entirely hung off of the scaffolding structure.

preparation for gap installation


02 Frame & Foundation

Shaping a new civic space for the Seattle Greyhound Bus Terminal Location: Seattle, WA Completed: March 2011 Project focus: Tectonics, Structural system Programs used: Sketchup, AutoCAD, Kerkythea, Adobe Due to the increasing cost of air travel and a lack of high speed rail, individuals traveling in the United States are left with few economical and ecological transportation options. A viable solution is to reconsider the bus for both regional and long distance transit. Preparing for the next generation of bus travel, the Seattle Greyhound Bus Terminal accomodates the civic nature of public transit terminals through creating an open and accessible public space. The terminal itself acts as an extension of the streetscape, allowing for ease of flow of people and buses to and from the site. The tectonics shift between a dense manipulated ground and a highly transparent plane defined by an expressive steelframed roof above. The roof meets the ground at support points on either side of the narrow building. These points of convergence between the tectonic and stereometric; the earth and the sky; the concrete and steel; become important moments of microspatial significance. The base of the columns respond to the human scale and become occupiable spaces; opportunities for sitting, meeting, congregating, and resting.


02

long-term waiting along street


frame frame

1

metal sheathing + roofing

2

secondary structure

3

primary lattice structure

foundation foundation

framing plan

Structural System

4

column + ground connection

5

concrete ground plane

Vertical and lateral support systems are integrated via three canted columns at each support point which rise from an extrusion of the concrete ground plane and meet a curved roof plane overhead. The frame of this roof also stitches together the lateral support.


02

intersection of boren st + stewart ave

lower level access to bus platform

rear bus loading platform


a

b

b TICKETING CAFE

LONG-TERM WAITING

DROP-OFF TICKETING a

CAFE

LONG-TERM WAITING

DROP-OFF

BUS LOADING SHORT-TERM WAITING

street level plan

LUGGAGE

LUGGAGE ADMIN

MECHANICAL

Through exaggerating the existing topography on the site, the minimal square footage of the required program is tucked into the earth, leaving a truly open space above. This carefully carved concrete ground plane negotiates the grade change through a ramping split-level building.

BUS LOADING ADMIN

SHORT-TERM WAITING

MECHANICAL

lower level

section b


02 2 1

3

1 king post truss connection

2 major beam + column detail

3 column + ground connection


The following photos display a detailed tectonic exploration through constructing a 1/4” = 1’0” scale model using bass wood and MDF board. This model was used to resolve several structural details during design development.


02


03 Integrated Urban Agriculture

Living + Growing in Yesler Terrace, Seattle Location: Seattle, WA Completed: June 2010 Project focus: Multi-family housing, integrated systems, urban agriculture Programs used: Sketchup, AutoCAD, Kerkythea, Adobe Plants and humans require the same basic elements; sunlight, water, and food. The strategy of this project is to integrate living and growing in such a way that the architecture allows for both plants and people to recieve their vital nutrients. This tall, narrow building is oriented towards the south where ample sunlight yields primary growing space. This large facade becomes a vertical growing screen and accomodates the primary circulation for the building, individual hung ‘backyard’ gardens, and small porches which extend the variety of plants capable of growth. The building structure itself welcomes plant growth and this tension cable facade becomes a host for climbing vines. Five empty units penetrate this growing wall, representing communal volumes where residents practice composting and maintain chicken coops.


03

exterior growing screen + circulation


Building Statistics + + + + + + +

provides housing for 140 people feeds 56% of residents required daily portion of vegetables 63,300 lbs of vegetables grown per year 54 chickens for eggs and compost indoor/outdoor soil-based growing constructed wetlands recycles: 70% of potable water 40% of grey water 10% of black water


