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Heather Pelz


Education Bachelor of Landscape Architecture 2012 University of Guelph Guelph, ON

Horticultural Technician diploma 2007 Sir Sanford Fleming College` Haliburton, ON

High School diploma 2002 Correlieu Secondary School Quesnel, BC

Work Experience Garden Maintenance Supervisor June 2012 - Jan 2013 Great Canadian Landscaping Company Ltd. North Vancouver, BC - directed plant care including trimming trees and shrubs, shearing hedges, and dead-heading perennials - lead maintenance crew through 7-10 sites each day within allotted time

Heather Pelz (778) 870-4159 heather.pelz@gmail.com

Landscape Designer and Project Manager Summer 2011 Horlings Garden Centre Lakefield, ON - consulted with clients to design residential and commercial landscapes - estimated costs for materials and labour, and worked within a budget - coordinated and supervised a construction crew of three

CAD Technician and Office Assistant 2009 - 2011 part-time Fiona Rintoul and Associates Guelph, ON - generated CAD drawings for residential and institutional landscapes - surveyed sites initially and performed maintenance after planting - projects included residential planting plans, a seniors housing complex, and a long term care facility with a wetland for storm water management nearby

Landscape Designer and Salesperson Summer 2010 New North Greenhouses Sault Ste Marie, ON - responsible for sales and maintenance of trees and shrubs - worked directly with clients to create complete residential designs - designed and maintained the centre display gardens


Volunteer Experience

References

BCSLA Intern Rep 2012-2013

Nathan Perkins PhD, FASLA

BCSLA Board of Directors Vancouver, BC

Associate Professor University of Guelph Guelph, ON nperkins@uoguelph.ca 519-824-4120 ext. 58758

Community Studio 2012 City Edge Playground Design Vancouver, BC

Sean Kelly OALA, CLSA, ASLA Red Cross Volunteer 2011-2012 University Blood Donor Clinics Guelph, ON

Guelph Organic Conference 2012

Assistant Professor University of Guelph Guelph, ON skelly03@uoguelph.ca 519-824-4120 ext. 56870

Guelph, ON

Virginie Gysel BLA Peoples Garden Member 2010 Community Garden Sault Ste. Marie, ON

City Beautification Judge 2010

Owner, Landscape Designer SPOTT Gardens Guelph, ON vgysel@sympatico.ca 416-878-2055

Water Feature Category Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Awards ASLA Merit Award 2012

heather.pelz@gmail.com

(778) 870-4159 Heather Pelz


INVENTORY

NORTH

1DYNAMIC GROUNDWORK

lph ue

G of

m

22

5m

La

ird

335 330 325

310 315

PROPERTY LINE

COMMERCIAL

PUBLIC BLDG

OPEN AREA

RESIDENTIAL

INDUSTRIAL

PARK/REC

WATER

315

305

SP

EE

NISKA ROAD

DR

IVE

305

R

AGRICULTURAL ZONE

LOW 0M DEPTH TO WATER TABLE HIGH 46.61M The water table is very close to the surface on the south and east portions of the site as it nears the Speed River.

SOILS

PROPERTY LINE

BOTTOM LAND

SANDY LOAM

DUMFRIES

MUCK

WATER

LOAM

Most of the soil on site is a fertile loam. Much of the soil surrounding the site is also loam that is excellent for agriculture.

PARKS

RIVER WATCH SITE

PROPERTY LINE

VEGETATION

WATERWAYS

FLOODPLAIN

The site is located adjacent to the flood plain with some overlap in the southern portion. Vegetation in the surrounding context is very patchy. The largest patches of vegetation are located within the riparian zone (floodplain). However, there are also several patches with smaller gaps. There is opportunity on the site to create alternate routes for fauna traversing the gaps in the vegetation. River Watch sites are used to monitor the Speed River and collect data about water levels and quality. There are two Grand River Conservation Authority river watch sites in very close proximity to the Guelph Plant site.

EXTRACTION As area C is excavated overburden is moved to area B to fill the pit. This process of filling previously excavated areas with the overburden from current excavation is repeated throughout the site phasing. Excavation moves from the eastern side of the area to the west, using the haul road established in phase I to access area B. Extraction in area C does not extend into the current woodland to keep this area intact and protect the river from unnecessary runoff. As extraction in area C extents below the water table, assumed to be located at 298m, water is pumped from the pit floor and discharged into area B. BIODIVERSITY The conversion of area B to a shallow wetland nearly closes all the gaps in the riparian corridor that follows the Speed River. This facilitates the movement or migration of fauna. As much of the current habitat is sparse and patchy, this connection is vital. The new wetland will filter water pumped from the excavation sites, allowing for gradual percolation through the soil to the Speed River. This also allows the water warmed by the extraction process to cool before entering the freshwater system. Plants will evapotranspirate some water back to the atmosphere so as not to overburden the river system.

