Issuu on Google+

DCCC takes on Wake County in volleyball.

Coming Saturday

THOMASVILLE

Find results from Friday night’s prep football games in Saturday’s Times.

Times

See Sports, Page 7

Thursday, September 10, 2009

118th Year - No. 135 50 Cents

www.tvilletimes.com

Suspect in attempted murder sought BY ELIOT DUKE Staff Writer

Randolph County Sheriff ’s Office is looking for a Thomasville man who was involved in a stabbing and shooting in Trinity Monday and is considered armed and dangerous. RCSO issued a warrant for Charles Gray Gordon, 41, of 603 Pennington Ave., charging him with

two counts of attempted first degree murder, two counts of assault with a deadly weapon, first degree burglary and impersonating a police officer. Gordon, and his son, Dustin Gray Gordon, were involved in an altercation with two men who were found by deputies suffering from gunshot and stab wounds at 5985 Jim Pierce Road in Trinity.

“If someone sees this man, do not app r o a c h him, call 911,” RCSO Lt. Barry H a z e l t o n C. Gordon said. “I consider him armed and dangerous.” Davie County police arrested Dustin Gray Gordon, 21, of 1044 Har-

vest Drive, at his job on Monday and transferred him to the Randolph County D. Gordon Jail where he facing the same charges as his father. Dustin Gordon was issued a $250,000 secured bond and is scheduled to

appear in Randolph District Court on Sept. 16. According to a RCSO press release, deputies arrived at the scene and found Toby McDowell shot in the lower abdomen and Trevor Kindley suffering from multiple stab wounds from an edged weapon. Both men were transported to Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and are recovering from non-life threat-

Man arrested in weekend stabbing

EDC addresses economic future of county

BY ELIOT DUKE Staff Writer

A Thomasville man was arrested early Sunday morning for stabbing another man at a party. Thomasville Police arrested Jimmy Ray Routh Jr., 21, of 406 Sullivan St., and charged him with second degree attempted murder for stabbing Ian Michael Smith, of Archdale. The two men were attending a get-together at 10 E. Sunrise Ave. Saturday night when a disagreement happened, according to TPD Sgt. Les Rickard. Smith was found suffering from multiple stab wounds to his upper body and had to be transported to Wake forest Baptist Hospital, where he was treated and later released. “There was a argument that led to a physical confrontation,” Rickard said. “It ended with [Smith] suffering from multiple stab wounds throughout his body.” Due to the circumstances of the assault, Routh

See STABBING, Page 3

ening injuries. Hazelton did not want to comment on how the four men knew each other. “They’re doing well,” said Hazelton of the victims. “I talked to them at the hospital [Tuesday].” Anyone with information on the whereabouts of Charles Gordon are asked to contact Randolph County Crime Stoppers at 672-7463 or RCSO at 318-6699.

BY KARISSA MINN Staff Writer

One of Davidson County’s greatest assets is its skilled manufacturing workforce, says Steve Googe, executive director of the Davidson County Economic Development Commission. Despite recent hard-hitting job losses in the industry, he believes that in the next couple of years, this workforce will be able to return to what it does best. “We are a manufacturing community,” Googe said. “During these types of downturns, manufacturing is hit the hardest and the longest, but when it comes back, it always comes back fastest. Probably not this year, and maybe not until the latter part of next year, we expect to see some of these things coming back.” Googe presented the EDC’s economic development report on Tuesday to about 50 community leaders at Sapona Country

See FUTURE, Page 6 TIMES PHOTO/ELIOT DUKE

BADGES FOR BASEBALL Thomasville Police Officer and K-9 Handler Chris Leonard offers some batting tips to a youngster at Doak Park. Leonard is active in the Badges for Baseball program offered through the Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club of Davidson County that brings at-risk youths and police officers together once a week on the baseball diamond.

Commissioners approve new fire district maps BY KARISSA MINN Staff Writer

Piedmont Triad region, including medical and health sciences, creative enterprises in the arts, logistics and distribution, advanced manufacturing and teaching,” Ross said. “These are the industries that are going to grow and the ones that will need people to fill those jobs.” Committee members will meet this week with a consultant to discuss the next steps to creating the school, which is expected to have

The Davidson County Board of Commissioners has approved new maps of the county’s fire service districts increasing their size from five to six miles, allowing more residents to enjoy lower insurance premiums and pay taxes to the same fire departments that serve them. The public hearing about the fire districts from the board’s Aug. 11 meeting was continued on Tuesday, to allow time for the board to review last-minute adjustments to the maps. Paul Jarrett, Davidson County assistant fire marshal, said that on further review, only one of the corrections was needed. “We were able to determine through GPS coordination that the maps were in fact good,” Jarrett said. Nearly two years ago, the office of the state fire marshal found inconsistencies in maps of the county’s rural fire protection

See ACADEMY, Page 3

See MAPS, Page 3

Plans for Career Technical Academy progressing BY LISA WALL Editor

LEXINGTON — Davidson County Board of Education was updated on the progress on the proposed Career Technical Academy during Tuesday night’s monthly meeting. Ben Ross, Executive Director of Davidson Vision, and Barry Sink of the Piedmont Triad Partnership, informed the board of the headway made in developing the school, which is aimed at preparing chil-

dren for the work place of the future. “We need to be sure the pathways or curriculum we are teaching in career technical education are going to yield students five years from now who are fully equipped to deal with the challenges they are going to face in this changing economy,” Ross said. In 2005, after years of watching jobs in the manufacturing sector being lost, Davidson County Schools officials identified a need for training students for

Community Sponsor

jobs of the future. Recognizing that this is an issue facing more than just Davidson County, a committee was formed bringing on board officials and educators from four different counties — Davidson, Davie, Surry and Yadkin — along with eight school systems and two community colleges, to help bring the concept into fruition. This is the first such project in the state. “We concentrated on five industrial clusters that are most prevalent in the

Today’s Weather

Mostly Cloudy 79/62

Full Forecast Page 2

What’s Inside

Weather Focus Opinion Obituaries Sports Classifieds TV Listings

Thomasville, North Carolina • Your Town. Your Times.

2 3 5 6 7 12 14


2 – Thomasville Times – Thursday, September 10, 2009 Big Chair tulips

What’s happening?

Thomasville City Beautification Committee is taking orders for “Big Chair” tulip bulbs. The cost is 25 bulbs for $20; 50 bulbs for $35; 75 bulbs for $45; or 100 bulbs for $50. Make checks payable to City Beautification and mail to P.O. Box 368, Thomasville, N.C. 27361. Please include your name, address, phone number and email address. Deadline for ordering is Oct. 15. Delivery will be in November.

Hospice volunteer training Planter raffle

The City Beautification Committee is holding a raffle for a Pamela Crawford planter. The planters are the same as those recently installed at the Big Chair. Tickets are $1 each or six for $5, and the drawing will be held at Everybody’s Day. Proceeds will benefit the City Beautification Committee. See City Administration or a Beautification Committee member for tickets or purchase at Everybody’s Day.

Denton cruise in

There will be a cruise-in at Harrison Park in Denton Saturday from 9 a.m. until. Music will be provided by “Southern Justice.” Food will be available. For more information, contact Ronnie Harrison at 250-9525

Community Garden

Each Saturday from 8 a.m. until noon, volunteers will gather to work on a community garden to help feed needy families. The garden is located at 9 Memorial Park Drive on land owned by Thomasville Habitat for Humanity. Organizers are asking for volunteers in the community to assist in this endeavor. Anyone wishing to volunteer can park in the Thomasville Farmer’s Market parking lot and bring basic garden hand tools. Donations of tools, plants, seeds and money will be accepted. Organizers are planning on expanding the program to other sites throughout the city next year. For more information, contact Doug Gore at 476-8433.

Hospice of Davidson County will offer volunteer training for administrative and patient/family volunteers Sept. 22 – 24 from 1–5:00 p.m. Classes will be held at the agency Home Care & Administrative office located at 200 Hospice Way, Lexington. The training sessions are coordinated through the agency’s Support Services Department and will provide the necessary skills for volunteer opportunities in the administrative office, Home Care program, or The Henry Etta and Bruce Hinkle Hospice House. Areas for involvement include: office support, arts and crafts, fundraising, music, cosmetology, baking, reading and compassionate listening. To find out more about volunteer opportunities or to register for the September training session, contact Windy Cole-Hedrick, Volunteer Coordinator, at 336-474-2068 or whedrick@hospiceofdavidson.org.

Fire Prevention Week coloring contest Mighty Dollar and Thomasville Fire Department will be hosting the annual coloring contest for Fire Prevention Week. Copies of the Fire Safety Coloring Contest Form can be picked up at the Mighty Dollar at 856 Julian Ave. Entries must be returned in person to the Mighty Dollar by Sept. 23. Entries will be judged and winners will be put on display at the Mighty Dollar from Oct. 3-11. Only one entry per person is allowed. Entries will be judged on originality, color and creativity. Winners will be notified by phone. Contestants will be broken down into the following

age categories: 4 and under, 5-7, 8-10 and 11-13. First, second and third place winners in each category will receive a ribbon and gift bag. For more information, call Dolly Hulin of the Thomasville Fire Department at 475-5545 or Beverly Pierce of Mighty Dollar at 475-5082.

THS class reunion Thomasville High School Class of 1974 will have its 35th Reunion on Sept. 12 at Big Game Safari Steakhouse, 15 Laura Lane. Social hour will be from 7-8 p.m. For more information, contact Jerri Moore Murphy 476-4538.

Horse show The Humane Society of Davidson County will sponsor its sixth annual horse show sanctioned by the Piedmont Horseman’s Association on Saturday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. at Fox Den Farms, 2585 Jerusalem Road, Lexington. Rain date is Sept. 20. Fox Den Farms is located on Old Hwy. 64 East, 4 miles east of I 85. Turn right on Young Road, go 2 miles and turn left on Jerusalem Road, go .2 miles to top of hill to gray barn on left, turn left into driveway. Admission for the public is adults $2 and children under 12 free. Concessions will be available with all the proceeds going to the Humane Society. More than 1500 animals were helped last year. The public will enjoy a fun, inexpensive event while supporting the Humane Society. Bring yard chairs or blankets. The admission for showing horses is $7 for PHA members, $8 for nonmembers, and $10 for jackpot classes.

High school reunion The Denton High School classes of 1949 and 1950 will hold a joint reunion at the Classic Restaurant in Denton on Saturday, Sept. 12 at 6 p.m. Details have been mailed to each class member. For more information, call Jim Harrison at (704) 983-2186 or Mary Ruth Sheets (336) 357-2602.

Final Summer Music Stroll PACE of Thomasville announces the final installment of the Third Thursday

Music Stroll for Thursday Sept. 17 at 6:30 p.m. Performers will include local artist Scott Huffman and friends and Second Chance Bluegrass from Welcome. This will be an exciting combination for country and bluegrass music fans of all ages. The event is sponsored by Academy Eye Center, Dr Danford E Raymor and The Eye Care Clinic, Dr James S Pope. The Third Thursday Music Stroll was created to bring extra foot traffic to the downtown merchants, provide free entertainment to the community, and give local area artist an outlet to get noticed. PACE (People Achieving Community Enhancement) is a non-profit organization comprised of volunteer citizens and business people in Thomasville. This group of volunteers works towards the improvement of our community by identifying projects that will serve to enhance our city, with an emphasis on the downtown area. For more information contact David Yemm at 259-4522

Genealogy Jamboree

The Genealogical Society of Davidson County, Inc., will host its 1st Annual Genealogy Jamboree at the Robbins Recreation Center, 512 S. Hargrave Street in Lexington, NC on Saturday, Sep. 19 from 10 a..m - 3 p.m. The event is free to the public and will feature local societies, libraries, and individuals sharing genealogical and historical information they have compiled or collected with the public. Participation is thought from those who have researched their ancestral lines or historical items of interest. For more information, contact Belinda Rodgers at (336) 798-3537.

Seniors Day at the Fair

Seniors Day at the Davidson County Agricultural Fair will be Sep. 24 at the Davidson County Fair Ground. Admission is free for those 55 years and older. The fun begins at 9 a.m. There will be free drinks, snacks, door prizes, blood pressure checks, and health info. This event is sponsored by your Davidson County Department of Senior Services, “Senior Dynamics.”

Sept. 10, 2009

Thomasville Times Weather 7-Day Local Forecast

Weather Trivia Who developed the temperature scale?

Friday Partly Cloudy 83/64

Saturday Mostly Sunny 86/66

Sunday Mostly Sunny 84/64

Monday Partly Cloudy 80/65

Almanac Last Week High Day 77 Tuesday Wednesday 76 80 Thursday 86 Friday 88 Saturday 85 Sunday 82 Monday

Low Normals Precip 58 83/64 0.00" 56 83/64 0.00" 56 83/64 0.00" 59 82/64 0.00" 62 82/64 0.00" 64 82/63 0.00" 63 82/63 0.00"

In-Depth Local Forecast

Sunrise 6:59 a.m. 7:00 a.m. 7:00 a.m. 7:01 a.m. 7:02 a.m. 7:03 a.m. 7:03 a.m.

Last 9/11

Today we will see mostly cloudy skies with a slight chance of showers, high temperature of 79º, humidity of 69% and an overnight low of 62º. The record high temperature for today is 98º set in 1983. The record Average temperature . . . . . . .70.9º low is 41º set in 1956. Friday, skies will be partly Average normal temperature .73.1º cloudy with a high temperature of 83º, humidity of Departure from normal . . . . . .-2.2º 73% and an overnight low of 64º. Expect mostly Data as reported from Greensboro sunny skies Saturday with a high temperature of 86º.

Sunset 7:35 p.m. 7:33 p.m. 7:32 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 7:29 p.m. 7:27 p.m. 7:26 p.m. New 9/18

Moonrise 10:53 p.m. 11:49 p.m. No Rise 12:53 a.m. 2:04 a.m. 3:17 a.m. 4:31 a.m. First 9/25

Moonset 1:07 p.m. 2:12 p.m. 3:12 p.m. 4:05 p.m. 4:51 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 6:04 p.m.

UV Index 0-2: Low, 3-5: Moderate, 6-7: High, 8-10: Very High 11+: Extreme Exposure

Full 10/4

Lake Levels

City

Thursday Hi/Lo Wx

Friday Hi/Lo Wx

Saturday Hi/Lo Wx

Asheville Cape Hatteras Chapel Hill Charlotte Greenville Raleigh Wilmington Winston-Salem

78/58 79/73 80/63 82/62 80/66 81/64 83/67 79/61

79/57 81/73 85/65 84/63 84/67 85/66 83/69 83/63

79/61 83/74 86/66 86/66 88/68 86/67 84/69 85/64

t sh mc mc mc mc pc mc

t pc pc pc pc pc pc pc

Staff Writer Karissa Minn 888-3576 newsdesk@tvilletimes.com

Webmaster Zach Kepley 888-3631

Editor Lisa M. Wall 888-3590 editor@tvilletimes.com

Advertising Director Lynn Wagner 888-3545 lwagner@hpe.com

Circulation Director Daniel Pittman 888-3651 dpittman@hpe.com

Advertising Manager Elizabeth Hyde 888-3567 ehyde@hpe.com

Missed Delivery For missed papers, please call 888-3511 between 6 and 11 a.m. for delivery

Marketing Consultant Annissia Beal 888-3524/847-9832 abeal@hpe.com

Classified Advertising To place a classified or legal advertisement, please call 888-3555

Lake level is in feet. Lake Date Thom-A-Lex Sept. 8

Lake Level 1.5” above full pond R

All forecasts, data and graphics provided by Accessweather.com, Inc. © 2009. All rights reserved.

