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BON APPÉTIT š VOLUME 58 NUMBER 09

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T H E H OT 1 0 : A M E R I C A’S B E ST N E W R E STAU R A N TS

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A fearless chef’s risk-taking pays off big at the best restaurant of 2013.

You heard it here irst: Fish is the new steak, thanks to places like this palatial seafood “shack.”

ALMA

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SAISON

Quinton Roach, a Jeffrey’s back waiter, prepares for service.

Could a meal really be worth $248 before drinks, tax, or tip? We look at the numbers behind “yes.”

134

ROLF AND DAUGHTERS

A Nashville newcomer offers pasta that pulls ahead of the pack.

140

FAT RICE

Our new favorite cultural mashup serves a namesake dish we couldn’t wait to make at home.

THE OPTIMIST

162

JEFFREY’S & JOSEPHINE HOUSE

After years of rowdy-casual restaurants, ine dining makes a comeback— starting here.

168

THE WHALE WINS & JOULE

Two chefs reinvent steak tartare, our 2013 Dish of the Year.

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ASKA

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A Swedish chef plants a New Nordic lag in Brooklyn soil (the edible kind, of course).

Veggies steal the scene at Portland, OR’s freshest Italian spot.

Photograph by Gentl & Hyers.

AVA GENE’S

150

THE PASS & PROVISIONS

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One building, two (very) different restaurants.

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B O N A P P E T I T. C O M

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THE BA ARSENAL

Move over, kale salad: Iceberg’s making a comeback.

C O LU M N S

54

24

Date night rules. BY JENNY ROSENSTRACH AND ANDY WARD

Chefs request memorable meals.

THE PROVIDERS

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57

Rustic, smallbatch, handmade— restaurant plates catch up with the food.

Andrew Knowlton ate America to report this issue (poor guy). Here are the 25 most amazing things he saw and savored.

THEY’RE EVERYWHERE

38

KNOW-IT-ALL

Pro tips for day drinking and dining out from Austenland’s Keri Russell. INTERVIEW BY MICKEY RAPKIN

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THE READ

A taste of fall’s best chef cookbooks.

42

LOVE LETTER

A thermos worth bragging about.

SPECIAL PULLOUT

THE TAKEAWAY

Bring the season’s hottest trends into your kitchen. BY STACY ADIMANDO

52

THE WINE INSIDER

Sherry: suddenly cool. BY DAVID LYNCH

THE FOODIST

T H E B A K I TC H E N

65

FAST, EASY, FRESH

Our favorite chefs serve up their home recipes.

76

GOOD HEALTH

Funky, zippy, goodfor-you fermented foods are having a moment. BY AMIEL STANEK

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THE PROJECT

Authentic Japanese ramen at home? We shoyu how. BY ALISON ROMAN

175

PREP SCHOOL

D.I.Y. preserved lemons and more.

R.S.V.P.

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BA STORYTELLERS

Stars dish on San Francisco’s most legendary bar. BY MICKEY RAPKIN

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NAVIGATOR

Devouring Charleston, SC. BY BRYS STEPHENS

106

FEAST OR FASHION

Style icons on cooking, restaurants, and culinary innovation. BY CHRISTINE MUHLKE

114

THE OBSESSIVORE

Adam Sachs cooks for a growing brood.

202

BACK OF THE NAPKIN

Sofia Coppola’s grab-and-go map of L.A.

IN EVERY ISSUE

14 @bonappetit 22 editor’s letter 200 recipe index 200 sourcebook

The Hey Hey, My My, shaken at our No. 5 restaurant. P. 52

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BEHOLD

THE NEW BONAPPETIT.COM! Starting now, things are going to look a little different around here. We’ve overhauled our Web site with tons of cool new features. Here’s what to look for…

Don wo ry: ve kept veryth ng o l ve i d ng o than 0 s

A New Recipe Box Like your trusty index cards, but digitized.

Inside the BA Test Kitchen Our food team shares its tricks of the trade.

Add Your Suggestions An easier way to comment on your favorite recipes.

Enhanced Search Find what you’re hungry for, faster than ever.

Big, Beautiful Photos More pixels, more power to make you swoon.

More Daily Content The latest reporting on food news and trends.

ON THE WAY TO OUR HOT 10, WE CAME UP WITH 50 NOMINEES FOR AMERICA’S BEST NEW RESTAURANTS. SEE THE ENTIRE LIST AT BONAPPETIT.COM/GO/50BEST.

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COURTESY OF APPLE IMAC

Kitchen Mode Step-bystep slides to guide you through recipes.


“Birthday dinners at Benihana: flying shrimp, teriyaki steak, and banana tempura, prepared with knife skills I still aspire to.”

Editor in Chief

“French dip sandwich! The local tavern allowed kids in with their folks. I remember dipping this delicious thing, watching the grown-ups. What’s not to love?”

ADAM RAPOPORT Creative Director Executive Editor Managing Editor Food Editor

—A.G.

Deputy Editor SCOTT D SIMON Food & Features Editor Senior Associate Editor Associate Editor JULIA KRAMER Assistant Editor

WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE RESTAURANT MEAL AS A KID?

Art Director Deputy Art Director Designer Junior Designer Photo Director Photo Editor Photo Assistant Senior Food Editor Recipe Editor Associate Food Editor Assistant Food Editor

Production Director Assistant Production Manager Assistant Managing Editor Copy Chief Research Director Research Editor

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“Grilled cheese and tomato, with fries, at Friendly’s. Followed by a Happy Ending sundae with cookies-and-cream ice cream, peanut butter sauce, and marshmallow sauce.”

Contributors

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Executive Director, Public Relations & Events Associate Director, Public Relations Artistic Director

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editor’s letter

Big night out: Shrimp toast and Shirley Temples at a D.C. landmark.

I DON’T KNOW ABOUT YOU, but when I was a kid in Washington,

D.C., going out to dinner was a big deal. Once a month or so, my parents would pile my brother, my sister, and me into our banged-up, coffee-colored Dodge wagon and we’d truck off to a spot like Bish Thompson’s in Bethesda, Maryland. This was one of those nautical-themed seafood restaurants with captain’s wheels on the wall, netting on the ceiling, glowing fish tanks in the dining room, and mints at the door. It was like having dinner at an amusement park. Same with Yenching Palace in Washington’s Cleveland Park, with its neon-lit Chinatown-style facade, radioactive-red Shirley Temples, and crisp, golden shrimp toast. On a couple of occasions, my dad took me to Sir Walter Raleigh’s in Chevy Chase, Maryland. I remember two suits of armor standing sentinel in front of the “British” pub, and ordering a burger that came on an English muffin (this is what passed for exotic back then). D.C. had other beloved spots, like Blackie’s House of Beef (a New Orleans–style white-brick fortress with black wroughtiron balconies, and prime rib and baked potatoes on the menu) and Duke Zeibert’s (the city’s power-broker destination, with its bowls of dill pickles and baskets of onion rolls). Part of me misses these restaurants, with their theatrical ( ( 8E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C šI ; F J ; C 8 ; H  ( & ' )

flair and the promise of soup, salad, and crudités included in the price of your entrée. But I’m not going to lie: When I read through Andrew Knowlton’s Hot 10 list of America’s best new restaurants (page 119), I realize how good we’ve got it. As a country, we’ve never eaten better. From big cities to small, the quality of ingredients that chefs can access is astounding (safe to say, I wasn’t ordering house-cured salumi or foraged maitake mushrooms at Duke Zeibert’s). And the level of style that’s cultivated at places like Jeffrey’s and Josephine House, sister restaurants in Austin (page 162), is stunning (yes, those are custom-made jackets on the waiters). The fact is, going to restaurants is part of the fabric of my life these days; I dine out several times a week. And while I might miss the suits of armor and the fish tanks, I’ll take salumi and maitake over English muffins and mints any day.

ADAM RAPOPORT EDITOR IN CHIEF

FOLLOW ADAM ON TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM AT @RAPO4

PHOTOGRAPH BY BILL HOLMES

T H AT ’ 7 0 S C H OW


r. s.v.p. SPECIAL CHEFS’ REQUEST EDITION C H E F M AT T M C C A L L I S T E R FT33, Dallas

Off-Site Kitchen in Dallas is pure Americana, from the motorcycles to the sweet, spicy, and cheesy Ibeffo@e[ºijob[jWYei$

SLOPPY TACOS

6 SERVINGS The only thing better than Sloppy Joes for dinner is taco night. This hybrid is the best of both worlds.

1 1 ¼ 2 1

—CHEF MATTHEW GAUDET, West Bridge, Cambridge, MA

CLAM AND BACON PIZZA

Blanched garlic, which is sweet and mild, is blended with briny clam liquor and olive oil to make a creamy white sauce for this unconventional pizza. 2 heads of garlic, separated into cloves, peeled 24 littleneck clams, scrubbed 2 Tbsp. olive oil plus more 8 oz. thick-cut bacon, sliced crosswise ¼" thick 1 lb. prepared pizza dough, room temperature 1 oz. Pecorino, finely grated (about ½ cup) Fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves and crushed red pepper flakes (for serving) Bring garlic and 4 cups water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Drain. Repeat process twice more. On inal turn, do not drain; reduce heat and simmer until garlic is tender, 20–30 minutes. Drain; reserve garlic. Cook clams and ¼ cup water in a large (* 8E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C  I ; F J ; C 8 ; H  (& ' )

pot over medium-high heat, covered, stirring occasionally, until clams open, about 5 minutes (discard any clams that do not open); transfer to a large bowl. Strain clam cooking liquid through a finemesh sieve into a small bowl. Remove clams from shells and coarsely chop. Place in a medium bowl, cover, and chill. Purée reserved garlic, ½ cup clam cooking liquid, and 2 Tbsp. oil in a blender, adding more cooking liquid by the tablespoonful, until smooth and creamy. Preheat oven to 500°. Cook bacon in a medium skillet over medium heat until fat renders and bacon is slightly crisp, about 5 minutes; transfer to a paper towel–lined plate. Cut pizza dough in half. Working with 1 piece at a time and keeping other piece covered with a damp towel or plastic wrap, gently stretch dough into 12"–14" rounds and transfer to lightly oiled baking sheets. Spread dough with garlic purée and top with Pecorino, clams, and bacon. Bake pizzas until cheese is melted and crust is brown and crisp, 10–15 minutes. Drizzle with oil and top with parsley and red pepper flakes.

¼ 3 1 1 1 1 12

FILLING AND ASSEMBLY Tbsp. olive oil, divided lb. ground beef chuck small yellow onion, chopped garlic cloves, finely chopped 14-oz. can whole peeled tomatoes 12-oz. bottle tomato-based chili sauce (such as Heinz) cup Worcestershire sauce Tbsp. ancho chile powder or chili powder Tbsp. garlic powder Tbsp. onion powder Tbsp. brown sugar Tbsp. ground cumin crisp taco shells, warmed Shredded Wisconsin cheddar, lettuce, pico de gallo, cilantro, and lime wedges (for serving)

LIME SOUR CREAM Mix sour cream, lime zest, lime juice, cilantro, and vinegar in a medium bowl; season with salt. Cover and chill at least 1 hour or up to 1 day. FILLING AND ASSEMBLY Heat 1 Tbsp. oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook beef, breaking up with a spoon, until cooked through, about 5 minutes. Transfer to a large bowl. Reduce heat to medium. Heat remaining 1 Tbsp. oil in skillet. Add onion and garlic; cook, stirring occasionally, until just beginning to brown, about 5 minutes. Preheat oven to 400°. Add tomatoes to skillet; cook, breaking up, until thickened, 8–10 minutes. Add beef; chili and Worcestershire sauces; chile, garlic, and onion powders; sugar; and cumin. Cook, stirring, until flavors meld, 10–12 minutes. Spread in a 13x9x2" baking dish; bake until a crust forms, 30–40 minutes. Serve filling in shells with toppings.

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THE CLAM AND BACON PIZZA FROM AREA FOUR IN CAMBRIDGE, MA, HAS JUST THE RIGHT AMOUNT OF SEA FLAVOR AND SALTY, SMOKY BACON. IT’S FREAKIN’ DELICIOUS—I WANT ONE RIGHT NOW!

2 2 1 6 1 1

LIME SOUR CREAM cup sour cream Tbsp. finely grated lime zest cup fresh lime juice Tbsp. chopped fresh cilantro Tbsp. unseasoned rice vinegar Kosher salt


r. s.v.p.

The lamb shoulder at Justus Drugstore_dIc_j^l_bb["CE"_i incredibly tender and flavorful.

generously with salt and pepper and rub basil purŽe all over. Cover with foil, and cook until fork-tender, 3Ð3 ½ hours. Increase oven temperature to 500¡. Remove foil and roast lamb until golden brown, 10Ð15 minutes. Let rest 30 minutes. Pour pan juices into a measuring cup and skim; set jus aside. P E T Reduce oven temperature to 325¡. Mix thyme, shallot, garlic, polenta, cream, and 3 cups broth in a 13x9x2" baking dish; season with salt and pepper. Cover with foil and bake, without stirring, until polenta is softened and liquid is almost completely absorbed, 60Ð75 minutes. Thin polenta with more broth, if needed.

LAMB SHOULDER WITH POLENTA AND BEANS

SER S Thanks to two very hands-off methods for the lamb and polenta, this is an excellent choice for a dinner party. R ST 2 cups fresh basil leaves 2 Tbsp. olive oil 1 3-lb. boneless lamb shoulder roast, tied (a butcher can do this) Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

4 1 1 1 1 3

P E T sprigs thyme small shallot, inely chopped garlic clove, inely grated cup coarse polenta cup heavy cream cups (or more) low-sodium chicken broth Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

E S SSE Y ⅓ cup sugar ⅓ cup unseasoned rice vinegar ½ tsp. hot chili paste (such as sambal oelek) 1 tsp. kosher salt plus more 2 leeks, white and pale-green parts only, halved lengthwise, sliced crosswise ¼" thick, divided 3 oz. thick-cut bacon, sliced crosswise ¼" thick 1 14-oz. can cannellini beans, rinsed Freshly ground black pepper ¾ cup fresh lat-leaf parsley leaves ½ cup fresh cilantro leaves with tender stems R ST Preheat oven to 325¡. Blend basil and oil in a food processor until smooth. Place lamb in a roasting pan. Season (. 8E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C  I ; F J ; C 8 ; H  (& ' )

E S SSE Y Bring sugar, vinegar, chili paste, 1 tsp. salt, and ⅓ cup water to a boil in a small saucepan. Add half of leeks, reduce heat, and simmer until soft, 8Ð10 minutes. Drain; set leeks aside. Wipe out saucepan. Cook bacon over medium heat until fat renders and bacon is crisp, about 5 minutes; transfer to a paper towelÐlined plate. Add remaining uncooked leeks to saucepan and cook, stirring often, until soft, 8Ð10 minutes. Add beans, bacon, and reserved boiled leeks and cook until heated through, about 3 minutes; season with salt and pepper. Untie lamb and thinly slice. Divide polenta among bowls. Top with lamb, beans, and herbs; drizzle with jus.

C H E F T Y L E R S H I P TO N Borough, Minneapolis

When I can, I go to Tilia in Minneapolis late at night and have a beer and the potted meat.

CLASSIC POTTED PORK

They look unassuming, but these little jars of unctuous spiced meat served with crunchy toast and rich shallots are a decadent and satisfying treat.

1 1 ¼ ¼ ¼ ¼ 1 2

Tbsp. sugar tsp. freshly ground white pepper tsp. dried thyme tsp. ground cinnamon tsp. ground cloves tsp. ground nutmeg Tbsp. kosher salt plus more lb. skinless, boneless pork shoulder (Boston butt) 1 ¼ cups (2 ½ sticks) unsalted butter 1 Tbsp. fresh thyme leaves

R SE SH TS SSE Y Tbsp. vegetable oil large shallots, halved lengthwise cup brandy garlic clove, crushed sprig thyme cups low-sodium chicken broth Tbsp. Sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar 1 Tbsp. sugar Kosher salt 1 baguette, thinly sliced, toasted Whole grain mustard (for serving)

1 4 ½ 1 1 2 2

P TTE P RK Preheat oven to 275¡. Mix sugar, pepper, dried thyme, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and 1 Tbsp. salt in a small bowl. Place pork in a roasting pan and season with spice mixture. Cover with foil and cook until fork-tender, 3Ð4 hours. Let pork cool in pan. Meanwhile, heat butter in a small saucepan over medium heat until foaming, about 5 minutes. Skim foam from surface; discard. Gently simmer butter, skimming foam from surface, until butter is clear (do not let solids brown). Slowly pour clarified butter into a small bowl, leaving solids behind (you should have about 1 cup). Cover and chill until firm, 1Ð2 hours. Coarsely shred pork and place in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Add fresh thyme and ¾ cup clarified butter and mix on medium-low speed until a coarse but emulsified mixture forms; season with salt. Divide mixture between two 8-oz. jars, packing down. Melt remaining clarified butter in a small saucepan over low heat; pour over mixture. Cover jars. Chill until pork mixture is firm, at least 4 hours. HE : Clarified butter and potted pork can be made 1 week ahead. Keep chilled. Let potted pork sit at room temperature 2 hours before serving. R SE SH TS SSE Y Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add shallots and cook, stirring occasionally, until browned, 8Ð10 minutes; remove from heat. Add brandy, then return pan to heat and cook shallot mixture until brandy is reduced by half, about 2 minutes. Add garlic, thyme, and broth; cook, stirring occasionally, until shallots are soft and glazed, 25Ð35 minutes. Remove from heat, discard garlic and thyme, and stir in vinegar and sugar; season with salt. Let cool. Serve potted pork with braised shallots, toasts, and mustard. HE : Shallots can be made 3 days ahead. Cover and chill.

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CHEF JONNY HUNTER Forequarter, Madison, WI


r. s.v.p.

?¿l[X[[djeABC Kitchen _dD[mOehaj^h[[j_c[i"WdZ I always get the crab toast. ?j¿il[hoi_cfb[»Z[Y[fj_l[boie$

CRAB TOAST WITH LEMON AIOLI

4 SER S This dish is only as good as the crab it’s made with; buy the best you can get. E large egg yolk* garlic clove, inely grated tsp. inely grated lemon zest Tbsp. (or more) fresh lemon juice tsp. Dijon mustard Kosher salt 1 cup vegetable oil

1 1 1 2 1

TARRAGON CREAMED CORN

SER S At farmers’ markets, look for Golden Bantam or Silver Queen varieties of corn, which are less sugary than some of the supersweet hybrids. 8 ears of corn, shucked 4 sprigs tarragon plus chopped leaves for serving 1 cup heavy cream Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper ½ cup grated Parmesan Cut corn kernels from cobs and set aside. Using the back of a knife and working over a large dish, scrape each cob to extract as much milk as possible. Bring corn milk, cobs, tarragon sprigs, cream, and 4 cups water to a boil in a large saucepan. Remove from heat and let sit 10 minutes. Strain cream mixture into another large saucepan; discard solids. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer until reduced by half, 20–25 minutes. Add reserved corn kernels and simmer until soft, 5–10 minutes; season with salt and pepper. Transfer ⅓ of corn mixture to a blender; add Parmesan and purée until smooth. Stir purée back into corn mixture. Serve creamed corn sprinkled with chopped tarragon.

R B T ST 8 oz. lump crabmeat, picked over 2 Tbsp. chopped fennel fronds 1–2 serrano chiles, seeded, inely chopped 6 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided Kosher salt 4 ¾"-thick slices country-style sourdough bread Lemon wedges (for serving) E Whisk egg yolk, garlic, lemon zest and juice, mustard, and a large pinch of salt in a medium bowl. Whisking constantly, slowly drizzle in oil, drop by drop at first, until aioli is thickened and smooth; season with salt and more lemon juice, if desired. HE : Aioli can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill. R B T ST Toss crabmeat, fennel fronds, 1 chile, and 2 Tbsp. oil in a medium bowl. Season with salt; add more chile, if desired. Drizzle both sides of bread with remaining 4 Tbsp. oil, and working in batches, toast in a large skillet over medium-high heat until golden brown, about 2 minutes per side. Spread each piece of toast with 1 Tbsp. aioli. Top with crabmeat; cut each toast into 4 pieces. Place a small dab of aioli in center of each piece; serve with lemon wedges. (Extra aioli can be used for dressings or dips.) HE : Crabmeat mixture can be made 2 days ahead. Cover and chill.

C H E F S A N D R E W TAY LO R A N D M I K E W I L E Y Eventide Oyster Co., Portland, ME

The tom kha gai at Long Grain in Camden, ME, is not only a fantastic dish but also uses mushrooms foraged in Maine.

TOM KHA GAI CHICKEN COCONUT SOUP

This silky, aromatic soup is a complete meal in a bowl. 2 stalks fresh lemongrass, tough outer layers removed 1 1" piece ginger, peeled 10 kaffir lime leaves, or use 1 Tbsp. lime zest and ¼ cup lime juice 6 cups low-sodium chicken broth 1 ½ lb. skinless, boneless chicken thighs, cut into 1" pieces 8 oz. shiitake, oyster, or maitake mushrooms, stemmed, caps cut into bite-size pieces 1 13.5-oz. can coconut milk 2 Tbsp. ish sauce 1 tsp. sugar Chili oil, cilantro leaves with tender stems, and lime wedges (for serving) Using the back of a knife, lightly smash lemongrass and ginger; cut lemongrass into 4" pieces. Bring lemongrass, ginger, lime leaves, and broth to a boil in a large saucepan. Reduce heat and simmer until flavors are melded, 8–10 minutes. Strain broth into clean saucepan; discard solids. Add chicken and return to a boil. Reduce heat, add mushrooms, and simmer, skimming occasionally, until chicken is cooked through and mushrooms are soft, 20–25 minutes. Mix in coconut milk, fish sauce, and sugar. Divide soup among bowls. Serve with chili oil, cilantro, and lime wedges.

Eaten a restaurant dish that you’d like to replicate at home? Send your recipe requests, along with your name, address, phone number, and the name and address of the restaurant, to rsvp@bonappetit.com. Submissions may be used in any medium, edited for length and clarity, and become the property of Bon Appétit. We are unfortunately unable to answer all queries.

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While visiting Memphis, I went to Hog & Hominy with my wife and son. The tarragon creamed corn turned out to be my favorite dish of the night.

W Y L I E D U F R E S N E Alder, New York

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C H E F RYA N P R E W I T T Pêche Seafood Grill, New Orleans


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For our ultimate recipe and ideas for more toppings, see Prep School, page 185.

PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRISTOPHER TESTANI

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They’re Everywhere 5

4

6

3 2

7 1

8

9

Dish Network

At today’s hottest tables, the organic-shaped, vintage-inspired plates are as much of an attraction as the meal itself 1 Jeffrey’s;

4 Forequarter;

Match Pewter “Scribed Rim” charger, $235; didriks.com

Greg Hartman cheese board, $32; shop.underground foodcollective.org

2 Little Country

5 Antique Taco;

Austin

Gentleman; St. Louis

Small rectangular slate board, $10; crateandbarrel.com 3 Pêche

Seafood Grill; New Orleans

“Evolution” Granite coupe plate, $661 for 36; dudson.com

10

Madison, WI

10 The Optimist;

Atlanta

Small plate, $14; ericbonnin ceramics.com

11

11 Aska; Brooklyn “Aska” dinner plate, Jane Herold Pottery; $48; 845-359-5421

Chicago

Vintage bowl, $7–$20; fishseddy.com 6 Spoon Bar & Kitchen; Dallas

“Craft Collection” 6" terra-cotta coupe plate, $9; steelite.com for information

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7 Eventide Oyster

Co.; Portland, ME

Alison Evans small oyster plate, $46, and medium oyster plate, $60; aeceramics.com

8 Rye; Leawood, KS “Craft Collection” 5" green bowl, $14, and 10" blue coupe bowl, $25; steelite.com for information

9 Alma; Los Angeles

Heath Rim Line “Opaque White” bread and butter plate, $24; heathceramics.com

See more plates (with food!) in the Foodist’s online road trip. Go to: bonappetit.com /go/roadtrip

PHOTOGRAPH BY MICHAEL GRAYDON + NIKOLE HERRIOTT


Know-It-All

The art of eating (and drinking) out: An afternoon

glass of wine is totally ine with the Austenland star. Bad music? Not so much.

Music Makes the Meal

“I like music in restaurants—when it’s used well. I’ve spent a lot of kitchen time dancing to Edward I^Whf[WdZj^[ Magnetic Zeros’ ‘Man on Fire.’”