A

B

III

DESIGN Extraction in area D brings the operation closer to the main haul and allows the closure and removal of the haul road in area B, which inclu decompacting the soil. Planting of wetland species over the filled pit and o pioneer forest species on the surrounding lands brings the site closer to its rehabilitation. Area C begins to be filled with overburden from area D to br up to the same elevation as area B. In the end, these two zones will be primarily undisturbed areas with limited access for research purposes in ord to separate human-use areas from wildlife habitat as much as possible. Cl in area C are collapsed as in area B to facilitate eventual wildlife access to water.

EXTRACTION Area D is adjacent to the main infrastructure for processing materials which eases transportation. This is also the location of current stockpiles, which were used initially for the infill of area B, or could be use during this phase to backfill area C. As area C is to be similar in elevation area B, overburden from areas D and E will be used to fill it, with supplem clean fill from off-site as required. As material is extracted from areas D a water is pumped out and discharged into areas B and C.

BIODIVERSITY The building of shallow wetland habitat in areas B and C t to remain undisturbed after rehabilitation creates one of the largest patches habitat along this section of the Speed River. This will provide refuge and for fauna requiring interior habitat. In phase III area B is planted with vege that will act as biofilters, cleaning the water as it passes through to the Sp River. Native vegetation for the wetland includes sedges orchids, iris, dogw and willows, among others. For the forest plantings, species include alders poplar, birch, pine, and fir. Large woody debris is placed along the shoreli and in the newly planted forest to add nutrients to the soil, and to create v microclimates to aid in the growth of young plant material.

RO W LA

KOSTIUK PELZ WILLIAMSON PHONE: 1-519-546-8561 EMAIL: patriciagooch@gmail.com

AGRICULTURAL ZONE

0

50M

100M

PEDESTRIAN WALK BUILDINGS SHOP, SHED, GARAGE RESIDENTIAL INDUSTRIAL CABIN, HUT OFFICE/SCALE WOOD FRAME OTHER WATERWELL SPEEDWELL RIVER PROPERTY LAND EXTRACTIONS AREA EXTRACTION LINE

300M

LEGEND 400M

1:5000

500M

SURFACE DRAINAGE TRAFFIC SUN MOVEMENT DIRECTION OF SUNSHINE FLOODPLAIN WIND DIRECTION PROPERTY LINE ELEVATION CONTOUR VIEW WIDE RIPARIAN HABITAT NARROW RIPARIAN HABITAT PATCHY AREA STOCKPILE SILT POND EXISTING VEGETATION

EXISTING CONDITIONS

Dynamic Groundwork Heather Pelz (778) 870-4159 heather.pelz@gmail.com

II

D

C

B

DESIGN The operation moves to area C and rehabilitation begins in area B. The goal for areas B and C is to have them provide shallow wetland habitat in keeping with the local surrounding landscape. With this in mind, the vertical rock faces remaining after extraction are collapsed using large hoe rams and other appropriate demolition machinery with a resulting slope of 4:1 or more gradual. Clean infill material to bring the pit close to surrounding ground level will need to be brought in initially and this may be sourced from demolition projects in the surrounding county. Because the extraction removes a large amount of material from the site, it is appropriate that other clean ‘waste’ material be brought in to replace it. Silt from the three settling ponds, and top soil from the berms, is used to top off the filled pit and prepare the site for planting.

F

AD

INDUSTRIAL EXTRACTIVE ZONE

CONSTRAINTS • Majority of the site will be excavated below the water table • Cliffs act as a barrier to the water and therefore impede wildlife access • Residences are in close proximity to the site and therefore noise, dust and vibration must be minimized • Fences may limit wildlife access to the site, affecting biodiversity • Proximity to the Speed River means involvement with the water table must be considered • Relatively thin overburden provides less material for infill, so outside resources such as clean fill are required

2010 OSSGA Student Design Competition Sponsored By:

OSSGA Gravel Pit Rehabilitation Design Competition Fall 2010

BIODIVERSITY The agroforestry operation in area A is planted with native species of high commercial value. This may include, but is not limited to, black cherry, black walnut, red and white oak, red and sugar maple, and white pine. While the stand is mixed to a certain degree, it is recommended that the black walnut species be clustered in a pure stand to prevent large areas of soil from being affected by Juglone, a natural plant toxin emitted by black walnut.

INDUSTRIAL EXTRACTIVE ZONE

E

A

C

B

EXTRACTION Initial extraction takes place in areas farthest from the main road, Wellington County Road 124, and closest to existing riparian habitat. Looking at the site in the larger context, there are two significant gaps in the forested corridor along the Speed River. One is in the City of Guelph and the other is adjacent to area B. By initiating extraction, and therefore rehabilitation, in areas B and C, Lafarge is able to narrow this corridor gap quickly. With areas B and C being farthest from the main haul road, once work in these sites is completed they can remain undisturbed for the remainder of the process. During extraction of area B, overburden will be stockpiled in area C, which is currently a relatively flat site that will allow quick and easy access. The final extraction elevation will be 18 metres below the water table to rest at 280m.