SUBSCRIBE TO THE TIMES 3 month $12 6 month $23 1 year $46 Name Address City, State, Zip Phone

Visit us on the Web at www.tvilletimes.com

pc pc s s pc s s s

Weather (Wx): cl/cloudy; fl/flurries; pc/partly cloudy; ra/rain; rs/rain & snow; s/sunny; sh/showers; sn/snow; t/thunderstorms; w/windy

Publisher Michael B. Starn 888-3655 mstarn@hpe.com

Staff Writer Eliot Duke 888-3578 duke@tvilletimes.com

0 - 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11+

Around the State Forecast

CONTACT US

Sports Editor Zach Kepley 888-3631 tvillesports@yahoo.com

Local UV Index

Precipitation . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.00" Normal precipitation . . . . . . .0.97" Departure from normal . . . . .-0.97"

Sun/Moon Chart This Week Day Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday

Tuesday Wednesday Isolated T-storms Isolated T-storms 75/61 78/62

Answer: In 1714, Gabriel Fahrenheit developed the scale.

Thursday Mostly Cloudy 79/62

?

Email

CALL: 888-3511


Thursday, September 10, 2009 – Thomasville Times – 3

FROM PAGE 1 ACADEMY From page 1 both a north and south campus to accommodate those enrolled. “One thing that is unique is that we are plugging into the growth clusters in our region,” Sink said. “We’re not only building our kids for the future, we’re building our community for the future.” Funding for the planning stages of the school has been made possible

through a $75,000 grant from Piedmont Triad Partnership. As progress on the school develops, officials look to seek funds from the American Recovery and Stimulus Package. Also during the meeting, Dr. Tony Peele, associate superintendent of human resources and administration, gave an update on hiring for the 2009-10 school year. According to Peele, the school system lost 58 positions since May of 2009 to help with the state’s call for a return of $3.1 mil-

MAPS From page 1 and fire insurance districts. Two districts were providing service to areas farther than the 5-mile limit, and there were several errors of overlapping or inadequate coverage areas. In June, commissioners decided to switch from rural fire protection districts to fire service districts, making it easier to alter the corresponding tax districts to reflect boundary changes. To draw the new boundaries, the county’s fire marshal office used GIS mapping instead of relying solely on natural landmarks. Some local citizens told commissioners that they were not happy with the new maps because they did not do anything to improve service. Robert Beeson said that he lives three-tenths of a mile from the Gumtree Fire Department, but he is served by the much farther Midway Fire Department. “I can stand in my backyard and see Gumtree Fire Department,” Beeson said. “I am in the Midway Fire District. Can somebody explain to me how they can give me service, when they are five miles away, better than the fire department that is three-tenths of a mile away?”

STABBING From page A5 is facing more serious charges, Rickard said. “The nature of the wounds, the incident and the assault were all factors in him being charged with attempted murder,” Rickard said. By the time police ar-

lion in funding. Superintendent Dr. Fred Mock noted that without the $5 million in stimulus funds for non-instructional support, the school system would be operating with more than $8 million less than in previous years. “Is there a stimulus package for next year?” Mock questioned. “If it’s not, there will be many tough decisions to make for the 2010-11 and 2011-12 school years.” Editor Lisa Wall can be reached at 888-3590, or at editor@tvilletimes.com.

Donna Willard, a retired member of the Gumtree department, displayed a petition with more than 50 signatures of community members who wanted to change their fire district from Midway to Gumtree. She said that they have experienced slow response times from Midway, when even a minute or two is critical in an emergency situation. Midway Fire Chief Mike Craft said that response time is determined by more than just location — call volume and available staff also affect it. Even if a department is a short distance away from a structure “as the crow flies,” there may not be a fast or direct way for fire trucks to get there. Commissioners assured those who spoke that they heard their concerns, but could not alter the maps easily or quickly to address them all. First, they needed to get the tax districts in line with the insurance districts — which already have been changed — and correct the errors in the previous maps. “Tonight, to me, is just the first step of an ongoing process,” Don Truell said. “The first thing we’ve got to do is take that big step and try to coincide all of these fire district lines.” Commissioner Billy Joe Kepley cast the sole dissenting vote, saying that the county needed to consider response time, not just distance, in the creation of its fire service districts.

rived at the scene, Routh had fled and was later found at his residence. As of Tuesday, Routh was still in custody after being issued a $500,000 secured bond. He is scheduled to appear in court on Oct. 9. Rickard didn’t want to comment on the nature

Your Town. Your Times. Subscribe today! 888-3511

Trunk Show Friday, September 11 & Saturday, September 12

709 Randolph Street, Thomasville 476-9220 • Open Monday through Saturday

of the disagreement but said that alcohol may have been a factor. The two were at a party of a third person. Staff Writer Eliot Duke can be reached at 888-3578, or at duke@tvilletimes. com.

EDC changes policy on business incentives BY ELIOT DUKE Staff Writer WALLBURG — Steve Googe, Director of the Davidson County Economic Development Commission, paid Wallburg a visit Tuesday night at the monthly town council meeting to discuss a new plan that he hopes will spur growth in the area. In a closed session, Googe told council members the EDC is considering changing guidelines that will make the county more business friendly when it comes to offering incentives. Under existing guidelines, the EDC primarily focuses on incentives for companies that invest at least $1 million toward a project. If Googe’s proposal goes through, new or existing businesses will be eligible for incentives with an investment of at least $50,000, making Davidson County a more viable option to prospective companies. “What we’re saying to a company that may consider moving here is that if you’re a small business and you’re going to invest less than $1 million, last year we wouldn’t have given you the time of day,” Googe said. “We would’ve helped find a site, but as far as incentives, we wouldn’t be interested in participating. With this, we will participate with you as long as you invest $50,000 or more. We think it will at least give us an opportunity to be noticed by some of the folks who ordinarily wouldn’t pay us any attention.” Googe said the new format will lessen the loopholes a company has to jump through, and the

visit to Wallburg was part of his effort to get smaller communities on board who may not have known what their options are when it comes to attracting new businesses. “I am the original hoop jumper,” said Googe. “A lot of times in what I do, I’ll go talk to one group and they’ll say yes we’ll be supportive of that idea. I’ll go to another and they’ll say they’re not interested. What we’re asking them to do is at least buy into the concept so we have a unified front and we can market the county equally in all areas.” In other news: • Council members presented its 2009 Business of the Year Award to NewBridge Bank located at 10335 N.C. Highway 109. “We’re very proud to be part of this community,” Branch Manager Rick Byrd said. “It’s a pleasure being here and we appre-

ciate all the support we get from the community. It’s a great partnership.” • Council members passed a zoning ordinance revision that allows a homeowner to determine where their street frontage should be located. Planning and Zoning Director Dean Coe said a majority of people prefer to place their building or house towards the front of their lot. This change makes its easier for landowners to meet established building offsets and lessen government restrictions. • Conceptual drawings for the new town hall will be available later this month, according to Davidson County Purchasing Director Dwayne Childress, who was brought in to help with the construction. Childress said the architect has laid out plans for office layout, the building of the land, spatial relationships and the parking lot.

There’s never been a better time to

make your move.

Smiles come naturally when you live the carefree, comfortable life. Start Living Well Every Day at Providence Place.

Act Now and your second month is RENT FREE.

GOOD

1765 Westchester Drive, High Point | 336.888.4564

www.providenceplacenc.com


4 – Thomasville Times – Thursday, September 10, 2009

FOCUS Fleming receives Eagle Scout Award How to have a killer garage sale TIMES STAFF REPORT

MARY HUNT Syndicated Columnist

COURTESY PHOTO

Jacob Patrick Fleming, 17, of Thomasville, was recently honored with his Eagle Scout Award.

BUSINESS

EQ points the way TaylorMade

MARILYN TAYLOR Business Columnist

On Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2009, President Obama addressed the nation’s school children through a televised speech delivered during the school day. His apolitical message was to use what you have to discover who you are and what you would like to be, and then work hard to become that person. His personal story may have resonated with those who know they have strikes against them or some difficulties ahead. I guess that would be, uh, everyone. Also implicit within his speech was the idea that we don’t all have the same gifts, but we are all gifted in unique ways. This is an important tenet of personal responsibility. Each individual has to see herself as gifted or “able� in order to be willing to put forth effort. The “Yes, We Can� premise of the campaign, (which incidentally, proved true in this case) holds here for every child in America. In diverse ways, we can work hard, achieve and contribute something to the greater good. While a strong IQ score may provide a window for academic achievement, we know that it is

no guarantee for success. The old fashioned qualities of early rising, (The early bird gets the worm), hard work (Hard work never killed anyone), and personal honesty (If you don’t know — ask) were espoused by Obama as essential in this new fashioned economy. All children can develop them, particularly with help from teachers, mentors and family. With encouragement from the highest office, children heard the message to be persistent, overcome their circumstances, and make a difference in the world. Let’s review some of the points from today’s lesson: Explore and discover who you are. Work hard to develop your skills, talents and abilities. Don’t let failures stop you. Does any of this sound like “self awareness?� What about “self mastery?� How about “self motivation?� Yes, the first three pillars of EQ (Emotional Intelligence) that were introduced in last week’s column resound loudly here. No question that emotional intelligence competencies play a big role in school and workplace success. Was this a lesson for the younger generation? When we participate in new learning activities, exercises, or even field trips, we can become

3IMON*EWELERSISBUYINGYOUROLD STYLESANDBROKENJEWELRY #ONVERTITEMSYOUARENOTWEARING INTOCASHORRECEIVEEVENMORETO TRADEINTONEWJEWELRYYOUCANENJOY

469737

3TOPINTODAY NOAPPTNECESSARY 6ALIDDRIVERSLICENSEREQUIRED 2ECEIVEMOREFORYOURGOLDAT

3IGNATURE*EWELRYFOR,IFETIME#ELEBRATIONS .-AIN3TREET (IGH0OINTs   -ON &RIAM PMs3ATAM PM WWWSIMONJEWELERSCOM

Taylor Training & Development, Inc. has provided team development in this region for 18+ years. Team tools include EDGE 360, TKI, CPI 260, the Enneagram and the MyersBriggs Type Indicator. Marilyn Taylor is the owner of Taylor Training and a certified coach/corporate trainer with the Boston Coaching Company, home of PaperRoom System for Coaching. For more information, contact Marilyn at taylortrain@lexcominc. net or 336.249.3194. You may visit on the web at www.taylortrain.com.

Day Care Center 719 Fisher Ferry St. Thomasville, NC 475-0721

Call 472-9500 to make it work for you!

Your Town. Your Times.

BREAKFAST Saturday September 12, 2009 7 - 10 am $6 Adults $2 Under 12 Country Ham, Sausage, Bacon, Eggs, Grits, Stewed Apples, Gravy, Homemade Biscuits, Coffee, Juice, Tea and Soft Drinks

BETHEL UMC FELLOWSHIP HALL 508 Fisher Ferry St., Thomasville

Burglar • Fire • Security Cameras • Access Control • Medical Panic

=HFG9BELBH

Our Family Protecting Your Family

CONSIGNMENT

12 W. Guilford St., Thomasville (across from the police station)

No AGE Limit

(336) 476-4357

• Educated Staff • Rediness for Kindergarten • Free Registration • Free Activities • Breakfast/Lunch • Afternoon Snack Furnished Vouchers Welcome Hours 6am - 5:30 pm Take to & from area schools Serving Thomasville for over 40 years Four Star Child Care License 483936 ----

Mary Hunt is the founder of www.DebtProofLiving.com and author of 18 books, including her latest, “Can I Pay My Credit Card Bill With a Credit Card?� You can e-mail her at mary@ everydaycheapskate. com, or write to Everyday Cheapskate, P.O. Box 2135, Paramount, CA 90723. To find out more about Mary Hunt and read her past columns, please visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.

United Methodist Women’s

Kids R Our Business Early Education Makes A Difference

“EBOOKS,� and follow the downloading instructions. You’ll be minutes from having all the information you need to create your successful sale. If you rather would pay by check, send $4.95, along with your e-mail address, to “Have a Killer Garage Sale,� co Paul and Marissa Osborne, 6773 Township Rd. 55, Alger, OH 45812. Once your payment clears, Paul and Marissa will send the PDF file of the e-book to your e-mail address. Good luck, and be sure to let me know how it goes!

If you’re reading this, advertising works!

482327

KID CITY 'OLDAND0LATINUM PRICESAREHIGH

more self aware at any age. When we exercise good self discipline, pushing ourselves to do what must be done even when we don’t want to, we inch a little closer to managing ourselves well. Although self motivation is the goal, we may have gotten a little help Tuesda from an unlikely source — the President’s lunch hour address to kids across our land.

Whether your goal is to purge your home of stuff you no longer need or to raise some cash — or both — you have options. You can sell your items on an auction Web site, such as eBay, list them in the classifieds or on Craigslist, or just give the stuff away through your local chapter of The Freecycle Network. Another option is to hold a killer garage sale that turns all of your stuff into cold, hard cash! Don’t assume that a great garage sale just happens. The secret is to have a strategy and a plan. It wouldn’t hurt to have help from someone who knows how to put the “killer� in a garage sale. You’re in luck today because I’ve found that “someone.� Paul and Marissa Osborne of Alger, Ohio, are garage sale experts. Their most recent sale was attended by more than 350 people and brought in nearly $1,800 — in the rain! After 25 years of suc-

cessful garage sales, Paul and Marissa decided to share strategies that they have developed that will excite you, inspire you and help you have the most fulfilling (and pocket-filling) garage sale ever. They’ve written down every step, every trick and every technique they use in a wonderful e-book, “Have a Killer Garage Sale! And live to tell about it.� The 24-page digital booklet is not only jampacked with specific information but also a really fun read. This is a killer resource, for sure! From the specifics of planning to gathering items for a sale, getting organized and picking out the perfect day and time, the Osbornes share everything they know. Paul, a graphic designer by trade, believes that advertising your sale is the key to its success. He gives specific steps for how to get the best advertising for the least amount of money and how to make signs that will attract buyers, not litter up the neighborhood. “Have a Killer Garage Sale� covers planning, staying legal, getting organized, pricing your items, advertising, setting up the sale, displaying merchandise, collecting the dough and even preparing for the worst, e.g., rain! To purchase this ebook for $4.95, go to www. podesign.com. Once you are there, click on

BIG SIDEWALK SALE Thursday, Friday & Saturday

Serving the Triad for over 37 Years! ( Family Owned ( No Contract Required ( Many Options To Choose From ( Free Estimates ( 24 Hour Local Monitoring ( Low Monthly Monitoring Rates 477086 444101

Jacob Patrick Fleming, Age 17, received his Eagle Scout Award on Aug. 31, 2009. As his Eagle Scout Service Project, he designed, secured funding for, and supervised the construction of a kindergarten playground at Thomasville Primary School. Fleming is a member of Troop 104, Fairgrove United Methodist Church in Thomasville, and is Senior Patrol Leader of his troop. He attends Thomasville Senior High School, where he is an Honor Student He is the son of David and Cindy Fleming of Thomasville. The Scoutmaster of Troop 104 is Jim Elliott.