Embrace Happy Hour

“It’s always okay to have an afternoon glass of wine. I’m a mother of two. Isn’t it in the rule book?”

Don’t Obsess Over Price

“It doesn’t always re lect a restaurant’s quality. If a place is cozy and delicious, it’s so much better than having eight courses and being uptight.”

Go Early

THE GOLDEN RULE

“Always order something you don’t normally cook yourself. That’s what the late Jill Clayburgh told me once. I^[ehZ[h[Zim[[jXh[WZi$?j sounded so exotic to me. But even if it’s something I can cook, they’re going to cook it better than I could.”

“I eat alone a lot, so I love inding a tucked-away-inthe-corner spot with my book, just when they open.”

Define Your Night “Maybe I’m old, but to me, ‘going out’ means going out to dinner. It’s about the conversation: someone recognizing your intellect, the charm of lirting, and really speaking to somebody.” INTERVIEW BY MICKEY RAPKIN

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MY TOP NOLA IFEJI “When I’m in a city for a few months, I get a bunch of favorites and create a routine.” >[h[¿im^[h[Hkii[bb ate in New Orleans this summer while shooting Dawn of the Planet of the Apes. Boucherie “They make this insane appetizer: shredded-pork carnitas rolled up with peach inside.” Patois “I love the olive oil cake.” Velvet Espresso Bar “A sweet little coffee shop.” Lilette “Every single one of the desserts was incredible.” Sylvain “I stumbled into this magic dark alley and had a glass of rosé with good food in a hidden courtyard.” For addresses, see Sourcebook, page 200.

For more celebrity interviews, go to bonappetit.com /go/celeb

PHOTOGRAPH BY DAYMON GARDNER

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Keri Russell on…


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The Read

DEFINITE MUST-READS You can find all our fall cookbook picks at bonappetit.com /go/cookbooks

Manresa Xo:Wl_ZA_dY^WdZ 9^h_ij_d[Ck^ba[1+&

On the BA Reading List IecWdoe\ekh\Wleh_j[ chefs are releasing cookbooks this fall. Here’s a taste by JOANNA SCIARRINO

THE ONE RECIPE YOU NEED FROM… Turns out, the man X[^_dZj^[Ae]_88G truck is really into... milkshakes. He shared his obsession—and his recipe—straight from his book. Now we’re hooked, too. L.A. SonXoHeo9^e_ )&

MY MILKSHAKE 3 cups premium vanilla ice cream 1 banana, peeled and chopped 1 cup shaved ice, made by putting ice cubes in a resealable storage bag and crushing them with a can of soup or any other heavy object 3 T granulated sugar Microscopic pinch of Maldon sea salt 2 cups whole milk Frosted Flakes and caramel sauce

Roberta’s Cookbook by Carlo Mirarchi [jWb1)+

Pok Pok Xo7dZoH_Ya[hWdZ @$@$=eeZ[1)+

Pack the ice cream down into a blender. Add the banana, ice, sugar, and salt. Pour one cup of the milk over the top. Cover and blend everything until it’s nice and creamy. With the blender still going, open the top and gently add more milk until the shake gets to your desired

thickness. Mine is thick but viscous and drinkable with the ice shavings as a backdrop. Pour the milkshake _djeW\hep[d]bWii and garnish with Yhki^[Z<heij[Z <bWa[iWdZWZh_ppb[ of caramel, if you wish. I usually gain a few pounds ’cause I can’t stop...

Gorgeous recipes (1), candid snapshots (2), and a year’s worth of journal entries (3) are what oek][jm_j^H[dƒH[Zp[f_¿ibWj[ij"A Work in Progress ($60). But that’s not our favorite thing about the Noma chef’s three-volume set. The package design—three monochromatic and straight-up minimalist covers, all held together by a color-coordinated rubber band—makes this title (and all its parts) a must for any collection. 1

3

BUY IT FOR THE PICTURES ALONE

Stunning food photography fills chef Alex Atala’s D.O.M.: Rediscovering Brazilian Ingredients ($50). But just as important are the photos of the people and places that connect him to the culinary traditions of Brazil. Above, skewers of churrasco sizzle, and a cattle herder sounds his horn. *& 8E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C šI ; F J ; C 8 ; H  ( & ' )

2

PHOTOGRAPHS BY ZACH DESART

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THE PERFECT PACKAGE


Love Letter

Heat-Keeping Missile It may look sinister, but trust us: The Zojirushi thermos only uses its game-changing powers for good

OWN IT, LOVE IT

GUTTER

Zojirushi Stainless Steel Mug ($42 for 16-oz. container; amazon.com)

When Andrew Knowlton, BA’s restaurant and drinks editor, told me he spotted a chef using a Zojirushi to sauce dishes at Table restaurant in Washington, D.C., I wasn’t surprised. In fact, I felt validated. This is the same space-age commuter’s cup I’d been proselytizing about for months. Oh, I hear you: “No insulated mug is worth bragging about.” Believe me, if you had one you’d brag, too. The Zojirushi people credit their “vacuum insulation technology” for keeping liquids hot—or cold—for an insanely long time. It’s the science behind that feeling of sheer joy I get when I pop the top and see steam rise out of it hours after arriving at work. Then there’s the time I used it to bring iced coconut water to the beach in August and the ice didn’t melt.Ij_bbdejed board? Take it from a pro: “Between the irst customer who comes in and hours later, it’s the exact same sauce—and just as warm,” says Table’s owner, Frederik de Pue. Just wait till he uses it for his coffee. —CARLA LALLI MUSIC

* ( 8E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C  I ; F J ; C 8 ; H  (& ' )

PHOTOGRAPH BY MICHAEL GRAYDON + NIKOLE HERRIOTT


The Wine Insider

Oh, Sherry How did formerly ijeZ]oI^[hho become the darling of hip sommeliers and fashionable Zh_da[hi5I_cfb[0 J^[IfWd_i^\ehj_Ȉ_[Z wine (brandy is added after fermentation to boost the alcohol content) is deliciously kd_gk[0iec[j_c[i sweet, sometimes saline and bracingly dry, often nutty and whiskey-like. It pairs well with food, from appetizers to desserts. While complex enough to be sipped on _jiemd"I^[hho_i easily co-opted by crafty bartenders. In fact, it’s hard to say who appeared Ȉ_hijedI^[hho¿i unlikely road to Yeeb0j^[e[de#ZkZ[ enjoying a cold predinner fino or the mixologist who subbed oloroso for bourbon in search of a lower-octane cocktail. No matter; everyone’s drinking it now. Oh, and did we mention that it’s a great bargain? In fact, it’s one of the best—and last— values in wine, and value never goes out of style.

Once relegated to old ladies and British aristocrats, it’s now the pour of the moment (go figure). Here’s all you need to know by DAVID LYNCH

87HJ;D:;HI LOVE IT, TOO

I^[hho_iWd¼?j½ cocktail ingredient, with enough heft to build a drink around but still relatively low in alcohol.

HEY HEY, MY MY From Ava Gene’s, Portland, Oregon Combine 1 ½ oz. Aperol, ¾ oz. fino Sherry, 1 oz. fresh grapefruit juice, ½ oz. fresh lemon juice, and ¼ oz. honey simple syrup (shake 3 Tbsp. honeym_j^'JXif$ hot water; chill) in a cocktail shaker. Fill with ice, cover, and shake until outside of shaker is \heijo"WXekj)& i[YedZi$IjhW_d_dje a coupe glass. Makes 1

I^[hho¿ibed] history makes it catnip for wine nerds, but here’s a simple guide to the main ijob[i$Dej[0 Always serve I^[hhoWj\h_Z][ temperature.

OLOROSO

PEDRO XIMÉNEZ

CREAM

GLASS ACT

Both can be light, salty, yeasty, and very dry. Pair with oysters and other seafood.

Nutty, dark, and rich. Typically dry, but may be sweetened. Pair with braised meats or aged cheese.

The sweet grape often referred to as “PX” yields a syrupy wine. Drizzle over vanilla ice cream.

Despite the name, it’s not especially creamy, nor as sweet as a PX. Drink it on its own or pair it with foie gras.

Ditch the dainty traditional copita and go with this repurposed rosé glass.

El Maestro Sierra Fino, $18/375 ml

Emilio Lustau Very Rare, $30/750 ml

Bodegas Toro Albalá “Don PX,” $28/375 ml

Hidalgo Alameda Cream, $16/500 ml

Vineyard Rose, $15; crateandbarrel.com

FINO AND MANZANILLA

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PHOTOGRAPH BY MICHAEL GRAYDON + NIKOLE HERRIOTT

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BOTTLE SERVICE


The Providers

The day after we had our irst child, a friend with kids visited us in the hospital to meet the new addition. He held the baby, we took some pictures, and before he left, he delivered some advice: “Make sure to get a date night every once in a while,” he said. “Alone time is important, and it can get lost.” Lost? On us? Never! As if to prove our point, we headed out for our irst post-kid dinner six weeks later—an early-bird special in downtown Manhattan. We put our daughter to bed, handed the babysitter many pages of insane instructions, and ran out the door. But the alone time we’d carved out didn’t feel so…alone. We checked our phones. We called the sitter. We ate like cavemen and skipped dessert, telling ourselves we were too full (we weren’t). When we got home, it was still light out. Was this how it was gonna be? Like, forever? For a while, yes. Forever, no. At some point, the clouds parted. Our one kid turned into two kids, who miraculously learned to place food into their own mouths and go to sleep without us. And so we embraced dinner out in a big, existential way. Even when the girls were inally old enough to tag along, we kept the reservation capped at two. Going to a good restaurant became the easiest way to remind us that there was a world out there beyond Wow! Wow! Wubbzy! and “Kidz” menus. Nowadays, we do not mess around with these nights. We book the sitter within minutes of booking the reservation. We hand the girls

their favorite take-out menus and tell them to make a night of it themselves. We meet at a bar for a cocktail. We wear shoes that are not waterproof. We order dessert. Last month, we hit Lafayette, Andrew Carmellini’s new downtown brasserie, a leather-boothed place that felt like a New York institution the minute it opened its doors. We sat down for dinner at 8:30— when we used to aim to be home by—and started to feast: leaves of butter lettuce served with Roquefort and country ham; short-rib ravioli; market-fresh peas tossed with mint pesto and ricotta salata. We took particular pleasure in ordering things the kids would never allow in their airspace: buttery, sweet scallops, a pickled-blueberry sorbet. The stars of the night, though, were the tender, Moroccan-spiced lamb chops that we could have eaten by the dozen. “Man, the kids would love these,” we said as we ate them. “We should bring them here.” On second thought, no, we shouldn’t. But if they’re lucky, we might make them at home.

The Providers are Jenny Rosenstrach and Andy Ward. When it’s not date night, they tackle family dinners on their blog, Dinner: A Love Story.

Get our Lafayetteinspired lamb chop recipe at bonappetit.com /go/lambchop

Just the Two of Us Family dinner is great. Family dinner is important. But date night rules

PHOTOGRAPH BY RICHARD KALVAR MAGNUM PHOTOS GUTTER

A couple enjoys a child-free meal, c. 1996.

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The

FOODIST 1 of 6

The Maple-Miso Salmon Head from New York’s Chez Sardine

E F O O D I ST

25

TH

Eating America

The most amazing things Andrew Knowlton saw, heard, and yes, devoured during his 120-day, 26,333-mile, 22-state tour of the country’s best new restaurants*

* PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRISTOPHER TESTANI

FOR HIS TOP PICKS, SEE OUR HOT 10,

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2 of 6 The

FOODIST JEF(+JH;D:IE<(&')

2

FISH HEADS! (EAT THEM UP, YUM)

1

Why throw away what could be a signature dish? Miso-maple roasted salmon head, fish-head terrine, and both country-fried and grilled hamachi collar are proof that one person’s bait is another’s must-order. S E E N AT: FWf[hFbWd[":[YWjkh"=717F_]_dW<kh9eWj" CWZ_ied"M?1J^[EhZ_dWho"9^Whb[ijed"I9

SQUEEZE PLAY The plastic squeeze bottle has left the kitchen for a dining room table near you, filled with all kinds of house-made condiments, from hot sauce to fish iWkY[$?jid[njcel[5 =e_d]^ec[m_j^oek$ 2-oz. bottle with cap, $1; thinkgarnish.com

3

Seems like restaurants are putting as much thought _djej^[h[ijheecWij^[oWh[_djej^[Z_d_d]heec$? visited the hyper-designed loo at The Pass & Provisons _d>ekijedȈ_l[j_c[i»`kijje^Wd]ekj$

ANATOMY OF A 2013 RESTAURANT BATHROOM

(7) DESIGNER SUDS Boutique soaps from the likes of Malin + Goetz and Further a[[fj^_d]iYb[Wd$ (B) SINKING FEELING Sinks are ijWj[c[djf_[Y[i$ The farmhouse-style soapstone ones were co\Wleh_j[$ (C) HEADY TUNES Restroom-only speakers provide a i[fWhWj[iekdZjhWYa$

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(:) HIGH AND DRY There’s something about a terry-cloth hand towel that says, ¼M[YWh[$½ E

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(E) GENDER BENDERS M^oki[M and W when you can ask one of your artist friends je][jYh[Wj_l[5 (F) EMPLOYEES MUST WASH HANDS... So remind j^[c_dWYb[l[hmWo$ Foreign languages, pictograms, cool collages—I saw them Wbbedj^[mWbbi$

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+

COLD COMFORT I’m not sure how my wife feels about all the koozies I picked up at restaurants like Two Boroughs Larder in Charleston, SC (right), but I know one thing: My beer is always cold.

6

THE KITCHEN AFFIRMATION

Chefs are posting quotes to keep cooks motivated night in and d_]^jekj$I[[co\Wleh_j[iedj^[ \ebbem_d]fW][i0

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“RIDE OR DIE.”

4 THE SOUNDTRACK OF AMERICA’S BEST NEW RESTAURANTS Man, did I hear a lot of Mumford Iedi$>[h[ are other key tracks on heavy hejWj_ed$ 7doj^_d]Xo The Black Keys ¼JkcXb_d]:_Y["½ The Rolling Stones ¼J^[>ekhi"½ Beach House ¼Iekb"½ Gary Clark Jr. ¼@kijB_a[>[Wl[d"½ The Cure ¼8WXo¿i7hci"½ Kurt Vile ¼>WhZje>WdZb["½ Patti Drew ¼Bel[:ed¿j B[Wl[C[MW_j_d]"½ Glen Hansard 7doj^_d]Xo Fleetwood Mac

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“CONSISTENCY.”


8

9

CHEFS REKINDLE AN OLD FLAME

DRINK UP! I first spotted a Dinuba Water jug at Blue Bottle Coffee in San Francisco, then again at Antique Taco in Chicago. Now I own one for my backyard parties. ($159 for a 15-liter jug; dinubawater.com)

From Uruguayan grills (Pêche Seafood Grill in New Orleans) to Argentine crank versions (King + Duke in Atlanta) to rustic ovens (Bar Sajor in Seattle), wood-fired hearths are very hot. 7

UNMATCHED Forget word of mouth: I think a smartly designed book of matches is the best marketing tool. Seems I’m not alone. S E E N AT:

The Ordinary, Atlanta; Jeffrey’s, Austin; Ava Gene’s, Portland, OR

11

10

THE NEW LIME SLICE This will change the way you garnish everything: guacamole, fish tacos, a Margarita. (No, seriously, it will.)

2

STEP 1: Place lime on cutting board like it’s a football on a tee. STEP 2: Cut a ½" cross section off each side. STEP 3: Squeeze, effortlessly, on pretty much anything.

DINING ROOM READING It used to be chefs kept their inspiration to themselves. Now you’ll find it on display in the form of their favorite cookbooks. Here are three recurring classics I spotted on the shelves at Nashville’s Rolf and Daughters, San Francisco’s Saison, and other spots: Noma, On Food and Cooking, and Plenty.

12

PHOTOGRAPHS: ZACH DESART; CHRISTOPHER TESTANI (BLUE HILL). ILLUSTRATIONS BY JOE MCKENDRY.

3

1

Raw baby veggies: most likely on a menu near you (with or without the nails).

RAW POWER

Restaurants are giving new life to crudités, a.k.a. raw vegetables, thanks to endless varieties of produce, inventive dips, and—at least at Blue Hill at Stone Barns in Pocantico Hills, NY—stunning serving ware. S E E N AT: Lafayette, New York; Jeffrey’s, Austin; Forequarter, Madison, WI

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4 of 6

FOODIST

The

JEF(+JH;D:IE<(&')

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THE INCREDIBLE, SPREADABLE SALUMI ‘Nduja (en-DOO-yah), the fiery pork paste from Calabria, Italy, is everywhere. Keep some in your fridge to spread on grilled bread, or toss with steamed clams. ($12 for 4 oz., redapron butchery.com)

A SUCKER Watch out, squid, you’ve got some eight-legged competition. Taste octopus EATEN in a wide range of dishes like these: EVERY MINUTE Grilled with cashew pesto; Alder, New York Poached with beluga lentils and fried egg; Allumette, Los Angeles Ceviche; Bar Marco, Pittsburgh In fideo with kielbasa; Bar Amá, Los Angeles

WILL, PHILADELPHIA

THE KITCHEN AFFIRMATION

“WITH SELF-DISCIPLINE MOST ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE.”

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5 of 6

FOODIST

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JEF(+JH;D:IE<(&')

(B) Mini clothespin; Lafayette, New York

A

(C) Reused can from the pantry; Fat Rice, Chicago

C

B

D

(D) Stainlesssteel tray with custom wax stamp; Saison, San Francisco

(A) Sardine can; The Pass & Provisions, Houston

'+

ANATOMY OF A 2013 RESTAURANT CHEF 7iheeci^Wl[]ed[ ceh[YWikWb"ie ^Wij^[Yeea¿ibeea$ (A) BANDMATES J^[ebZ#iY^eeb ^[WZXWdZ_iXWYa$ (B) FIT TO A TEE J^[om[Whj^[_h h[ijWkhWdj¿iXhWdZ[Z i^_hj$J^[o¿bbe\j[d i[bboeked["jee$

(E) Vintage saucer; The Whale Wins, Seattle

(F) Handmade mini clipboard; Rolf and Daughters, Nashville

(C) THE NEW TONGS FeYa[j[ii[dj_Wbi0 Wc[Wjj^[hcec[j[h WdZjm[[p[hi$ (:) STRUNG UP :[i_]d[hZ[d_c_dj^[ a_jY^[d5O[i"_\_j¿iW Ykijec#cWZ[Wfhed$

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FALLBACK MOVES

This year, whenever chefs were in doubt, they’d...

CHECK, PLEASE!

Getting the bill can be a bummer. At least places are getting inventive with how they deliver it.

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ADD MISO S E E N AT:

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TOP WITH SUNFLOWER SEEDS

PUT IT ON TOAST S E E N AT:L[hd_Ya<eeZ

S E E N AT:

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Tomato compote and grilled corn toast from Vernick Food & Drink

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THE KITCHEN AFFIRMATION

“AT THE END OF THE DAY, IT’S JUST FOOD, ISN’T IT? JUST FOOD.”

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A 20

COCKTAILS WITH A DASH OF WIT J^_daI[nedj^[8[WY^_ij^[ ^[_]^je\YeYajW_bYb[l[hd[ii59^[Ya ekjj^[i[Yh[Wj_l[Zh_dadWc[i$ Love Oolong Time17bZ[h"D[mOeha

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Coffee & Cigarettes; Ho["B[WmeeZ"AI Love Makes You Feel Ten Feet Tall1 7lW=[d[¿i"FehjbWdZ"EH

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Last Chance to Lose Your Keys1 Ela, Philadelphia

21

Metal Surrenders When Oak Trees Meet Fenders18WhJDJ"7hb_d]jed"L7

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ANATOMY OF A 2013 RESTAURANT BAR The best seat in the ^eki[5<ehc["_j¿iWj the bar, where design got lighter, brighter, and much more ceZ[hd_d(&')$

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THE ENTRÉE FOR 2, 4, 6…

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24 A SHORE THING Beeam^Wjj^[ trend tide brought in! Seaweed is sustainable, nutritious, and packs an umami fkdY^$J^Wj¿im^o chefs are using it like an herb in sauces and batters, and sprinkled Wii[Wied_d]$ Irish moss from Maine Coast Sea Vegetables, $7 for 6 oz.; seaveg.com

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2014 PROSPECTS Every year, there are restaurants that just miss my cutoff to be eligible for the Hot 10. Here are a few front-runners heading into next year. It already looks like there’s some stiff competition.

QUI, AUSTIN

Fine dining from Paul Qui. The place that Texas has been waiting for.

TROIS MEC, LOS ANGELES

Ludo Lefebvre finally settles down at this tiny bricks-and-mortar spot.

MOTT ST, CHICAGO

The Ruxbin crew’s latest serves Asian street food at communal tables.

SERPICO, PHILADELPHIA

Momofuku alum Peter Serpico pairs with restaurateur Stephen Starr.

23

BIG. CHEAP. BEERS. First, cans of PBR hit the hipster jackpot at the poshest of h[ijWkhWdji$Dem_j¿i 32- and 40-ounce bottles of lessthan-premium brew at places like Uno Mas in Portland, OR (Pacifico), and MehbZIjh[[jA_jY^[d in Minneapolis C_bb[h>_]^B_\[$

I ordered plenty of 42-ounce steaks from non-steakhouses this year. I also saw crisp-skinned duck for two (MilkWood, Louisville), whole roast chicken for the family (Vernick Food & Drink, Philadelphia), and, gulp, an entire lobe of foie gras (The Pass & Provisions, Houston).

The Foodist spotted many of these trends at our 50 Best Restaurant nominees. For a full list, see: bonappetit.com /go/50best

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CH

DI EF E

TION

BA

WHAT TO COOK RIGHT NOW: RECIPES, TIPS, AND MENU IDEAS FROM OUR EXPERTS

THESE CHEFS HAVE ONE THING IN COMMON: THEY’RE ALL 50 BEST NEW RESTAURANT NOMINEES. SEE THE FULL LIST: BONAPPETIT.COM /GO/50BEST

F A S T, E A S Y, FRESH No sous vide machine? No problem. Our chef friends reveal the quick, simple, and satisfying meals they cook at home

PHOTOGRAPHS BY HIRSHEIMER & HAMILTON

Cornmeal Crepes with Figs and Pears. For recipe, see page 73.

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FAST, EASY, FRESH CHEFS’ NIGHT IN

CHEF TIP: GIVE IT EXTRA LOVE “Always make more so you have leftovers. When I was growing up, my grandma would make spaghetti and fried chicken on Sundays. The best part about it was later that night: As I got older, we’d go outside and have a couple of beers, and the thing I looked forward to more than anything was coming back in and eating cold spaghetti. I think it’s every Italian kid’s gluttonous dream.” —CHEF MICHAEL HUDMAN, HOG & HOMINY

Pasta with Chorizo and Chickpeas As co-chefs, Hudman and Ticer see each other daily, but the old friends still cook together on days off. “Andy does the steak,” says Hudman, “and I do the pasta.” 2 Tbsp. olive oil 2 small shallots, chopped ¾ lb. fresh Mexican chorizo or hot Italian sausage, casings removed 2 Tbsp. tomato paste ½ tsp. crushed red pepper flakes 2 cups low-sodium chicken broth 1 15-oz. can chickpeas, rinsed 12 oz. small dried pasta (such as malloreddus or orecchiette) Kosher salt 2 Tbsp. chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley (optional) Finely grated Parmesan and lemon zest (for serving)

Heat oil in a large skillet over mediumhigh heat. Add shallots and cook, stirring often, until beginning to brown, about 3 minutes. Add chorizo and cook, breaking up with a spoon, until browned and cooked through, 5–7 minutes. Add tomato paste and red pepper lakes to skillet and cook, stirring, until paste darkens, about 1 minute. Add broth; bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until sauce is thick-ened, 15–20 minutes. Add chickpeas and cook until heated through, about 2 minutes. Meanwhile, cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until al dente. Drain pasta, reserving 1 cup pasta cooking liquid. Add pasta and ½ cup pasta cooking liquid to sauce. Cook, stirring and adding more cooking liquid as needed, until sauce thickens and coats pasta, about 3 minutes. Serve pasta topped with parsley, if using, Parmesan, and lemon zest. CALORIES 660 FAT 35 G FIBER 4 G

Can’t find chorizo? Go for spicy Italian sausage.