D

ITE

OPPORTUNITIES • Site is close to existing amenities such as commercial areas and City of Guelph roadways • Proximity to the Speed River strengthens opportunities to increase biodiversity and habitat patch size • International Year of Biodiversity – site provides an opportunity for Lafarge to showcase dedication to environmentally responsible excavation and rehabilitation procedures. • Relatively thin overburden makes harvesting materials efficient • Site shape provides an opportunity for ecologically focused phasing that considers adjacent riparian area • Location near roadway offers opportunities for public interaction with the quarry once all phases are completed • Excavation creates dramatic cliffs

C

F

N

VEGETATION AND HYDROLOGY

SITE ANALYSIS

E

A

WH

LOW 271.83M CONTOUR HIGH 385.71M The site is located in a low point relative to the surroundings. The surrounding area has very little variance in elevation. As the map shows, there is a difference of just over 100m across this region.

300 305 300

D

DESIGN Rehabilitation begins with an agroforestry planting in area A. It is assumed from information provided on site that this area has no material for extraction and will remain at its present elevation. As the extraction process may continue on this property for fifty to one hundred years, there is an opportunity for high value trees to be planted that will provide wildlife habitat and forge in the present, and material for construction of proposed buildings on site in the final phase. Additionally, solar panels and wind turbines are installed at the onset to provide power to extraction infrastructure, with any extra being sold back to the grid.

310

300

F

I

320

RURAL ZONE

Most of the surrounding land use is agricultural. There is also a large park area northeast of the site and following the Speed River. On the outer edges of Guelph, closest to the property is a large area of residential zoning.

E

Stone

KEY MAP

50

0m

RURAL ZONE

HAZARD LAND ZONE LAND-USE

PHASING

m

0m

College

815

90

300

PROPERTY LINE MAJOR HIGHWAY MAJOR ROAD LOCAL ROAD ROADS The site is south of County Road 124 and west of Highway 6, the Hanlon. It is located southeast of Guelph.

City

320

TOWNSHIP OF GUELPH

TOWNSHIP OF PUSLINCH

RURAL ZONE

Hanlon

To

County Rd 124

RURAL ZONE

870m

305

1290m

600m

310

SITE The Guelph Plant is a sand and gravel pit and a dolomite limestone quarry, with concrete and asphalt recycling and processing on the property. There are two areas on site noted as being previously rehabilitated. However, these areas still have material of value to be extracted and so will be affected by future operations. The limit of extraction excludes the ‘Stonehenge’ site in the northwest portion of the Guelph Plant. Three settling ponds exist where sediment from the gravel washing process was deposited. The silt contained in these ponds is rich in minerals and can be used to enhance soils on site during the rehabilitation process. Along Whitelaw Road, there is a wire and post fence. Other fence placement was unconfirmed during ground-truthing due to the large size of the site.

Rd

RURAL INDUSTRIAL ZONE

WELLINGTON COUNTY ROAD 124

RURAL INDUSTRIAL ZONE

MAIN ENTRANCE

CONTEXT The site follows the contours of the Speed River, which offers unique challenges and opportunities. Between the property line and the river, and in some places crossing the property line, is a riparian zone composed mainly of Eastern White Cedar. There are significant vegetation gaps in this zone and improving the connection across them would greatly benefit local wildlife. While the City of Guelph is nearby, the zoning west of the Hanlon is primarily residential in built areas. The Guelph Plant site is easily accessible from County Road 124 along the existing haul road. As the material extraction will extend below the water table, the level of the water table is assumed to be at an elevation of 298m. Much of the current site surface is between 305m and 320m above sea level. Given that extraction can occur up to 18m below the water table, the pit bottom will be at 280m before rehabilitation.

315

124

320

LOCATION The Guelph Plant property lies over the border between the City of Guelph and the Township of Puslinch. Its 141 hectares stretch south to the floodplain of the Speed River and east to just beyond Whitelaw Road. While its neighbours to the north include mainly industrial or commercial shops, much of the surrounding landscape is zoned agricultural. There are a few residential lots adjacent to the site along its northern boundaries. Care must be taken to reduce the effects of noise, dust and vibrations for these residents.

2DYNAMIC GRO OF 3

320

Co un ty

OF 3

WINDMILLS AND SOLAR PANELS SUPPLY CLEAN ENERGY FOR OPERATIONS ON SITE, WITH EXCESS SOLD BACK TO THE GRID.

A FOREST IS PLANTED IN PHASE I TO SUPPLY LUMBER FOR CONSTRUCTION IN PHASE IV. THIS LUMBER CAN ALSO BE USED TO GENERATE REVENUE IN THE FUTURE.