EVERYDAY CHEAPSKATE


Thursday, September 10, 2009 – Thomasville Times – 5

OPINION

Thomasville Times MICHAEL B. STARN Publisher mstarn@hpe.com • LYNN WAGNER Advertising Director lwagner@hpe.com

LISA M. WALL Editor editor@tvilletimes.com • ZACH KEPLEY Sports Editor tvillesports@yahoo.com

Respect and responsibility VIEWPOINT

SUSAN ESTRICH Syndicated Columnist

The gifted woman who headed my children’s elementary school, Reveta Bowers, always said that teaching kids values was as important as teaching them skills. Maybe more, I have come to believe, as my children got older. Facts are easily forgotten; what isn’t is the determination you show in learning them, the responsibility you take in trying. The values we teach our children, at home, at school, at our places of worship, are what will hopefully stand them in good stead as the challenges get bigger and harder. Learning to work hard, get along with others, accept failure, redouble your effort — that’s what school is about, as much as sine and cosine; learning to accept responsibility and show respect is critical to every other lesson. It should come as no surprise to anyone that these are the things the president talked about in his address to the nation’s school children Tuesday. There was no partisanship in the speech, nor was there any reason to expect there would be. There was no call to pass a government option for health care or support gay marriage or grow up and register Democrat. Even some of the president’s harshest critics admitted, after the fact, that the speech was entirely appropriate and inspirational. So why did they make such a fuss beforehand? Why have we been “treated” to days of conservatives clamoring that the president

had no business addressing the nation’s schoolchildren on the first day of school? How is it that conservatives have allowed their own antipathy for the president to subvert the values we should be teaching our children? Take respect for the presidency. I would have thought that was a very conservative value. As a matter of fact, I can’t tell you how many times I heard conservatives attacking liberals for not showing respect for President George W. Bush, and rightly so. So why not this president? Last week, Jim Greer, the chairman of the Florida Republican Party, attacked the president’s planned speech, accusing the president of trying to “indoctrinate America’s children to his socialist agenda.” Today, after he read the speech, he admitted that it was a “good speech” and speculated that maybe the president changed it because of him. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Now what is the lesson you’ve taught America’s children? Show no respect for the president. Assume the worst. Do no wait for facts. Attack first, verify later. Go for the jugular. Not educate but “indoctrinate.” Not Democratic but “socialist.” When you turn out to be wrong, don’t admit it. Don’t apologize. Instead, take credit. Even if you have absolutely no facts to suggest that your smears had anything to do with the speech, say it’s because of you that it was a good speech. Got that: First you attack, smear and lie; then you take credit for the fact that what never was going to happen didn’t happen. Conservative? Not in my book. To find out more about Susan Estrich and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com.

A free press is an ugly press VIEWPOINT

DAVID HARSANYI Syndicated Columnist Why did The Associated Press — and newspapers across the country — run the controversial and disturbing images of an American Marine dying in Afghanistan? The AP said it was “to make public an image that conveys the grimness of war and the sacrifice of young men and women fighting it.” It succeeded. Fortunately, we are not a nation of trembling children powerless to discern between news and exploitation. And it is, despite the anger surrounding the AP’s decision, the job of the press to offer citizens a glimpse — albeit slight, in this case — of the war they cover. When photographer Julie Jacobson was patrolling with a Marine unit that came under attack in southern Afghanistan, 21-year-old Lance Cpl. Joshua Bernard was hit with a rocket-propelled grenade and died of his injuries. Embedded, Jacobson had photos of the unit prior to the attacks, of Bernard’s death, of the evacuation and of the memorial service Bernard’s fellow Marines held for him after his death. She did her job admirably. Yet Sarah Palin, echoing

the blistering condemnation of some conservatives and others, called the move a “heartless and selfish decision to turn its back on the wishes of a grieving family in order to exploit the tragic death of a true American hero.” U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates wrote a “scathing” letter to Tom Curley, president and CEO of the AP, bemoaning his “lack of compassion and common sense” and “judgment and common decency” for defying “the family’s wishes.” When looking at the photo series, “Death of a Marine,” I felt a heightened respect for the gravity of war. The pictures unquestionably added humanity and context to Bernard’s death. Now, if I could recall a wanton penchant of the press to run photos of dead Marines, my reaction might have been very different. It is also conceivable, of course, that I’m a callous journalist, willing to set aside all decency to quench my baser voyeuristic instincts. There is an undeniable emotional component to these pictures that can’t be disregarded. It is unfathomable to imagine the anguish the Bernard family must feel. Yet the awful reality remains. As cruel as it sounds, those concerns should not guide the journalist’s decision-making process; the press can’t be solely beholden to notions of decency or compassion — subjective, as they are in most cases — when it has a duty to follow a story wherever it goes. Whether the mainstream press has abdicated this obligation in certain circumstances is a matter of useful

discussion (unquestionably, the AP’s cowardly refusal to distribute the Muhammad cartoons in 2006 for fear of upsetting some Muslims was a perfect example of this surrender), but trying to limit the media’s capacity to cover war is no way to make it more accountable. It was only recently that the Pentagon finally rescinded the misguided restriction on the media’s ability to photograph military caskets, overturning the ban instituted by President George H.W. Bush at the time of the Gulf War. Our delicate constitutions can handle the debate over war. Obviously — at the risk of dropping a massive cliche on readers — the troops exist to defend the First Amendment and things like it, as ugly as they may find the results. There is now some question as to whether the agreement with the AP stipulated next-of-kin permission to publish pictures of deceased or wounded military personnel. That issue should be investigated. But on the debate over the substance of these pictures, the press has one overriding question to ask: Do the photos help citizens better understand the story of the war in Afghanistan? Obviously, they do. David Harsanyi is a columnist at The Denver Post and the author of “Nanny State.” Visit his Web site at www.DavidHarsanyi.com. To find out more about David Harsanyi and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.

‘Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances’ — First Amendment United States Constitution

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR All letters should include name, address and daytime phone number. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Letters should be no more than 400 words, unless otherwise approved by editor. Limited to one letter every 30 days. All letters are subject to editing.

EMAIL: Editor@tvilletimes.com FAX: 888-3632 MAIL: Letters to the Editor Thomasville Times 210 Church Ave. High Point, N.C. 27262

EDITORIALS All unsigned editorials are the consensus of Editor Lisa Wall and Sports Editor Zach Kepley


6 – Thomasville Times – Thursday, September 10, 2009

FUTURE

OBITUARIES

From page 1

Club, using charts and graphs to illustrate various trends. The county maintained its 2007 ranking of 14th in the state for population, with an estimated population of 158,166, and all three school systems had increases in enrollment. Property tax revenue, which makes up 47 percent of the county’s total revenue, increased for the second year in a row by $11.3 million. Between 2000 and 2008, the county’s tax revenues increased by $26.9 million, or 67.33 percent. The county’s labor force grew from 2004 to 2007, then declined by 2,764 in 2008. Unemployment rates over the past decade were as low as 3.3 percent in 2000 and as high as 7.3 percent in 2008. The county ranked seventh in the state last year for the number of jobs announced, with four new industries bringing in 115 jobs and 71 existing industries adding 14,48 workers. “It doesn’t help to be unemployed and see that, but we at least know that what we’re doing is the right thing,” Googe said. The total number of new single-family homes constructed was cut in half in 2008 compared to 2007, from 876 to 470. Residential home sales showed a less drastic drop, from 2,100 to 2,045. From 1998 to 2008, foreclosures have increased by 696, or 436 percent, giving Davidson County a rank of 14th in the state for the number of foreclosures last year. The county currently averages about 74 foreclosures a month. Also speaking was Dale Moorefield, deputy director for the Davidson County Department of Social Services, who said that there is increased demand for the agency’s economic services programs. Moorefield said that since 2002, there has been a 142 percent increase in the number of people receiving food and nutrition services, also known as food stamps. In the past two years, the amount of benefits paid though this program has gone up by 49 percent, from $1.5 million as of July 2007 to $2.9 million as of July 2009. The number of people receiving Medicaid benefits also has risen by 86 percent from 2000 through 2009. “Most of it has to do with the fact that more people are participating in the programs than ever before,” Moorefield said. Pat Hillard, manager of the Employment Security Commission office in Lexington, spoke about the challenges her agency has faced during this recession. She said that by the end of August, the North Carolina ESC borrowed $900 million from the federal government to pay unemployment benefits. They continue to borrow at a rate of $60 million a week. The county unemployment rate has doubled since 2007 to a current rate of 13.5 percent. A number of large layoffs caused the increase, but Hillard said that new employers like Atrium Windows and ASCO in Welcome are bringing a significant number of jobs back to the county. Others are rehiring at a slow but steady pace. “We’re not seeing large numbers as we saw jobs going, but we are starting to see employers rehire,” Hillard said. “We are starting to see people getting replaced, and that, to me, is a good sign.”

Index Thomasville Sherry Helmick, 62 Herbert Ray Mainor, 79 Lexington Roy Barr, 62 Dorothy Bates, 89 Helen Beavers, 80 Ruth Hutchins Miller, 92 Bill Smith, 82 Other Areas Dean Cavanaugh, 51 Betty Hunt, 65 J.C. Lanier, 86 Lewis S. Little, 63 Bobby Potts, 69

Roy Barr LEXINGTON — Roy Austin Barr, 62, of Oakdale Street in Lexington, died Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2009, at his home after losing a two-year battle with cancer. Funeral service will be held at 2 p.m. Friday at Davidson Funeral Home Chapel, conducted by the Revs. Gary Foster and Max Shoaf. Burial will follow in Forest Hill Memorial Park. The family will receive friends from 6-8 p.m. today at Davidson Funeral Home and other times at the home. Memorials may be made to Davidson County Cancer Services in Lexington. Online condolences may be made at www.davidsonfuneralhome.net.

Dorothy Bates LEXINGTON — Dorothy Huck Bates, 89, of East Old Highway 64, died Monday, Sept. 7, 2009, at Lexington Health Care. Funeral service will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday at Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses with George Hurd officiating. There will be no visitation. Online condolences may be made at www.davidsonfuneralhome.net.

Helen Beavers LEXINGTON — Helen Linville Beavers, 80, of Lexington Health Care, formerly of East 10th Avenue in Lexington, died Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2009, at Lexington Health

Care. Helen was born Nov. 8, 1928, in Guilford County, to Julius Saunders Linville and Nettie Lithicum Linville. She was a retired employee of Stanley Furniture and a member of Second Presbyterian Church. Funeral service will be held at 1 p.m. Friday at Second Presbyterian Church, with the Revs. Kurt W. Johnston and Bill Sosebee officiating. Burial will follow at Forest Hill Memorial Park. The family will receive friends from 6- 8 p.m. today at Davidson Funeral Home. Memorials may be directed to Alzheimers Disease and Related Disorders Association in Charlotte. Online condolences may be made at www.davidsonfuneralhome.net.

Dean Cavanaugh GERMANTON — J. Dean Cavanaugh, 51, of Germanton, died Friday, Sept. 4, 2009. Cavanaugh was born May 13, 1958, a son of Johnny James Cavanaugh and Carolyn Gardner Cavanaugh. He retired after 25 years of employment from R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. Funeral service was held at 7 p.m. Wednesday at Bethlehem Church with the Rev. Aaron Long officiating. J.C. Green & Sons Funeral Home Wallburg Chapel, 10301 North N.C. Highway 109 in Winston-Salem, is in charge of arrangements. Memorials may be directed to a charity of the donor’s choice. Online condolences may be made to the Cavanaugh family at www.jcgreenandsons. com.

Sherry Helmick Sherry Ann Ruble Helmick, 62, of 7029 Wright Road, died Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2009, at her residence. Helmick was born Jan. 8, 1947, in Paintsville, Ky., a daughter of Paul Ruble and Marcella Maggard Ruble. She was a retired employee from the federal court as a court recorder. Private services for Helmick will be conducted. J. C. Green and Sons Funeral Home is assisting the family. Online condolences may be sent to the Helmick family at www.jc-

Herbert Ray Mainor

greenandsons.com.

Betty Hunt DENTON — Betty Ann Kindley Hunt, 65, of 287 Seeley Drive, died Sunday, Sept. 6, 2009, in Thomasville Medical Center. Hunt was born Dec. 2, 1943, in Davidson County, daughter of Leon Kindley and Bertha Rider Kindley. She was formerly employed with Burlington Industries and was a member of Clarksbury United Methodist Church, where she served as the church pianist. Funeral service will be held at 4 p.m. today in Clarksbury United Methodist Church with the Rev. Chris Sheffield and Mr. Frank Bibus officiating. Interment will be in the church cemetery. Memorials may be directed to Clarksbury United Methodist Church in Thomasville. Online condolences may be sent to the Hunt Family at www.jcg reenandsons. com.

J.C. Lanier WELCOME — John Claude Lanier Jr., 86, of Welcome Bethesda Road, died Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2009, at Hinkle Hospice Home. Funeral service will be held at 2 p.m. Friday at Center United Methodist Church with the Rev. Dr. Stephen Pillsbury officiating. Burial will follow in the church cemetery. Online condolences may be made at www.davidsonfuneralhome.net.

Lewis S. Little WADESBORO — Lewis S. Little, 63, of 10400 John Price Road in Charlotte, died Saturday, Sept. 5, 2009, at his residence. Surviving are two aunts, Mittie Little and Louise LuAllen, both of Thomasville. Funeral service will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday at Smith Funeral Home in Wadesboro. Burial will be at Deep Creek Baptist Church in Wadesboro. Visitation will be from 1:30 to 2 p.m. Saturday in Smith’s Chapel.

Herbert Ray Mainor, 79, of Thomasville, died Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2009, at the Hospice Home in High Point. Mainor was born Nov. 30, 1929, in Loudon, Tenn., a son of James Walter Mainor and Josie Marie Akins Mainor, who preceded him in death. He retired from Thomasville Furniture Industries in 1992 after 35 years, and he was of the Baptist faith. Funeral service was held at 6 p.m. Wednesday in the chapel of J.C. Green and Sons Funeral Home in Thomasville, with the Revs. Kenneth Evans and Jeff Dawkins officiating. Burial will be at 11 a.m. today at Floral Garden Park Cemetery. Memorials may be made to the Hospice of the Piedmont in High Point.

Ruth Hutchins Miller LEXINGTON — Ruth Hutchins Miller, 92, of Carolina House of Lexington, formerly of Quail Ridge Court, died Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2009, at the nursing facility. Funeral service was held at 2 p.m. Wednesday at Forest Hill Memorial Park, with the Revs. Tommy Wilson and Dr. Ray Howell III officiating. The family will receive friends at the home of Nancy and Gordon Wright on Twin Acres Drive in Lexington. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Hospice of Davidson County in Lexington or Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center in Durham. Online condolences may be made at www.davidsonfuneralhome.net.

held at 2 p.m. Saturday at Davidson Funeral Home Chapel. Burial will follow in Sandy Creek Cemetery. The family will receive friends from 6-8 p.m. Friday at the funeral home and other times at the home on Swicegood Road. Memorials may be made to Hospice of Davidson County or Davidson County Cancer Services in Lexington. Online condolences may be made at www.davidsonfuneralhome.net.