FOR COMPLETE NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION FOR THE RECIPES IN THIS STORY, GO TO BONAPPETIT .COM/RECIPES

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FAST, EASY, FRESH CHEFS’ NIGHT IN

, . .

Fennel and Orange Salad with Lemon-Ginger Vinaigrette Typically steamed or sautéed, fresh mustard greens are also great raw and simply dressed. “I like the strength they give to salads,” says de Pue. ¼ 2 1 1 1 ½ 3 2 1 4

Try this ultrafresh salad alongside fish.

baguette, very thinly sliced Tbsp. white wine vinegar tsp. finely grated lemon zest tsp. finely grated orange zest tsp. finely grated peeled ginger tsp. coarsely ground black pepper Kosher salt Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil navel oranges fennel bulb, trimmed, very thinly sliced, plus ¼ cup fennel fronds oz. mustard greens, center ribs and stems removed, leaves torn into bite-size pieces (about 4 cups)

Preheat oven to 375°. Place baguette slices on a rimmed baking sheet and toast, 8–10 minutes. Let cool and break into pieces. Meanwhile, whisk vinegar, lemon and orange zests, ginger, and pepper in a large bowl; season with salt and whisk in oil. Using a sharp knife, cut all peel and white pith from oranges; discard. Working over bowl with dressing, cut between membranes to release segments into bowl; discard membranes. Add fennel, fennel fronds, mustard greens, and croutons to bowl; toss to combine. CALORIES 240 FAT 12 G FIBER 5 G

CHEF TIP: KEEP IT CRUNCHY “Just a few ingredients can make an interesting salad,” says Table’s Frederik de Pue. For the chef—and his two kids—it’s all about crunch. In this recipe, that comes from toasted baguette and superthin fennel slices. The logic’s easily adaptable: Adding nuts, seeds, or crisp, thinly sliced veggies to your greens promises a simple salad that more than delivers. —JULIA KRAMER

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FAST, EASY, FRESH CHEFSÕ NIGHT IN

Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Speck and Chimichurri Feel free to play with different herbs in the chimichurri recipe—that’s what these brothers and co-chefs have always done: “When we were younger, our mom would buy lots of herbs, but she’d never use them,” says Michael. “So we’d just blend them with garlic, oil, and vinegar.” 4 small sweet potatoes, unpeeled, cut lengthwise into wedges 2 Tbsp. plus ¼ cup olive oil Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper ½ cup fresh cilantro leaves with tender stems ½ cup fresh lat-leaf parsley leaves ¼ cup fresh oregano leaves 1 Tbsp. fresh thyme leaves 2 garlic cloves 2 Tbsp. red wine vinegar 2 oz. thinly sliced Speck or prosciutto, torn Heat oven to 425°. Toss sweet potatoes and 2 Tbsp. oil on a large rimmed baking sheet; season with salt and pepper. Roast, turning once, until tender, 25–30 minutes. Meanwhile, pulse cilantro, parsley, oregano, thyme, and garlic in a food processor until inely chopped. With motor running, slowly add vinegar and remaining ¼ cup oil and process until combined; season with salt and pepper. Spoon chimichurri onto a serving platter and top with sweet potatoes and Speck. CALORIES 420 FAT 23 G FIBER 7 G

3 MORE IDEAS FOR… SWEET POTATO WEDGES Crispy on the outside, velvety within, and with a prep time of about, oh, three minutes, sweet potato wedges are perfect for family dinner. Use the roasting method above, then try these riffs from Michael Sheerin. —J.K. ERB OG RT Blend yogurt with a handful of chopped cilantro, then spoon onto a plate and top with wedges. AL O S SAGE Just before the potatoes inish cooking, add sage leaves to the baking sheet so they cook in the remaining oil. Before serving, sprinkle potatoes with chopped smoked almonds and the crisp sage. GLA E Toss cooked wedges with a mixture of soy sauce, rice vinegar, and sugar.

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If you’d like, omit the meat for an even simpler side.


FAST, EASY, FRESH CHEFS’ NIGHT IN

Strip Steak with Japanese Dipping Sauce To give steaks a boost, Myers makes an herb rub (he likes to dry the herbs himself; if you don’t have a microwave, sub in 1 tsp. of each dried herb) and pairs the meat with a tart ponzu sauce (ponzu is available at Asian markets and some supermarkets). 2 sprigs rosemary plus leaves for serving 2 sprigs thyme plus leaves for serving 2 strip steaks (about 1" thick; 1 ½ lb. total), cut in half crosswise, room temperature 1 Tbsp. olive oil Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper ½ cup ponzu ¼ cup finely grated carrot ¼ cup finely grated daikon (Japanese white radish) Prepare grill for medium-high heat. Place rosemary and thyme sprigs on a plate and microwave on high until brittle, about 2 minutes.

Rub steaks with oil, season with salt and pepper, and sprinkle with herbs, crushing gently and pressing to adhere. Grill steaks to desired doneness, about 4 minutes per side for medium-rare. Let rest 5 minutes. Meanwhile, mix ponzu, carrot, and daikon in a small bowl. Top steaks with rosemary and thyme leaves; serve with dipping sauce. CALORIES 440 FAT 29 G FIBER 0 G ,

Cornmeal Crepes with Figs and Pears V Paper-thin crepes aren’t so fussy. “They’re almost simpler than pancakes,” says pastry chef Garrelts. For flip tips, see Prep School, page 176. 2 Tbsp. unsalted, shelled raw pistachios 1 large egg ½ cup whole milk ¼ cup all-purpose flour ¼ cup cornmeal 2 Tbsp. sugar ½ tsp. vanilla extract ⅛ tsp. kosher salt

1 ¼ cups heavy cream, divided Unsalted butter (for skillet) 1 ripe pear, cored, thinly sliced 4 fresh black Mission figs, quartered Honey (for drizzling) Preheat oven to 350°. Spread pistachios on a small rimmed baking sheet; toast, tossing occasionally, until fragrant, 6–8 minutes. Let cool, then coarsely chop; set aside. Meanwhile, whisk egg, milk, lour, cornmeal, sugar, vanilla, salt, and ¼ cup cream in a medium bowl until smooth. Heat a 10" nonstick skillet over medium heat. Lightly coat skillet with butter and add 3 Tbsp. batter, swirling to cover the bottom of skillet. Cook, undisturbed, until edges turn golden and center begins to puff, about 2 minutes. Using a heatproof rubber spatula, loosen edges and then, using your fingers, flip crepe and cook until bottom is dry and set, about 30 seconds longer. Transfer to a plate. Repeat with remaining batter, coating skillet with butter between crepes. Beat remaining 1 cup cream to soft peaks. Serve crepes folded, topped with whipped cream, pears, figs, and pistachios and drizzled with honey. CALORIES 450 FAT 32 G FIBER 4 G

Dry your own herbs with our quick microwave method.

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HE D O GO

A LT

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F E R M E N TAT I O N N AT I O N See those house-made pickles and tangy sodas on menus? Chefs are embracing good-for-you fermented foods. Here’s how you can, too BY AMIEL STANEK

can come in unlikely forms. For Cortney Burns, co-chef of Bar Tartine in San Francisco, it started with a doctor’s appointment. “It’s not so sexy: I was having digestion problems,” she says. A naturopathic doctor put her on a regimen including sauerkraut and water kefir, a fermented soda. The probiotic prescription was a delicious success. Fermented foods like sauerkraut and yogurt contain “good” bacteria that aid digestion, which in turn improves nutrient absorption. As Burns felt better, she began experimenting at home. She realized that lactic acid, a fermentation by-product, was “deepening flavor, creating awesome layers.” Discovering that funkiness inspired her to start an expansive fermentation program at Bar Tartine, ranging from dry, effervescent fruit sodas to tart pickled vegetables. Burns isn’t the only pro who’s hooked. Fermented pickles, kimchis, and buttermilk are now part of the savvy chef ’s arsenal. “Fermentation provides a special acidity and buoyancy,” says Hugh Acheson of Empire State South in Atlanta, who hops up salads with fermented pickled carrots (for the recipe, go to bonappetit.com/go/carrots). But there’s another reason chefs are experimenting with fermentation: It’s easy. “This is grandmother stuff, not avantgarde molecular cuisine,” says Burns. Turn the page for two great ways to bring the new-old trend home.

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PROBIOTICS IN FERMENTED FOODS HAVE BEEN SHOWN TO

FIGHT THE COMMON COLD AND MORE.

Bright and bubbly grape soda from San Francisco’s Bar Tartine

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHRISTOPHER TESTANI


GOOD HEALTH F E R M E N TAT I O N

Brussels Sprouts Kimchi

ACTIVE 30 MINUTES TOTAL 3 DAYS OR LONGER The shape of the crystals varies quite a bit from brand to brand, so measuring kosher salts by weight is the most reliable method. Not ready to invest in a scale? See the box below for volume conversions. 3.5 oz. plus .7 oz. kosher salt 1 ½ lb. small brussels sprouts, trimmed, halved ½ small onion, coarsely chopped 2 scallions, sliced 4 garlic cloves ¼ cup gochugaru (coarse Korean red pepper powder) 2 Tbsp. ish sauce (such as nam pla or nuoc nam) 2 Tbsp. Sriracha 1 Tbsp. grated peeled ginger 1 Tbsp. soy sauce 2 tsp. coriander seeds, crushed 2 tsp. fennel seeds, crushed

FERMENTED VEGGIES ARE ACTUALLY

MORE NUTRITIOUS THAN THEIR RAW COUNTERPARTS.

I I I : Gochugaru can be found at Korean markets. Combine 3.5 oz. salt and 2 quarts warm water in a large bowl, whisking to dissolve salt. Add brussels sprouts and top with a plate to keep brussels sprouts submerged. Let sit at room temperature 4 hours; drain. Rinse, drain, and place in a large bowl. Pulse onion, scallions, garlic, gochugaru, fish sauce, Sriracha, ginger, soy sauce, and coriander and fennel seeds in a food processor until smooth. Add to bowl with brussels sprouts and toss. Transfer to two 32-oz. canning jars, packing down to eliminate air gaps. Combine remaining .7 oz. salt and 1 quart warm water in a large bowl, whisking to dissolve salt. Add pickling liquid to jars to cover brussels sprouts, leaving at least 1" headspace. Cover jars with lids. Let sit out of direct sunlight at room temperature until kimchi tastes tangy and releases bubbles when stirred, 3–5 days. Chill. : Kimchi can be made 2 months ahead (flavor will deepen). Keep chilled. CALORIES 20 FAT 0 G FIBER 2 G

CORTNEY BURNS BAR TARTINE SAN FRANCISCO

Fermented Grape Soda

ACTIVE 40 MINUTES TOTAL 7 DAYS OR LONGER The ginger “bug,” which jump-starts the fermentation, specifically uses organic ginger because it’s rich in microbes. You’ll have extra bug; use it to make more grape soda, or try 4 cups fresh unpasteurized apple juice in place of grape. 4 tsp. inely grated washed unpeeled organic ginger, divided (grate 1 tsp. at a time over 4 days) 4 tsp. sugar, divided 3 lb. red seedless grapes : A clean 1-liter plastic soda bottle with cap; cheesecloth Stir 1 tsp. ginger, 1 tsp. sugar, and 4 cups water in a 32-oz. canning jar to combine. Cover jar with cheesecloth; secure with a canning jar band (without lid). Let sit 1 day out of direct sunlight at room temperature. Stir in 1 tsp. ginger and 1 tsp. sugar and let sit 1 day. Repeat twice more. Mixture (ginger bug) should have bubbles throughout and release more when agitated. After 3 days, purée grapes in a blender until smooth. Strain, pressing on solids (you should have about 4 cups juice). Combine juice and ½ cup ginger bug in a large nonreactive bowl. Cover with cheesecloth; secure with a large rubber band. Let sit out of direct sunlight at room temperature, skimming white mold from surface, until mixture is slightly foamy and releases bubbles when stirred, 3–4 days. Strain into bottle, cap, and let sit at room temperature until bottle feels pressurized, about 1 day longer. Chill. : Soda can be made 2 weeks ahead. Keep chilled. CALORIES 250 FAT 5 G FIBER 3 G

SALT SUCCESS We prefer measuring salt by weight in the kimchi recipe for accuracy. But if you don’t have a kitchen scale, just use these volume conversions: Diamond Crystal kosher salt: 3.5 oz. = ¾ cup .7 oz. = 2 Tbsp. + 1 tsp. Morton coarse kosher salt: 3.5 oz. = 7 Tbsp. .7 oz. = 4¼ tsp.

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The ingredients in these three bowls form tare, a serious lavoring agent.

Dried noodles will get the job done, but fresh ones are best. We love Sun Noodle brand.

You’ll need three cuts of meat: pork ribs and chicken wings to lavor the stock, and pork shoulder, which cooks in the stock, then gets sliced and served with the ramen.

THE PROJECT

Ramen officially reached cult status this year at noodle joints from San Francisco to Washington, D.C. But thereÕs no need to wait in that hour-long lineÑyou can host your own pop-up with this authentic, step-by-step recipe BY ALISON ROMAN

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHRISTOPHER TESTANI

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THE PROJECT RAMEN

Soy-based shoyu ramen is Tokyo’s most popular style.

, toothsome noodles, and a heady broth you can’t stop slurping—it’s no wonder ramen joints are drawing droves of diners, off-duty chefs, and seemingly everyone on your Instagram feed. Bringing shoyu ramen home takes a trip to an Asian market, three days of work, and your largest pot, but this low-stress (really!) labor of love might be the best soup you’ll ever make. .( 8E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C  I ; F J ; C 8 ; H  (& ' )

WHAT YOU’LL NEED FOR SHOYU RAMEN

2 pieces dried kombu ½ cup reduced-sodium soy sauce 2 Tbsp. dry sake 1 Tbsp. mirin 1 ½ lb. boneless pork shoulder Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

2 Tbsp. vegetable oil ½ cup menma (fermented 2 lb. chicken necks, backs, bamboo shoots) and/or wings 6 scallions, thinly sliced 1 lb. pork spareribs 3 toasted nori sheets, 2 bunches scallions, chopped torn in half 2 carrots, peeled, cut into Chili oil, toasted sesame pieces oil, and shichimi 1 head of garlic, halved togarashi (for serving) horizontally Note: Don’t have kombu in 1 1" piece ginger, peeled, your pantry? You can find all sliced the Asian ingredients here ¼ cup bonito lakes at Asian markets, in the Asian foods section of some supermarkets, and at amazon.com. 3 large eggs Look in the refrigerated sec6 5-oz. packages fresh tion of Asian markets for fresh thin and wavy ramen noodles. Ask your butcher for noodles (or six 3-oz. chicken necks and backs. packages dried)


THE PROJECT RAMEN

Two days ahead MAKE KOMBU DASHI AND TARE The stock’s complexity comes from two elements: kombu dashi (a broth) and tare (a soybased mixture).* For the dashi, combine kombu and 4 quarts cold water in a large bowl. Cover and let sit at room temperature at least 8 hours and up to 12 hours. For the tare, combine soy sauce, sake, and mirin in a small bowl; cover and chill.

One day ahead

PREP PORK SHOULDER Season pork shoulder with salt and pepper. Roll up and tie with kitchen twine at 2" intervals. (This helps keep the meat intact while cooking and makes for round, compact slices.)

*Kombu, a.k.a. dried seaweed, brings major umami. Tare (pronounced ta-REH) is like ramen’s secret ingredient, giving the stock most of its flavor. Many shops closely guard their recipe. Ours uses soy sauce, sake, and mirin.

...One day ahead, cont. COOK PORK SHOULDER AND MAKE STOCK Heat oil in a large heavy pot (at least 8 quarts) over mediumhigh heat. Cook pork shoulder, turning, until brown all over, 10–12 minutes. Add chicken, spareribs, scallions, carrots, garlic, ginger, and bonito flakes. Remove kombu from dashi; discard. Add as much kombu dashi as will fit in pot once liquid is boiling (reserve remaining dashi). Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, skimming the surface occasionally and adding remaining dashi as liquid reduces, until pork shoulder is tender and stock has reduced to about 2 quarts, 2½–3 hours. CHILL PORK SHOULDER AND STOCK Remove pork shoulder from stock and let cool. Wrap tightly in plastic and chill until ready to use. (Chilling pork will make meat easier to slice.) Strain stock through a fine-mesh sieve into another large pot or a large bowl or container; discard solids (including ribs and chicken). Cover and chill.

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THE PROJECT RAMEN

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“Just like pasta, you want the right noodle for the right broth. For shoyu ramen, you’ll want a curly, thinner noodle.”

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Day of COOK EGGS Bring a medium pot of water to a boil. Carefully add eggs one at a time and boil gently for 7 minutes. Egg yolks should be shiny yellow and almost jammy; egg white should be just set. Drain eggs and transfer to a bowl of ice water to stop cooking; let cool. Peel; set aside. (Eggs can be cooked 1 day ahead. Keep unpeeled eggs covered in cool water. Cover and chill.) SLICE PORK Remove string and thinly slice pork; cover and set aside. REHEAT STOCK AND COOK NOODLES When ready to serve, bring stock to a simmer; it should be very hot. At the same time, cook noodles in a large pot of boiling water according to package directions until al dente; drain (no need to salt the water, as ramen noodles contain more salt than pasta).

TATSU AIKAWA RAMEN TATSU-YA AUSTIN

Just before serving PUT IT ALL TOGETHER [A] Divide noodles among 6 deep bowls. [B] Top with sliced pork, placing it off to one side. Add tare to hot stock and ladle over pork to warm through (stock should come up just to the level of the noodles). [C] Place a small pile of menma next to pork. Halve eggs and place next to menma. [D] Place a small pile of sliced scallions next to egg. Tuck half a sheet of nori between side of bowl and noodles so it’s just poking out. [E] Serve ramen with chili oil, sesame oil, and shichimi togarashi.

A

B

C

D

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BA ST

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San Francisco treat “The great thing about Tosca is we don’t have to re-create,” says new owner Ken Friedman.

THE WORLD’S BEST LAST DIVE BAR

where the mayor of San Francisco would chat up Sean Penn and Christopher Hitchens until four in the morning. Or where the owner would leave the keys with the drummer from Metallica—and tell him to lock up when he’s finished. That was Tosca Cafe, a North Beach staple that has been a dimly lit home to everyone from the Beats to Rudolph Nureyev to…Kid Rock? There was no velvet rope, no bottle service—just some rippedup red vinyl booths and a jukebox playing opera and a vintage espresso machine that barely heated water anymore. Nobody cared if you smoked. Nobody hounded you to pay your tab on time. The only rule: Don’t bother anyone. If every great party needs a great host,

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“the Tosca” had Jeannette Etheredge, a true dame, who bought the bar in 1980 and made everyone from Bono to Hunter S. Thompson to former mayor Willie Brown feel at home. She was the real San Francisco treat, taking the likes of Mikhail Baryshnikov and Lauren Hutton under her wing. With such a following, what could go wrong? Well, last year, the landlord issued an eviction notice, claiming that the bar owed more than $100,000 in back rent. A Hail Mary came from an unlikely source. Longtime supporter Sean Penn reached out to restaurateur Ken Friedman and chef April Bloomfield, the team behind New York’s The Spotted Pig, imploring them to save the place. Friedman, a fan himself,

was on a plane the next day. After a threemonth renovation, the Tosca reopens this month, serving small and large plates of Italian food by Bloomfield that are meant to go with booze—rather than the other way around. (“Because it is a bar,” emphasizes Friedman.) But what of Etheredge? Though she has “owner emeritus” status, September marks a changing of the guard. So pull up a stool and listen to the famous patrons and no-nonsense Etheredge share some of their Tosca tales. Jeanette Etheredge (former owner): My mother [Armenian refugee Armen Bali] said the Tosca was the first bar she came to when she came to America in the early ’50s.

PHOTOGRAPH BY KATY RADDATZ SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE CORBIS

It’s the kind of joint where Beats got bounced, Bono belted opera, and a certain actor may or may not have blown a hole in the wall to get a certain musician to stop playing. On the eve of Tosca Cafe’s handover, Mickey Rapkin coaxes the most notable patrons into telling their after-hours tales


BA STORYTELLERS TO A S T I N G TO S C A C A F E

PHOTOGRAPHS, CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT: CARTER YOUNG; MICHAEL MACOR/SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE/CORBIS; ALEXIS TJIAN; COURTESY TOSCA CAFE.

She said, “You have to buy that bar.” [Laughs] So, my mother’s responsible. Laurence Fishburne (actor): I loved the stories Jeannette would tell about her mom. The one about her being involved in weapons smuggling during the war… Boz Scaggs (musician): Jeannette and her mother were both refugees, and I think that life was precious to them. They both had a sense of welcoming people and taking them in. When the first defectors came from Russia or when the dancers would come to San Francisco, the girls would stay at Jeannette’s house. Tosca would be loaded with these gorgeous ballerinas. Mikhail Baryshnikov (dancer): Armen was a strong woman and a second mother to Rudolf Nureyev. Armen and Jeannette held the key to the city. And I quickly learned I would meet anyone interesting passing through San Francisco [at the Tosca]. Roman Coppola (director, screenwriter): My dad [Francis Ford] and Jerry Brown, the governor, share a birthday. And they had been out together [with Jeannette] at Tommaso’s just nearby. Jeannette said, “Hey, let’s go over to the Tosca.” My dad said, “I don’t want to go over there.” Apparently one of the previous owners was not such a warm person. It turns out, of course, that Jeannette had just bought the place. THE BEATS Tony Dingman (poet; driver for Francis Ford Coppola, among others): The previous owner [of the Tosca] was a very grumpy guy. I remember he threw Allen Ginsberg out because Allen’s boyfriend, Peter Orlovsky, went to the women’s room. He said, “You goddamn hippies!” Etheredge: City Lights [bookstore] is across the street. Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Ginsberg—all of them hung out here. There’s been so many writers through this place. Norman Mailer to Jim Harrison to Susan Sontag to Christopher Hitchens. Salman Rushdie’s been here quite a bit. I used to get phone calls from Hunter S. Thompson in the middle of the night. I never answered. I’d listen to his voice mail yelling at me, “I know you’re there!” Hunter brought Johnny Depp here. I’m not very good with words. Maybe that’s why I like writers so much, you know? Dingman: I was sitting at the end of the bar one New Year’s Eve. At about 11:30, the poet Gregory Corso collapsed on the floor right in the doorway. He was so drunk he was kind of sliding across the wall. I said, “Jeannette, do me a favor. Because he’s a legendary poet and completely a mess, can

we not 86 him? Can we sit him on the bench by the window until he sobers up or wanders out?” Jeannette runs a pretty tight ship. She doesn’t like any bullshit. But we did that. I was proud of Jeannette. Just because he couldn’t get through the front door doesn’t mean he’s a bad man. THE NAME-DROPPING Lauren Hutton (model): I’ve been going to Tosca for 25 years. I was going up to San Francisco to make a movie. Anjelica Huston said, “The first thing you have to do is go to Tosca. Every actor, every writer, everybody who is everybody goes to Tosca.” From then on, I was friends with Jeannette and Armen—forever. Roman Coppola: I went to the Tosca with my cousin, Nicolas Cage, when I was in high school. His brother Christopher was a bartender there for some time. The pool table was in the back room, and I had my personal pool cue which I kept there. For a 17-year-old kid to have a pool cue at the back room of a bar was pretty exciting.

There was no illicit, sneaky “I’ll serve you under the counter.” Kid Rock (musician): I spent many a night in the back talking politics with Sean [Penn] and life with Lars [Ulrich], who introduced me to the Tosca hang. There was a late-night acoustic jam with Bobby Bare, Jr., Holly Williams, myself, Winona Ryder, and a few others. Etheredge: Michael Douglas used to come to this bar way before I owned it, when he was doing The Streets of San Francisco. I walked in one night and he was sitting at the bar with another actor. I said, “What are you doing in town?” And he said, “I’m making a film, and I wanted my friend to see where he should be drinking.” Michael Douglas (actor): I had some fun times at Tosca. I always liked the company, and Jeannette made me feel very welcomed. Gavin Newsom (lieutenant governor of California; former mayor of San Francisco): It’s name-dropping, but that’s Tosca. How many times do you have a salon with Sean Penn and Christopher Hitchens

“I was going to San Francisco to do a movie. Anjelica Huston said, ‘The first thing you have to do is go to Tosca. Every actor, every writer, everybody who is everybody goes to Tosca.’” LAUREN HUTTON

Clockwise from top: Former owner Jeannette Etheredge holds court; the bartender keeps it classic; Etheredge with Robin Williams (left) and Eddie Izzard (right); the unchanged facade.