PITS IN AREAS B AND C ARE BACKFILLED TO CREATE WETLANDS THAT COOL AND FILTER WATER BEFORE IT ENTERS THE SPEED RIVER.

2010 OSSGA Student Design Competition Sponsored By:

KOSTIUK PELZ WILLIAMSON PHONE: 1-519-546-8561 EMAIL: patriciagooch@gmail.com


3DYNAMIC GROUNDWORK

OUNDWORK

ed n to mentary and E,

that is s of rest etation peed wood, s, ine varied

D

A C

DESIGN Area E is the western-most zone, nearly surrounding the ‘Stonehenge’ property. The backfilling of area C is completed, followed by the addition of topsoil and plant material to match the wetland and forest habitats of area B. The haul road is closed and removed back to area D, where clean fill is needed to build up the islands. Other than the shallow slopes of the islands, cliffs generally remain around this pond, though they are stepped at varied intervals from 2 to 5 metres. Areas D and E are both kept as deep ponds to provide cold water habitat to aquatic species. The cliffs will be partially collapsed in the eastern portion of this area to ease the transition to the shallow wetlands. EXTRACTION Final extraction will take place in area E, with overburden being used in the filling of area C and in the wetland connection between area C and the pond of area D. As in phase II, extraction is kept more than the minimum setback from the river, following the existing tree line. BIODIVERSITY The high south facing cliffs of area D offer excellent opportunities for micro-habitat creation. A stepped and rough faced wall provides niches where water can pool; the stone can receive and radiate heat in small pockets; a crevice can provide shade and protection from the wind. In short, opportunities abound to attract a great diversity of flora and fauna. The islands offer protected nesting grounds for water fowl, away from the accessible edges of the wetlands.

D

A C

B

IV

F

E

DESIGN With extraction completed, finalizing the rehabilitation of the different areas is the priority. Rehabilitation of area E is similar to that of D, with the focus on creating micro-habitat opportunities in the south-facing cliffs. Another island, larger than those on area D, is built up in area E using imported clean fill before the area is allowed to fill with water. A connecting stream is opened up between the areas D and E to allow movement between the two. Haul roads are removed or allowed to be covered with water. EXTRACTION Infrastructure is dismantled and removed from site. Components such as foundations and structures that will not be reassembled at other sites are used as clean fill where deemed appropriate. Access to the site from County Road 124 remains as the point of entry. The total area extracted covers 73 hectares. BIODIVERSITY The two deep ponds and two shallow wetlands, the stepped, rough cliff faces, and the extended riparian forest provide diverse habitat for birds, fish, pollinators, and small mammals, and provide stronger continuity of native vegetation along the Speed River.

D

A

320

305

0

B

VI

4

1

COMPLETED REHABILITATION EXTRACTION LINE

1:5000

400M

500M

5

SUSPENSION BRIDGE

280

3

SP

DEEP POND

DR

6

310

305

PICNIC AREA

R WETLAND BOARDWALK 300

B2

FINAL CONCEPT

WETLAND

LAYING THE GROUND WORK FOR BIODIVERSITY IN REHABILITATION WHILE LAYERING OPPORTUNITIES FOR RESEARCH, PERSONAL EXPERIENCE, AND WILDLIFE HABITAT CREATION.

PICNIC AREA • Located close to trails for maintenance and access • Secondary uses as research shelter, outdoor education centre, or host to outdoor events

VERTICAL SCALE 1:1000

PHASING PLAN

280

310

B1

road

forest

cliff

deep pool

boardwalk

wetland

road

290

C2

300

310 300

290 fish lunkers and boardwalk

HORIZONTAL SCALE 1:10,000

C1

A2

B2 forest

trail

susp. bridge

2010 OSSGA Student Design Competition Sponsored By:

KOSTIUK PELZ WILLIAMSON PHONE: 1-519-546-8561 EMAIL: patriciagooch@gmail.com

3 WOODEN BRIDGE ACROSS COVE

MEDITATION CABINS • Modern, minimalist cabin retreats • Visually secluded from trail system, but close location for maintenance accessibility • Opportunities for meditation/writing/research in solitude • Oriented to maximize energy efficiency

NOTE Five metre contour intervals communicate the design intent clearly and this would be complicated rather than enhanced by showing contours at one metre intervals.

300

6

RESEARCH PLOTS • Opportunity to work with the University of Guelph • Hardwood forest area to grow valuable hardwood for selective harvest and use in construction of proposed infrastructure • Wetland, permaculture, microclimate, and groundwater research areas • Long term quarry rehabilitation monitoring

A2

A1

ISLANDS WITHIN THE DEEP PONDS OFFER PROTECTED RESTING AND NESTING HABITAT FOR WATERFOWL.