H TH 9T 9

LIVING SYSTEMS

03

R DE AL R DE AL

single

double

27 units @ 750 sq ft

28 units @ 1,100 sq ft

triple 16 units @ 1,500 sq ft

R ER 8 TH8 TH

N N b b

a a

N

8 TH 8 TH

e plan te plan = 100’ = 100’

scale: 1/8” = 1’ constructed wetlands constructed wetlands

resident amenities

communal kitchen

resident amenities

communal kitchen

mailboxes mailboxes restaurant restaurant

greenhouse greenhouse

alternating floor plans

retail

b b

of living units

a a

YESLER YESLER

pical floor plan pical floor plan 16” = 1’0” 16” = 1’0”

pical floor plan pical floor plan 16” = 1’0” typical 16” = 1’0”

retail

vendor stalls

education center

elevation

ound floor plan ound floor planmatrix 16” = 1’0” 16” = 1’0”

vendor stalls

education center


GROWING SYSTEMS

growing greenhouse

waste chicken coop

chickens

growing

eggs

vegetables

growing screen

compost

eggs vegetables

Growing Types

waste

Living / Growing Cycle

chickens

growing types

growing

education center

waste cycle

harvesting the growing screen

from garden to table


03 50%

75%

90%

100%

summer summer solstice solstice sunlight transmitted

rainwater collection stored in rooftop cistern

plants gravity fed through drip irrigation

grey water from washer/shower to toilet

Water System Rain water is collected on the roof and circulated to a plant irrigation system. Grey water is circulated through a constructed wetland while black water runs through a membrane bioreactor

50%

supplemental water purchased from city

75%

winter solstice

sunlight sunlight transmitted transmitted

90%

winter solstice

100%

75%

95%

100%

grey water overflow to constructed wetland on site

summer summer solstice solstice

summer solstice

sunlight transmitted

membrane bioreactor processes black water from toilets

Sun Shading Sunlight and plant growth on the building naturally correspond with human need for light and warmth

75%

95%

100%

winter solstice sunlight sunlight transmitted transmitted

6th floor chicken coop

street market along yesler


D

C

B

A

ve

zia ne

04 Lavori Linea C

A Metro Station at Piazza Venezia Location: Rome, Italy Completed: December 2011 Project focus: Urban issues, transportation infrastructure Programs used: Sketchup, AutoCAD, Adobe An archeological strata lies beneath Rome today, a sort of ‘untouchable’ layer which inhibits major infrastructural changes. Traffic is one of the greatest debilitating factors for this city and an expanded metro network is necessary for the progress of the city. Roma Metropolitan has planned two additional metro lines which will bisect the city, filling the gap in the public transportation network. Line C was scheduled to open in 2011 with one of its major stops at Piazza Venezia. After countless digs, the station was halted indefinitely on account of the archeological strata sitting underneath the piazza. Lavori Linea C is a proposal for reclaiming the traffic circle as the station for the Venezia stop at the interchange of metro lines C and D. This requires lifting the lid of the city to reveal what is underneath, finding an appropriate opportunity to puncture this precious layer and digging past, realizing the potential of an underground network in Rome.


04

standing on train platform looking up into the station


Piazza Venezia: 2010 condition (L); 2006 excavation (R)

rome 0m

2010

precious rome 10 m

50 bc

modernization of rome 2020 33 m

The station is almost entirely subterranean, entered through a small ‘hole in the ground’, circulating past the archaeological dig, and expanding once beyond this strata. The incision becomes a light well in addition to ventilation for the station. An underground tunnel system connects to multiple entrances, including a major bus station which allows for the safe navigation of the traffic circle above.


04 Via del Corso

Via dei Fori Imperiali

Venezia Bus Stop

Piazza Venezia site plan + major connections


to Via del Corso

to Venezia Bus Stop

Metro Line C


04 Piazza Venezia (0 m)

to Via del Corso

conceptual model

to Venezia Bus Stop

to Via dei Fori Imperiali

train platform (33 m)

Metro Line C station plan

descending into metro station


heather ruszczyk @ hruszczyk@gmail.com

781.608.2923 131 11th st ne #3 washington d.c. 20002

Architecture Portfolio  

Graduate work completed during an M.Arch program at the University of Washington

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