Bill Smith

LEXINGTON – William Gerald Smith, 82, of Woodcrest Drive in Lexington, died Sunday, Sept. 6, 2009, in Forsyth Medical Center after four years of declining health. Smith was born Oct. 23, 1926, in Davidson County, to Fred R. Smith and Mary Leonard Smith. He was a retired owner and operator of Bill Smith Paint Store, a member of First Reformed United Church of Christ and a veteran of the U.S. Army during World War II. There will be no service. Davidson Funeral Home is serving the family. Online condolences may be made at www.davidsonfuneralhome.net.

Bobby Potts LINWOOD — Bobby Windell Potts, 69, of Swicegood Road, died Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2009, at his home following an extended illness. Potts was born March 14, 1940, in Davidson County, to Walter Gray Potts and Sally Lou Towe Potts. He was retired from maintenance at PPG. Funeral service will be

10301 North N.C. 109 Winston-Salem Wallburg Area 769-5548

PASSAGES A Pictorial history of High Point

MARRIAGE LICENSES July 13-17 Donald Ray Hunt Jr., 27, of Thomasville, to Jessica Lynn Fields, 27, of Thomasville. Mickey Wayne Jordan, 28, of Lexington, to Ashley Dawn Jones, 26, of Lexington. Mitchell Lee Lawson, 24, of Denton, to Tiffany Nicole Watkins, 22, of Denton. Michael Todd Ball, 43, of Loganville, Ga., to Melissa Cheryl Hunt, 43, of Thomasville, Justin Chase Decker, 22, of Lexington, to Amber Dawn Berrier, 22, of Lexington. Craig Charles Stevens, 34, of High Point, to Stephanie Marie, Sharpe, 31, of High Point. Christopher Anthony Jordan, 21, of Lexington, to Margaret Elizabeth Bailey, 22, of Lexington. Dwight Shawn Truitt, 34, of Lexington, to Daniela Faye Arnold, 39, of Lexington. Todd Steven Perry, 27, of Lexington, to Kylie

Elena Echerd, 29, of Lexington. Christopher Darin Routh, 37, of Thomasville, to Regina Gail Pais, 39, of Thomasville.

Thomasville Times

Only 2 more weeks at this price -

Order your book today!

Periodicals Postage Paid Thomasville, N.C. USPS 628-080 ISSN 1068-1523 Published Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday Mornings By the Thomasville Times PO Box 1009/210 Church St.

High Point, NC 27261 Postmaster: Send address changes to the above address All carriers, dealers, distributors are independent contracted agents (not employees) of the Thomasville Times. All subscriptions are due and payable in advance prior to the fifth (5th) of each month. When paying in advance for more than one month, we suggest that payment be made to this office where it will be held in escrow and credited monthly to your carrier’s account. The Thomasville Times will not be responsible for advance payments made to any carrier, dealer, or distributor exceeding one (1) month.

Subscription Rates Home Delivery Office Pay In Advance

1 Mo. -

Carrier Collect

4.00

By Mail

4.77

3 Mos.

6 Mos. 12 mos.

12.00

23.00

14.33

e Available for th of n blicatio price Special pre-pu

$

.95

29

46.00

-

-

28.66

57.32

Miss your paper? We certainly hope not. However, if your carrier should err, please call (336) 472-9500 or 1-800-933-5760. For missed copy delivery to the city of Thomasville, please call prior to 9:00 A.M. T275692

Order now and SAVE $10 off the post-publication price of $39.95!


THOMASVILLE TIMES

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2009

Tough loss to take

Sports

DCCC volleyball lets a win get away to Wake Tech. See Story Below

7

tvillesports@yahoo.com

Dog fight set for Friday night BY ZACH KEPLEY

WEEK 4 SCHEDULE

Sports Editor

CALENDAR TODAY VOLLEYBALL Guilford Tech @ DCCC 6 p.m. VOLLEYBALL Ledford @ N. Davidson 5:30 p.m. GOLF Ledford @ No. Guilford 4 p.m.

Thomasville head coach Allen Brown is not about to start hitting the panic button, and for good reason. Yes, the Bulldogs are 1-2 to start the season and yes, another loss is possible this week against Albemarle. But the way Brown sees it, the teams they are losing to will be state title contenders at season’s end, and he hopes the experience learned through the grueling nonconference schedule will result in positive things to come when conference play rolls around. He just hopes his players will hang in there and understand they can be a great football team. “We are getting better here and there, but the big obstacle to overcome is the discouragement that goes with getting beat and the lack of confidence that comes with that,” Brown said. Last week against Kannapolis Brown,

Albemarle Bulldogs @ Thomasville Bulldogs Cushwa Stadium 7:30 p.m. E. Davidson Golden Eagles @ SW Randolph Cougars SW Randolph HS 7:30 p.m. Thomasville was in control at halftime with a 28-14 lead. Twenty-four minutes later, the clock struck zero and the Wonders walked out with a 35-28 win. The breakdown had a lot to do with a tiring defense, but it was the lack of offensive production Brown was miffed about. “When we need offense, we aren’t getting it,” Brown said. “That is a sign of a team that is young and doesn’t know how to finish a game. Our running backs are working themselves to death and playing over their heads because we are not blocking people

the way we need to. We are making so many mistakes and it is just sad. The kids are trying and the coaches are trying, but we are not executing assignments.” A complete 360 will need to be done before Friday night as the 3-0 Albemarle Bulldogs come strutting into town. Albemarle has yielded only seven points through three games this year, and are hungry to get revenge after the defeat last fall. They have the type of offense that can wear defenses down by the second half with a rushing attack mixed with just enough pass. Running backs Rusty Parks and A.J. Little have combined for 730 rushing yards, albeit against lower quality teams. Quarterback Nate Dunlap has not been called on to pass much attempting only 15 passes, but he has been quite efficient completing eight of those for 176 yards and four touchdowns. “They can score handing it off and throw-

See FIGHT, Page 8

Storm lets one slip away to Tech

TENNIS Salisbury @ Ledford 4:30 p.m.

BY MATTHEW AMICK Times Correspondent

set points in hand leading 24-22, but never put another mark on the board with three errors to close. Leonard had her spike go into the net to tie it at 24, then Katie Watkins hit long and Leonard could not come up with the handle to give the set away. “I told them after that first game we have a team of superstars that are not playing as one,” Hammond said. “We need to get back to the basics and playing fundamental volleyball.” They listened, blistering the ball and blocking shots to win 25-16 in game two. The win in the third game put them one step away from defeating the Division I team, but errors would be their downfall. DCCC took what appeared to be a 8-5 lead as Whitley Saintsing stuffed a Wake Tech spike, but the Storm were ruled to have hit out of order, sending the point the other way. Trailing 21-20, two bad serves by Davidson gave Tech some breath-

The Golden Eagles of East Davidson will try to end their two-game losing streak as they travel to battle the Southwestern Randolph Cougars this Friday night. “It is going to be a tough football g a m e , they are a real p hy s i c a l team,” said Eagles head c o a c h B r y a n Lingerfelt Lingerfelt. East (1-2) lost against a formidable North Davidson squad last week, but are showing signs of improvement since last season. They held the Black Knights to fewer points and also managed to avoid being shutout. “It is going to be just like the North Davidson game and we are going to see if we have improved since that one,” said Lingerfelt. “The things that we need to correct can hopefully be corrected this week going into this game. “Southwestern (Randolph) has got a lot of returners on their offensive and defensive lines which will pose us a challenge against the style of play that we try to have,” Lingerfelt said. The young Eagle team will have to be ready for the Cougars experience and they will also have to step up and fill a crucial hole in their defense. “We lost our inside linebacker Dylan Robinson during the North game. He injured his knee and we don’t know how long he will be out,” said the Eagles coach. They are scrambling around to try and replace him and hope that Nathan Bundy, who plays inside on the JV can come up and make an impact by filling that void. Southwestern Randolph (2-1) is off to a good

See SLIP, Page 9

See PREPARE, Page 8

SOCCER Thomasville @ Wheatmore 6 p.m. Soccer W. Davidson @ Ledford 7 p.m.

FRIDAY FOOTBALL Albemarle @ Thomasville 7:30 p.m. FOOTBALL E. Davidson @ SW Randolph 7:30 p.m.

SATURDAY VOLLEYBALL DCCC vs Louisburg noon VOLLEYBALL DCCC vs Johnston CC 2 p.m.

MONDAY SOCCER Thomasville @ HP Andrews 6 p.m.

GAME REPORT DEADLINES: Monday-Friday 9 p.m. tvillesports@yahoo.com

Eagles prepare for Cougars

TIMES PHOTO/ZACH KEPLEY

Wake Tech’s Brittany Rasmussen sends a kill over the arms of Davidson’s Jessica Flynn (left) and Katie Watkins in the first set of Tuesday’s match won by the visiting Eagles. BY ZACH KEPLEY Sports Editor LEXINGTON — For the second consecutive home game, Davidson County Community College had to wait for its opponent to arrive Tuesday evening at Brinkley Gym. Head coach Kevin Hammond is still awaiting the arrival of his highly touted recruiting class. Wake Tech overcame a 2-1 deficit to steal a win in five sets, 26-24, 16-25, 23-25, 26-24, 15-12, as the Storm could not overcome an injury to one of its hard hitters, and the Eagles devised the perfect plan to stop the power attack of DCCC. Outside hitter Lauren Leonard went down with an ankle sprain in the third set with DCCC up 11-7. The Storm held on to win the set and go up 2-1, but the loss of Leonard on the outside took its toll as the Eagles won the final two games to beat Davidson for the second time this season. “You count on key players and you build your offense around certain people,” Hammond said.

TIMES PHOTO/ZACH KEPLEY

Storm outside hitter Logan Ballue hammers a kill down the line past Lauren Wall of Wake Tech. “Lauren has power in the left hand and when it is gone you have to go to the well and dig somewhere else. Our biggest problem, though, was we would lose momentum just as fast as we got it tonight, and that

is something we need to work on as a team.” The match could have easily ended in straight sets in favor of DCCC, but a letdown by the Storm allowed Wake Tech to jump ahead 1-0. DCCC (2-3) had two


8 – Thomasville Times – Thursday, September 10, 2009

SPORTS FIGHT

AREA SPORTS BRIEFS

From page 7 ing the ball,” said Brown. “Watching film of them we have not seen their punt formation and we have not seen a fumble, so that means they are scoring every time they get the ball. I am highly impressed with their efficiency in all areas.” Quin Riley has emerged as a quality option for Thomasville at tailback, rushing for 104 yards last week against Brown. Riley, Kesean Green and fullback Lawrence Thomas have given their all to compensate for the missed blocking assignments, and could have big games if the lineman and other offensive players can execute. Sam Nelson had a tough role to fill at the quarterback position and has competed fairly well. He has passed for 360 yards in three games, and has had much success finding his favorite target Brandon Lucas, who is up over 260 yards receiving. Brown had a tough time remembering the last time a Thomasville team lost three games in a row, and would prefer not to let it happen again. “It has been since the early 90s or somewhere around there last time we lost three straight, and I was getting sympathy cards from everywhere,” he joked. Both THS and AHS have won at least three state titles this decade, and have become fierce rivals over the years. But Brown hardly considers this to be a rivalry game. “Our biggest rival right now is Central Davidson, because it is the first conference game we have this season,” said Brown. “We are trying to survive all of this and get on to the one that really matters for us.” Sports Editor Zach Kepley can be reached at 888-3631, or at kepley@tvilletimes.com.

VOLLEYBALL Lady Panthers pick up two wins Ledford hosted rival East Davidson on Wednesday and waltzed to a 25-18, 25-21, 25-15 drubbing of the Eagles. Carmen Pericozzi had six kills and three blocks, Kaitlyn Otey nine blocks and four kills and Taylor Parks 11 service points. On Tuesday, the Lady Panthers beat Trinity in four games, 24-26, 25-19, 25-9, 25-19. Brittany Wiggins recorded 10 service points, Cady Ray 19 service points and 15 assists, Sara Persiani 14 kills and Stevie Williams eight digs and seven kills. Ledford improves to 81.

TIMES PHOTO/FRANK RAUCCIO

Thomasville quarterback Sam Nelson has done well this season passing for 360 yards thus far. Nelson and the Bulldogs entertain Albemarle Friday night at 7:30. Paid Advertisement

New Device Alleviates 83% of all Back Pain Back pain now the number one cause of missed work

CHARLOTTE, NC- Medicare is working with local medical supply companies to offer breakthrough new remedy for persons with chronic back pain. If Medicare is your primary insurance you may already qualify for this new home treatment that could eliminate the need for surgery. Medicaid and

RELAY FOR LIFE/OPEN ARMS CANCER SUPPORT GROUP

GENERAL Panthers tickets The Thomasville Parks and Recreation Department has a limited number of tickets available for the Carolina Panthers

Concealed Hangun classes There will be a concealed handgun class Sept. 12 at Fairgrove Fire Department and Sept. 26 at Pilot Fire Department. Both classes are from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. This class is mandatory for anyone wishing to get a concealed handgun permit. The classes are covered by Jason Livingston, N.C. certified firearms instructor and

See BRIEFS, Page 9

YOUR MONEY ISN’T. You may have given up your traditional job, but your retirement money still needs to work. To help ensure your retirement stays on track, you need a clear picture of your investments. Moving your accounts to Edward Jones can give you a more focused view, and having a single statement allows you to help make sure all your investments are working together. To learn why consolidating your retirement accounts to Edward Jones make sense, call your local financial advisor today. We’ll meet with you face to face to help you achieve your financial goals. Kevin H White Financial Advisor

September 18th & 19th

From page 7

Ledford took down East Davidson 25-23, 25-15 on Wednesday in Wallburg. Tori Griffits had eight service points and seven digs, while Molly Holbert had 12 points. On Tuesday, the Panthers beat Trinity 25-11, 25-19. Holbert had 10 service points and Haley Leonard had 12 points (seven aces). The junior Panthers are 7-0.

game on Dec. 6 against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. It is first come first serve. To secure tickets contact Tony Ingram at 4754280.

YOU’RE RETIRED.

2nd Annual Softball Tournament

PREPARE start and is coming off a dramatic comeback victory against North Moore, 34-22. The Cougars scored three touchdowns in the fourth quarter, with quarterback Butch Dunn giving his team the lead with a 40-yard scamper with only three minutes to play. Last year East Davidson lost on their home turf to Southwest Randolph 13-6. Coach Lingerfelt knows that his youthful team will have to play flawless football if they are going to have a chance going into enemy territory. “Well, we played Randleman on the road the first game of the year and we will try and prepare the same way,” said Lingerfelt. “We need to be ready for anything bad that goes against us and being on the road you just have to overcome those obstacles as they come. “We have got a long bus trip, but hopefully the bus will not wear us out and we just have to play our best and not make any mistakes,” Lingerfelt concluded.

many private insurance carriers also cover the cost. “This non surgical home procedure only takes minutes to apply, and treats even the most severe types of pain often alleviating years of suffering” says Chad McCain of TTI. Call the national hotline to be qualified. 1-800-526-8926.