2 RIDGE WALK ON CLIFF

DEEP PONDS • Provide deep cold water habitat for aquatic species • The depth of the ponds is dictated by the depth of excavation which was assumed to be 18m below the water table to stop at 280m • Islands within deep ponds provide safe refuge for prey species UNDULATING CLIFF FACE • Coves will support diverse species • Varied trail route and viewpoints excite trail users • Cliffs were modified in phases IV and V using demolition equipment to make the faces stepped and rough for microclimatic variance

WETLAND

The rehabilitation design for the Guelph Plant, Dynamic Groundwork, celebrates 2010 as the United Nations International Year of Biodiversity by highlighting Lafarge’s commitment to environmental stewardship. Through a series of progressive rehabilitation phases, two wetlands and two deep ponds diversify the available habitat. Around the two deep ponds the design takes advantage of steep south-facing cliffs to create micro-habitats for a great diversity of native flora and fauna. These favourable microclimates increase thermal comfort, creating people friendly space. Finally, the scene is tied together with an open conference centre in place of the existing quarry infrastructure, its geometric form connecting it to the vertical faces of the cliffs. While the rental of the conference centre will provide revenue, human use is limited to the area surrounding the eastern pond so as to leave the majority of the site undisturbed after rehabilitation. A conference centre was chosen to add an amenity area for residents of Guelph living west of the Hanlon Parkway, who currently have little space for recreation. Current options for conferences held in Guelph include a few large hotels. The Guelph Plant site provides a scenic, memorable area removed from the busy activities of the city. Progressive rehabilitation of the site is phased from east to west, allowing the main haul road to be backed out as extraction of each defined area is completed. Overall, this design lays the groundwork for showcasing Lafarge’s commitment to environmental stewardship in the rehabilitation of pit and quarry sites.

1 CONVENTION CENTRE

INTERPRETIVE RIDGE WALK WITH LOOKOUTS • Interpretive/educational opportunities • Highlights views to convention centre and view towards waterfront • Areas for public access separate public from naturalized areas • Provides unique opportunities for guests to interact with the quarry landscape BIOSWALES • Located around all roads and parking areas • Filter sediments and pollutants from roads before entering the ponds or wetland areas

IVE

310

THE GRADUAL PROGRESSION FROM WETLAND TO FOREST EASES THE TRANSITION TO THE WATER AND CREATES NICHE HABITATS.

OBSERVATION PLATFORM • Destination for guests and nearby residents • Attached to convention centre and cantilevered from cliff • Revenue generation through strategic placement of bistro attached to platform • Close proximity to ridge walk • Provides a dramatic experience of the quarry

315

320

CLIFFS ARE MODIFIED TO EASE THE TRANSITION TO THE WATER LEVEL AND TO CREATE MICROCLIMATES FOR NATIVE SPECIES.

CONVENTION CENTRE • LEED Gold certified • A place for researchers and others to congregate • Generate revenue as a wedding/event destination or hotel • Geometric architecture to accentuate cliff features • Uses wind and sustainable energy sources to supplement building energy supply • Layers public and academic uses • Interpretive signage in the building to highlight Lafarge’s commitment to biodiversity and site rehabilitation

SOCIAL • Create open space for public • Minimize negative impact on surrounding neighbourhoods during extraction and remediation • Provide amenities to nearby residents • Incorporate research potential for university including ecology and groundwater

C1 MEDITATION CABINS

2

280 295

EE

PROGRAM

ENVIRONMENTAL • Increased biodiversity • Progressive rehabilitation • Provide patch connections to surrounding context • Cluster human use within the site ECONOMIC • Incorporate revenue into design • Create clean energy • Minimise topsoil movement and compaction • Use materials on site in proposed developments

320

RIDGE WALK

The trees planted in phase I have reached maturity. They are selectively harvested and milled for lumber to be used in the construction of the various proposed developments. Wood can also be sold to generate revenue. A LEED Gold standard conference centre is the central component of the design, with ecologically responsible surface parking and outdoor picnic spaces nearby. Paths tour the perimeter of the pond in area D with a bridge offering expansive views of both deep ponds and the surrounding cliffs. The path meanders as a boardwalk where the wetland narrows and drains into the larger pond. Trees harvested from the agroforestry area are replaced with new plantings of the same species selection so that they can be used in future construction, renovation, or restoration.