BA STORYTELLERS TO A S T I N G TO S C A C A F E

getting into a deep debate? And people are smoking and breaking all the rules and Hitchens is 18 drinks in and Sean is throwing them back? I remember being with Bono in the early ’90s. Naomi Campbell was in the back room. You name it. Etheredge: I met Mickey Rourke when he was doing Rumble Fish with Francis Ford Coppola, and he brought U2 and Bono here. And then every time they were in San Francisco, this was their place. Editor’s Note: In 1997, Bono got on the bar at 4 a.m. and requested “O Sole Mio,” then sang along with a recording of Pavarotti. Etheredge: The jukebox was all opera. You know, we have changed it the last few years. We’ve put on a lot of old rock and roll. I mean, we’ve got Patsy Cline. Whenever people say to me, “Oh, well, that’s not opera.” I say, “Yes, it is. It’s Grand Ole Opry.” THE RIGHT STUFF Etheredge: I bought the bar in 1980, and in ’82, [director] Phil Kaufman started shooting The Right Stuff. Sam Shepard would play the piano. Wim Wenders and Sam Shepard wrote part of Paris, Texas in this bar. Dennis Quaid (actor): Like in the movie, Tosca was our Pancho’s: It’s where all the pilots used to hang out just about every night after work. That was back in the old days, when people used to bond and not just hang out in their trailers. We all got around the piano and sang our hearts out— everything from Hank Williams to opera. Ed Harris (actor): I don’t recall Dennis Quaid ever singing at Tosca’s while I was there. I just remember numerous nights of playing pool in the back room with the guys from the film, sitting at tables with various

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“I don’t want to get all cagey on you, but if it happened in that back room, it should probably stay in that back room.” LARS ULRICH

luminaries—Werner Herzog, Boz Scaggs, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Mr. Coppola, and any number of performers, writers, artists who happened to be in town. I never had too much to say. I was a bit enamored at the time by the status of the clientele and constantly amazed at Jeannette’s largesse. Etheredge: Those nights were pretty wild. Dennis Quaid and Scott Glenn caught a purse snatcher in here. And they held him until the cops arrived. THE HOUSE CAPPUCCINO Quaid: The House Cappuccino was the thing to order. Fishburne: Those coffee drinks? Insane, man! The best. Coppola: The House Cappuccino doesn’t have any coffee in it, which is interesting. Etheredge: It was invented during Prohibition. It’s Ghirardelli chocolate and milk, and then we steam it up in the machine and add a shot of brandy. It has no coffee. I guess it was a way for them to sell booze illegally. How many do we sell every night? I have no idea. They’re lined up on the bar. Baryshnikov: When it came to drinking at Tosca, I always stuck with vodka and good beer. Ken Friedman (new owner): We reached out to Ghirardelli to try and talk to them about the House Cappuccino, and they wouldn’t even return our calls. Needless to say, there are some great new artisanal chocolate companies in San Francisco. THAT TIME WITH MEL BROOKS Etheredge: I met Mel Brooks at a funeral in Los Angeles for a friend of my mother’s, the ballet dancer Nora Kaye. That funeral

was so star-studded. I sat down next to Mel Brooks. I looked at him and I said, “Oh my God, you’re Mel Brooks! And I love your movies.” He looked at me—absolutely straight-faced—and said, “We’re at a funeral.” I thought, “Oh, God. I’ve really screwed up.” Thirty seconds later he leaned over and said, [whispering] “Which one did you like the best?” A couple months later, this car pulls up to the Tosca and Mel Brooks gets out. He’s with somebody. And he says to the guy, “Oh, you’re gonna love her. I met her at a funeral.” He started coming in every night. We’d go to dinner, this and that. One night, he’s at the bar. He walks into my office, he closes the door, and he says, “Jeannette, guess who just walked in? Norman Mailer.” I said, “Oh, well, we have to go say hi.” He said, “You know Norman Mailer?” “Yeah, I know Norman Mailer.” So I took him over to the table and introduced him to Norman. Mel asked me if I had a camera, and I did. He said, “Would you take a picture of me and Norman?” Shelby Van Vliet (assistant to Mel Brooks): Would you mind passing on a thanks, but no? Mel does not remember eating there. THAT INCIDENT WITH SEAN PENN Henry Alex Rubin (director): Did you hear the story of Sean Penn blowing a hole in the wall? Etheredge: Oh my God. Who told you that? Rubin: Kid Rock took out a guitar and started regaling customers with some songs. I think Sean Penn didn’t like what he was playing and—not to be outdone— pulled out his gun. He said, “I think you

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Clockwise from above: Lauren Hutton (right) makes a connection; Francis Ford Coppola; the men’s room; Sean Penn (with House Cappuccinos) in the ‘80s.


need some percussion.” And he blew a hole through the wall. Sean thought it was hilarious and kept partying. Jeannette confiscated his gun. And the party continued like no big deal. Kid Rock didn’t think much of it either. But he stopped playing. Etheredge: You know what, I don’t think that’s a good thing to print. Truly. Rubin: What was strange to me was that no one went to check the back room. I was with Winona Ryder, and we went to examine the bullet hole. We’d noticed that it had pierced the wall and gone into the pool room, where luckily no one was playing. There were wood chips on the pool table. The bullet continued through the next wall and into the building next door. Kid Rock: There is a story about Sean Penn wanting to play percussion and a gun going off that I will neither confirm nor deny! Editor’s Note: Sean Penn denies this incident. Coppola: There was a period where you could still smoke in the back room. There’s always been a little bit of a bending of the rules. Newsom: Jeannette was the only one who got away with allowing people to smoke. I mean, what a fraud I am: I was one of the principal proponents of the no-smoking ban as mayor and supervisor. [Laughs] There was always the Jeannette Etheredge/ Tosca Rule. Every cop knew it. People would sometimes complain. We said, “We’ll take care of it.” We’d go down and talk to Jeannette. She’d say, “That person’s been trying to shut me down for 20 years.” And we’d say, “Oh yeah, that is unfair.” [Laughs] Eventually the complaints were such that she had to make it stop. Lars Ulrich (drummer, Metallica): I don’t want to get all cagey on you and PC, but if it happened in that back room, it should probably stay in that back room. Hutton: If you were offensive in any way, Jeannette 86’d you. Good writers that just had an alcohol problem for a while? In the end, Jeannette probably cured them because she 86’d them. Their social life was over. They had to go into rehab! Fishburne: Why was Jeannette such a good hostess? One, Jeannette is one of the great broads. And two, she’s got balls. She never had to lay down the law with me because I recognized her authority and character and never challenged those things. I come from a matriarchal society, anyway. I ain’t got no problems with a lady being in charge.

Friedman: I always thought, If one of a handful of places ever became available, I would grab it and try to save it. And Tosca was at the very top of the list. Etheredge: I didn’t have to tell Ken anything. He walked in, and the way he looked at everything was…I mean, I think he felt like I felt when I bought the bar. Friedman: The great thing about Tosca is we don’t have to re-create. It’s like, certain songs just don’t get covered. Because you’d never do a better version. Dingman: The place has 25-watt bulbs. I said [to Jeannette], “Don’t be changing them. Not even 40 watts.” Quaid: Jeannette is just the most magnificent human being that God planted on this earth. She doesn’t take any guff off anybody. At the same time, she’s the most welcoming, hospitable, funny, smart, generous person. I’m sorry to hear the Tosca’s been sold. Newsom: There was a secret sauce to Tosca. You can’t match that organic connection to San Francisco’s soul—the crosscurrents of old North Beach and the beatnik world and the cross-pollination of Hollywood and the directors, musicians, and the thoughtful actors. It wasn’t the flavor of the month; it was the grittier, more real side of culture that was always represented there. You’re not going to see that anywhere else. Ulrich: As I started to consider Jeannette a close friend, we were sitting there in the back room at four in the morning and she reached out and said, “I’m going home.” And then she gave me the keys. She said, “Lock up when you leave.” That in some way defines the whole experience: There was that kind of trust and that kind of comfort. It was like a brotherhood. Everyone would sit in the back and solve the world’s problems until six in the morning. And then the key was just handed. Etheredge: I’m staring at Hunter [S. Thompson]’s favorite photo right now. It’s called “The Death Bomb.” It’s a photo of Hunter shooting a gun at a poster of Ronald Reagan dressed as a cowboy. Hunter was the finest. I adored him. He was such a great friend. Why are you doing this to me? I’m gonna hang up from you and break down and start crying. [Pauses] I’m taking the photo home. Don’t tell Ken. Contributing editor Mickey Rapkin is the author of Pitch Perfect, which inspired the hit movie from Universal.


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CHARLESTON TOWERS

We’ve always loved the palmetto-lined streets and legendary Low Country cooking this city offers. But the real draw now is a booming restaurant scene that has made it the South’s most exciting food destination BY BRYS STEPHENS

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Triple play Want to induce table envy? The threetiered shell ish plateaux at The Ordinary does the trick every time.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY TERRY MANIER


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EAT LIKE A CHEF On days off, Charleston’s kings of cuisine opt for real country cooking.

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Ken Vedrinski Coda del Pesce

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: Bertha’s Kitchen : Fried pork chop with tomato-okra soup. “It’s simple, delicious, and they’re not scared to use a little bit of salt.”

Josh Keeler Two Boroughs Larder 4

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Ever since Sean Brock opened his celebrated Husk Restaurant

three years ago, Charleston, South Carolina, has exuded a gravitational pull for food lovers as the one city they absolutely, positively must visit. But you could argue that it wasn’t until very recently that this picturesque town—gaslight lamps, cobblestone streets, centuries-old townhouses— offered the breadth of restaurants that truly make it a dining capital. Now, in addition to the heritage Southern cuisine that Brock serves at Husk, Charleston boasts a growing number of chef-driven places, from a boisterous oyster bar to a pan-Asian hideout in a former garage. Combine this energized scene with the old-fashioned charm and comforting flavors of Low Country cooking already present, and you’ve got a town you really do need to visit.

People notice when Mike Lata, the chef behind the beloved FIG, opens a restaurant. You should, too. His latest, The Ordinary [1], is anything but. The sophisticated oyster bar and seafood brasserie is located in a historic bank (the original vault door offers a peek into the kitchen), and there’s more white marble and tile in the soaring space than at the Acropolis. Sit at the long wooden bar and order a seafood tower that includes local oysters and clams from celebrity isherman Clammer Dave. What Balthazar is to New York, The Ordinary is to Charleston: big, buzzy, and fun.

This is a brunch town, and on Saturdays, The Glass Onion is the place for a Bloody Mary (with housepickled vegetables, of course). Hangover cures include shrimp and grits, and pork country sausage with pimiento cheese and garlic bread [4]. The service is sweet and the setting is casual— think re ined diner. At night, blue-plate specials include fried chicken livers and Cajun boudin ravioli with collards and potlikker.

Two Boroughs Larder [3] is a bit off the tourist trail, but venture out to this hybrid neighborhood restaurant– market and you’ll be rewarded with the city’s best all-day spot. Josh Keeler’s cooking, as good as any in town, is centered around local ingredients and enhanced with global lavors. It’s best for brunch or a long, lazy lunch illed with dishes like fried quail with berbere spice; roasted okra with curry and onion soubise [2]; and the ramen-inspired Bowla-Noodle with pork confit and a softboiled egg—all at a fair price. Every town needs a Two Boroughs Larder, but for now it’s only in Charleston. »

: Martha Lou’s Kitchen : Fried chicken. “Martha Lou Gadsden has cooked the same dishes for 30 years at this no-frills joint. You can taste that passion in every bite.”

Sean Brock Husk Restaurant : Fishnet Seafood : Fried hard-shell crab with lemongarlic butter. “They’re doing it with honesty— and that’s true soul food. “ —Reported by Lucy Nieboer

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DRINK LIKE A LOCAL You’re never too far from a solid bar in these parts.

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SOUTHERN PIE World-class, woodfired Neapolitan-style pizza knows no boundaries these days. More proof can be found at the freewheeling Extra Virgin Oven (EVO) pizzeria in North Charleston, where perfectly blistered crusts are the canvas for toppings like summer squash and cherry tomatoes [9], and house-made sausage and mozzarella. The bakery behind the restaurant features some of the area’s best

baked goods (the Speck and provolone croissants are particularly noteworthy). Locals know to stop for lunch on the way in and out of town.

THE CURE THING The South’s welldocumented love of all things pork gives it a leg up when it comes to charcuterie. Case in point: the incredible cured, smoked, and cooked meats crafted by Craig Deihl and his team at Cypress. Bypass the main

dining room and head upstairs for a meal assembled from a revolving selection of over 80 types of country ham, salumi, and terrines [6]. Deihl sources pig breeds like the American Guinea hog, whose marbled meat marks the difference between the artisanal and mass stuff. Locals have the luxury of a steady supply via the restaurant’s meatshare subscriptions. Out-of-towners, fear not: They’ll sell you a few slices, too.

LATE-NIGHT BUZZ

ASIAN INFUSION

Lunch is worth a visit at new-wave sandwich shop Butcher & Bee, but the warehouse space really comes alive after 11 p.m. on Friday and Saturday nights, with a latenight menu. You’ll likely see restaurant-industry folk with six-packs on their tables (it’s the city’s only BYOB), scarfing down the signature burger [8] with pimiento cheese or an eggplant banh mi. Also look for special guestchef pop-up dinners.

Charleston might be the last place you’d expect to find textbook mapo tofu [5], that satisfying Sichuan dish, but that’s what you’ll find at Xiao Bao Biscuit, a hip hangout set in a converted gas station. Owners Josh Walker, Duolan Li, and Joey Ryan serve what they call Asian soul food, their take on authentic dishes from China, Korea, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam. This mashup means you might run across kimchispiked mung bean cakes alongside paratha bread with green curry. Wash it all down with a Toña lager.

WHERE TO STAY: CHARLESTON Steps from the Old City Market, Charleston Place is the ideal launching pad for exploring uptown and downtown. (Bonus: Kids love the pool with a retractable roof.) The charming, historic Wentworth Mansion is for those weekends when you want to leave the tots at home.

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For more info, see Sourcebook on page 200.

The Bar at Husk Like Sean Brock’s lauded restaurant next door, this two-story bar is deeply Southern. Choose a bourbon from the best selection in town, and pair it with one of the country’s finest cheeseburgers. The Gin Joint Sworn off gin? This preProhibition-style spot will win you back with a Maiden’s Mule, made with Death’s Door gin, ginger tincture, and seltzer. The Griffon We dare you not to have fun at this dive and chef magnet. Order from an impressive array of craft brews, or keep it simple with a shot and a beer.

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The Belmont Upper King Street bars gets crazy on the weekends, but this den of mixology stays sophisticated. A jalapeñocucumber gimlet [7] is a good start.


P RO M OT I O N

Photograph by Christopher Testani (cover). Apple, the Apple logo and iPad are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc. Amazon, Kindle, Kindle Fire, and the Amazon Kindle logo are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates. NOOK Color and NOOK Tablet are trademarks of Barnes & Noble, Inc.

The Dream Team

Get both the print and digital issues of Bon Appétit for one great price. Go to bonappetit.com /magazine/tablet to subscribe. Already a magazine subscriber? The tablet edition comes FREE with your current subscription. Just download the Bon Appétit app and enter the subscription number from your mailing label. Available on the iPad®, Kindle Fire, and NOOK Tablet™


FEAS

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I N G O O D TA ST E Food and style have always gone together, whether at an elegant bistro or a glam dinner party. Our favorite designers tell us how they entertain, hunt down the chicest restaurants, and translate culinary innovation into covetable fashion

Paris perfect The waiters at Le Voltaire, a beloved restaurant of designers like Thom Browne. ' & , 8E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C  I ; F J ; C 8 ; H  (& ' )

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BY CHRISTINE MUHLKE


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For the hostess, “a jumpsuit is always chic and nice and almost relaxing.”

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Thakoon Panichgul is done with the cool restaurant thing. “I feel like you let trends dictate as opposed to being able to say, ‘This is what I like,’ ” explains the womenswear designer. These days, he prefers making Thai and rustic recipes for friends: “To me, even just the quality of food is exponentially better when you cook at home.” Here are his ingredients for a stylish dinner party.

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O N R E STAU R A N TS

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DESIGN

FOUR SEASONS BARSTOOL

THOM BROWNE

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If you’ve lunched in the Grill Room at New York’s Four Seasons, chances are you’ve seen a handsome man in a shrunken gray suit. Thom Browne dines regularly at the architectural landmark, mostly so he can marvel at the 1959 design: “That room is so important as inspiration,” he says. “You can see the aesthetic in my stores and home,” not to mention his precisely tailored clothes.

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¼M^[dZh[ii_d]\ehZ_dd[h"Zed¿j el[hZe_j$There’s nothing better than a woman in a skirt and a twin set.”

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SUSTAINABLY COOL

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I N N OVAT I O N

WA R B Y PA R K E R

Warby Parker’s eyewear is vintage inspired, but the company’s business ethos is 21st century: online oriented, altruistic, and highly innovative. A key source of creative inspiration? Today’s food world. Eating well is so central to the WP culture, says co-founder Neil Blumenthal (above left, with David Gilboa), “We posted our core values in the kitchen because that’s where we figured people would be exposed to them most frequently.”

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½F[efb[Wh[c_n_d]ȈbWlehi_dmWoij^WjdeXeZo mekbZ¿l[Zh[Wc[Ze\j[do[WhiW]e"½ Blumenthal says. “There’s innovation unlike any point in history. That inspires us.” GLASS ACT MFcWZ[j^_ijhWo\eh ;b[l[dCWZ_iedFWha ]k[ijim^e\eh][jj^[_h h[WZ_d]]bWii[i$Ed j^[hee\Wji_Xb_d] h[ijWkhWdjJ^[DeCWZ" _j¿iikd]bWii[i$

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O N FO O D


THE O

SS BSE

IVORE Feeding time Cooking in chaos requires a lexible, scalable recipe.

AND BABY MAKES FREE FOR ALL An infant daughter plus a toddler son, minus anything resembling a good night’s sleep. What could go wrong? Adam Sachs pulls on his pants and relearns the importance of a proper family meal “

,”

.

I thought I detected an unfamiliar note of concern and tenderness in his voice. But my powers of detection were blunted by an interrogation level of sleep deprivation. It was a time of happy chaos within our growing household: The boy, not quite two years old, had just been joined by a girl whose age we still measured in days. We sang nonsense songs all night and ate ice cream for breakfast. For a week, nobody went outside or wore pants. Sensing a frayed fabric of life in need of mending, my son stopped me as I leapt by him on the way to fetch something infant-related in the kitchen. “Dada, sit,” he said, indicating the seat opposite his high chair. He sounded serious. So I sat.

' '* 8E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C  I ; F J ; C 8 ; H  (& ' )

Typically at this point, he would ask to honk my nose or demand a Lego train car. But now he fixed me with an arresting look, forgiving but firm. We need to have a little chat, it said. Pay attention. I recognized it as the kind of look I’d no doubt use on him in fatherly negotiations ahead. But now my son had the floor and was ready to make his case. “Dada,” the boy said, “I want to have eat-eat.” I was impressed. Nobody around here, least of all the nearly two-year-old, was in the habit of using full sentences. And I knew what he meant. “Eat-eat” was more than the sum of its repetitive parts. It wasn’t food as fuel. Eat-eat, I’d come to understand, was a proper family meal. It was togetherness at the table, the boy sharing what we ate.

It was civilized—healthier and more fun than the kind of disjointed permasnacking we’d fallen into. He wanted to yell “Cheers!” and clunk his milk cup into my wineglass. We all wanted eat-eat. The directive was clear, the tone urgent: Venture forth into the sunny world to hunt and gather (or at least shop and schlep) something nice for dinner. So we all put on pants, except for the little girl, who dozed in her pastel muumuu-straitjacket. And we set out toward the farmers’ market with two strollers and bed head and a bag of wipes. When the boy had first arrived, I’d been flush with joyful mania—and the need to make myself useful somehow. The miniature, mother-focused creature asked little of me in those early weeks,

PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRISTOPHER TESTANI


THE OBSESSIVORE PA R E N TA L G U I D A N C E

laden manner not at all resembling austere American notions of a salad.” My version, adapted to what I found at the market, may not be traditional, but it is true to its spirit. Not quite a recipe, it’s simply a reliable combination of things that shine together: sturdy, flavorful greens brightened by a mustardy vinaigrette; the sunsetty yolks of good eggs; the earthy heft and salt of the duck, thinly sliced; the crunch of walnuts; a bit of crumbly blue cheese. The nice thing about a salad like this is that you can cook the eggs, wash and dry the greens, and whisk your vinaigrette whenever you want. (While others are napping, say.) Then assemble it— at room temperature—for lunch, dinner, or anytime in between (or after). The nicer thing about a salad like this is that when I served it to the mother, whose soul had also been silently crying out for leafy things and smoky-salty protein and the satisfying crunch of bread nuggets crisped in duck fat, she

When I served the salad to the mother, she let out a low purr of approval. Her look said, Now youÕre pulling your weight around here. sustained attention; something that easily scales to mass quantities and can be repurposed for days. At the market, I saw crates of green and wavy purple lettuces, peppery mizuna, and esoteric leafy things whose names I would never remember even when rested. Typically I’m not a salad craver, but I’d been living on ginger ice cream, lemon sorbet, and adrenaline, and these leaves, man, they were lookin’ real good to me. Across from the lettuce monger was the duck dude. He pulled some nice-looking smoked magrets from his case, and I knew we had the makings of a kick-ass eat-eat. I spent a hot week in the Périgord region of southwestern France a few years back. Every lunch consisted of some variation on the salade Périgourdine, which roughly translates as “all the delicious things you can think of thrown together in a louche, duck-and-goose-fat-

' ' , 8E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C  I ; F J ; C 8 ; H  (& ' )

let out a low purr of approval. Her look said, Now you’re pulling your weight around here. My son inhaled the greens, hand to mouth, a natural. He ate the egg, cut up. I tore off a piece of the smoked magret and told him, “Duck.” “Duck,” the boy said, taking it and seeming satisfied. After a thoughtful chew, he appeared to remember a bedtime book about lost ducklings and said again, a little scandalized, “Duck?” “Cheers!” I yelled to change the subject. That was a conversation that could wait. The boy clunked my glass with his milk cup. Beside us in her cradle, the girl slept on, quietly. The important thing was that we were here together, seated and finally sated. Bon Appétit contributing editor Adam Sachs inally did the responsible thing and got a job. He is now the editorial director of Tasting Table.

A FRENCH ISH SALAD TO FEED AN EXPANDING HOUSEHOLD An assemblage of delicious things to be deployed in necessarily inexact proportions. Leafy greens, the more peppery the better. A mustardy vinaigrette. Whisk 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar with 1 teaspoon each Dijon and grainy mustards. Gradually whisk in ½ cup olive oil. Fresh farm eggs. Slide into alreadyboiling water, cook for about 7 minutes, then put straight into ice water. Smoked duck breast. Trim off some fat for frying the croutons, then thinly slice the meat against the grain. Order at dartagnan.com. Toasted walnuts Slivered red onion Croutons. Fry torn bread in a combo of olive oil and rendered duck fat until crisp. Crumbled blue cheese Now, arm yourself with enough ingredients to feed everybody for a few meals. Toss some greens with vinaigrette. Top with the duck and halved eggs. While snacking on the croutons, scatter some around. Sprinkle the cheese, onion, and walnuts over the top; finish with Maldon salt and pepper. Bask in the admiration of your loved ones. Nap. Repeat.