LHS junior varsity sweeps two

1152 Randolph Street Suite C Thomasville, NC 27360 336-472-3527

Myers Park, Thomasville

$150 Entry Fee

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

1st, 2nd & 3rd Place Trophies Concessions available Contact Ella Bunting to register

336-475-1278

476321

Look Whoʼs Reading the Times! The Times provides its readers with local stories and community news.

YES!

Please deliver the Times to my home every day for the low price of $4.00 per month!

Name: Delivery Address:

Telephone: Check One:

My Check is enclosed for 13 weeks - $12 26 Weeks - $23

1 Yr. - $46

Customer Signature:

Thomasville Times Your Tri-Weekly Source For Community News

Brad Hoover, Carolina Panthers

210 Church Ave. High Point, NC

472-9500


Thursday, September 10, 2009 – Thomasville Times – 9

SPORTS

NASCAR Family Tree: The lineage of No. 5 NASCARMEDIA.COM DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Terry Labonte drove the No. 5 Kellogg’s Chevrolet to the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series championship in 1996 for Hendrick Motorsports. It was a somewhat surprising performance by a highly respected veteran who many considered past his prime. Sound familiar? Fastforward to the 2009 season and you’ll find Mark Martin, 50 years young and in the thick of championship contention after coming out of “semiretirement” to join the Hendrick organization. He’s taken the No. 5

Kello gg’s/CARQUEST Chevrolet to Victory Lane four times this year and is 12th in the series standings coming into Saturday night’s race at Bristol Motor Speedway. Clearly, it’s a good time to drive the No. 5 — again. Martin has returned the number and, of course himself, to prominence. In the process, he has joined an illustrious list of No. 5 drivers, a list that began back in 1949, the first season for NASCAR’s Strictly Stock Division, the forerunner of today’s NASCAR Sprint Cup Series. That season, Felix Wilkes, Frank Mundy and Ray Erickson all drove “5”

GETTY IMAGES

Veteran Mark Martin currently drives the No. 5 car in the Sprint Cup Series. cars. Cotton Owens drove the No. 5 in 1950, ’60, ’61

Cronkite was a racer NASCARMEDIA.COM Walter Cronkite, known world-wide as a newsman extraordinaire, had another kind of notoriety that not everyone is aware of; he was also a racer of note. A sports car aficionado, he co-drove winning cars for Art Riley Motors three times at Lime Rock Park — in 1957, ’58 and ’61. He competed in the 12 Hours of Sebring, in ‘59, finishing 40th in a Lancia, co-driving with fellows named Peter Baumberger and Walter

Rohlfs. And in ‘59, his skill sets merged. During a practice session, he was right behind a driver who crashed and died in an accident just short of Sebring’s infamous hairpin. Cronkite was first on the scene and took on the task of calling the driver’s family with a firsthand report, followed by heartfelt condolences. The driver’s wife fondly recalls Cronkite’s professional, yet comforting style on that phone call, to this day. Cronkite served as the

official announcer at Sebring for a number of years. He had crossover appeal, as well in the world of auto racing. He was the grand marshal for the 1959 Firecracker 250 — Daytona International Speedway’s first summer event, in the track’s first year of operation. He also drove the pace car at Daytona International Speedway, for the 1962 Daytona 500. He was a friend of NASCAR founder Bill France Sr. and other NASCAR stars through the years.

and ’64, putting the number – it was on a Pontiac at the time — in Victory

Lane for the first time on Aug. 16, 1960 at the Piedmont Interstate Fair-

BRIEFS

SLIP

From page 8

From page 7

16 years law enforcement experience. The classes cover laws for citizens governing the use of deadly force to protect their homes, as well as deadly force laws in general as they pertain to citizens of N.C. Also, gun safety, marksmanship and fundamentals are covered and practiced during the class, with hands on range time. To sign up for either class call Livingston at 6870290 or go by the respective fire department for date desired.

ing room and the mistakes were costly. A long rally later in the game finished by a Shannon Mayo tip tied the game at 24 apiece, but a Watkins hit sailed long and the Storm were unable to handle the serve to finalize the set for the guests. “If you can’t serve and pass, you are not going to win,” Hammond said. “I don’t care if it is middle school, high school or Olympics, it is not going to happen.” Wake Tech settled into a defense in the fifth set that took away the

grounds in Spartanburg, S.C. Geoffrey Bodine was in on the ground floor when Hendrick Motorsports debuted in NASCAR — and in the No. 5. He drove the memorable Levi Garrett-sponsored car for Hendrick from 1984-89, winning seven times, including the number’s most-famous Victory Lane appearance — at the 1986 Daytona 500. Labonte has the record for most starts (368) and victories (12) in the No. 5, between 1994-2004. And he also has the only series championship in the number’s history. Martin is working hard toward another.

strengths of DCCC, as they never trailed in the final game. “Unfortunately, they were in a perimeter defense and that is what you play in against a power team like ours,” said Hammond. “Every angle was covered on the floor.” Davidson will look to get back on track tonight against Division I Guilford Tech at home, before traveling to Louisburg for a tri-match this weekend that will also include Johnston Community College.

Sports Editor Zach Kepley can be reached at 888-3631, or at kepley@tvilletimes.com.

483320

Your Town. Your Times. what it really means...

483321

...family memories.

J Michael Fine Jewelry 11651-R North Main St., Archdale, NC • 27263 Archdale Commons Across from J Butlers

336-431-2450

GOLD NEWS METALS MARKET AT A 35 YEAR HIGH Clean Out The Old Jewelry Box And Convert Broken Or Out Of Style Jewelry to $DOLLARS$ PAYING TOP PRICE FOR GOLD, SILVER AND PLATINUM

WE BUY GOLD

u o thank yo t s te u in . m Eliot a few las t ted to take ady Eagles over the ds n a w t s ju I or eL erage of th and kind w for your cov eciate your suppor t Elizabeth ppr for e 3 years. I a ve kept a scrapbook lete . I hav a th h a I S . H h D c E u so m as an ach , her 4 years it, thanks to you , Z e f o h c a e r fo s in of th eat ar ticle easure all so many gr s. I know she will tr with her e em and the Tim mories and share th eday. e m som wonder ful and grandchildren ren own child erritt #43 Susan M of proud mom

CITY OF THOMASVILLE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The Thomasville City Council will hold a public hearing on September 21, 2009 at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers Room on the second floor of the Thomasville Police Department located at 7 West Guilford Street, Thomasville, NC. The purpose of this hearing is to receive citizen comments and questions regarding the submittal of an application for grant funds to the NC Department of Commerce. The City intends to submit the grant application for a $75,000 Utility Hook Up Grant. Upon funding the City intends to provide water and sewer connections for homes owned by low and moderate income owners. Persons with disabilities, non-English speaking persons or anyone who needs assistance to participate in this public hearing should notify the Thomasville City Clerk at 336-475-4214 at least forty-eight (48) hours prior to the meeting, or call the North Carolina Relay Number for the Deaf at 1-800-735-8262. 482638

The Thomasville Times is dedicated to bringing you news that affects YOUR life. YOUR TOWN. YOUR TIMES. Find out what it really means to you.


10 – Thomasville Times – Thursday, September 10, 2009 36-1 (09)

release dates: September 5-11

TM

Mini Spy . . .

Mini Spy and her friends are re-enacting Henry Hudson’s landing. 3EEIFYOUCANFINDsLEMONSLICEsLETTER$sNUMBER sBANANA sBROOM sGOLFCLUB sLADDER sFISH sWORD-).) sLETTER! sTOPHAT sRULER sCAT sPENCIL sBIRD sMUSHROOM sMANINTHEMOON sEXCLAMATIONMARK

© 2009 Universal Press Syndicate from The Mini Page © 2009 Universal Press Syndicate

His 1609 Voyage

Henry’s Hudson Henry Hudson made four voyages in search of a way to the Far East from Europe.

Can you imagine yourself as a young Native American boy or girl? You live on the East Coast of the United States in the early 1600s. Your family is part of a tribe called the Mohicans. For food, your family catches fish and birds. You grow vegetables and hunt for nuts and fruits. Sometimes you trade items with other tribes. Members of your tribe walk or use canoes on the rivers and ocean to move around.

1607 1608 1609 1610-11

Strange sight One day in early fall, as your family is storing foods to eat during the cold winter months, a ship arrives near your settlement. You’ve never seen a boat of this size. It’s about 85 feet long and 16 feet wide, and it’s made of wood. Tall masts have six sails billowing from them. About 20 grown men come ashore. They look different from your family and friends. They don’t have any women or children with them.

from The Mini Page © 2009 Universal Press Syndicate

Looking for a route

Earlier failures

The men on the ship were led by Henry Hudson, an English explorer. His ship the Half Moon had left Amsterdam, in the Netherlands, in April 1609 and arrived at Henry Hudson the mouth of the Hudson River in early September. This voyage was the third of four trips Hudson made, in 1607, 1608, 1609 and 1610-11.

In 1607, Hudson was looking for a way to get from Europe to Asia without sailing around the southern coast of Africa. People in Europe liked items brought from India and China, especially spices to help preserve food. At first, Hudson thought he could sail right over the North Pole to get to the Far East. But the ice and freezing temperatures made him turn back. In 1608, he tried a route along the northern coast of Russia. When ice blocked this route, he turned toward North America. But his crew forced him to turn back toward England.

TM

Rookie Cookie’s Recipe

Crunchy Granola Snack You’ll need: sCUPROLLEDOATS s1/2 cup chopped peanuts s1/2 cup sunflower seeds (without shells) s1/2 cup shredded coconut sCUPCRISPYRICECEREAL

s2/3 cup honey s1/3 cup canola oil sTABLESPOONSBROWNSUGAR sTEASPOONCINNAMON

What to do: 1. Mix oats, peanuts, seeds, coconut and cereal together in a medium bowl. 2. In a separate bowl, combine honey, oil, sugar and cinnamon. Pour into oat mixture and mix well. 3. Spread the mixture evenly in a shallow baking pan coated with cooking spray. 4. Bake at 300 degrees for 20 to 30 minutes until lightly browned. Serve as a topping for yogurt or fruit. You will need an adult’s help with this recipe. from The Mini Page © 2009 Universal Press Syndicate from The Mini Page © 2009 Universal Press Syndicate

Meet Asheba Asheba has made many CDs for kids. He sings music in the calypso (kuh-LIP-so) style of the islands in the Caribbean (care-uh-BEE-an) Sea. Calypso is energetic music that often pokes fun at powerful people or things going on. Asheba was born in Trinidad, an island in the Caribbean. He started singing in his choir in elementary school. When he was a teenager, he formed his own band. He began singing with calypso bands and learned to play the steel drum. He moved to New York City in 1989. He began playing his music in the New York subway system. Later, he began performing more for children. His songs have been included in a Putumayo Kids CD, which highlights music from around the world. He often visits children’s wards of hospitals to entertain. Asheba loves baking and making jam. He lives in Oakland, Calif. from The Mini Page © 2009 Universal Press Syndicate

from The Mini Page © 2009 Universal Press Syndicate

TM

Supersport: Hershel McGriff Birthdate: 12-14-27

Hometown: Bridal Veil, Ore.

Ordinarily, nobody raves about the person who finishes 13th in a car race. But when that person is 81 years old, it creates more than a roar of excitement. That’s what happened recently when Hershel McGriff placed 13th in the Portland (Ore.) International Raceway event. McGriff, who began racing in 1945, made his mark on the NASCAR circuit in 1954. That year he won four times and produced 17 top-10 finishes in 24 events. While wheeling around various tracks, McGriff also operated a timber and mill business on the West Coast. In 2002, the ageless father of five children was inducted into the West Coast Stock Car Hall of Fame and in ’06 was enshrined in the Motorsports Hall of Fame. Now, at 81 going on 18, what will McGriff do next? Stay tuned.

Heading to North America An offer from the Netherlands

Exploring America

The Half Moon reached the coast near modern Virginia in August 1609. On Sept. 2, Hudson spotted a large island. It was Manhattan Island, where part of New York City is today. Hudson noted a river flowing into the bay and thought it might be the passage he was looking for. The Native Americans in the area called The ship offered to Hudson by the Dutch, the Half Moon, was smaller than the English ship he had sailed before. He the river Muhheakunnuk, which means “great waters asked for a better ship, but his request was turned down. constantly in motion.” Today, Other plans Changing course we call it the Hudson River. Hudson wanted to explore North But after traveling about 150 miles Hudson and his crew started north America. In 1608, another explorer, up the river, Hudson had to turn in April 1609. But the Dutch sailors John Smith, had told Hudson he around. The river became too shallow on board didn’t like to work in cold believed there was a for the ship. weather. Northwest Passage — a Hudson wanted to stay through the When the weather turned bad, way to sail from the Hudson decided to head west, toward winter and set out again in the spring. Atlantic Ocean to the The crew wanted to go back to Europe. North America. He promised his Pacific. Hudson was eager In November, the Half Moon sailed crew warmer weather and easier to find such a route. John Smith sailing, and they agreed. into the English port of Dartmouth. After the 1608 voyage, Hudson lost his job with his English employer, The Muscovy Company. But soon, the Dutch East India Company offered to send him exploring again. They made him promise to sail around the north side of Novaya Zemlya, a group of islands north of Russia, and if he could not find a passage, to return to Amsterdam immediately.

from The Mini Page © 2009 Universal Press Syndicate

from The Mini Page © 2009 Universal Press Syndicate

TM

Changing America In the early 1600s, Dutch people had just become independent, or free, from Spain. They were trading and doing business with people from other countries. By doing so, the Netherlands was becoming a more powerful country. Dutch people lived in both cities and rural, or country, areas.

After Hudson’s voyage When the Half Moon returned to England, Hudson was arrested for sailing under the Dutch flag. The British didn’t want the Dutch to gain any property in North America. However, King James finally dropped the charges against Hudson. His ship and its contents were returned to Amsterdam in 1610, and he started planning another voyage on an English ship.

Hudson’s final journey across the ocean Henry Hudson made his final attempt to find another route to Asia in 1610. An English company provided him with a sturdy ship, the Discovery, and let him chart his course as he wanted. But Hudson’s crew was very unhappy, and in June 1611, they planned a mutiny*. Hudson, his son, and a few others were cast off the ship in a small boat and left to drift away. There are many legends about what happened to Henry Hudson and the other castoffs. *A mutiny is a planned takeover, usually of a ship, by crewmembers who are not in charge.

New Amsterdam Hudson’s discoveries in North America brought opportunities to Dutch businessmen and traders. In 1614, Adriaen Block and his partner, Hendrick Christiaensen, started a trading company called New Netherland. Soon a colony formed, also called New Netherland, that

All the following jokes have something in common. Can you guess the common theme or category?

included parts of modern New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Connecticut and Delaware. The city at the tip of Manhattan Island was known as New Amsterdam. In 1664, when the British took control of the city, it became New York.

This painting, “The Last Voyage of Henry Hudson,” was made by British painter John Collier.

One native legend tells of finding a small boat with a young boy who was still alive. This might have been John Hudson, Henry’s son. But experts say we’ll probably never know what happened to Hudson and the others.