ACTIVE REHABILITATION

300M

280

280 CONVENTION CENTRE OBSERVATION PLATFORM UNDULATING CLIFF FACE

ACTIVE EXCAVATION

100M

C2 DEEP POND

LEGEND

50M

B1

300

C

B

V

F

GOALS

A1

S DRUARFAC INA E GE

der liffs o the

F

E

315

310

N

road udes of s final ring it

E

OF 3

forest

speed river

WETLAND • During progressive rehabilitation, the wetlands are the locations of discharged water from the excavation where the water is able to cool and filter through vegetation before entering the Speed River • The undulating bottom will be created during progressive rehabilitation with overburden from other areas and clean fill brought in from off-site • Irregularity on bottom surface will enhance microclimatic opportunities and increase biodiversity • Used for research to study the success of gravel pit rehabilitations • Water drains from the wetlands into the deeper ponds BOARDWALK • Elevates pedestrians out of sensitive wetland • Creates shaded habitat areas for flora and fauna • Strategically placed lunkers provide protected fish rearing areas SUSPENSION BRIDGE • Spans cliffs to complete recreational loop • Provides a distinct vertical space experience within Guelph

290 280 forest

cliff

4 MEDITATION CABIN

DESIGN SOLUTION

deep pond conference ctr. deep pond

island

shore forest

heather.pelz@gmail.com

5 LONG SUSPENSION BRIDGE

(778) 870-4159 Heather Pelz


Phasing Plan

Excavation Rehabilitation Complete

Dynamic Groundwork The Guelph Plant is a 141 hectare sand and gravel pit and dolomitic limestone quarry, with concrete and asphalt processing on site. Rehabilitation planning had to consider the bordering Speed River and its riparian zone, neighbouring residential and agricultural uses, extraction levels below the water table, and the dramatic cliffs resulting from extraction processes. Capitalizing on the International Year of Biodiversity, the rehabilitation design highlights Lafarges commitment to environmental stewardship. A series of progressive rehabilitation phases result in two wetlands and two deep ponds to diversify the available habitat.The design takes advantage of steep south-facing cliffs to create micro-habitats for a great diversity of native flora and fauna. An open conference centre in place of the existing quarry infrastructure will provide revenue, though human use is limited to the area surrounding the eastern pond so as to leave the majority of the site undisturbed after rehabilitation. While the group worked cohesively on the whole project, my focus was on the phasing process. Progressive rehabilitation of the site is phased from east to west, allowing the main haul road to be backed out as extraction of each defined area is completed. The wetlands created near the beginning of the process help cool and filter the water pumped from the continuing operations. Heather Pelz (778) 870-4159 heather.pelz@gmail.com


Agroforestry Convention Centre Deep Ponds Suspension Bridge Ridge Walk Wetlands

heather.pelz@gmail.com

(778) 870-4159 Heather Pelz


Ridge Walk

Drawn by Jen Williamson

Road

Forest

Cliff

Deep Pond

Boardwalk

Wetland

Road

a

b

a

Horizontal scale is compressed to show topography clearly

b

Heather Pelz (778) 870-4159 heather.pelz@gmail.com


b b a

Horizontal scale is compressed to show topography clearly

a

Speed River

Forest

Suspension Bridge

Trail to Convention Centre

Forest

Convention Centre Drawn by Patricia Gooch heather.pelz@gmail.com

(778) 870-4159 Heather Pelz


Simply Design to improve the journey for University of Guelph

Thesis Abstract

Economically-oriented planning does not incorporate aesthetic preference, a key factor in an individuals decision making. This slows the adoption of new ideas, technologies, and behaviours that do not appeal to perceptual experience, though they may be based on valid knowledge. This paper explores the cause and effect relationships between experience, behaviour, and preference, and applies it to the negative impacts of car dominance to promote cycling as a sustainable transportation alternative. The aesthetic quality of a cycling network can either encourage or discourage its use and must therefore be integrated into the design. The solution, then, is in the process rather than in the product as user preferences must be obtained and incorporated. It is the physically-oriented, tangible elements such as infrastructure and spatial layout, and the perceptually-oriented, intangible elements such as aesthetics, coherence, and perceived safety that are necessary to make the cycling network both useful and enjoyable.

vi

Ontario Veterinary College

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332

330 329 328

327

v

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325

i

i

331

context: City of Guelph

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326 325 324 325 324

324 324 323

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327 327 326

Centennial Collegiate Vocational Institute

A

Heather Pelz (778) 870-4159 heather.pelz@gmail.com

vi

Heather Pelz

Legend: Map Left Existing Trees Parking and Driveways Hydro Poles Bus Stops Sidewalks Roads Buildings Legend: Map Right Commercial Bldgs Residential Bldgs Schools Contours (1m intervals) Common Student Path

Circulation & Safety

v

324 325 326

Thesis Design Winter 2012

N

College Avenue is wide and straight with a hill just east of Edinburgh, and a hill at Gordon Street. This open feel encourages drivers to travel above the speed limit increasing the danger of collision for all users, especially in front of the two high schools and the public school. With residences set far back from the road, and wide lots spacing buildings far apart, the area has low activity for people, but plenty of opportunity for natural elements.