<EE:IJOB?D=8OH;8;997@KHA;L?9>$FHEFIJOB?D=8OA7?JBOD:KHEII$

so I set my euphoric enthusiasm loose in the kitchen. I cranked up the oven and churned out piles of pizzas for visiting grandparents and friends. I made chicken salad for the new nanny and heaping bowls of nutty farro salad with tiny halved tomatoes and sweet beets for the new mom. I simmered and froze great quantities of chicken stock and meat ragouts for our bright and homebound future. This time around, confidence had bred complacency. Until my son reminded me of the central importance of making sure we all ate well. The question, then, was what to make? What to feed a growing gang when you’ve got work deadlines to meet and a son who knows you’re phoning it in; when it’s also brain-meltingly hot out and everybody’s already a little goofy from lack of sleep? The answer is, you want something stabilizing that can be assembled—in stages—ahead of time without too much


PHOTOGRAPHS: THIS PAGE AND FOLLOWING SPREAD, LUCAS VISSER


by

Andrew Knowlton

illustrations by Mike Perry

Additional reporting by Scott DeSimon, Sara Dickerman, Matt Duckor, Julia Kramer, Meryl Rothstein, Joanna Sciarrino, and Amiel Stanek


To see the full list of all 50 nominees for the Best New Restaurants of 2013, go to bonappetit.com/go/50best

Thirteen must be my lucky number. That’s how many Bon Appétit restaurant issues I’ve worked on. My role has changed over the years, from spell-checking Kokkari Estiatorio in 2001 to choosing the Hot 10 in 2009, the irst time we made such a list. But I’ve got to admit: This is the issue I’m most proud of. I’ve traveled more, eaten more, spent more, and endured more sleepless nights deciding whom to include than any year prior. I think you’ll be able to see (or is it taste?) the passion for all things food that went into this issue. There would not be a list without the help of my Norwegian father-in-law, Terje Skogly—or Teddy, as I call him. You see, each year I choose an alias so I can eat anonymously. I’ve used the names of ex–Atlanta Braves. (In Atlanta, the staff would look at me in disappointment when I checked in.) One year, I was Bo Circle, my porn name (i.e., my childhood pet plus the street I grew up on). This year, I became Mr. Skogly. I don’t know how many times I said “Teddy, like the bear, S K O G L Y” when making a reservation. But it worked. Had Teddy actually dined with me during my quest for the best of the best, he would have sat at countless marble bars, begun his tasting menus with a barrage of dazzling snacks, and had his entrées delivered by the chefs who prepared them, among the other elements that de ined dining out in 2013. He would have sampled Macanese food for the irst time and slurped more oysters than he could ever have imagined. He would have had a mind-blowing meal at a scrappy spot in Los Angeles that quickly rose to number one, and scooped up bites of the dish of the year at pretty much every stop. In the end, he would have discovered a dining scene that is being reinvented by a band of young chefs (33 is the average age on this list), and one that knows no creative or geographic boundaries. These men and women have inspired me, and I know that over the next 51 pages, they’ll inspire you, too. Thanks, Teddy. I owe you dinner. I know a few good spots. You free in 2014?


Dishes from the tasting menu, including the Seaweed and Tofu Beignets (recipe on page 126). Opposite: The Alma family. (The guy second from left in back is chef Ari Taymor.)


RESTAURANT of the

YEAR

1

Alma Los Angeles, California

The best new restaurant of 2013 proves that youth, creativity, and fearlessness are the new recipe for success photographs by Michael Graydon + Nikole Herriott


TREND SPOTTING

Personalized Playlists

“Chefs aren’t shy about sharing their musical taste. I heard lots of Beach House, Fleetwood Mac, and Stones during my meal here.” —A.K.

Clockwise from above: Banquettes in the Cali-casual dining room. Greens with sprouts, seeds, and horseradish–crème fraîche dressing (for the recipe, see page 126). The chalkboard wall. Pork loin with butternut squash, brussels sprouts, pickled apple, and dry mole. Sous chef Brian D. Maynard and line cook Topher Hoffman focus as service begins. Buttermilk Cake with Sour Milk Jam and Gin-Poached Cherries (for the recipe, see page 126).


Ari Taymor has a knack for knocking on doors, and a talent for showing up unannounced at a restaurant’s service entrance. He’s not afraid to call a chef every day for a month to ask if he can come work for free. In other words, he can be a royal pain in the butt. But it’s that won’t-take-no-foran-answer attitude that led him, at just 26 years old, to open Alma. The story of how this unassuming, 39-seat restaurant in Los Angeles became the restaurant of the year is, to put it in sports terms, like that of a minor league baseball player who goes from batting .200 one year to hitting a grand slam in the bottom of the ninth with two outs to win the World Series the next. Yes, it’s that unexpected. Taymor grew up in Palo Alto, California, on a steady suburban diet of Food Network (he was partial to Good Eats and Iron Chef) and Taco Bell (his go-to order: two chalupas and a Crunchwrap Supreme). But it wasn’t until 2007, when he had a monumental, eye-opening meal of lamb leg à la ficelle at the legendary Chez Panisse, that food became more than entertainment and cheap fuel. From that point forward, Taymor wanted to cook. That’s not to say that the road to Alma was linear. Along the way, he was fired from an externship at Lucques in Los Angeles, honed basic culinary skills at a community kitchen in Berkeley, and hunkered down at San Francisco’s Flour + Water, where he spent six months only making pasta. I’ve seen better résumés on The Hot 10. It was while working as an unpaid stagiaire at La Chassagnette, a country restaurant with its own garden in Arles, France, that Taymor adopted the techniques that became the foundation of his cooking style (not to

mention where he became enamored with the idea of having a farm). These varied experiences gave Taymor a vision for his own concept—and bolstered the tenacity required to pull it off. In February 2012, less than five years after that pivotal meal at Chez Panisse, he launched Alma as a pop-up in Venice, California. What would soon become his trademarks— almost no butter, lots of vegetable stocks, and selections that changed nightly—shined in the three- and five-course tasting menus. It was an overnight success, but seeing as it was a pop-up, his success was over almost as soon. Taymor was about to take a job opening up someone else’s restaurant when he got a call about a permanent space in downtown L.A. He had 24 hours to decide his future. Taymor and his business partner, Ashleigh Parsons, signed the lease and opened Alma an unheard-of two weeks later. The restaurant nearly failed. Some nights, no one came in. “I was terrified,” says Taymor. “I kept running out of money.” To be completely honest, the first time I ate there, I had my own doubts about the place. Alma is situated in an area undergoing a cultural and culinary renaissance, but there are still pockets of seediness, like the bubble gum–stained block on which Alma’s modern, woodpaneled facade stands out. Inside, you can feel its makeshift roots. It resembles a temporary gallery space more than a bona fide eating establishment (chalkboard wall;

simple wood finishes; a long open kitchen where, behind bouquets of flowering herbs and tiles doubling as plates, Taymor and his merry band of cooks work all night, barely stopping to look up). Could a restaurant stuck between a hostess bar and a former marijuana dispensary steal the top spot on this year’s list? By the time the seven-course, $90 tasting menu began, I looked at my wife and said, “This place has a chance.” My change in attitude was thanks in part to the number of “snacks” diners received before the meal officially began. One after another they appeared: airy seaweed and tofu beignets, smoked salmon with housemade English muffins, sea urchin toast with burrata and caviar, crispy pig ears with celery mayonnaise. With every bite, Alma was making me a believer. If Taymor could do that with finger food, I was happy to imagine what lay ahead. The menu changes weekly, if not nightly, partly because of Taymor’s constant need to keep things fresh and seasonal, and partly because he never knows exactly what the restaurant’s half-acre garden, located near the beach in Venice, will yield that day. His food isn’t easy or expected. There’s no script or formula: His plating is refreshingly free-form, and he excels at pairing seemingly opposing flavors with stunning results. On paper, chilled artichoke soup with burnt avocado and succulents didn’t strike me as genius. It just sounded like cold soup. But after a few spoonfuls, all those ingredients—the grassy artichoke, charred avocado, and salty sea beans—became something way more than the sum of their parts. Every odd-sounding dish I tried—uni and cauliflower, crab with turnip and sea lettuces, ten-day dry-aged pigeon—initially had me scratching my head. But, like a song whose discordant chords flow into a harmonious chorus, the flavors united, almost by magic. By the end of my meal, I was an Ari Taymor apostle. Despite his age and relative inexperience, this guy is cooking on a level I rarely see or taste. I eat out almost every night, so it takes a lot for me to get overly excited about a meal. But there I was, like a teenage boy on his first real date. At Alma, I’d experienced something special—that unique moment when potential meets skill and anything seems possible. I saw a star born. —A.K.

THERE’S MORE FROM

THE HOT 10 ONLINE

Including a video of a day in the life of Alma’s chef, Ari Taymor, and a slide show of the dishes on his tasting menu. Check it out at bonappetit.com/go/hot10


This is one of those sleeper recipes that’s more complex-tasting than it sounds. Each element is supereasy to prepare and can be made days in advance, but the inished dessert is a stunner.

1 ¼ cups (2 ½ sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature, plus more 2 cups all-purpose flour plus more 1 tsp. baking soda 1 tsp. kosher salt 1 cup sugar 2 large eggs 1 cup buttermilk OUR S MILK JAM 1 cup whole milk ½ cup sugar 1 cup crème fraîche

1 1 ½ 2

GIN-POACHED CHERRIES AND ASSEMBLY cup dried tart cherries cup gin cup sugar tsp. juniper berries Fennel fronds (for serving)

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT: A 9"-diameter cake pan BUTTERMILK CAKE Preheat oven to 350°. Butter and lour pan. Whisk baking soda, salt, and 2 cups lour in a medium bowl; set aside. Using an electric mixer, beat sugar and 1 ¼ cups butter in another medium bowl until light and fluffy, about 4 minutes. Add eggs one at a time, beating to blend between additions and scraping down sides of bowl. Reduce mixer speed to low and, with motor running, add dry ingredients in 3 additions alternating with buttermilk in 2 additions, beginning and ending with dry ingredients. Scrape batter into prepared pan. Bake until cake is golden and a tester inserted into the center comes out clean, 40–45 minutes. Transfer pan to a wire rack and let cake cool before turning out. DO AHEAD: Cake can be made 2 days ahead. Store tightly wrapped at room temperature. SOUR MILK JAM Bring milk and sugar to a boil in a small saucepan over medium heat, stirring to dissolve sugar; reduce heat and simmer gently, whisking occasionally, until mixture measures a scant ¼ cup, 20–25 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl; let cool (it will thicken as it sits). Whisk in crème fraîche, cover, and chill. DO AHEAD: Jam can be made 2 days ahead. Keep chilled. ' (, 8E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C  I ; F J ; C 8 ; H  (& ' )

GIN-POACHED CHERRIES AND ASSEMBLY Bring cherries, gin, sugar, juniper berries, and 1 cup water to a boil in a medium saucepan; reduce heat and simmer until liquid is syrupy, 6–8 minutes. Let cool. Spoon a few dollops of jam onto plates. Tear cake into pieces and arrange around jam. Top with cherries and fennel fronds. DO AHEAD: Cherries can be poached 3 days ahead. Cover and chill.

SEAWEED AND TOFU BEIGNETS WITH LIME MAYONNAISE

6 SERVINGS At Alma, these airy beignets are topped with yuzu kosho, a spicy condiment made with yuzu (an aromatic Japanese citrus), chile, and salt. Though not the same, we got great results using lemons.

1 1 2 1

LIME MAYONNAISE large egg yolk* tsp. finely grated lime zest tsp. fresh lime juice cup grapeseed or vegetable oil Kosher salt

LEMON-JALAPEÑO PASTE 1 large lemon 1 jalapeño, with seeds, chopped Kosher salt

½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 1 3 1

SEAWEED AND TOFU BEIGNETS cup dried wakame (seaweed) cups all-purpose flour tsp. baking soda tsp. kosher salt plus more large egg yolk oz. soft (silken) tofu (about ⅓ cup) cup (or more) club soda Vegetable oil (for frying; about 3 cups)

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT: A deep-fry thermometer LIME MAYONNAISE Whisk egg yolk and lime zest and juice in a medium bowl. Whisking constantly, slowly add oil, drop by drop at first, and whisk until mayonnaise is thickened and smooth; season with salt. DO AHEAD: Lime mayonnaise can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill. LEMON-JALAPEÑO PASTE Finely grate lemon zest; then, using a small knife, remove peel and pith and discard. Halve lemon; remove seeds from flesh. Pulse lemon zest and flesh and jalapeño in a food processor until smooth. Transfer to a fine-mesh sieve and press out liquid; discard liquid. Place paste in a small bowl; season with salt. DO AHEAD: Paste can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill.

SEAWEED AND TOFU BEIGNETS Place wakame in a small bowl; add warm water to cover. Let stand until softened, about 10 minutes. Drain; squeeze wakame to remove excess water and coarsely chop. Whisk flour, baking soda, and salt in a large bowl. Whisk in wakame, egg yolk, tofu, and 1 cup club soda, adding more club soda if batter is too thick (it should be the consistency of pancake batter). Fit a medium saucepan with thermometer; pour in oil to measure 2". Heat over medium-high heat until thermometer registers 350°. Working in batches and returning oil to 350° between batches, drop tablespoonfuls of batter into oil and fry, turning occasionally, until crisp, cooked through, and deep golden brown, about 4 minutes. Transfer beignets to a paper towel–lined plate; season with salt. Dot serving plates with lime mayonnaise; place beignets on plates and dab each one with lemon-jalapeño paste. DO AHEAD: Batter can be made 1 hour ahead (do not add baking soda and club soda). Cover and chill. Bring to room temperature and whisk in baking soda and club soda just before frying.

GREENS WITH HORSERADISH– CRÈME FRAÎCHE DRESSING

6 SERVINGS Toasting grains and seeds is a simple move that adds texture and deep flavor to this green salad. The dressing will be milder if you use fresh horseradish, or sharp and a tad spicy if you use prepared.

4 1 3 2

tsp. golden and/or brown flaxseeds Tbsp. amaranth Tbsp. crème fraîche Tbsp. freshly grated horseradish or 1 Tbsp. prepared horseradish 1 Tbsp. Champagne vinegar or white wine vinegar Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper 8 cups young bitter greens (such as watercress or miner’s lettuce) Radish flowers or sprouts (optional)

Toast flaxseeds in a large dry skillet over medium heat, tossing often, until fragrant, about 2 minutes; transfer to a small bowl. Toast amaranth in same skillet until fragrant, about 2 minutes; add to flaxseeds and let cool. Whisk crème fraîche, horseradish, and vinegar in a large bowl. Thin with water, if needed; season with salt and pepper. Add greens and flowers, if using, and toss to coat. Serve topped with flaxseeds and amaranth. DO AHEAD: Flaxseeds and amaranth can be toasted 5 days ahead. Store airtight at room temperature.

*RAW EGG IS NOT RECOMMENDED FOR INFANTS, THE ELDERLY, PREGNANT WOMEN, PEOPLE WITH WEAKENED IMMUNE SYSTEMS...OR PEOPLE WHO DON’T LIKE RAW EGG.

BUTTERMILK CAKE WITH SOUR MILK JAM AND GIN POACHED CHERRIES


from the chef

“We had nights where nobody would come into the restaurant and we would close at nine o’clock.” ARI TAYMOR

Seaweed and Tofu Beignets with Lime Mayonnaise


GO YOUR OWN WAY

The Path to No. 1

What does it take to become a capital-C chef? The old guard would say culinary school, followed by years spent patiently working your way up the kitchen hierarchy. But these days, a tale like 27-year-old chef Ari Taymor’s—of persistent cold calls, occasional failures, unhampered pop-ups, and sheer will—is just as likely.

OCTOBER 11, 1985 Hawaii

JUNE 1986 Hawaii

MAY 2003 Palo Alto, CA

OCTOBER 11, 2007 San Francisco

Ari Taymor is born in Lihue, on the Hawaiian island of Kauai, to two doctors. He’s expected to go to medical school or a earn a master’s degree in public health.

Taymor eats his first shave ice cone and is given a bath in a kiddie pool filled with spaghetti—on the same day.

His first cooking experiment—roast chicken and peach cobbler—for a date is “completely inedible.”

Three months into a desk job at a software company, Taymor quits. A “perfect” dinner at Chez Panisse sets him on a path toward restaurant kitchens.

JULY 2010 Arles, France

SEPTEMBER 2009 San Francisco

JULY 2008 Los Angeles

JUNE 2008 Napa, California

Inspired by an interview with the chef, Taymor repeatedly calls La Chassagnette, a Michelinstarred restaurant with a garden. “It took four months, then they told me I could come.” His four-month stage has a huge influence on his cooking.

Taymor spends months making pasta at Flour + Water. He and his future business partner, Ashleigh Parsons, hatch the concept for his dream restaurant.

He lands an externship at Suzanne Goin’s Lucques but doesn’t make the cut. “Suzanne didn’t have time for my crap—rightly so,” Taymor recalls. He moves back to the Bay Area.

At Ubuntu (the beloved, nowclosed vegetarian restaurant), Taymor has what he says is “single-handedly the most mind-blowing meal” of his life. Jeremy Fox, the chef at the time, becomes a mentor.

FEBRUARY 15, 2012 Los Angeles

JUNE 26, 2012 Los Angeles

MARCH 2013 Los Angeles

Despite a failed head-chef gig, Taymor focuses on a place of his own. “I didn’t want to lose the momentum,” he says. He rents a spot in Venice two days a week, where Alma opens as a month-long pop-up.

After impulsively signing a lease on a downtown space between a hostess bar (1) and a marijuana dispensary (3), Taymor launches Alma (2) in a permanent spot. The reaction is grim. Within months, he’s struggling to stay afloat.

Positive reviews trickle in, and business rallies. Taymor partners with Courtney Guerra, a farmer in nearby Venice, CA, fulfilling his dream of having his own garden.

SEPTEMBER 2013

1

2

3

Alma is named Bon Appétit’s Best New Restaurant of 2013.


PHOTOGRAPHS: OPPOSITE PAGE, MICHAEL GRAYDON + NIKOLE HERRIOTT (ARI TAYMOR HEADSHOT); JAKOB LAYMAN (ALMA); COURTESY CHEZ PANISSE (ALICE WATERS); COURTESY OF LUCQUES (MATCHES); GETTY IMAGES (5)

from the chef

“You never get anything unless you ask for it.” ARI TAYMOR


2 Saison

San Francisco, California

Dinner for two at Joshua Skenes’s stunner will set you back—gulp!—$1,000. Let’s run the numbers

The custom buildout for Saison’s kitchen and dining room came in at a cool

$2,800,000.

photographs by Bonjwing Lee

FLOWERS

$800/WEEK Natalie Bowen Designs provides custom arrangements.


LET’S GET THIS OUT OF THE WAY: Eating at Saison, Joshua Skenes’s 32-seat stunner, is expensive. Very expensive. Figure $248 for the prix fixe (the only option), and $148 more for the wine pairing, which you should get. You’ll also want a few cocktails at the bar first. Six hours later, your table of two will have spent around $1,018.25. At least, that’s what it cost me. And here’s the real shocker: It was worth it. For most, this price tag is a deal-breaker. But consider that a full-time staff of 24 crafts your 18 exquisite courses—which are made from maniacally sourced ingredients at their ultimate peak and served on museum-worthy plates and bowls—and dinner starts to sound like a relative bargain. Bookended between a house-made rhubarb soda gilded with forget-me-nots and a sesame seed soufflé that would make Escoffier cry is a dazzling array of miniature works of art. Imagine Parmesan custard topped with gold leaf; blue wing sea robin crudo with foraged yuzu; abalone liver and rice stew; and duck dry-aged for 30 days. Skenes, the guy cooking in an untucked dress shirt, is a flawless technician who’s at the top of his game at just 34 years old. He’s making some of the most personal food out there. If, like me, you’d rather spend your money on a once-in-a-lifetime meal than on a new laptop or Super Bowl tickets, it’s time to book a table. —A.K.

FIREWOOD AND CHARCOAL

$700/WEEK Almond, fruit, and smoking woods—plus high-end binchotan charcoal—keep the custom hearth, wood oven, and smoker blazing.

OVERHEAD

$24,000/MONTH Rent, occupancy costs, and utilities make up a substantial chunk of Saison’s operating budget.

TREND SPOTTING

Wood-Burning Ovens “Despite all the technology in the kitchen, I realized chefs just want to play with fire.” —A.K.


STAFF

$88,000/ MONTH

For the kitchen and the front of house, Saison has 24 full-time employees to serve no more than 30 diners each night.

AGING ROOM

The

$1,000,000 kitchen is stocked exclusively with Mauviel copper cookware. It has more than 200 pieces. The largest pots cost

$1,000.

$40,000 This dualtemperature, humiditycontrolled room gives Skenes the flexibility to age and store different proteins. One area is set to 55 degrees and is used for charcuterie and shorter-term aging. The other, set to a cooler 38 degrees, is used for dryaging meats up to seven months.

FOOD COSTS

$15,000 WEEK Luxe ingredients like this live scallop push food expenses to almost 50 percentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;way above the industry target of 33 percent.

FISH TANKS

$15,000 Saison installed four tanks for live seafood; they cost $200 a week to maintain. To fill them, Skenes trained a crew of fishermen to catch and handle product to his standards. He pays them $200 per trip on top of the price of the fish.

Saison pays

$108,000/YEAR to rent and staff a two-acre farm in Marin County. Currently, they harvest just a few herbs and greens.


Almost every dish on the menu benefits from time in Saison’s custom-built

$50,000 wood-burning hearth. The cooks’ uniforms were designed by Levi’s and are

$500 EACH. Not to be outdone, the bespoke aprons, designed by Matt Dick of Small Trade Company, come to

$80 APIECE. Oh, and each ornate fan used by this cook—whose job is to man the fire all night—costs

$40.

1 THE TABLE

PHOTOGRAPHS: ADAM FRIEDBERG (SHRIMP, STAFF, TABLE)

1 WINEGLASS

2

DINING TABLE

Saison’s epic wine list demands this artisan-crafted wineglass by Austria’s Zalto.

A total of ten walnut tables were custommade by Original Timber of San Francisco.

H20 lives large in a mouth-blown, hand-etched glass by the Kimura Glass Company.

4

5

6

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FORK, KNIFE, AND SPOON

DINNER PLATE

CASHMERE THROW

CHAIR

$70

$8,500

2

3 WATER GLASS

During an 18-course meal, a diner will drink from more than $2,000 worth of glassware and eat from over $10,000 worth of dinnerware.

3

$100

5 4

$100

And that’s just for one base setting of modern Italian flatware by Mepra.

$300

This handrolled porcelain plate is made in Germany by Hering Berlin.

$500

Catch a chill easily? Wrap yourself in a custom design by HD Buttercup.

$1,000

Skenes chose sturdy walnut chairs by Hans J. Wegner to go with the tables.

7 6


Strozzapreti with Spinach and Preserved Lemon P. 139

3 Rolf and Daughters Nashville, Tennessee

House-made pasta is the heart and soul of Nashville’s newest, coolest neighborhood joint photographs by Christopher Testani

I’M STARTING TO THINK that chef Philip Krajeck was put on earth to make pasta. Let’s look at the evidence: He happened to live between two Italian families while growing up in Brussels, Belgium. One night he’d be eating gnocchi with fresh porcini with one family, cacio e pepe with the other the next. Later, he worked in a Swiss kitchen surrounded by Italian cooks. That’s where he learned how to form the twisted pasta called strozzapreti (“priest strangler”), among other shapes. Lord knows I’ve eaten my fair share of pasta dishes around the country this year (it seems that tough economic times call for a big, comforting bowl of noodles). But when I tried Krajeck’s takes, like the earthy hand-cut farro gemelli with mushrooms, kale, and Parmesan that he serves at Rolf and Daughters, his rowdy neighborhood restaurant in Nashville’s up-and-coming Germantown area, I was mesmerized. His rustic sauces and house-made doughs—some flavored with whole grain flours, others, like the garganelli verde, green from fresh spinach—are standouts in a crowded field. How do I express how good they were? Let’s just say my friend had to tell me about all the Nashville music celebrities I didn’t notice the night we were there. Apparently, my eyes were on the real stars. —A.K.


from the chef

“Your pasta doesn’t have to look perfect. I fret about it at the restaurant, but that’s my job. At home, it’s just about the experience. If some pieces are weird or thicker or chewier, all the better.” PHILIP KRAJECK


FRESH PASTA

Because this dough is eggless, it has great al dente texture. If you can’t find durum wheat flour, all-purpose will work well, too. 4 SERVINGS (MAKES 12 OZ.)

1 cup plus 2 Tbsp. fine durum wheat flour or all-purpose flour plus more for dusting 1 cup semolina flour (pasta flour) INGREDIENT INFO: Fine durum wheat flour is available at natural foods stores and some specialty foods stores. Semolina flour is available at Italian markets, specialty foods stores, and some supermarkets. Combine durum wheat flour and semolina flour in a large bowl. Bring a small saucepan of water to a bare simmer. Add ⅔ cup hot water to flours and mix with a fork until mixture just comes together. Turn out dough onto a surface lightly dusted with durum wheat flour and knead until smooth and elastic, 8–10 minutes (alternatively, using a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook, mix on low speed, about 5 minutes). Wrap tightly in plastic wrap; let sit 1 hour at room temperature. DO AHEAD: Pasta dough can be made 1 day ahead. Wrap tightly and chill.