Changes for natives European explorers brought many changes to the native people of North America, both good and bad. Mohicans and other tribes were introduced to different animals, including cows, that provided new sources of food and hides. The Europeans brought guns and gunpowder, giving Native Americans more ways to defend themselves. Europeans also brought diseases that Native Americans had not seen before and had no natural defenses against. The Mini Page thanks Michelle Stefanik, exhibit coordinator for “1609,” an exhibit at the New York State Museum, and Peter Theunissen of the Royal Netherlands Embassy for help with this issue.

The Mini Page Staff

!

N

I]ZB^c^EV\Zœ

7dd`d[HiViZh

The Mini Page’s popular series of issues about each state is collected here in a 156-page softcover book. Conveniently spiral-bound for ease of use, this invaluable resource contains A-to-Z facts about each state, along with the District of Columbia. Illustrated with colorful photographs and art, and complete with updated information, The Mini Page Book of States will be a favorite in classrooms and homes for years to come.

Barry: Why did the banana get a ticket from the police? Ben: He peeled away from a stoplight! Buford: How is a banana peel on the floor connected to music? Barra: You will B flat if you don’t C sharp! from The Mini Page © 2009 Universal Press Syndicate

Brown Bassetews The N d’s Houn

TM

Betty Debnam - Founding Editor and Editor at Large Lisa Tarry - Managing Editor Lucy Lien - Associate Editor Wendy Daley - Artist

EW

Bob: What do you call it when bananas share? Barb: A banana split!

Henry Hudson

TRY ’N FIND

Words that remind us of Henry Hudson are hidden in the block below. Some words are hidden backward or diagonally, and some letters are used twice. See if you can find: MOHICAN, COAST, SHIP, HENRY, ENGLISH, HALF, MOON, HUDSON, NETHERLANDS, INDIA, CHINA, RUSSIA, ROUTE, AMERICA, PASSAGE, TRADE, ANIMALS, GUNS, DUTCH, MUTINY, VOYAGE, POLE, ICE, COLD. M K T S A O C W L E G A Y O V

I’LL TAKE MANHATTAN!

U T I N Y R H C

O S R C K O C O

Q O L A E U T L

V P N A D T U D

N I B D M E D S

H H J K W I V D

U S P O L E N N

D I R U S S I A

S L X H G N M L

O G E M D E Q R

N N J I R J X E

R E A I F L A H

Z Q C S N U G T

P A S S A G E E

G M O H I C A N

from The Mini Page © 2009 Universal Press Syndicate

Ready Resources The Mini Page provides ideas for Web sites, books or other resources that will help you learn more about this week’s topics. On the Web: www.ny400.org/features At the library: “Henry Hudson: Arctic Explorer and North American Adventurer” by Isaac Asimov and Elizabeth Kaplan “Henry Hudson: Discover the Life of an Explorer” by Trish Kline

To order, send $15.99 ($19.99 Canada) plus $5 postage and handling for each copy. Make check or money order (U.S. funds only) payable to Universal Press Syndicate. Send to The Mini Page Book of States, Universal Press Syndicate, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206. Or call toll-free 800-591-2097 or go to www.smartwarehousing.com. Please send ______ copies of The Mini Page Book of States (Item #0-7407-8549-4) at $20.99 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.) Name: ________________________________________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________________________________ City: _________________________________________ State: _________ Zip: ________________

Please include all of the appropriate registered trademark symbols and copyright lines in any publication of The Mini Page®.


Thursday, September 10, 2009 – Thomasville Times – 11

AROUND THE STATE

Plastic bottles to be banned in state landfills Increased recovery fuels growing demand for plastic bottles TIMES STAFF REPORT

RALEIGH – Starting Oct. 1, plastic bottles, oil filters and wooden pallets are banned from disposal in North Carolina’s landfills. North Carolina recovers less than one out of every five plastic bottles generated in the state, despite hosting some of the largest processors of these materials. The new ban is intended to boost the recovery of bottles, in large part to meet the growing demand for these materials. An example of the appetite for recovered plastic bottles is the Clear Path facility being built in Fayetteville, which will have the capacity to use 280 million pounds of polyethlene terephthalate (PET #1) bottles annually. Envision Plastics, the nation’s second largest recycler of high-density polyethlene (HDPE #2) bottles, also operates a facility in Reidsville. According to the National Association of PET Container Resources, end users of recycled PET in 11 southeastern states have the capacity for 1.439 billion pounds per year. HDPE reclaimers in the United States can use more than 1 billion pounds annually, but due to poor recovery rates are operating at 69 percent capacity. “Widespread compliance with the plastic bottle disposal ban will ensure a flow of plastic bottles to meet market demand for the materi-

als and will result in additional job creation through the expansion of recycling collection companies,” said Scott Mouw, environmental supervisor for the state Division of Pollution Prevention and Environmental Assistance. “The law represents a major growth opportunity for the state’s recycling businesses and for local government recycling collection programs as well.” State officials are educating public and private solid waste management facilities to separate the banned items from the waste stream before those items arrive at a disposal facility. If necessary, enforcement of the disposal bans will be applied primarily at disposal facilities such as landfills and transfer stations by the N.C. Division of Waste Management. The law does allow for accidental or occasional disposal of small amounts of banned materials. However, starting a recycling program for the banned materials is the simplest and easiest way to ensure compliance. Moreover, such recycling programs are good for the environment. If all the plastic bottles generated in the state were recycled, more than 2.4 billion additional plastic bottles would be kept out of landfills annually. Data from the N.C. Solid Waste Annual Report shows that some North Carolina counties are recycling plastic bottles at much higher rates than others. Orange County has a comprehensive program and claims the top spot in the county-by-county rankings. With a recovery rate of more than 29 pounds of plastic bottles per person, Orange Coun-

Your Town. Your Times.

ty recycled more than seven times the state average on a per capita basis. The average county per capita recovery is 3.81 pounds per person. Caswell, Graham, Martin and Warren counties do not collect plastic as part of their recycling programs. A list detailing per capita plastic bottle recycling rates for each county can be found below. The totals include tonnage recycled by county and municipal programs in the county. Local collection programs typically target residential recyclables; additional plastic bottle recovery may be occurring through private recycling efforts. For more information regarding the data, contact Jim Hickman, DPPEA local government assistance team leader at (919) 7156528. The statutory reference for the disposal ban can be found at: www.p2pays. org/ref/38/37984.pdf.

Subscribe today! 888-3511

If you’re reading this, advertising works! Call 472-9500 to make it work for you!

DADDY’S HOME

BY TONY RUBINO AND GARY MARKSTEIN

Governor’s office launches Twitter page TIMES STAFF REPORT RALEIGH – The Office of Governor Bev Perdue today launched a twitter page, https://twitter.com/ ncgovoffice, to help citizens find the latest news and information from inside the Governor’s Office and administration. “With only 140 characters, a little bit of twitter can go a long way toward my goal of a transparent, accountable and interactive state gov’t,” tweeted Perdue.

As part of Gov. Perdue’s emphasis on transparency, accountability and interactivity with the people of North Carolina, she has increased the use of new media. Initiatives include NCOpenBook. gov, NCRecovery.gov and JobsNOW.nc.gov, as well as the Governor’s eTownhall, featuring a blog and video Q&A. In addition to Twitter, citizens also can follow the Governor’s Office on YouTube, Facebook and Flickr.

MOMMA

BY MELL LAZARUS

Davidson County Agricultural Fair seeking entries TIMES STAFF REPORT

Officials with the Davidson County Agricultural Fair are encouraging residents to show off their gardening, baking and crafting skills by entering this year’s fair. Entries for the Davidson County Fair should be brought to the Davidson County Fairgrounds on Sunday, Sept. 20 between 2 and 6 p.m. Judging of exhibits will take place Monday, Sept. 21 by competent judges. No exhibitors will be

allowed to accompany judges while exhibits are being judged. Premiums, ribbons and exhibits will be available for pick on Sunday, Sept. 27 between 2-4 p.m. Competition is open to all Davidson County residents, and the fair opens Monday, Sept. 21 at 4 p.m. For more information on entering exhibits at the fair and entry forms for livestock and poultry go to www.davidsoncountyagfair.com or call the Davidson County Extension Office at 242-2080.

WIZARD OF ID

BY PARKER AND HART


12 – Thomasville Times – Thursday, September 10, 2009

0010

AROUND THE STATE

T h e C i t y o f Thomasville had a d i s c h a r g e o f approximately 15.93 million gallons of u n t r e a t e d wastewater from the North Hamby Creek Outfall located near Baptist Children Home Road. First knowledge of the discharge occurred on August 3rd, 2009 at 2:05 p.m. and the discharge ended by about 5:30 p.m. August 4th, 2009. A manhole that had collapsed inward and partially blocked the line was the cause of the discharge. The manhole is suspected of having collapsed following the heavy rains of July 13th, 2009. It is estimated 15.93 million gallons of the untreated wastewater entered a tributary to North Hamby Creek. This notice was required by North Carolina General Statutes Article 21 Chapter 143.215.C. For more information contact Morgan Huffman at 336-475-4220.

Prevention urged as flu season arrives 0010

TIMES STAFF REPORT

RALEIGH – Gov. Bev Perdue today called on North Carolina residents to re-dedicate themselves to following good prevention practices as the number of influenza cases are expected to rise with the beginning of the school year and the arrival of flu season. “Parents, students and teachers can help prevent the seasonal flu and H1N1 flu from spreading by getting vaccinated, practicing good hygiene and keeping themselves healthy,” Perdue said. “I don’t want folks to be scared about the flu, but I do want every North Carolinian to be vigilant and prepared.” “North Carolina is

ahead of the curve in monitoring influenza type activity by exceeding the CDC recommended 34 sentinel reporting sites. Currently there are 95 sites in 56 counties which means Public Health is better able to monitor the spread of flu, detect new strains, and determine effective use of anti viral treatment,” said DHHS Secretary Lanier Cansler. Influenza data collected by the state through its sentinel surveillance network of physicians, university health centers, hospitals/medical centers and public health agencies across the state indicate that influenza activity has begun to increase since the beginning of the school year, as expected. The data also

show that the majority of influenza samples confirmed by the State Laboratory of Public Health continues to be the 2009 H1N1 virus. “As the school year starts, we want to remind everyone to make sure they’re prepared for this flu season,” Perdue said. Everyone should follow standard health precautions as a first line of prevention; • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it. • If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve, not your hands. • Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough

or sneeze. Alcohol-based hand cleaners are also effective. • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread this way. • Try to avoid close contact with sick people. • If you have flu-like symptoms, stay home from work or school and limit contact with others to keep from making them sick. • Get the seasonal flu vaccine now and the H1N1 vaccine when it becomes available. For more information about influenza in North Carolina, please visit www.flu.nc.gov. For more information about the Sentinel Surveillance Program, go to www.epi. state.nc.us/e pi/gcdc/ flusentsurv.html.

TIMES STAFF REPORT

Several nationally renowned, best-selling authors of books written exclusively for children, young readers and teens will educate and entertain families at BOOKMARKS Festival of Books, a free-to-the-public event for all ages and interests to be held on Saturday, from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. in downtown Winston-Salem’s Arts District, centering on Sixth and Trade Streets. In its fifth season, BOOKMARKS Festival of Books will again feature book readings and activities designed specifically for young audiences at indoor and outdoor locations throughout the Arts District, between 5th and 7th Streets, Liberty and Cherry Streets. “We are pleased to have The Children’s Theatre of Winston-Salem, the Forsyth County Public Library, Piedmont Parent Magazine, The Children’s Museum of Winston-Salem, SciWorks and Smart Start of Forsyth County join us in presenting “Young Readers Central” our festival within a festival geared to children from toddlers to teens,” said Caron Armstrong, YRC coordinator and volunteer. “Our Festival of Books is enriched by having these vital community institutions join us in our mission to provide a positive literacy experience for all ages and family demographics and reach our community’s diverse cultures through partnerships and collaborations that also reflect these organizations’ missions,” said Debbie Harllee, BOOKMARKS president. Some of the authors appearing at Young Readers Central, include: • Renowned storyteller Willy Claflin, reading from his The Uglified Duck and other stories from Maynard Moose Tales; • Frances O’Roark Dowell, reading her newest book The Kind of Friends We Used to Be to be, as well as her Phineas L. MacGuire Blasts Off, her third in a series, featuring Mac, an elementary school science wiz kid; • Emily Ecton, reading from her Night of the Living Lawn Ornaments,

which features Arlie and friends as they solve hysterical and bizarre neighborhood mysteries • Laura Malone Elliott, reading from her newest work about a WW2 fighter pilot, A Troubled Peace, the sequel to NC Battle of the Books’ choice, Under a War-Torn Sky • John Hutton, reading from his Christmas Maus: Another Small Tale of Sisters House in Salem, set in the Single Sister’s House in Old Salem in the 1780s • Sonia Manzano, best known as “Maria” from Sesame Street, reading from her latest book, • Kim Underwood and Garnet Goldman, reading from their book, The Wonderful World of Sparkle Girl and Doobins • Frances O’Roark Dowell, reading from The Kind of Friends We Used to Be, her sequel to The Secret Language of Girls • Carole Boston Weatherford, reading excerpts from her latest book, Becoming Billie Holiday, accompanied by a jazz ensemble; and A Reader’s Theatre featuring local teens performing the original script “Waiting for Zora”, based on Zora Neal Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, the Forsyth County Public Library’s BIG READ/On the Same Page 2009 selection.

Legals

NORTH CAROLINA DAVIDSON COUNTY NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified as Executrix of the Estate of Jack Perrin Camp JR, late of 180 Crotts Avenue, Winston-Salem, Davidson County, North Carolina, the undersigned does hereby notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against the estate of said decedent to exhibit t h e m t o t h e undersigned at P. O. Box 966, Thomasville, NC, 27361, on or before December 3, 2009, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and c o r p o r a t i o n s indebted to the said estate will please make immediate payment to the undersigned.

September 10, 2009

Buy * Save * Sell Place your ad in the classifieds!

This the 3rd day of September, 2009.

Buy * Save * Sell

_________________________ __ Janet Camp Crigler, Executrix of the Estate of Jack Perrin CampJR 180 Crotts Avenue Winston-Salem, NC 27107 Josephine L. Citrin P. O. Box 966 38 Salem Street Thomasville, NC 27361 September 3, 10, 17 & 24, 2009

Finance Your Garage!

BOOKMARKS Festival of Books coming to Winston

Legals

NOTICE OF DISCHARGE OF UNTREATED SEWAGE

Classified Ads Work for you!