323

Simply Design

e

Av

Landscape & Identity

322

College Avenue Public School

College Heights Secondary School

ge

lle

Co

ii

B

1

of 5 cyclists, pedestrians, and motorists

Currently, cyclists ride with traffic between the Hanlon and Edinburgh, and close beside vehicles east of Edinburgh. Their differing speeds create a hazard for both. Buses pulling over at stops enter the bike lane, and pedestrians cross at multiple points along the road, often far from crosswalks.

iii

iv

Intersections & Clarity

Intersections are the most frequent location of collisions for all road users. The bike lane on College ends several meteres east of the intersection with Edinburgh, leaving both cyclists and motorists without clear direction. At the intersection of College and Gordon cyclists and motorists must cross paths in many situations, increasing the possibility for collisions to occur.

Three Sections

iii

N

Following the route of a cyclist from his residence on Janefield Ave to the University of Guelph at Gordon Street, the journey is divided into three sections. In Section A there are four lanes of traffic and no bike lanes. The area is mainly residential, with two high schools and a public school. Section B has an open field up hill to the south, and widely spaced residences set far back from the road to the north. Bike lanes run on each side of the road. The Onterio Veterinary College and the intersection with Gordon street are prominent in Section C with bike lanes continuing through.


Section A Hanlon Converting the two outside traffic lanes to bike lanes with curbed bioswales not only increases safety for cyclists and motorists by separating their paths, but also encourages pedestrians to cross the street in designated areas. Where bus stops are available, pedestrian crossings are marked on bike lanes.

1.5m

2of 5 Section B Edinburgh to Smith

to Edinburgh

4.6

1.8

1.8

7.2

1.8

1.8

5.2

1.5

Shifting and expanding the road to the south allows for the inclusion of two bioswales. The boulevards are planted with meadow grasses and wildflowers to compliment the imitation cedar rail fence. This long swath, visible along the whole section at once, gives the impression of a prairie or agricultural field.

3

of 5

4of 5

At the Intersection

1.5m

3.0

1.8

1.4

7.2

1.4

1.8

3.0

1.5m

1.5

Bioswale Buffer

1

Section C Smith to Gordon

2.1

1.8

7.2

1.8

varies

1.5

varies

Straight Through the cyclist keeps to the outside of the intersection. If a vehicle is turning right, eye contact is possible where they meet

0.3m min. depth soil

Existing Subgrade 3/4� Clear Aggregate Stormwater Facility Soil Concrete Curb and Gutter

Right Turn the cyclist follows the curb and the vehicle stays outside the bike lane

inflow check dam

The busy intersection at Scottsdale Drive is easier to navigate for all users when the lanes and crosswalks are clearly marked. The raised curbs are only necessary here on two corners. 0m

1

1:75

2

3

4

N 5m

Inlets in the curb allow surface water to enter the swale from both the traffic lane and bike lane. Check dams allow silt and pollutants from run off to settle while reducing erosion by slowing water flow during storm events.

2

0m

1

1:75 2

3

N 4

Left Turn the cyclist goes straight, then waits at the far corner for the light to change, at no time needing to cross lanes of moving traffic

3

Circulation The fence keeps vehicles and bicycles on separate paths and makes pedestrian crossings more predictable. The recycled tires used to build the fence will absorb some of the impact should a collision occur, further protecting all road users.

Landscape The vegetated swale collects runoff from the traffic and bike lanes and prevents the gravel and sand from collecting in the bike lane. At night, the road is illuminated by lighting along the fence, creating a visual rhythm. Heather Pelz

0m

5m

Heather Pelz

1

2

1:75 3

4

N

5m

4

Intersection The painted lanes at the intersections are protected at the corners by low concrete islands that keep right-turning vehicles outside the bike lane. Where motorists and cyclists cross paths they will be able to make eye contact to reduce confusion and reduce the risk of collision.

heather.pelz@gmail.com

Heather Pelz

(778) 870-4159 Heather Pelz


Design 1.5m

4.6

1.8

1.8

7.2

1.8

1.8

5.2

1.5

The final design contains four main elements - a bioswale separating the traffic and bike lanes, a rail fence made of recycled tires running the length of the bioswale, plantings along the boulevards, and intersections redesigned to minimize cyclists and motorists crossing paths. The rail fence of recycled tires is both functional in separating the vehicles from the cyclists, and is also a sculptural piece that contributes to the agricultural feel of the journey. This provides an element of protection for cyclists and vehicles, and makes crossing the street safer as it directs pedestrians to cross at designated places. Solar lighting above the fence posts compliments the existing street lighting and creates a visual rhythm along the avenue at night. The swale that supports the rail fence and buffers the bike lane from traffic also functions as a filter for surface runoff. The plantings in the bouldevards are one of two elements that create the agricultural feel for the site, reminiscient of the area’ s rural past.

Section A Heather Pelz (778) 870-4159 heather.pelz@gmail.com

At the intersection existing bike lanes are shifted to the outside and crosswalks moved back, using the existing infrastructure and keeping costs to a minimum. This improved awareness reduces the risk of collision and encourages cycling and walking as safe and enjoyable modes of sustainable transportation.