THERE’S MORE FROM

THE HOT 10 ONLINE

We shot videos of all of our Best New Restaurants, including a pasta demo at Rolf and Daughters. Check it out at bonappetit.com/go/hot10


ORECCHIETTE HOW-TO

After making and kneading the dough (1–3) and lightly flouring your work surface, slice off a few ½"-thick planks, then cut lengthwise into ½"-wide pieces (4). Keep remaining dough wrapped in plastic as you work. Roll each piece into a ¼"-thick rope (5) and cut crosswise into ½"-long pieces (6). Using the sharp edge of a paring knife (or your thumb), simultaneously press down on the middle of each piece of the dough and push it away from you (7). The dough should curl up on itself. Push each curled piece inside out, molding it over the tip of your finger to create the “little ear” shape (8). Transfer pasta to a rimmed baking sheet dusted with semolina flour.

3

1

2

4

5

To learn how to make strozzapreti, see Prep School, page 182.

6

7

8

I ; F J ; C 8 ; H  ( & ' ) š 8 E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C' )-


Orecchiette Carbonara with Charred Brussels Sprouts

ROLLING IN DOUGH

Making—and serving— pasta like a nonna takes time, patience, and practice. Here’s chef Philip Krajeck’s crib sheet.

PREP YOUR SURFACE

Instead of sprinkling flour over a work surface like it’s salt, “do a sidelong throw and let your fingers help disperse the flour evenly,” he says. It guarantees even coverage as opposed to random lumps. “I’m programmed to do it that way because I used to get yelled at all the time by my European chef.”

GAIN TRACTION

When making small shapes like orecchiette or cavatelli, avoid smooth, glossy surfaces (like marble) in favor of something rough, like a scuffed-up wooden cutting board (Krajeck’s choice). The uneven, grainy texture of the wood will create small ridges and nooks in the dough, which will help the sauce cling to the pasta.

SAUCE AND SEASON

Stirring a ladleful of pasta cooking liquid into the sauce just before you add the noodles not only helps it come together, it also adds salt, which flavors the dish. With sauces that contain salty ingredients, like the guanciale in carbonara, check for seasoning before adding too much pasta liquid.


ORECCHIETTE WITH SQUASH, CHILES, AND HAZELNUTS

Orecchiette with Squash, Chiles, and Hazelnuts

4 SERVINGS There are two hits of chile in this dish. It’s used early on to infuse the oil, where it mellows. The sprinkle added at the end is more “precocious,” says Krajeck. “It’s not in every bite, but when it hits you, it makes a big impact.”

¼ cup blanched hazelnuts 12 oz. fresh orecchiette (see Fresh Pasta recipe) or other fresh or dried small pasta Kosher salt 2 Tbsp. olive oil ½ small butternut squash, peeled, cut into ½" pieces (about 2 cups) 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced ½ tsp. crushed red pepper flakes, divided ¼ cup (½ stick) unsalted butter, cut into pieces 1 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice ¼ cup grated Parmesan plus more for serving 4 Tbsp. torn fresh mint leaves, divided Freshly ground pepper Preheat oven to 350°. Spread out hazelnuts on a small rimmed baking sheet and toast, tossing occasionally, until golden, about 6 minutes. Let cool, then coarsely chop; set aside. Cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until al dente (about 5 minutes for fresh pasta). Drain, reserving 1 cup pasta cooking liquid. Meanwhile, heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add squash and cook, tossing occasionally, until crisp-tender, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and ¼ tsp. red pepper flakes and cook, stirring, just until garlic begins to brown, about 2 minutes. Immediately add ½ cup pasta cooking liquid to keep garlic from burning; reduce heat to low and gradually add butter, swirling skillet and adding more pasta cooking liquid as needed, until a thick, glossy sauce forms. Add pasta to skillet with squash and sauce and toss to coat. Add lemon juice, ¼ cup Parmesan, 2 Tbsp. mint, and remaining ¼ tsp. red pepper flakes and toss to combine; season with salt and pepper. Serve pasta topped with reserved hazelnuts, more Parmesan, and remaining 2 Tbsp. mint. DO AHEAD: Hazelnuts can be toasted 5 days ahead. Store airtight at room temperature.

Add pasta to skillet and toss to coat. Add Pecorino; toss to combine. Remove from heat; mix in egg yolks. Add reserved brussels sprout leaves; toss, adding pasta cooking liquid (or hot water) as needed to thin sauce. Serve pasta topped with more Pecorino.

STROZZAPRETI WITH SPINACH AND PRESERVED LEMON

ORECCHIETTE CARBONARA WITH CHARRED BRUSSELS SPROUTS 4 SERVINGS

Krajeck says the key to this dish is getting a good char on the brussels sprouts, which helps balance the richness of the porky, eggy sauce. Salt draws moisture out of the leaves, which might make them soggy, so he doesn’t season them. 2 Tbsp. olive oil, divided ½ lb. brussels sprouts, trimmed, leaves separated 12 oz. fresh orecchiette (see Fresh Pasta recipe) or other fresh or dried small pasta Kosher salt 2 oz. guanciale (salt-cured pork jowl) or pancetta (Italian bacon), finely chopped (about ¼ cup) ½ tsp. coarsely ground black pepper ¼ cup (½ stick) unsalted butter, cut into pieces ⅓ cup grated Pecorino plus more 2 large egg yolks, beaten to blend Heat 1 Tbsp. oil in a large skillet over high heat. Working in batches, add brussels sprout leaves and cook, tossing occasionally, until charred in spots and crisptender, about 5 minutes; transfer to a plate and set aside. Wipe out skillet. Cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until al dente (about 5 minutes for fresh pasta). Drain, reserving 1 cup pasta cooking liquid. Meanwhile, heat remaining 1 Tbsp. oil in same skillet over medium heat. Add guanciale and cook, stirring often, until slightly crisp, about 4 minutes. Add pepper and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Immediately add ½ cup pasta cooking liquid to keep pasta from burning; reduce heat to low and gradually add butter, swirling skillet and adding more pasta cooking liquid as needed, until a thick, glossy sauce forms. (Taste as you go and switch to hot water once sauce is adequately seasoned.)

4 SERVINGS This bright, vegetarian sauce features lemon three ways: juice, zest, and preserved lemon peel. Go to Prep School, page 182, for Krajeck’s preserved lemon recipe (and step-by-step photos).

2 Tbsp. olive oil 8 Tbsp. (1 stick) unsalted butter, divided 1 garlic clove, crushed ½ tsp. crushed red pepper flakes, divided ¾ cup panko (Japanese breadcrumbs) 1 tsp. finely grated lemon zest Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper 12 oz. fresh strozzapreti (see Fresh Pasta recipe) or other fresh or dried pasta 2 bunches flat-leaf spinach, trimmed, large leaves torn in half (about 8 cups), divided 1 Tbsp. (or more) fresh lemon juice 1 Tbsp. (or more) thinly sliced preserved lemon peel Heat oil and 2 Tbsp. butter in a large skillet over medium heat until butter is foaming. Add garlic and ¼ tsp. red pepper flakes; cook, stirring often, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add panko and cook, stirring often, until panko is golden brown, about 2 minutes. Mix in lemon zest and transfer panko to a paper towel–lined plate; season with salt and pepper. Let cool; set aside. Wipe out skillet. Cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until al dente (about 5 minutes for fresh pasta). Drain. Meanwhile, heat remaining 6 Tbsp. butter in same skillet over medium heat. Cook, swirling skillet occasionally, until butter is brown, about 3 minutes. Add 1 bunch spinach; cook, tossing, until wilted, about 1 minute. Add pasta to skillet and toss to coat. Add lemon juice, preserved lemon peel, and remaining ¼ tsp. red pepper flakes and toss to combine; season with salt, pepper, and more lemon juice and preserved lemon peel, if desired. Add remaining spinach and toss until slightly wilted, about 1 minute. Serve pasta topped with reserved panko. DO AHEAD: Panko can be toasted 1 day ahead. Store airtight at room temperature. I ; F J ; C 8 ; H  ( & ' ) š 8 E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C' ) /


Get the recipe for pickled cauliflower and more at bonappetit.com /go/fatrice

Find this hot pot in Prep School, page 180.

photographs by Dominique Lafond


4 Fat Rice Chicago, Illinois

Learn how to make the Portuguese/ Macanese/Euro-Asian dish that’s taking the Windy City by storm

A YEAR AGO, I WOULD have had a hard time describing Macanese food, let alone finding a restaurant serving it that belonged on this list. That all changed when I ate at Chicago’s Fat Rice. As it turns out, the food of Macau is a culinary mutt, mingling ingredients and influences from Portugal, China, India, and Southeast Asia. Owners Abraham Conlon and Adrienne Lo describe it as “Euro-Asian comfort food.” On the plate, that translates to dishes like ginger-lime cauliflower pickles, fried smelts with tongue-searing Sichuan peppercorns, and rustic clay pots overflowing with everything from caramel catfish to piri piri chicken. It’s like a far-flung episode of The Amazing Race, except here all the players go home happy. The line to get a seat at the lively communal tables often spills out the door and over to the adjacent waiting room. Insist on a seat at the L-shaped bar surrounding the open kitchen so you can watch Conlon preparing arroz gordo (fat rice), his signature dish. It’s packed into a clay pot that can barely contain its riches: a crisp-bottomed layer of jasmine rice topped with head-on prawns, tender clams, Chinese and Portuguese sausages, marinated chicken, hard-boiled eggs, and sweet and spicy peppers. Imagine a love triangle between paella, bouillabaisse, and bibimbap and you get the idea. According to Conlon, it’s a dish rarely prepared outside the home kitchen. That may have been true before Fat Rice brought it—and Macanese cuisine—to America. But now the secret of the world’s ultimate fusion cuisine is officially out. —A.K.


FAT RICE

If paella escaped from Spain, sailed to China, and did some soul-searching along the way, you’d have arroz gordo, the namesake dish at Chicago’s Fat Rice. The generous pot of aromatic rice, curry-scented chicken, and (much) more can be traced back to Macau, the former Portuguese colony in China, where it’s almost always served at home. Chefs Conlon and Lo took inspiration from foreign-language cookbooks; their version is a blend of Portuguese and Chinese cooking that Conlon calls “the original fusion.” 6 SERVINGS

2 2 1 2 2 6

MARINATED CHICKEN garlic cloves, finely chopped Tbsp. fresh lemon juice Tbsp. smoked paprika tsp. curry powder tsp. ground turmeric skin-on, bone-in chicken thighs (about 3 lb.)

RAISINS ½ cup golden raisins 2 Tbsp. Sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar SOFFRITTO 2 Tbsp. olive oil 2 red bell peppers, thinly sliced 1 large onion, thinly sliced Kosher salt 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 Tbsp. tomato paste 1 tsp. (or more) Sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar ½ tsp. smoked paprika Freshly ground black pepper

4 2 3½ 2 4

RICE Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper Tbsp. olive oil, divided oz. cured Spanish chorizo, thinly sliced cups low-sodium chicken broth cups jasmine rice, rinsed oz. Chinese sausage or andouille sausage, thinly sliced

PRAWNS AND CLAMS 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 Tbsp. fermented black beans (optional) 1 Tbsp. finely chopped fresh cilantro stems 1 Tbsp. finely chopped pickled chiles (such as serrano or jalapeño) 6 large head-on prawns 1 lb. Manila clams, scrubbed ½ cup dry white wine Kosher salt

ASSEMBLY 2 Tbsp. gochugaru (coarse Korean red pepper powder) ½ tsp. cayenne pepper ½ tsp. kosher salt 2 lemons, quartered, seeds removed Halved hard-boiled eggs, oil-cured black olives, green Spanish olives, pickled chiles (such as serrano or jalapeño), pickled sweet peppers (such as Peppadew or cherry), and thinly sliced scallions (for serving) INGREDIENT INFO: Gochugaru and fermented black beans can be found at Asian markets. MARINATED CHICKEN Whisk garlic, lemon juice, paprika, curry powder, and turmeric in a medium bowl; add chicken and toss to coat. Cover and chill at least 6 hours. DO AHEAD: Chicken can be marinated 1 day ahead. Keep chilled. RAISINS Bring raisins, vinegar, and 2 Tbsp. water to a boil in a small saucepan, reduce heat, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until liquid evaporates, 8–10 minutes. DO AHEAD: Raisins can be prepared 3 days ahead. Let cool, then cover and chill. SOFFRITTO Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add bell peppers and onion; season with salt. Cook, stirring often, until softened, 8–10 minutes. Reduce heat to low and cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are caramelized, 45–60 minutes. Add garlic and tomato paste to skillet and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until tomato paste begins to darken, 10–15 minutes longer. Mix in vinegar and paprika; season with salt and pepper. DO AHEAD: Soffritto can be made 3 days ahead. Let cool, then cover and chill. RICE Remove chicken from marinade; season with salt and pepper. Heat 2 Tbsp. oil in a heavy 5–6-qt. pot with a lid over medium-high heat. Cook chicken, skin side down, until skin is brown and crisp, 10–12 minutes; transfer to a plate. (You can remove bones at this point, if desired.) Reduce heat to medium. Add chorizo to pot and cook, stirring often, until crisp, about 2 minutes; transfer to a small bowl. Add soffritto to pot and cook, stirring constantly, until sizzling, about 1 minute. Add broth, scraping up any browned bits; season with salt (salting liquid adequately here is important for flavorful rice). Add rice, sausage, chorizo, and raisins. Stir and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, arrange chicken on top, cover pot, and simmer gently, until rice

is tender, 20–25 minutes. Uncover; increase heat to medium-high. Drizzle remaining 2 Tbsp. oil around edges of pot and cook, undisturbed, until underside of rice is crunchy, about 5 minutes longer. PRAWNS AND CLAMS While rice is cooking, mix garlic, fermented beans, if using, cilantro stems, and chiles in a small bowl. Peel prawns, leaving heads and tails on. Devein, stuff cut side with garlic mixture, and set aside. Combine clams and wine in a large skillet, cover, and cook over high heat, stirring often, until clams open (discard any that do not open), about 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer clams to a large bowl. Reduce heat to medium-low. Lightly season prawns with salt and cook in same skillet until opaque in the centers, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer prawns to bowl with clams; pour pan juices into a small bowl. DO AHEAD: Prawns can be stuffed 1 hour ahead. Cover and chill. ASSEMBLY Mix gochugaru, cayenne, and salt in a small bowl. Dip cut sides of lemon wedges into seasoning mix. Top rice with prawns and clams and drizzle with reserved pan juices. Top with lemon wedges, eggs, olives, pickled chiles and peppers, and scallions.

A DOABLE FEAST

Pulling off this centerpiece-worthy dish is a matter of knowing when to get serious (hint: prep!) and when to chill. Here’s our approach. STRATEGIZE

Most of this dish can be made in advance: Plump the raisins and caramelize the soffritto up to three days ahead. Marinate the chicken thighs and scrub the clams the day before. After that, everything except the shellfish, which should be cooked just before you eat, comes together in a single pot.

IMPROVISE

There’s no one way to make arroz gordo. Fat Rice’s recipe uses chef Abraham Conlon’s favorite ingredients, but if they’re not yours, change them up. Can’t find head-on prawns? Use regular shrimp and skip the stuffing. Clams not pristine? Move on: It’s more important to use the best ingredients.

ATTACK

Set the pot of Fat Rice on the table and let guests dig in: This is not a dish for shy eaters, as you’ll see when everybody starts tackling the shellfish on top. The best part— scraping away the dark, crisped patches of rice from the bottom of the pot—is saved for last.


TREND SPOTTING

The New Uniform “I used to think branded shirts were only for chains. But now all the cool kids are doing it.” —A.K.

THERE’S MORE FROM

THE HOT 10 ONLINE

We shot videos of all our Best New Restaurants, including a demo of Fat Rice’s signature arroz gordo. Check it out at bonappetit.com/go/hot10


5 Ava Gene’s Portland, Oregon

These days, it’s not just about the entrées. At this Italian newcomer, fresh, crunchy vegetable sides earn top billing

I USED TO JUDGE A CHEF by the way he or she roasted a chicken. But now that farmto-table is the standard, it’s more about what they can do with a carrot. At the trattoriainspired Ava Gene’s, the second restaurant from Stumptown Coffee Roasters founder and budding restaurateur Duane Sorenson, green-thumb cuisine becomes masterful. Chef Joshua McFadden cooked at the groundbreaking raw-vegan restaurant Roxanne’s in the Bay Area and was the chef de cuisine at Brooklyn trailblazer Franny’s, where, as far as I can tell, he created the raw kale salad that has become a menu staple everywhere. Then he spent a couple of years working on the storied Four Season Farm in Maine. Let’s just say the guy knows his way around veggies.   This doesn’t mean that you should skip the proteins on offer—the wood-grilled pork steaks with salsa verde and the wide-ruffled pasta with lamb ragù are must-orders. It’s just that you should anchor your meal with choices from the Giardini (“gardens”) section of the menu. That could mean a zingy carrot and beet slaw; roasted cauliflower with Calabrian chiles and anchovies; or, my favorite above all, the salad of apple, walnuts, chile, and lime (see recipe, page 149). I’m not sure how McFadden gets such complex flavors out of these unsung ingredients. And that’s exactly what makes a meal at Ava Gene’s such a revelation. —A.K.

photographs by We Are The Rhoads


Carrot and Beet Slaw with Pistachios and Raisins P. 149


Fried Farro with Pickled Carrots and Runny Eggs P. 149

'* , 8 E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C Â&#x161;I ; F J ; C 8 ; H  ( & ' )


Celery Salad with Dates, Almonds, and Parmesan P. 149

SautĂŠed Greens with Olives P. 149

Apple Salad with Walnuts and Lime P. 149


TREND SPOTTING

Marble Everywhere

“My favorite seat to eat is at the bar, which this year meant lots of meals on marble.” —A.K.

ROASTED PEPPER PANZANELLA 6 SERVINGS

If you’d like, let the croutons sit in the pepper mixture until the bread is fairly soft; it’ll soak up the flavorful dressing. 4 large red or orange bell peppers (about 2 lb.) 8 Tbsp. olive oil, divided Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper ½ small red onion, thinly sliced 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 Tbsp. red wine vinegar ¼ tsp. crushed red pepper flakes 2 Tbsp. fresh oregano and savory leaves, divided '* . 8 E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C šI ; F J ; C 8 ; H  ( & ' )

½ loaf country-style bread (about 12 oz.), torn into pieces 1 oz. thinly sliced spicy salumi (such as soppressata) 4 oz. fresh mozzarella, preferably buffalo, torn into pieces Preheat broiler. Toss bell peppers and 2 Tbsp. oil on a rimmed baking sheet; season with salt and pepper. Broil, turning occasionally, until skins are blackened in spots and blistered all over, 10–12 minutes. Transfer peppers to a large bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let sit 15 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 400°.

Peel and seed peppers; cut into 2" strips. Toss peppers in a clean large bowl with onion, garlic, vinegar, red pepper flakes, 1 Tbsp. herbs, and 4 Tbsp. oil; set aside. Toss bread and remaining 2 Tbsp. oil on a clean baking sheet; season with salt and pepper. Bake, tossing occasionally, until crisp on the outside but still chewy in the center, 8–10 minutes. Let croutons cool. Toss pepper mixture, salumi, and croutons in a large bowl. Arrange on a platter with cheese; top with remaining 1 Tbsp. herbs. DO AHEAD: Peppers and croutons can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover peppers; chill. Store croutons airtight at room temperature.


CARROT AND BEET SLAW WITH PISTACHIOS AND RAISINS

Preheat oven to 350°. Spread out pistachios on a small rimmed baking sheet; toast, stirring occasionally until golden brown, 6–8 minutes. Let cool; coarsely chop. Combine garlic, raisins, and vinegar in a large bowl; let sit 1 hour. Remove garlic from raisin mixture and discard. Add carrots, beets, pistachios, parsley, mint, lemon juice, and red pepper flakes; season with salt and pepper and toss to combine. Add oil; toss gently.

Place carrots and chile in a small heatproof bowl. Bring vinegar, sugar, 1 tsp. salt, and ½ cup water to a boil in a small saucepan, stirring to dissolve sugar and salt. Pour over carrots and chiles; let sit at least 30 minutes. Drain, reserving ¼ cup pickling liquid. Meanwhile, heat 1 Tbsp. oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Add farro and half of garlic and cook, stirring constantly, until farro is dark brown, 8–10 minutes. Add 6 cups water and bring to a boil. Boil farro until tender but still firm to the bite, 25–30 minutes. Drain; let cool. Heat 1 Tbsp. oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add mushrooms and cook, tossing often, until soft and just starting to brown, 5–7 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to a plate. Add 2 Tbsp. oil, then kale and remaining garlic to skillet. Cook, tossing often, until kale is wilted, about 4 minutes. Add colatura, farro, mushrooms, and pickled carrots. Cook, tossing often, until warmed through, 5–7 minutes; season with salt and pepper and reserved pickling liquid. Mix in parsley; divide among bowls. Heat remaining 1 Tbsp. oil in a small nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Crack eggs into skillet and fry until egg whites are set but yolks are still soft and runny, about 3 minutes (slightly longer for duck egg). Top farro with eggs and scallions; season with red pepper flakes. Just before serving, break up eggs and mix into farro. : Carrots can be pickled 2 weeks ahead; cover and chill.

FRIED FARRO WITH PICKLED CARROTS AND RUNNY EGGS

CELERY SALAD WITH DATES, ALMONDS, AND PARMESAN

McFadden always dresses his salads with the acidic components irst so the produce can absorb some of those lavors before being coated with oil. ¾ cup unsalted, shelled raw pistachios 2 garlic cloves, crushed ¾ cup golden raisins ¼ cup white wine vinegar 6 medium carrots (about 1 lb.), peeled, julienned 2 medium beets (any color; about 1 lb.), peeled, julienned ½ cup (packed) fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves ¼ cup (packed) fresh mint leaves 3 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice ½ tsp. crushed red pepper flakes Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper ⅓ cup extra-virgin olive oil

Browning the farro imbues it with a nutty flavor—a step you can add any time you prepare the grain. V

2 medium carrots, peeled, chopped 1 red chile, seeded, coarsely chopped ½ cup white wine vinegar 1 tsp. sugar 1 tsp. kosher salt plus more 5 Tbsp. olive oil, divided 1 ½ cups semi-pearled farro 2 garlic cloves, chopped, divided 6 oz. maitake mushrooms, torn into 1" pieces ½ bunch Tuscan kale, center ribs and stems removed, torn into 1" pieces 1 Tbsp. colatura (anchovy sauce) or ish sauce (nam pla or nuoc nam) Freshly ground black pepper ½ cup fresh lat-leaf parsley leaves 2 large eggs or 1 duck egg 2 scallions, thinly sliced Crushed red pepper lakes

Sweet from dates, sour from lemon, bitter from celery, and salty from Parmesan, this humble salad manages to get all taste buds firing at once. V

½ cup raw almonds 8 celery stalks, thinly sliced on a diagonal, leaves separated 6 dates, pitted, coarsely chopped 3 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper 2 oz. Parmesan, shaved ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil Crushed red pepper lakes Preheat oven to 350°. Spread out almonds on a small rimmed baking sheet; toast, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, 8–10 minutes. Let cool; coarsely chop. Toss almonds, celery, celery leaves, dates, and lemon juice in a medium bowl; season with salt and pepper. Add Parmesan and oil and toss gently; season with red pepper flakes.

SAUTÉED GREENS WITH OLIVES

V This dish is called misticanza (“mixed greens”) on the Ava Gene’s menu. You can sauté whatever leafy greens you like or happen to have on hand; it’s an ideal way to use up those slightly past their prime.

2 Tbsp. olive oil 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced ¼ tsp. crushed red pepper lakes plus more 10 cups torn mixed greens (such as kale, turnip greens, and lettuce) Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper ¼ cup black olives, pitted, halved 2 Tbsp. (or more) fresh lemon juice Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and cook, stirring often, until beginning to brown, about 2 minutes. Add red pepper flakes and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add greens a handful at a time, tossing until wilted between additions; season with salt and pepper and cook until all greens are wilted and softened, about 3 minutes longer. Add olives and lemon juice and toss to combine; season with red pepper flakes and more lemon juice, if desired.

APPLE SALAD WITH WALNUTS AND LIME

V An invigorating hit of citrus brings together crisp apples, toasty bread and nuts, and sharp cheese, making this one of our favorite recipes this year.