90 Days No Monthly Payments & No Interest If Paid Within 90 Days!

Buy * Save * Sell Place your ad in the classifieds! Buy * Save * Sell NORTH CAROLINA DAVIDSON COUNTY

chw t u Pole ay D Barns ECONOMICAL

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

Specials Include: (1) garage/slider door • (1) entry door • material • delivery • construction *On promo purchase, no monthly payments required and no finance charges assessed if promo purchase paid in full in 90 days. If not paid, Finance Charges will be assessed from purchase date at a reduced APR of 14.99% & repayment of promo will be 1.5% of the highest promotional balance after the promotional period expires, until paid in full. In addition, (1) any minimum monthly payments on account must be paid when due, and (2) account balance may not exceed Financed by credit limit. Otherwise, promo may be terminated and standard terms apply. GE Money

• Residential Garages • Commercial Storage/Offices • Entertainment/Playrooms • Lodge/Cabins/Homes • Industrial/Warehouses • Workshops/Hobby Shops • Horse/Equine Facilities/Arenas • Agricultural Buildings

1-877-434-3133 www.cbstructuresinc.com

1090

Having qualified as Executor of the Estate of Jeannette M. Goodman, late of 241 Kate Drive, Thomasville, North C a r o l i n a , t h e undersigned does hereby notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against the estate of said decedent to exhibit t h e m t o t h e undersigned at P.O. Box 966, Thomasville, NC, 27361, on or before December 10, 2009, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and c o r p o r a t i o n s indebted to the said estate will please make immediate payment to the undersigned. This the 19th day September, 2009

CUSTOMER SERVICE MANAGER Decorative Home Fabric Wholesaler needs an Experienced Customer Service Manager. To manage our inbound and outbound calls to established dealers. Do you have team leadership abilities? Are you a great motivator? We are looking for a manager to coordinate all activities of our call center. Only those who have Management Experience within a call center environment need apply!! Reply in confidence to box 969, C/O High Point Enterprise, PO Box 1009, High Point, NC 27261 Ads that work!!

of

Make your classified ads work harder for you with features like Bolding, Ad Borders & eye-catching graphics

_________________________ __ Dianne B. Loftin, Executor of The Estate of Jeannette M. Goodman 241 Kate Drive Thomasville, NC 27360

st

REGISTRATION ENDS SEPTEMBER 21

1120

Josephine L. Citrin P. O. Box 966 38 Salem Street Thomasville, NC 27361 September 10, 17, & October 1, 2009

Management

Miscellaneous

3 Night Course for Y o u r M i n i s t e r License. $125. Call 3 3 6 - 8 8 2 - 5 4 8 3 . Lights for Christ Ministry

24

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA DAVIDSON COUNTY IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION 09 E 783 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF GREG THOMAS KEATON, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND DEBTORS All persons, firms and corporations having claims against Greg Thomas Keaton, deceased are notified to exhibit them to Glen P. Keaton, as Executor of the decedent’s estate on or before December 10, 2009 at 500 East Green Drive, P.O. Box 430, High Point, North Carolina 27261, or be barred from their recovery. Debtors of the decedent are asked to make immediate payment to the above-named Glen P. Keaton. This the 10th day of September, 2009. Glen P. Keaton, Executor of The Estate of Greg Thomas Keaton Bryant T. Aldridge, Jr. Bretzmann & Aldridge, L.L.P. 500 E. Green Drive, Suite 201 P.O. Box 430 High Point, NC 27261 Telephone: (336) 841-1100 September 10, 17, 24, 2009 October 1, 2009 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY OF THOMASVILLE Notice is given that on the 21st day of September 2009 at 7:00 P.M. in the City Council Chamber (Old Thomasville Courtroom) 7 West Guilford Street Thomasville, North Carolina, the Thomasville City Council will conduct a Public Hearing in consideration of the following: 1. Z-09-06 Proposed Addition/Amendment to Zoning Ordinance Text Signs exempt from regulation: Article VI, Section 5 by adding (K) to the existing text Which will read as follows: K. Banners advertising or promoting church related events. Banners must be located on the church property where advertised event or ministry will take place. Banners must be placed in a location that will not block visibility for any vehicle traffic. The Public is further advised that at said hearing all interested and affected parties will be heard on these matters. Hearing impaired persons desiring additional information or having questions regarding this subject can call the North Carolina relay number for the Deaf (Dial 7-1-1 or 1-800-735-2962). The meeting facilities of the City of Thomasville are accessible to people with disabilities. The City provides the opportunity to request in advance auxiliary aids and services. Copies of the proposed agenda items are available for inspection in the offices of the Planning & Inspections Department, Second Floor, City Hall, 10 Salem Street between the hours of 8:00 A.M. & 12:00 Noon and between 1:00 P.M. & 5:00 P.M. Monday through Friday. For further information call Ken Hepler at 336475-4255. This is the 8th day of September, 2009. Ken Hepler Planning & Zoning Administrator City of Thomasville September 10, 2009 & September 17, 2009.


14 – Thomasville Times – Thursday, September 10, 2009

Man arrested for making false reports

A Thomasville man is in trouble with the Davidson County Sheriff ’s Office for reporting his car stolen when he actually wrecked it. According to a DCSO press release, Edwin Soto, 24, of 315 Earlie Everhart Road, is charged with filing a false report of a motor vehicle theft after deputies discovered he was lying. On Monday, Soto called police claiming his 2001 Mitsubishi Eclipse Spider had been stolen from his residence. Deputies later found the vehicle was involved in a single-car accident on E. Holly Grove Road in Lexington. Deputies went back and re-interviewed Soto, who admitted to wrecking the car and falsely reporting it stolen. He was issued a $500 secured bond and is scheduled to appear in court on Oct. 5.

Man dies after being struck by train

An early morning accident Saturday left a Thomasville dead after he was hit by a train near downtown. Kenneth Michael Brown, 35, of High Point, died Saturday around 3 a.m. after he apparently tripped while walking down the railroad tracks and was struck by a train at the 600 block of E. Main St. Emergency workers responded but Brown was pronounced dead at the scene. Alcohol may have been a factor. The investigation is ongoing.

Two arrested for stealing four wheeler

DCSO deputies tracked down two men who were stealing a 4-wheeler and fled when police arrived. On Tuesday, deputies received a call from a passing motorist who saw two people pushing a

4-wheeler on Cid Road toward a red Nissan truck parked on the side of the road. When deputies arrived the truck was pulling off, but when police tried to stop them, the men sped off. A pursuit followed that eventually ended on Willowmore Springs Road, where the men stopped and fled off into the woods. A Sheriff K-9 tracked the suspects to New Cut Road, leading to their arrest at 11:09 a.m. The 4-wheeler was returned to its owner, who said it had been left

A

D

^

9

9

$

4

4

( 10

10

, 11

11

0 12

8

4

3

3

M

7

7

P 15

15

6

6

CABLE A&E AMC ANPL BET BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM CSPAN CSPAN2 DISC DISN E! ESPN ESPN2 FAM FOOD FX FXNWS FGSEW GOLF HALL HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NGC NICK SPIKE STYLE SYFY TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TRU TVLAND UNI USA VH1 WGN

28

30

24

29

63

63

22

33

43

73

35

38

30

35

34

21

37

41

39

37

38

65

25

31

73

22

46

46

17

25

16

26

20

20

65

67

60

60

40

59

51

47

52

52

49

49

55

55

53

53

33

28

59

43

27

36

29

45

32

18

18

40

61

61

45

42

23

32

57

57

44

50

21

44

48

48

54

54

41

99

62

62

56

56

50

16

36

34

77

77

PREMIUM

POLICE REPORTS

All entries in the section are based on information provided in police reports from the Thomasville Police Department.

July 23

Julie Ann Del Angel (WF, 35) arrested on charge of assault and battery at 130 Jewel St. Curtis Lee Thorne (BM, 37) arrested on charge of 2nd degree trespassing at James Ave./Cooksey. Victim of larceny at 708 Fairgrove Road. Victim of domestic violence at 911 Mendenhall St. Walmart victim of larceny at 1585 Liberty Drive

July 24

Cleveland Eugene Joiner (WM, 47) arrested on charge of DWI alcohol or drugs at 11 Pine St. Christopher Quinn McElroy (WM, 16) arrested on charge of larceny at 8 Conner Court. Tyler Adam Robinette (WM, 17) arrested on charge of larceny at 1109 Hrvest Drive. David Martin Byerly (WM, 35) arrested on charge of larceny at 1585 Liberty Drive. Teresa Hill Johnson (WF, 57) arrested on charge of no operator license at 809 Randolph St. Debra Koontz Hutchens (WF, 54) arrested on charge of DWI alcohol or drugs at 713 Edgewood.

HBO MAX SHOW TMC

400 400 412 412 421 421 438 438

6:30

A

D

^

9

9

$

4

4

( 10

10

, 11

11

0 12

8

4

3

3

M

7

7

P 15

15

6

6

CABLE A&E AMC ANPL BET BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM CSPAN CSPAN2 DISC DISN E! ESPN ESPN2 FAM FOOD FX FXNWS FGSEW GOLF HALL HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NGC NICK SPIKE STYLE SYFY TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TRU TVLAND UNI USA VH1 WGN

28

30

24

29

63

63

22

33

43

73

35

38

30

35

34

21

37

41

39

37

38

65

25

31

73

22

46

46

17

25

16

26

20

20

65

67

60

60

40

59

51

47

52

52

49

49

55

55

53

53

33

28

59

43

27

36

29

45

32

18

18

40

61

61

45

42

23

32

57

57

44

50

21

44

48

48

54

54

41

99

62

62

56

56

50

16

36

34

77

77

PREMIUM HBO MAX SHOW TMC

400 400 412 412 421 421 438 438

Grace Realty Company 809 Sea Mtn. Hwy. North Myrtle Beach, SC 29582

1-800-843-7221 Coastal Condos, Inc. North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

Call Us For Your Rental Needs! 1 to 4 Bedroom – Ocean Front and Ocean View Rentals www.coastalcondos.com Call 1-800-951-4880

P.O. Box 1004, North Myrtle Beach South Carolina 29598 1-800-939-4483 Reservations Only (843)272-6115

www.white-realty.com

7 PM

7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30 12 AM 12:30 1 AM 1:30 Jeopardy! Big Brother 11 Eviction. CSI: Crime Scn (:01) The Mentalist ËNews ËLate Show-Letterman ËLate Late Show Paid Prog. N.C. Now Our State Exploring North Car Folkways Great Lodges-Parks ËBBC News ËCharlie Rose (N) Å ËSmiley N.C. Now Black Iss Hollywood TMZ (N) Seinfeld Bones (PA) Å Fringe (PA) Å ËFOX 8 10:00 News (N) Seinfeld Bernie Mac King of Hill Malcolm Radio Paid Prog. ËNBC News Inside Entertain ÊNFL Kickoff ÊNFL Football Tennessee Titans at Pittsburgh Steelers. (Live) Å ËNews ËTonight Show ËLate Night-Jimmy Fallon Fam. Feud Reba Å Reba Å Ghost Whisperer Å NCIS “Yankee White” NCIS “Sub Rosa” Å Durham County Å Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Family Guy King King The Vampire Diaries Supernatural Å Raymond Raymond Punk’d Comics Un. Family Guy RENO 911! Paid Prog. Paid Prog. ËABC News Deal No Millionaire Grey’s Anatomy Å Grey’s Anatomy Å (:02) Private Practice Frasier ËNightline ËJimmy Kimmel Live (N) (:06) Extra South Park Simpsons Two Men Two Men ’70s Show ’70s Show Payne Payne One Videos Law Order: CI › “Crazy in Alabama” (1999) Melanie Griffith. Word-Life Fresh Fruit Lambs TCT Today Walking This Is Day Life Today Today Your Bible Gospel History In Touch-Dr TCT Today Healing 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30 12 AM 12:30 1 AM 1:30 CSI: Miami Criminal Minds Å The First 48 Å The First 48 “Blackout” The First 48 Å Crime 360 (N) Å The First 48 Å The First 48 “Blackout” (5:30) ››› “Pale Rider” (1985) ›› “Broken Trail” (2006) Robert Duvall. A cowboy and his nephew save five girls from prostitution. ›› “The Last Hard Men” (1976, Western) Å Weird, True Big Sting Walking With Dinosaurs Animal Armageddon (N) Animal Cops Walking With Dinosaurs Animal Armageddon Animal Cops (:00) 106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Nora’s Hair Salon” (2004, Comedy) Jenifer Lewis. The Game The Game ËW. Williams “Nora’s Hair Salon” (2004, Comedy) Jenifer Lewis. Atlanta Housewives-Atl Housewives-Atl Housewives-Atl Housewives-Atl Housewives-Atl Watch Housewives-Atl Rachel Zoe Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Nanny 911 Strict father. ›› “Murphy’s Romance” (1985) Sally Field. Premiere. ›› “Murphy’s Romance” (1985) Sally Field, James Garner. Mad Money Banking on Geithner ËCNBC Reports Fastest Grow. Banking on Geithner Mad Money Fast Money Fastest Grow. Situation Lou Dobbs Tonight ËCampbell Brown (N) ËLarry King Live Å ËAnderson Cooper 360 Å ËLarry King Live ËAnderson Cooper 360 Presents Scrubs Scrubs John Heffron South Park South Park Dane Cook Vicious Circle Å Jim Breuer Presents South Park Futurama (5:00) House of Representatives ËTonight From Washington ËCapital News Today (5:00) U.S. Senate Coverage ËTonight From Washington ËCapital News Today Cash Cab How-Made How-Made Destroyed Destroyed Nature’s Deadliest I Was Bitten (N) Å Destroyed Destroyed Nature’s Deadliest I Was Bitten Å Suite Life Wizards Montana Phineas Phineas Montana Wizards So Raven Life Derek Cory Replace K. Possible › “Catch That Kid” (2004) ‘PG’ Å Vanished E! News (N) Daily 10 Christina Aguilera: The E! True Hollywood Story Girls Kendra Chelsea E! News Chelsea Kendra Kendra Reality Hell ÊSportsCtr. ÊNFL Live ÊCollege Football Clemson at Georgia Tech. (Live) ÊSportsCenter (Live) Å ÊNFL Live ÊBaseball ÊSportsCenter Å ÊScoreboard ÊTennis U.S. Open -- Men’s Quarterfinals and Mixed Doubles Final. (Live) ÊWorld Series ÊSportsNation (Live) ÊNASCAR ÊYearbook My Wife ’70s Show ›› “Brown Sugar” (2002) Taye Diggs, Sanaa Lathan. Å Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club Å Whose? Whose? Paid Prog. Thinner Minute Challenge Iron Chef America Iron Chef America Cakes Cakes Good Eats Unwrapped Iron Chef America Cakes Cakes (:00) ›› “First Daughter” (2004) ’70s Show ’70s Show ’70s Show ’70s Show ›› “Maid in Manhattan” (2002) Jennifer Lopez. ›› “Maid in Manhattan” (2002) Jennifer Lopez. Bret Baier FOX Report The O’Reilly Factor (N) ËHannity (N) On the Record The O’Reilly Factor ËHannity On the Record ÊACC Foot ÊSEC Gridiron Live ÊBig 12 Football: From the Archives ÊACC ÊFinal Score ÊGolden Age ÊFinal Score ÊBest Damn 50 ÊFinal Score ÊFinal Score ÊPGA Tour Golf: Nationwide Tour ÊPGA Tour Golf BMW Championship -- First Round. ÊGolfCentrl Ê19th Hole ÊMasters Highlights ÊPGA Golf M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Touched by an Angel Touched by an Angel Touched by an Angel Golden Golden Golden Golden Cheers Cheers Carter Can House House First Place First Place House House House Intervention Property First Place First Place First Place House House Marvels Modern Marvels Å MonsterQuest Å MonsterQuest Å MonsterQuest Å Marked “Death Ride” MonsterQuest Å MonsterQuest Å Anatomy Medium Å Medium Å Project Runway Å Project Runway (N) Models Project Runway Å Models Will-Grace Anatomy ËEd Show ËHardball Å ËCountdown-Olbermann ËMaddow Show ËCountdown-Olbermann ËMaddow Show ËHardball Å ËCountdown-Olbermann Parental Pranked ÊNitro Circus Fantasy Fantasy Fantasy Beatdown ÊNitro Circus Pranked (N) Fantasy Beatdown ÊNitro Circus Pranked Busted Busted Science Howard Hughes Inside the Vietnam War Covert operations and military strategies. Inside the Vietnam War Covert operations and military strategies. Jackson SpongeBob SpongeBob Malcolm Malcolm Lopez Lopez Hates Chris Hates Chris The Nanny The Nanny Malcolm Malcolm Lopez Lopez CSI CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn ÊTNA Wrestling (N) Å Surviving Disaster MANswers Game MANswers MANswers House Supernanny Å Giuliana & Bill Giuliana Giuliana Giuliana Giuliana Giuliana & Bill Giuliana Giuliana Giuliana Giuliana Stargate “Beyond Loch Ness” (2008) Brian Krause. Å “Kraken: Tentacles of the Deep” (2006, Horror) Lost Å ›› “Deep Blue Sea” (1999) Thomas Jane. Friends Seinfeld Seinfeld Friends Friends Friends Friends Sex & City Sex & City (:10) “The Pallbearer” ›› “Must Love Dogs” (2005) Diane Lane. “Flipper’s Adv.” Parade End-River ›››› “The Thief of Bagdad” (1940) Sabu. ››› “Drums” (1938) Sabu, Raymond Massey. ›› “Song of India” (1949) Sabu. What Not LA Ink Å Police Women Police Women LA Ink (N) Å Police Women LA Ink Å Police Women (:00) Bones CSI: NY “Sweet 16” CSI: NY Å CSI: NY “On the Job” ›› “The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift” Å ›› “The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift” Å Total Johnny T Chowder Flapjack Stoked Total 6TEEN King of Hill King of Hill Family Guy Family Guy Chicken Aqua Teen Oblongs Home Steak Extreme Towns Å Bizarre Foods-Zimmern Johnny Colt ›› “National Lampoon’s European Vacation” ›› “National Lampoon’s European Vacation” PoliceVids Cops Å Cops Å Vacation Vacation World’s Dumbest... Speeders Speeders Black Gold Vacation Vacation World’s Dumbest... Little Hse. Hillbillies Hillbillies Married... Married... Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne “Lost Youth” Roseanne Roseanne ËNoticiero Un Gancho al Corazón En Nombre del Amor Mañana es La Rosa de Guadalupe Impacto ËNoticiero La Escuelita VIP Torrente, un Torbellino (:00) NCIS NCIS “Boxed In” Å NCIS “Singled Out” Burn Notice Å Royal Pains Å Monk Å Burn Notice Å Royal Pains Å Hip Hop Hip Hop Songs Hip Hop Songs Hip Hop Songs Behind the Music Å Real Chance of Love Behind the Music Å NWA: Dangerous Group Becker Funniest Home Videos ÊWWE Superstars Å ÊAmerican Gladiators ËWGN News at Nine (N) ÊWWE Superstars Å Scrubs Scrubs Star Trek: Next Gener. 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30 12 AM 12:30 1 AM 1:30 (5:45) “Ghost Town” 24 7 Hung Å Hung Å Hung Å Real Sex Making Hard Knocks “Schindler’s List” (1993) ›› “Meet Dave” (2008) ‘PG’ Å (:00) › “Fool’s Gold” (2008) ‘PG-13’ ››› “Hairspray” (2007) John Travolta. ‘PG’ (11:50) “Cleavagefield” (:05) ›› “Boomerang” ›› “Death Sentence” (2007) Kevin Bacon. ‘R’ (5:15) ›› “Thief” ‘R’ “Lower Learning” (2008) iTV. ‘R’ (:45) “Clive Barker’s The Plague” ‘R’ (12:15) ›› “The Ten” (2007) Paul Rudd. iTV. ‘R’ ›› “Encino Man” (1992) iTV. ‘PG’ (:05) ›› “Seven Girlfriends” (1999) ›› “Flashbacks of a Fool” (2008) Daniel Craig. “Spiral” (2007) Joel Moore. ‘PG-13’ “Virgin Territory” (2007) ‘R’ Å “Shameless Co-eds” ËCBS News Fortune ËNewsHour Business

A - High Point/Archdale/Guilford Co. Ê - Sports D - Davidson Co. Ë - News/Talk

FRIDAY EVENING CBS PBS FOX NBC ION CW ABC MNT WLXI

MAKE RESERVATIONS NOW Vacation Rentals & Sales

A - High Point/Archdale/Guilford Co. Ê - Sports D - Davidson Co. Ë - News/Talk

THURSDAY EVENING CBS PBS FOX NBC ION CW ABC MNT WLXI

on a trailer. Shannon Douglas Johnson, 24, of 653 Jarrell Road in Lexington, and Richard William Dixon, 44, of 2122 Chesteridge Drive Apt. F in High Point, were arrested and charged with felony larceny of a motor vehicle and resisting a police officer. Dixon also was wanted in High Point for larceny and obtaining property by false pretenses. Johnson and Dixon were issued $20,000 and $25,000 secured bonds, respectively.

www.tvilletimes.com

482000©HPE

CRIME BRIEFS

6:30

7 PM

7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30 12 AM 12:30 1 AM 1:30 Jeopardy! Ghost Whisperer Å Medium Å NUMB3RS Å ËNews ËLate Show-Letterman ËLate Late Show Foreclosure N.C. Now North Car Wash Wk ËN.C. People Exploring Richard Bangs Bill Moyers Journal (N) ËBBC News ËCharlie Rose (N) Å ËSmiley Hollywood TMZ (N) Seinfeld You Smarter? Glee “Showmance” ËFOX 8 10:00 News (N) Seinfeld Bernie Mac King of Hill Malcolm Paid Prog. Paid Prog. ËNBC News Inside Entertain Southland “Derailed” Dateline NBC Å ÊReport ËTonight Show ËLate Night-Jimmy Fallon ËLast Call Fam. Feud Reba Å ››› “Inside Man” (2006) Denzel Washington, Clive Owen. Criminal Minds Å Durham County Å Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Fellowship Family Guy King King The Vampire Diaries Melrose Place “Pilot” Raymond Raymond Punk’d Comics Un. Family Guy RENO 911! Paid Prog. Paid Prog. ËABC News Deal No Millionaire Supernanny Å Ugly Betty Å 20/20 Å Frasier ËNightline ËJimmy Kimmel Live (N) (:06) Extra South Park Simpsons Two Men Two Men ÊWWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) Å ’70s Show ’70s Show Payne Payne One Videos Law Order: CI Dorinda Abundant CBN TCT Today Love This Is Day Life Today Today Your Bible Gospel TCT Special Healing 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30 12 AM 12:30 1 AM 1:30 CSI: Miami Criminal Minds Å Criminal Minds Å Criminal Minds Å CSI: Miami Å CSI: Miami Å Criminal Minds Å Criminal Minds Å (5:45) ›› “Mobsters” (1991) Å ›››› “GoodFellas” (1990) Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta, Joe Pesci. Å ›› “The Return of the Living Dead” (1985) Å ››› “The Fly” (1986) Weird, True Animal Cops Å Untamed and Uncut Jockeys “Split Decision” Monsters Inside Me Jockeys “Split Decision” Untamed and Uncut Monsters Inside Me (:00) 106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live Frankie Frankie ËW. Williams ›› “Honey” (2003) Jessica Alba, Mekhi Phifer. ›› “Honey” (2003) Jessica Alba, Mekhi Phifer. (5:00) ››› “The Matrix Reloaded” ››› “Coming to America” (1988) Eddie Murphy. ‘R’ Å ››› “Coming to America” (1988) Eddie Murphy. ‘R’ Å ›› “Practical Magic” Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Jacked Up Jacked Up Videos Videos Jacked Up Jacked Up ››› “Urban Cowboy” (1980, Drama) John Travolta, Debra Winger. Mad Money Kudlow Report ËReports Options The Suze Orman Show American Greed Mad Money Fast Money American Greed Situation Lou Dobbs Tonight ËCampbell Brown (N) ËLarry King Live (N) ËAnderson Cooper 360 Å ËLarry King Live ËAnderson Cooper 360 Presents Scrubs Scrubs Jim Breuer Presents Presents Brand in New York City Presents Presents Demetri Martin Å Brand in New York City ËTonight From Washington ËCapital News Today U.S. Senate Close-Up on C-SPAN ËTonight From Washington ËCapital News Today Cash Cab MythBusters Å MythBusters Å Dirty Jobs Å County Jail: Miami MythBusters Å Dirty Jobs Å County Jail: Miami Suite Life Suite Life Suite Life Wizards Suite Life Phineas Phineas Wizards Montana Phineas So Raven Suite Life Cory Replace K. Possible True Story E! News (N) Daily 10 Girls Kendra Kourtney Kourtney The Soup Reality Hell Chelsea E! News Chelsea The Soup Kendra Soup ÊBasketball Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremony ÊCollege Football Colorado at Toledo. (Live) ÊSportsCenter Å ÊSportsCenter Å ÊNASCAR ÊCountdown ÊNASCAR Racing: Nationwide Series ÊBaseball Tonight Å ÊSportsCtr. ÊYearbook ÊBaseball ÊNFL Live ÊSportsNation (Live) My Wife Funniest Home Videos Funniest Home Videos Funniest Home Videos Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club Å ’70s Show ’70s Show Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Minute Challenge Unwrapped Unwrapped Diners Diners Chefs vs. City (N) Good Eats Rachael Diners Diners Chefs vs. City (:00) ››› “Double Jeopardy” ’70s Show ’70s Show Sons of Anarchy ›› “Perfect Stranger” (2007) Halle Berry. ›› “Flightplan” (2005, Suspense) Jodie Foster. Bret Baier FOX Report The O’Reilly Factor (N) ËHannity (N) On the Record The O’Reilly Factor ËHannity On the Record ÊSEC Grid ÊBest Damn 50 ÊSport Science ÊSEC Gridiron Live ÊUEFA ÊFinal Score ÊCountdown ÊFinal Score ÊBest Damn 50 ÊFinal Score ÊFinal Score ÊPGA Tour Golf: Nationwide Tour ÊPGA Tour Golf BMW Championship -- Second Round. ÊGolfCentrl ÊLPGA Tour Golf: P&G Beauty NW Ark. Champ. M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Touched by an Angel Golden Golden Golden Golden Cheers Cheers ›› “Stone Cold” (2005) Tom Selleck. Å Holmes House House Property Property House Bang, Buck House Unsellable Design Star Property Property House Bang, Buck Zero Hour The Day the Towers Fell 102 Minutes That Changed America Witnesses Hotel Ground Zero (N) Predicted 9/11 102 Minutes That Changed America Witnesses Anatomy Medium Å Medium “Light Sleeper” Project Runway Å Models Project Runway Å Models Frasier Frasier Will-Grace Anatomy ËEd Show ËHardball Å ËCountdown-Olbermann ËMaddow Show ËCountdown-Olbermann ËMaddow Show 9/11: As It Happened Parental The Real World Å ÊNitro Circus ÊNitro Circus Fantasy Fantasy Pranked Fantasy ›› “The Beach” (2000, Drama) Leonardo DiCaprio. Premiere. Pranked In Womb Locked Up Abroad Hubble’s Amazing Dog Whisperer (N) Jerusalem-Sites Hubble’s Amazing Dog Whisperer Jerusalem-Sites Jackson SpongeBob SpongeBob Penguins Penguins Penguins Penguins Hates Chris Hates Chris The Nanny The Nanny Malcolm Malcolm Lopez Lopez CSI CSI: Crime Scn CSI: Crime Scn ÊUFC Unleashed ÊUFC Unleashed To Be Announced Joe Rogan Spcl House Supernanny Å Split Ends How Do I Look? How Do I Look? Fatal Beauty: 15 Most Notorious Women › “The Escape” (1997) Stargate Star Trek: Enterprise Eureka Å Eureka (N) Å Warehouse 13 Å Eureka Å Stargate SG-1 Å Stargate Atlantis Å Friends Seinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy ›› “The Holiday” (2006) Cameron Diaz, Kate Winslet. Å Sex & City Sex & City (:45) ›› “I Spy” (2002) (PA) Å (:45) ›› “Brewster’s Millions” (:15) ›› “Man With a Million” (1953, Comedy) ›› “Three Hours to Kill” (1954) ›› “Million Dollar Baby” (1941) ›› “Always Together” Dress Dress Dress Dress Dress Dress Dress Making Over America Dress Dress Making Over America Dress Dress (:00) Bones CSI: NY “Silent Night” Dark Blue “August” Dark Blue “O.I.S.” CSI: NY “The Closer” Stealth ››› “300” (2007, Action) Gerard Butler. Premiere. Å Chowder Movie BrainRush Star Wars King of Hill King of Hill Chicken Amer Dad Clerks Aqua Teen Oblongs Dingo Vegas Do’s Extreme Megastructures Man Food Man/Food Ghost Adventures Å Weird Travels Å Most Haunted USA Man Food Man/Food Ghost Adventures Å PoliceVids Cops Å Cops Å World’s Wildest Forensic Forensic Power-Justice Forensic Forensic World’s Wildest Forensic Forensic Little Hse. Hillbillies Hillbillies Married... Married... ››› “Field of Dreams” (1989) Kevin Costner, Amy Madigan. Roseanne Roseanne Å Roseanne Roseanne ËNoticiero Un Gancho al Corazón En Nombre del Amor Mañana es La Rosa de Guadalupe Impacto ËNoticiero Desmadrugados Madre (:00) NCIS NCIS “Deception” Å NCIS “Light Sleeper” Monk (N) Å Psych (N) Å Law Order: CI Monk Å Psych Å Tool Acad Real Chance of Love Behind the Music Å TO Show Real Chance of Love Tool Academy ›› “Roll Bounce” (2005) Bow Wow, Chi McBride, Mike Epps. Becker Funniest Home Videos ››› “Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure” (1989) ÊMLB Baseball Chicago White Sox at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. Å ËWGN News Scrubs 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30 12 AM 12:30 1 AM 1:30 Real Time Real Time Hard Knocks (:05) “Pride and Glory” ››› “Shrek” (2001) ‘PG’ Å ›› “Eagle Eye” (2008) Shia LaBeouf. ‘PG-13’ (:20) ››› “Definitely, Maybe” Å (:15) ›› “The Ruins” (2008) ‘R’ MAX Set Lingerie (N) (12:15) “The Erotic Traveler 4: Self Portrait” (2007) ›› “Swordfish” (2001) ‘R’ Å ÊIn NFL Kevin Nealon (:25) ›› “The Eye” (2008) ‘PG-13’ ÊInside the NFL Å Love & Sex › “Awake” (2007) iTV. ‘R’ › “Witless Protection” (2008) iTV. (:05) ›› “Bright Lights, Big City” (12:10) › “Perfect Opposites” (2004) Clean ›› “The Color of Freedom” (2007) ‘R’ Å ››› “Stardust” (2007) Claire Danes. ‘PG-13’ ËCBS News Fortune ËNewsHour Business


tvt09102009