1 cup very coarse, fresh breadcrumbs ½ cup walnut halves 2 crisp apples (such as Pink Lady or Honeycrisp), thinly sliced 4 scallions, thinly sliced ¼ cup fresh lat-leaf parsley leaves ¼ cup fresh lime juice ½ tsp. crushed red pepper lakes Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper ½ cup grated provolone cheese or white cheddar 2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil Preheat oven to 350°. Spread out breadcrumbs on a small rimmed baking sheet; toast, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, 6–8 minutes. Let cool. Meanwhile, spread out walnuts on a small rimmed baking sheet; toast, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, 8–10 minutes. Let cool; coarsely chop. Toss breadcrumbs, walnuts, apples, scallions, parsley, lime juice, and red pepper flakes in a large bowl; season with salt and pepper. Add cheese and oil; toss gently. I ; F J ; C 8 ; H  (& ' ) 8E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C '* /


6 The Pass & Provisions Houston, Texas

One building, two restaurants, and a pair of chefs who deliver very different—but equally delicious—menus

THE PASS This massive pork rind, part of the Ham & Eggs course, is seasoned with ham dust that’s made from the scraps left over from Provisions.

THIS YEAR’S AWARD FOR THE MOST AWE-INSPIRING DISH goes to a first course served at The Pass, the white-tablecloth half of adjoining restaurants from chefs Terrence Gallivan and Seth Siegel-Gardner. It stars what has to be the world’s largest pork rind, dusted with prosciutto powder and presented alongside a tin of caviar, miniature dehydrated accompaniments (chives, egg yolk, capers, etc.), and fried buckwheat kernels set atop a purée of celery root and crème fraîche. It’s like caviar service on Adderall. The surprises don’t stop there. Bucatini pasta is made with nori; potato bread gets stuffed with lobster salad (an inside-out lobster roll); and a cheese course features an “Oreo” crafted with ricotta scorza nera and vegetable ash. A meal at the tasting-menu-only restaurant is playful, wildly inventive, and satisfying. But let’s say you want something a bit more down to earth—a meatball pizza or a lobster roll that’s not inverted. Gallivan and Siegel-Gardner fulfill those wishes on the other side of the wall at Provisions, an easygoing spot built for long lunches and family dinners, where menus double as place mats and the walls are made from an old church basketball court. The dual concept (one kitchen, two distinct experiences) allows this talented team to both flex their culinary muscles and please the masses under one roof, making The Pass & Provisions the best restaurant(s) to open in Houston in the past year. —A.K.

photographs by Cedric Angeles


PROVISIONS A casual meal might begin with Ham Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Day, slices from a rotating cast of hams mounded atop a rye-andcaraway mayo.

P. 155


THE PASS

A TALE OF TWO RESTAURANTS

PROVISIONS

The tweezer-happy co-chefs indulge their heady culinary whims at this white-tablecloth restaurant, where luxe ingredients (think uni and caviar) make plenty of appearances throughout the meal.

The distinct restaurants still have lots of common ground: They share a building, they share a kitchen, and, yes, they share this good-looking bathroom. For more on why The Foodist loves The P&P’s WC, see page 58.

Rowdy and convivial, Provisions is the more casual of the two. Wood-fired pizzas—based on the chefs’ favorite sandwiches—fill the communal tables, and craft cocktails are served alongside Lone Star beer.

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from the chef

“The best experience for us is someone eating at Provisions and making a reservation at The Pass on their way out. If we’re your two favorite restaurants, that’s pretty cool.” SETH SIEGEL-GARDNER

Creamy White Onion Soup P. 155


TREND SPOTTING

Writing on the Wall “I peeked into enough kitchens this year to see what’s keeping chefs motivated: quotes.” —A.K.

Outside the kitchen, fuel for the wood-burning oven (and some inspiring words) for both restaurants.


SHARING IS CARING

Most rookie chefs avoid overextending when opening their first place. Not Terrence Gallivan and Seth Siegel-Gardner. With The Pass & Provisions, “we made it as difficult as humanly possible,” says Gallivan of their two-restaurantsunder-one-roof arrangement. Here’s how the unconventional setup works: THE KITCHEN One large kitchen is the backbone of the two restaurants, though each has its own dedicated stations and cooks. The pastry department prepares dessert for both restaurants. On a busy night, things can get pretty wild. “It definitely feels like the wheels may fall off sometimes,” Siegel-Gardner says.

CREAMY WHITE ONION SOUP 6 SERVINGS

To ensure the snow-white color of this soup, don’t let the onions brown.

2 ¼ ¼ ¼

PICKLED SHALLOTS shallots, thinly sliced into rounds cup apple cider vinegar cup white wine vinegar cup sugar

RED ONION JAM 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1 medium red onion, thinly sliced Kosher salt ½ cup red wine ¼ cup red wine vinegar 1 Tbsp. sugar ¼ cinnamon stick ½ star anise pod ⅛ tsp. crushed red pepper flakes ⅛ tsp. ground allspice

THE INGREDIENTS The two spots share purveyors, a refrigerator, and, with few exceptions, ingredients. This gives the chefs flexibility to move raw and prepared ingredients between menus with unusual ease. Chard, for example, starts at The Pass, where cooks cut precise circles out of the leaves for a garnish. The oddly shaped scraps then move to Provisions, where they’re braised and added to sausage pizza.

THE IDEAS Having two distinct outlets gives the chefs a lot of creative leeway. “Dishes and recipes evolve into each other between the restaurants,” says Gallivan. They’ll start by riffing on an ingredient, like onions or ham, then decide which restaurant the eventual dish is more suited to down the road.

THE WORK Neither chef is willing to swear allegiance to one restaurant. “It’s food that we love,” says Gallivan. “Two very, very distinct types of food.” The pair is happy to dance between the places: Most nights, you’ll find them at the actual pass (the kitchen station where each dish lands before it’s taken into the dining room) of either restaurant, bouncing between the two to expedite orders. “We’re totally in conjunction the entire time.”

THERE’S MORE FROM

THE HOT 10 ONLINE

We shot videos of all our best new restaurants, including The Pass & Provisions. Check them out at bonappetit.com/go/hot10

WHITE ONION SOUP ¼ cup olive oil 4 large white onions, thinly sliced 1 leek, white and pale-green parts only, thinly sliced 2 celery stalks, chopped 4 garlic cloves 1 serrano chile, seeded, chopped 2 Tbsp. chopped peeled ginger Kosher salt ½ cup dry white wine ½ cup mirin 1 cup heavy cream

2 2 4 1

FONTINA TOAST AND ASSEMBLY Tbsp. unsalted butter slices brioche, quartered oz. Fontina cheese, grated Tbsp. chopped fresh chives

PICKLED SHALLOTS Place shallots in a small nonreactive bowl. Bring vinegars, sugar, and 1 cup water to a boil in a small saucepan, stirring to dissolve sugar. Pour over shallots; chill. DO AHEAD: Shallots can be pickled 5 days ahead. Cover and keep chilled. RED ONION JAM Heat oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion, season with salt, and cook, stirring often, until soft, 5–7 minutes. Add wine, vinegar, sugar, cinnamon, star anise, red pepper flakes, and allspice. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until liquid is thickened and syrupy, 40–45 minutes. DO AHEAD: Jam can be made 5 days ahead. Cover and chill. WHITE ONION SOUP Heat oil in a large pot over medium-high heat. Add onions, leek, celery, garlic, chile, and ginger; season with

salt. Cook, stirring often, until soft (do not let brown), 10–12 minutes. Add wine and mirin to pot, bring to a boil, and cook until reduced by half, about 4 minutes. Reduce heat to medium, cover, and cook, stirring occasionally, until onions are soft and translucent, 25–30 minutes. Let cool slightly, then purée in a blender until smooth. Strain into a large bowl and stir in cream (thin with water, if needed); season with salt. Reheat soup in a clean pot. DO AHEAD: Soup can be made 2 days ahead. Let cool; cover and chill. FONTINA TOAST AND ASSEMBLY Heat butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Cook bread until golden, about 3 minutes (you’ll have 2 extra). Flip, top with cheese, cover, and cook until cheese is melted, about 4 minutes. Top toasts with pickled shallots and chives. Spoon some jam into each bowl, pour soup around, and top with toasts.

HAM O’ DAY WITH RYE AIOLI

6 SERVINGS Love a ham sandwich with mustard on rye? Those familiar flavors are reimagined in this easily achievable dish.

¼ 2 1 1 2 2

cup whole grain mustard large eggs tsp. caraway seeds cup grapeseed or vegetable oil cups torn ½" pieces rye bread Tbsp. Banyuls vinegar or white wine vinegar 2 tsp. fresh lemon juice ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil Kosher salt 6 oz. thinly sliced country ham, prosciutto, or Speck Preheat oven to 200°. Thinly spread mustard on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake until dried, 1–1½ hours. Let cool; crumble. Place eggs in a small saucepan; add water to cover by 1½". Bring to a boil; remove from heat, cover, and let stand 5 minutes. Drain. Transfer eggs to a bowl of ice water; let cool. Peel; set aside (yolks should still be runny). Toast caraway seeds in a small skillet over medium heat, tossing often, 1 minute. Add grapeseed oil and bread; cook, tossing occasionally, until bread is just golden, about 4 minutes. Let cool, then blend in a blender until as smooth as possible; set rye oil aside. Blend eggs, vinegar, and lemon juice in a clean blender until smooth. With motor running, slowly add rye oil, then olive oil; blend until aioli is thickened. Pass through a sieve into a small bowl; season with salt. Spread aioli on plates, top with ham, and sprinkle with mustard powder. I ; F J ; C 8 ; H  ( & ' ) š 8 E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C' ++


7 The Optimist Atlanta, Georgia

The seafood shack gets supersized at this sea-and-beseen hot spot

photographs by Gentl & Hyers

ON PAPER, I SHOULDN’T LIKE THE OPTIMIST. The seafood-centric menu is as big as the Atlantic, and the dining room is similarly vast—180 seats huge. Out front, there’s a putting green where you can practice your golf game until your table is called. This high-volume playland is the exact opposite of the small and quirky places I’m usually drawn to. And yet...I love it. Named for a kid’s sailing dinghy, The Optimist is the creation of Atlanta chef and managing partner Ford Fry, who clearly knows how to navigate a winner: It is without a doubt the best of a growing number of big-name fish houses that have opened this year. (You read me right: Fish is the new steak.) The space, a former ham-aging warehouse, is a beauty, thanks to the vaulted ceiling, the movie-perfect lighting, and a nautical vibe that skips plastic-fish kitsch for sleek seaside sophistication. As for the food, they’ve got expertly shucked oysters, which, as far as I can tell, are the way to begin a meal in 2013. Start with a dozen, followed by comforting Southern hits like frothy she-crab soup with homemade shrimp toast, and plump, head-on Georgia shrimp in a buttery chile-lime sauce that you’ll want to drink. Heck, the clam and lobster rolls would make even a New Englander proud. Chef Adam Evans has a knack for rich, deeply flavored dishes that will convert the most ardent steak lover. Whatever you do, don’t skip the sides, especially the corn-milk hush puppies and basmati “fried rice.” Sometimes the best meals happen when you least expect them to. It helps to be an optimist.


TREND SPOTTING

Dish Towels as Napkins “If you’re like me, you got down and dirty with lots of bistro napkins this year.” —A.K.

Striped Bass with Lime Broth P. 161

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Skate Wing Schnitzel P. 161


To learn how to sear fish, see Prep School, page 180.

Clockwise from above: Chef and chief optimist Adam Evans. Snapper is perfectly pan-seared (for three easy sauces to serve with it, go to bonappetit.com/go/optimist). The scene at the soaring bar, where cocktails have names like Brackish Water and Tiki Torched. Superfresh fish (from left): lion fish, strawberry grouper, and queen triggerfish, three of the more than 20 varieties of seafood that are on offer daily.

I ; F J ; C 8 ; H  ( & ' ) Â&#x161; 8 E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C' +/


Fish and Chips with Malt Vinegar Mayonnaise

from the chef

“I remember when pork belly was all the rage. It’s such a relief to do fish.” ADAM EVANS


FISH AND CHIPS WITH MALT VINEGAR MAYONNAISE

4 SERVINGS Key when making this batter: Be sure your beer and club soda are ice cold, and chill the batter if prepping ahead. For The Optimist’s recipe for fries, go to bonappetit.com/go/fries.

MALT VINEGAR MAYONNAISE 1 large egg yolk* 2 Tbsp. malt vinegar, divided 1 cup vegetable oil Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

2 2 1 1 ½ 12 1 1 1 1½

FISH AND ASSEMBLY Vegetable oil (for frying; about 4 cups) cups all-purpose flour tsp. baking powder tsp. baking soda tsp. kosher salt plus more tsp. freshly ground black pepper plus more oz. (or more) chilled light lager cup chilled club soda Tbsp. malt vinegar cup corn flour or all-purpose flour lb. cod, haddock or pollack, cut into long, 1½"-wide strips French fries (for serving) Old Bay seasoning, flaky sea salt (such as Maldon), and chopped fresh dill Lemon wedges (for serving)

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT: A deep-fry thermometer

*RAW EGG IS NOT RECOMMENDED FOR INFANTS, THE ELDERLY, PREGNANT WOMEN, PEOPLE WITH WEAKENED IMMUNE SYSTEMS...OR PEOPLE WHO DON’T LIKE RAW EGG.

INGREDIENT INFO: Corn flour, which is more finely ground than cornmeal, is available at Latin markets, natural foods stores, and bobsredmill.com. MALT VINEGAR MAYONNAISE Whisk egg yolk and 1 Tbsp. vinegar in a small bowl. Whisking constantly, slowly drizzle in oil, drop by drop at first, until mayonnaise is thickened and smooth. Add remaining 1 Tbsp. vinegar; season with salt and pepper. Cover and chill. DO AHEAD: Mayonnaise can be made 1 day ahead. Keep chilled. FISH AND ASSEMBLY Fit a large pot with thermometer; pour in oil to measure 3". Heat over medium-high heat until thermometer registers 375°. Meanwhile, whisk all-purpose flour, baking powder, baking soda, 1 tsp. kosher salt, and ½ tsp. pepper in a large bowl. Whisking constantly, slowly add beer, club soda, and vinegar, adding more beer if batter is too thick (it should be the consistency of thin pancake batter).

Place corn flour in a shallow bowl. Season fish with kosher salt and pepper. Dredge fish in corn flour, shaking off excess, then dip in batter, letting excess drip back into bowl. Working in batches and returning oil to 375° between batches, fry fish until golden brown and crisp, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer to paper towel–lined baking sheet. Season fish and fries with Old Bay, sea salt, and dill; serve with malt vinegar mayonnaise and lemon wedges.

STRIPED BASS WITH LIME BROTH

4 SERVINGS Serving a perfectly cooked, crisp-skinned piece of fish in a seasoned lime broth lets you get a spoonful of bright flavor in every bite.

2 1 1 4 2 1 ⅓ 1 1 2 4

Tbsp. coriander seeds Tbsp. cracked cardamom pods tsp. Thai green curry paste sprigs cilantro, stems and leaves separated kaffir lime leaves or ½ tsp. finely grated lime zest Tbsp. fish sauce cup (or more) fresh lime juice Kosher salt grapefruit lime Tbsp. vegetable oil 6-oz. striped bass fillets or snapper, John Dory, or black bass fillets, halved if long and narrow Freshly ground black pepper Fresh mint and basil leaves, extravirgin olive oil, and flaky sea salt (such as Maldon; for serving)

INGREDIENT INFO: Thai green curry paste is available at Asian markets and in the Asian foods section of many supermarkets. Toast coriander, cardamom, and curry paste in a medium saucepan over medium heat, stirring, until spices are fragrant and curry paste begins to caramelize, about 2 minutes. Add cilantro stems, kaffir lime leaves, fish sauce, and 1 cup water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer gently until flavors meld, 8–10 minutes. Strain broth through a fine-mesh sieve into a large heatproof measuring cup; discard solids. Let cool, then stir in lime juice; season with kosher salt and more lime juice, if desired. Meanwhile, using a sharp knife, cut all peel and white pith from grapefruit; discard. Working over a small bowl, cut between membranes to release segments into bowl; discard membranes. Repeat with lime. Heat vegetable oil in a large cast-iron or other heavy skillet over medium-high heat.

Season fish with salt and pepper. Cook fillets, skin side down, 1 minute, then firmly press down with a fish spatula to ensure even browning and crispiness. Continue cooking until skin is golden brown and fish is mostly cooked through, about 4 minutes; carefully turn fish and sauté until just cooked through, about 1 minute longer. Divide lime broth and fish among shallow bowls. Scatter citrus segments, cilantro leaves, and mint and basil over; drizzle with olive oil and season with sea salt. DO AHEAD: Broth can be made 1 day ahead (do not add lime juice). Cover and chill. Bring to room temperature and add lime juice just before serving.

SKATE WING SCHNITZEL

4 SERVINGS “This dish was on our opening menu and still makes an appearance whenever we can get fresh skate wings,” says Evans. His method also works with skinless turbot, flounder, or sole fillets.

6 2 1 ½

4 ½ ¼ 2 2 1

cups torn country-style bread large eggs, beaten to blend cup all-purpose flour cup finely chopped fresh herbs (such as flat-leaf parsley, chives, and/or tarragon), divided Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper 6-oz. skate wing fillets cup olive oil cup (½ stick) unsalted butter Tbsp. drained capers Tbsp. fresh lemon juice Tbsp. Dijon mustard Lemon wedges (for serving; optional)

Pulse bread in a food processor until semifine crumbs form. Place breadcrumbs, eggs, and flour in separate shallow bowls. Mix ¼ cup herbs into breadcrumbs; season with salt and pepper. Season skate with salt and pepper. Dredge skate in flour, shaking off excess, coat with egg, letting excess drip back into bowl, and coat with breadcrumbs; transfer to a plate. Heat oil in a large cast-iron or other heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Working in batches, sauté skate until golden brown and just cooked through, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer to a paper towel–lined plate; season with salt. Pour off oil in pan; heat butter, stirring occasionally, until foaming and starting to brown, about 3 minutes. Whisk in capers, lemon juice, mustard, and remaining ¼ cup herbs. Drizzle skate with brown butter sauce and serve with lemon wedges, if desired. I ; F J ; C 8 ; H  ( & ' ) š 8 E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C' , '


8 Jeffrey’s & Josephine House Austin, Texas

Details make the difference at the country’s most stylish pair of restaurants

IT’S THE LITTLE THINGS that define a great restaurant. Monogrammed cocktail napkins. Warm bread and soft butter. A hostess’s simple “Good night,” as a guest exits. Thanks to 31-year-old Austin empire-builder Larry McGuire, there are few places that nail those details better than his reinvigoration of local institution Jeffrey’s and its sister spot, Josephine House. In an era of restaurants known for an off-the-cuff approach, these destinations are sophisticated fine-dining throwbacks where the flower arrangements matter, the comfort of the chairs matters, and, refreshingly, the customer matters. Of course, the food matters, too. I could spend hours lunching at the whitewashed space that is Josephine House, sipping Palomas (tequila, grapefruit, lime, salt, and sparkling water) and eating quinoa and carrots in an apple cider vinaigrette, and toasts with strawberries and house-made burrata. Same goes for dinner, when the laid-back modern country-club vibe continues at Jeffrey’s, with its walnut bar, leather-bound menus, Martini cart, and food that runs to a wedge salad smothered in goat-cheese dressing and a 35-day dry-aged Texas porterhouse that’s seared to perfection in the wood-burning oven. If this all sounds glamorous and special, it is. Welcome back to fine dining. —A.K.

JEFFREY’S Valets Luke Bedillion (left) and Justin Finney

photographs by Peden + Munk


JOSEPHINE HOUSE Bartender Tiff Dyess

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The Details JEFFREYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

Top row: The Jeffreyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s logo features an oak leaf from a tree on the property. A fireplace separates the lounge from the main dining room. Wood-roasted lobster thermidor pays homage to classic haute cuisine. Middle row:H[YehZihWd][\hecM_bb_[D[biedje:W\jFkda$ Menus are tucked into laser-cut leather books. A Martini cart makes the rounds. Bottom row: The larger, more casual of the dining rooms. Brass valet parking tickets. The luxurious and intimate barroom features custom-made wood and brass stools.


The Details JOSEPHINE HOUSE

Clockwise from top left:7i_cfb[iWbWZe\^[_hbeecjecWje[iWdZ^[hXia[[fiȈbWlehiYb[WdWjj^_ibkdY^j_c[\Wleh_j[$D[edi_]dW][ welcomes guests to the property. Fresh salads, baked goods, and towering floral arrangements line the marble countertop. An [Yb[Yj_YWhjYebb[Yj_edWZZiYebeh\kbY^WhWYj[hjej^[Xh_]^jm^_j[Z_d_d]heec$7i_bl[h#fbWj[9^WcfW]d[XkYa[jWdZf_jY^[hicWa[[l[d the water service sophisticated. Embossed coasters display the name of the restaurant’s neighborhood.

I ; F J ; C 8 ; H  ( & ' ) š 8 E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C' , +


HIGH STEAKS

When Jeffrey’s reopened, it brought back fine dining with flair, and a serious steak service. Here are the chef’s steps to perfection, whether New York strip steak or bone-in rib eye. GO TO THE SOURCE

Three ranches—Niman, Beeman Family, and Branch Ranch Natural—provide three different varieties of prime beef, all of which are custom cut and dry-aged (from 28 to 35 days) at a local, family-owned meat house, then trimmed to order. A stellar selection of beef means a lot of steaks—and flavors—to choose from.

KEEP ’EM COLD

Instead of bringing the meat to room temperature before cooking, chef Larry McGuire leaves it in the fridge until it hits the live-oak-burning grill. This method lets him apply a more intense heat. The steak is then finished beneath a 1,200º broiler to get a well-crusted exterior without overcooking the meat.

FINISH WITH FLAVOR

Why do steaks always taste better at restaurants? A higher quality of beef, of course, but more simply, it’s about how they’re finished. At Jeffrey’s, that means a last-minute brushing of butter (after lots of basting) and a sprinkle of Maldon sea salt to add gloss and crunch to every cut.

Jeffrey’s waiter Rion Bsaies

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COUNTRY CLUB COUTURE

It would be an understatement to say that owner Larry McGuire and creative director Ryan Smith put some thought into the uniforms. Because when they assembled an esteemed team of designers, the likes of which have worked with Phillip Lim and Zac Posen, to design, produce, and style every outfit on the property, there wasn’t a detail left undone. (Certainly not after tailors Mr. & Mrs. Sew It All altered each one to fit.) And if you’re picking up a Royal Tenenbaums vibe, that’s because Wes Anderson’s tailor, Mr. Ned, had a hand in some of the uniforms. Which look is your favorite?

JEFFREY’S BACK WAITER Quinton Roach

VALET Drew Greenstein

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Ryan Scott Smith

OWNER, EXECUTIVE CHEF Larry McGuire

JEFFREY’S BARTENDER Megan Bontempo

JEFFREY’S CAPTAIN Mark Bonus

JEFFREY’S COCKTAIL WAITRESS Samantha Parman

JOSEPHINE HOUSE BARTENDER Tiff iff Dyess


9 The Whale Wins & Joule Seattle, Washington

The perfect meal starts in one Seattle restaurant, continues in another, and should definitely include tartare

DISH YEAR of the

TA R T A R E The Bread Instead of toast points, Erickson prefers heartier toasted country bread. “I like the contrast of the crunch of bread with the soft tartare,” she says.

The Finish A bright golden egg yolk from nearby Early Bird Farm adds lushness to the lean meat. Sprinkle on crunchy Jacobsen sea salt from Oregon, and this dish is ready to eat.

The Meat Renee Erickson goes off-script, using local lamb loin instead of traditional beef. “Lamb is really sweet and mild when it’s raw,” she says. She hand-cuts it for the best texture.

THE WHALE WINS Lamb Tartare

photographs by We Are The Rhoads

The Olive Oil

The Mix-Ins

A small pool of buttery olive oil on the plate acts as a condiment; Erickson likes to draw a forkful of lamb through it for each bite.

She combines classic additions, like shallots and capers, with unconventional ones, like fresh mint and preserved lemon. She’s careful not to overseason the dish: “I’m all about tasting the meat.”


I’M CHEATING A BIT WITH THIS PICK , which is actually two completely different Seattle restaurants. But they have a lot in common. They share a front door and bathrooms. Each is run by a chef whom I’ve long admired. And both serve excellent tartares, 2013’s dish of the year (more on that in a minute). The Whale Wins is chef Renee Erickson’s follow-up to her tiny spot The Walrus and The Carpenter, which landed on this list back in 2011. You’ll now find her in an airy, bright dining room in the Wallingford neighborhood, serving rustic, wood-fired dishes driven by the bounty of the Pacific Northwest. Just across the hallway is the hip, well-lit Joule, whose chef, Rachel Yang, was doing the Korean-American mashup thing long before it became a national trend. Each place is a standout on its own, but combined, they’re the ideal restaurant: a little bit country cool and a little bit city chic. About that dish of the year, the one I saw (and ate) across the country this year. I’ve had versions of steak tartare made with veal, venison, tuna, salmon, beet, and bison, and mixed with unexpected ingredients ranging from fried oysters to bone marrow. At The Whale Wins, lamb gets the French bistro treatment and is served with a shingled stack of toasted bread. Joule’s Korean barbecue–inspired take combines beef with Asian pear, spicy cod-roe aioli, and pine nuts. They couldn’t be more different. But sometimes opposites attract, and sparks fly. —A.K.

JOULE Beef Tartare

The Meat

The Aioli

Yang uses a tender cut of beef from the chuck known as teres major. “You want lean beef,” she explains. “Higher-fat beef doesn’t melt in your mouth the same way.”

Instead of a frontand-center egg yolk, Yang’s tartare has a rich aioli spiked with mentaiko, or spicy cured cod roe, for heat and brininess.

The Seasoning Just before serving, Yang dresses the meat with a sweetsalty mixture of soy sauce, ginger, garlic, gochugaru (Korean red pepper powder; see Prep School, page TK), Chinese mustard powder, and sugar.

The Mix-Ins Yang folds in pickled Asian pear for pucker, brined mustard seeds as a nod to classic Dijon, scallions for freshness, and toasted pine nuts, which bring the toasty quality that bread typically delivers.

The Salad She tosses a tangle of red watercress in Sherry vinaigrette, providing a sharp contrast to the flavor of the meat.

THERE’S MORE FROM

THE HOT 10 ONLINE

To get the recipes for both tartares and watch a video on how to make them, check out bonappetit .com/go/hot10


10 Aska

Brooklyn, New York

Earnest, unyielding, and outspoken—a conversation with chef Fredrik Berselius reveals he’s as opinionated as he is gifted photographs by Tuukka Koski

THERE’S A PART OF ME THAT THINKS I’ll look back on a meal at Aska years from now and wonder, “Did I eat a dish of salsify, lichen, and autumn leaves, and like it?” There’s another part of me that thinks the New Nordic movement, of which Aska is a card-carrying member, is the most influential culinary philosophy since nouvelle cuisine of the 1960s. This cooking style—defined by hyperlocal, often foraged ingredients, earthy flavors, rustic techniques, and a penchant for the cerebral—has found one of its most talented disciples in Aska’s Swedish-born chef, Fredrik Berselius. At his 24-seat restaurant in the back of an art gallery in Brooklyn’s Williamsburg neighborhood, there’s a good chance you may eat something that he found growing around the corner. You’ll probably have a course made with pig’s blood, an ingredient he refuses to abandon. Whether you like it or not, his food makes you think, not just about your own dining habits, but also about flavor combinations, textures, and, most important, the act of eating. Don’t worry: A meal at Aska isn’t some sort of weird food experiment. It’s delicious, whether Berselius is offering dry-aged duck breast with thick shavings of raw rhubarb, or a single spear of roasted broccoli upended in a mussel-and-seaweed emulsion. Given the choice between a cheeseburger or dinner here, I know for sure which one I’ll remember. —A.K.


OPPOSITE: Chef Fredrik Berselius in front of the painted mural in Aska’s dining room.

Visitors can eat and drink at the bar, which is standingroomonly on weekends.

Pickled onions, yarrow, and daylily pistils await placement.

A dish of cured duck heart, pickled unripe mulberries, wild sheep sorrel, and reduced sunchoke juice.

Berselius holds court on foraging, demanding customers, and taste memories: Blood Lust Everyone talks about the blood course I serve. I want people to like the blood. It’s very natural; it runs through the veins of every mammal. I think it’s something that’s forgotten—animal parts have been replaced by the supermarket’s packaged meat. I grew up eating blood pudding in Sweden, so it’s not that odd to me. And at the end of the day, it’s just one dish in a tasting menu.

Forage Over Farming What you pick with your hands is so much more precious than something you pay for. I have

TREND SPOTTING

Earthenware Plates

“I’m a plate-flipper. This year, the handthrown, rough-hewn stuff—preferably from local potters— was everywhere.” —A.K.

several places upstate that I frequent. A lot of times, I go to the farmers’ market and see the same thing I picked, and then the ingredient no longer appeals to me.

The Humble Brag Scandinavians never cooked to show off. We never shouted about our cooking, either. We were humble about our ingredients. We took our time with them and let them be what they are. We’ve always done that. It just happens to be where food is going right now.

but then eat everybody else’s ice cream at the end of the meal.

Remembrances of a Swedish Chef Scandinavia has a special relationship with nature, and our food is an extension of that. In my cooking, I’m always looking to memories, to where I am from, and the ingredients that come from that place. So much of Aska’s menu goes back to childhood memories in Sweden.

“ It’s easy to use what’s fashionable, but you have to find luxury in simple ingredients.

The Customer Is Always Faking What gets me are the people who say they are lactose-intolerant I ; F J ; C 8 ; H  ( & ' ) š 8 E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C' - '


KNOW WHERE TO GO Addresses for our

HOT 10

restaurants can be found on page 200.

Kinfolk Studios, a gallery space in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, houses Aska’s kitchen and dining area.

ABOVE: A chip made from pig’s blood, topped with sea buckthorn jam.

Berselius forages nearby.

“ Our space is a bit funky and always changing, which reflects our cooking philosophy as well.

Theater in the Round I love abstract art where negative space is as important as the paint in terms of how you view something. I view plating the same way. Sometimes it makes sense to place ingredients offcenter because of their shape or the story of the dish. I like people to think when they eat. If they ask why is it plated that way, then there’s a dialogue that never would have happened otherwise.

to make before. I’m interested in foods other than what you see at most places. It would bore me to death to just cook burgers.

Cooking with the Micro-Seasons There aren’t just four seasons. There are 52 seasons. Every week, things change—every day, things change, actually. So you could say there are 365 seasons. That’s the way I approach it.

Risky Business Fear Factor I don’t want to scare or frighten anyone. The goal is to serve food that tastes good. I hate doing things that I’ve done before. I don’t want to even cook things that someone showed me how

There are no rules in what we serve or how we cook it other than to find the best ingredients we can, whether it’s a young vegetable or a weed. You’ve got to take risks. Without risk, nothing is exciting.

THERE’S MORE FROM

THE HOT 10 ON OUR TABLET

Including a video of Aska chef Fredrik Berselius foraging in the Hudson Valley. Download it now at bonappetit .com/go/tablet


prep school TECHNIQUES, TIPS, AND MORE FROM THE BON APPÉTIT TEST KITCHEN

KNOW YOUR ROE American caviar is no longer a poor man’s substitute for the imported stuff. Chefs have embraced sustainable domestic types, from salmon roe (on a Napa cabbage salad at Daikaya in Washington, D.C.) to luxe wild sturgeon (paired with chicharrón at Houston’s The Pass). But you don’t have to eat out to get a taste—a range of options is available online. —DAWN PERRY Edbo+f[hY[dje\j^[Transmontanous sturgeonWjj^_i9Wb_\ehd_W \WY_b_jofheZkY[]ebZ[d[]]i$J^[Yel[j[ZYWl_Wh_iYh[Wco"dejjee iWbjo»WdZfh_Y[o$Golden Reserve caviar, $300 for 1 oz.; tsarnicoulai.com

Salmon¿if[Whb#i_p[he["i^emd^[h["cWa[i_jimWo_djeWokpkZ_f WjI[Wjjb[¿i@ekb[$<[[b\h[[jeifeed_jedjeWXW][bm_j^Yh[WcY^[[i[$ Salmon caviar, $50 for 7 oz.; shop.brownetrading.com

IkijW_dWXbohW_i[Z_d<beh_ZW"Siberian sturgeoncWa[\ehXkjj[ho he[j^WjYWdX[YecfWh[Zje9Wif_WdI[Wi[lhk]W$Mote Marine Siberian caviar, $65 for 1 oz.; shop.brownetrading.com

IcWbb#X[WZA[djkYaospoonfishYWl_Wh_ij^[fheZkYje\Wif[Y_[idWj_l[ jej^[ijWj[¿ibWa[i"WdZfWYaW][ZXoW\ekhj^#][d[hWj_ed\Wc_boXki_d[ii _dBek_il_bb[$Kentucky spoonfish caviar, $49 for 2 oz.; kysmokedfish.com

PHOTOGRAPHS BY ZACH DESART

I ; F J ; C 8 ; H  ( & ' ) š 8 E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C' - +


PREP SCHOOL

S E V E N M I N U T ES TO P E R F ECT I O N FROM P. 87 For our ramen recipe, we knew we needed a perfect medium-boiled egg, with a just-set white and an almost runny yolk. A few dozen tries later, we nailed it: Lowering the eggs into already-boiling water gave us the most consistent results. —ALISON ROMAN

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It’s hard to ind a substitute for Korean gochugaru. The crimson lakes are made from peppers that are sundried and crushed, a process that lends them a fruity yet earthy lavor that’s milder than that of other chile lakes. Add a shake to any dish that would bene it from a little kick. —S.L. FROM P. 169

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STAFF PICKS: This month’s ideal menu “I’m planning an indulgent but totally doable dinner party: We’ll start off with Seaweed and Tofu Beignets (page 126), along with the Hey Hey, My My Sherry cocktail (page 52), then tuck into bowls of Orecchiette Carbonara with Charred Brussels Sprouts (page 139).”

GRAB AND GO

Once the edge of your crepe is golden and lacy and the center has set, gently loosen it with a spatula. Then, using your ingers—no, you won’t get burned—pull up the crepe and swiftly lip it over. FROM P. 73

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PREP SCHOOL

FISH WITHOUT FEAR

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FROM P. 159 Expertly cooked fish starts with a perfect sear. Luckily for us, Adam Evans, chef at The Optimist, has cooked a lot of ish—”and set off a lot of smoke detectors”—in the pursuit of excellence. He gave us his three essential tips for restaurant-worthy, crisp-skinned illets (minus the smoke alarms). —A.R.

; on.

CLAY DATE

4

3

5

PICK ME Now popping up at many of our Best New Restaurants: tiny lowers, buds, and leaves. They might require a tweezer to get to the plate, but they deliver concentrated lavor along with crazy visual appeal. Here’s a taste of what they have to offer. —A.R. HWd]_d]_dYebeh\hec f[h_m_dab[jeZ[[f fkhfb["j^[i[im[[j" ijWh#i^Wf[Xbeeci^Wl[ WȈbWlehh[c_d_iY[dje\ YkYkcX[h$ <[Wj^[ho]h[[db[Wl[i m_j^WdWii[hj_l["f_d[o jWij[j^Wj]e[i[if[# Y_Wbbom[bbm_j^icea[Z ehYkh[ZȈ_i^$ J^[if_Yob[Wl[iZ[b_l[h YedY[djhWj[Z"f[ff[ho ȈbWleh$IcWbbXbeeciWdZ XkZiWh[WbieZ[b_Y_eki b_]^jbof_Yab[Z$

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Rustic clay pots are used to make the signature dish at Fat Rice (page 140). “Their shape lets heat reach all around the sides,” says chef Abraham Conlon, “and the glazed interior helps brown the rice.” Conlon seasons the pots by soaking them in warm water for two hours, then oiling them with peanut oil once dry. Even more delicious? The price.


PREP SCHOOL

SUNSHINE IN A JAR FROM P. 139 We love using preserved lemons in the BA kitchen, and Philip Krajeck’s recipe makes the best we’ve ever tasted. They take 10 minutes to prep and need only two weeks to cure. Sure, you can buy preserved lemons at specialty stores, but when the end result is this good, we say make your own. —C.M.

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This recipe easily doubles or triples, and the lemons will keep up to a month. Use one big jar, or pack the lemons into several smaller ones. We can’t think of a better hostess gift.

“SEED WHOLE PRESERVED LEMONS, PURÉE THEM WITH LEMON JUICE, AND BLEND IN OLIVE OIL. IT’S A GREAT CONDIMENT FOR GRILLED FISH.” —PHILIP KRAJECK, CHEF, ROLF AND DAUGHTERS

LET’S DO THE TWIST

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FROM P. 137 Now that you’ve mastered pasta dough and warmed up your fingers with a few batches of orecchiette, try your hand at this spiral shape called strozzapreti. The name means “priest strangler,” but we promise no one will get hurt. —SCOTT DESIMON


PREP SCHOOL 1

2

3 4

5

7

6

9

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W E D G E A L L EG I A N C E FROM P. 35 We think our wedge salad recipe is the ultimate iteration (see below), but we’re not opposed to innovation— like these embellishments and swaps. —CARLA LALLI MUSIC

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sourcebook

Strip Steak with Japanese Dipping Sauce p. 73 POULTRY

A French-ish Salad p. 116 VEGETARIAN

Two of our favorite dishes from The Optimist (page 161)

APPETIZERS Classic Potted Pork p. 28 Crab Toast with Lemon Aioli p. 30 Ham O’ Day with Rye Aioli p. 155

Fennel and Orange Salad with LemonGinger Vinaigrette p. 68 Greens With Horseradish–Crème Fraîche Dressing p. 126

Seaweed and Tofu Beignets with Lime Mayonnaise p. 126

Shaved Vegetables*

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

Wedge Salad p. 185

Hey Hey, My My p. 52

SOUPS

NONALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

Creamy White Onion Soup p. 155

Fermented Grape Soda p. 78 Homemade Almond Milk*

Roasted Pepper Panzanella p. 148

Shoyu Ramen p. 82 Tom Kha Gai (Chicken Coconut Soup) p. 30

MAIN COURSES

My Milkshake p. 40

SEAFOOD

PIZZA

Fat Rice p. 142

Clam and Bacon Pizza p. 24

Fish and Chips with Malt Vinegar Mayonnaise p. 161

SALADS Apple Salad with Walnuts and Lime p. 149 Carrot and Beet Slaw with Pistachios and Raisins p. 149 Celery Salad with Dates, Almonds, and Parmesan p. 149

Skate Wing Schnitzel p. 161

Orecchiette with Squash, Chiles, and Hazelnuts p. 139 Strozzapreti with Spinach and Preserved Lemon p. 139 PASTA

Fresh Pasta p. 136 Orecchiette Carbonara with Charred Brussels Sprouts p. 139 Orecchiette with Squash, Chiles, and Hazelnuts p. 139 Pasta with Chorizo and Chickpeas p. 66 Strozzapreti with Spinach and Preserved Lemon p. 139

VEGETABLES, SIDE DISHES Blistered Brassicas*

Fried Farro with Pickled Carrots and Runny Eggs p. 149 Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Speck and Chimichurri p. 70 Sautéed Greens with Olives p. 149 Tarragon Creamed Corn p. 30

CONDIMENTS, MISCELLANEOUS Brussels Sprouts Kimchi p. 78 Ginger-Lemongrass Simple Syrup* Mascarpone Butter* Preserved Lemons p. 182 Quick Pickled Vegetables* Toasted Quinoa Topping*

DESSERTS Buttermilk Cake with Sour Milk Jam and Gin-Poached Cherries p. 126 Cornmeal Crepes with Figs and Pears p. 73 * For recipe, see The Takeaway booklet

HEALTHY OPTIONS

Striped Bass with Lime Broth p. 161 MEAT

Lamb Shoulder with Polenta and Beans p. 28

<EHDKJH?J?ED7B?D<EHC7J?ED <EHJ>;H;9?F;I?DJ>?I?IIK;"=EJE BONAPPETIT.COM RECIPES

Sloppy Tacos p. 24

. © 2013 . . . . 58, . 09. Bon Appétit ( 0006-6990) is published monthly by Condé Nast, which is a division of Advance Magazine Publishers Inc. : The Condé Nast Building, 4 Times Square, New York, NY 10036. S. I. Newhouse, Jr., Chairman; Charles H. Townsend, Chief Executive Officer; Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr., President; John W. Bellando, Chief Operating Officer & Chief Financial Officer; Jill Bright, Chief Administrative Officer. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and at additional mailing offices. Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40644503. Canadian Goods and Services Tax Registration No. 123242885-RT0001. Canada Post: Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to P.O. Box 874, Station Main, Markham, ON L3P 8L4. : .( 707.4.12.5); : Bon Appétit, P.O. Box 37614, Boone, IA 50037-0614. , , , : Please write to Bon Appétit, P.O. Box 37614, Boone, IA 50037-0614, call 800-765-9419, or e-mail subscriptions@bonappetit.com. Please give both new and old addresses as printed on most recent label. : If the Post Office alerts us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have no further obligation unless we receive a corrected address within one year. If during your subscription term or up to one year after the magazine becomes undeliverable, you are ever dissatisfied with your subscription, let us know. You will receive a full refund on all unmailed issues. First copy of new subscription will be mailed within eight weeks after receipt of order. Address all editorial, business, and production correspondence to Bon Appétit Magazine, 4 Times Square, New York, NY 10036. For reprints, please e-mail reprints@condenast.com or call 717-505-9701, ext. 101. For reuse permissions, please e-mail permissions@condenast.com or call 800-897-8666. Visit us online at BonAppetit.com. To subscribe to other Condé Nast magazines on the World Wide Web, visit CondeNastDigital.com. Occasionally, we make our subscriber list available to carefully screened companies that offer products and services that we believe would interest our readers. If you do not want to receive these offers and/or information, please advise us at P.O. Box 37614, Boone, IA 50037-0614 or call 800-765-9419. , , , ( , , , , ), . , , , , . , , .

.

(& & 8E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C I ; F J ; C 8 ; H (& ' )

THE HOT 10 \hecff$''/ȍ'-(

ALMA 952 S. Broadway, Los Angeles; 213-244-1422; alma-la.com ASKA 90 Wythe Ave., Brooklyn; 718-3882969; askanyc.com AVA GENE’S 3377 S.E. Division St., Portland, OR; 971-229-0571; avagenes.com FAT RICE 2957 W. Diversey Ave., Chicago; 773-661-9170; eatfatrice.com JEFFREY’S 1204 W. Lynn St., Austin; 512-477-5584; jeffreysofaustin.com JOSEPHINE HOUSE 1601 Waterston Ave., Austin; 512-477-5584; josephineofaustin.com JOULE 3506 Stone Way N, Seattle; 206-632-5685; joulerestaurant.com THE OPTIMIST 914 Howell Mill Rd., Atlanta; 404-477-6260; theoptimistrestaurant.com THE PASS & PROVISIONS 807 Taft St., Houston; 713-6289020; passandprovisions.com ROLF AND DAUGHTERS 700 Taylor St., Nashville; 615-866-9897; rolfanddaughters .com SAISON 178 Townsend St., San Francisco; 415-8287990; saisonsf.com THE WHALE WINS 3506 Stone Way N, Seattle; 206-632-9425; thewhalewins.com

SHOPPING INFO THE PROJECT: RAMEN pp. 81–87 YUZU TENMOKU BOWL $15; korin.com FEAST OR FASHION pp. 106–112 P. 108: THAKOON LACE INSET JUMPER $1,560; Barneys New York “COLBERT” ASTIER DE VILLATTE TUREEN $306–$663; John Derian Company, 212-677-3917 KITCHENAID ARTISAN STAND MIXER $350 for 5-qt. mixer; kitchenaid.com RUMOURS by Fleetwood Mac, $18; amazon.com P. 109: THOM BROWNE FOR BROOKS BROTHERS BLACK FLEECE COLLECTION TWIN SET brooksbrothers.com KRUG “GRANDE CUVÉE” BRUT CHAMPAGNE $149 for 750 ml; klwines.com P. 112: “THE PEOPLE’S PICKLE” $7; rickspicks.com “PRESTON” GLASSES $95; warbyparker.com SETTING THE TABLE: THE TRANSFORMING POWER OF HOSPITALITY IN BUSINESS by Danny Meyer, $16; amazon.com

TRAVEL PLANNER NAVIGATOR: CHARLESTON pp. 96–102 THE BAR AT HUSK 76 Queen St.; 843-577-2500; huskrestaurant.com THE BELMONT 511 King St.; thebelmontcharleston.com BERTHA’S KITCHEN 2332 Meeting St. Rd.; 843-554-6519 BUTCHER & BEE 654 King St.; 843-619-0202; butcherandbee.com CHARLESTON PLACE 205 Meeting St.; 843-722-4900; charlestonplace .com CODA DEL PESCE 1130 Ocean Blvd., Isle of Palms; 843-242-8570; codadelpesce.com CYPRESS 167 E. Bay St.; 843-727-0111; magnolias-blossom-cypress.com EXTRA VIRGIN OVEN 1075 E. Montague Ave.; 843-2251796; evopizza.com FISHNET SEAFOOD 3832 Savannah Hwy., St. John’s Island; 843-571-2423 THE GLASS ONION 1219 Savannah Hwy.; 843-225-1717; ilovetheglassonion .com THE GIN JOINT 182 E. Bay St.; 843-577-6111; theginjoint.com THE GRIFFON 18 Vendue Range St.; 843-723-1700; griffoncharleston.com MARTHA LOU’S KITCHEN 1068 Morrison Dr.; 843-577-9583 THE ORDINARY 544 King St.; 843-414-7060; eattheordinary .com TWO BOROUGHS LARDER 186 Coming St.; 843-6373722; twoboroughslarder.com WENTWORTH MANSION 149 Wentworth St.; 888-466-1886; wentworthmansion.com XIAO BAO BISCUIT 224 Rutledge Ave.; xiaobaobiscuit.com FEAST OR FASHION pp. 106–112 P. 106: LE VOLTAIRE 27 Quai Voltaire, Paris, France; +3342-61-17-49 P. 108: FLEISHER’S GRASS FED & ORGANIC MEATS 307 Wall St., Kingston, NY; 845-338-6666; leishers.com P. 109: LA GRENOUILLE 3 E. 52nd St., NYC; 212-752-1495; la-grenouille.com THE GRILL ROOM AT THE FOUR SEASONS RESTAURANT 99 E. 52nd St., NYC; 212754-9494; fourseasonsrestaurant.com NOUGATINE 1 Central Park West, NYC; 212-299-3900; jean-georges .com THE WAVERLY INN 16 Bank St., NYC; 917-828-1154; waverlynyc.com P. 112: ELEVEN MADISON PARK 11 Madison Ave., NYC; 212-889-0905; elevenmadisonpark .com THE FAT RADISH 17 Orchard St., NYC; 212-3004053; thefatradishnyc.com N O MAD 1170 Broadway, NYC; 212-796-1500; thenomadhotel.com PARM 248 Mulberry St., NYC; 212-993-7189; parmnyc.com

F>EJE=H7F>8O=;DJB>O;HI

recipe index SEPTEMBER 2013


back of the napkin

Sofia Coppola So ia Coppola is our kind of tastemaker. Bloggers ixate on the bags the director carries—Louis Vuitton asked her to collaborate, of course. And music hounds obsess over the songs in her ilms, like the track her husband’s band, Phoenix, contributed to The Bling Ring. SC watchers also know that her father, Francis Ford Coppola, named a cuvée of wines for her, with a 2012 Chardonnay joining those intoxicating little cans of sparkling wine. (“They’re much more lethal than you would expect,” says So ia.) But what we really want to know is: Where does she like to eat? She goes casual in NYC: just-made tofu at EN Japanese Brasserie or the chocolate mousse at Buvette. In Paris, it might be Welsh rarebit at Café de Flore or the luxe vegetable menu at L’Arpège. “Everything is slower there,” she explains. “You can take two hours for lunch. I feel like in New York or L.A., you’re kind of grabbing.” Which isn’t a bad thing. Here’s her map for grabbing a bite in L.A. —

IN HER BAG

THE BLING THING

t en n New r on e 2 2 3 (& ( 8E D 7 F F ; J ? J$9 E C I ; F J ; C 8 ; H  (& ' )

“We’d get these sandwiches brought to the set when we needed a pick-me-up.”

PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRISTOPHER TESTANI. FOOD STYLING BY REBECCA JURKEVICH. PROP STYLING BY KAITLYN DU ROSS. ILLUSTRATION BY MR. MANEL.

Smythson diary, Céline sunglasses, and So ia Mini sparkling wine.


Bon appetit  
Bon appetit  
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