Gordon Street Intersection heather.pelz@gmail.com

(778) 870-4159 Heather Pelz


Morgenstern Residence Residential Design - New North Garden Centre Summer 2010

Heather Pelz (778) 870-4159 heather.pelz@gmail.com


heather.pelz@gmail.com

(778) 870-4159 Heather Pelz


Higgins Residence Residential Design - Horlings Garden Centre Summer 2011 The challenge at the Higgins cottage on Stoney Lake was to direct drainage to prevent soil washing away and to create lawn and garden areas. We dug a stream at the outlet of the natural spring and sloped the driveway and yard toward this side of the property We built up the edges with limestone boulders and plantings that included iris, willow, asters, and lilies. After the spring runoff the lower part of the yard was built up to accomodate a fire pit and lawn. As the designer and project manager at Horlings Garden Centre I met with the clients, drew up a plan, ordered material, scheduled my crew, coordinated with subcontractors, and supervised construction,.

Heather Pelz (778) 870-4159 heather.pelz@gmail.com


heather.pelz@gmail.com

(778) 870-4159 Heather Pelz








   1

6'

6'







CL

4'6"





  



1'6"





  

  

3 10.10.27 Planting Plan HP 2 10.10.18 Design HP 1 10.10.01 Base Plan HP  

2'5"

4'



2'2"



4'1"

CL

1'5"

5'2"



 9" TYP 8'

   

6'







 

 

0

Puddy Residence Landscape Construction I Fall 2010 Heather Pelz (778) 870-4159 heather.pelz@gmail.com

5

10

20 feet










  

1









Cc











Gt

1

Al

1



Ca

1



Pp



As

1



 

1

 





Tc

1













Fg

1

Ba

Vl

1

1

Bp

1

Ps

1



Qr

1

0

5

10

20 feet

3 10.10.27 Planting Plan HP 2 10.10.18 Design HP 1 10.10.01 Base Plan HP   

Trees and Shrubs Symbol Botanical Name As Acer saccharinum Al Amalanchier laevis Ba Betula alleghaniensis Bp Betula papyrifera Ca Cornus alternifolio Cc Cercis canadensis Fg Fagus grandifolia Gt Gleditsia triacanthos Pa Pinus strobus Pp Prunus pennsylvanica Qr Quercus rubra Tc Tsuga canadensis Vl Viburnum lentago



Common Name Silver Maple Alleghany Serviceberry Yellow Birch Paper Birch (clump) Pagoda Dogwood Eastern Redbud American Beech Honey Locust White Pine Pin Cherry Red Oak Eastern Hemlock Nannyberry

Qty 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Size Spec 40mm 250cm single stem 30mm 30mm 3-5 stem 35mm 3-5 stem 60cm 3GAL specimen 45mm WB 35mm 175cm WB 30mm 30mm 150cm BB 60cm 3GAL

    





 



 

heather.pelz@gmail.com

(778) 870-4159 Heather Pelz


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT



35 %



op e .0

Sl

98

98

.5

99

.0

TEE SIGN

99

.5

DIRECTION OF FIRST HOLE

X LX



Contractor shall not grade the first tee

0

0.0

10

Proposed Elevation

100.00

.27

10

Existing Contours

2%

Direction of Slope

99

0.0

Vegetated Infiltration Catch Basin

2%

Direction of Swale Flow 99.37

99.60

99.81

99.81

99.52

99.52



99 .23

100.30 100.35

99.52

99

.85

2%

2%

2%

HP 100.50

2%

.61

99.52

TO MEN'S CHANGEROOM

2% 2%

2%

T.S. 99.86 B.S. 99.71

T.S. 99.71 B.S. 99.56

99.56 2%

2%

99

100.42

T.S. 99.79 B.S. 99.64

99.64

T.S. 99.94 B.S. 99.79

99.94

100.42

1

08.11.10

Base Plan

MS



4%



99.77

Stairs to be constructed as shown with a 150mm rise and 300mm tread

2%

99

.87

2%

99.84

.79

99.80 99.80 2% 99.77 T.S 99.80 T.W. 99. 67 B.W. 99.17 8%

99.80

CLUB HOUSE FFE 100.15

99.80 14%

99.17

8%

T.S 99.20 33% T.W. 98.54 B.W. 98.15 T.W. 98.54 B.W. 97.54 97.54 97.54 2% 97.51

8%

T.S. 97.55

T.W. 98.05 B.W. 97.75



8% 98.38

98.18

T.S. 98.15

T.W. 99. 67 B.W. 98.54 98.45

2%

T.W. 98.68 B.W. 98.18 B.S 98.15 2%



5.4%

B.S 99.20 2%

97.51

99

99.80

99.80

2% 99.80 99.80

100.10 2%

99.76

2%

35%

99.79

99.84 99.84

Slo

pe

100.00

Contractor shall grade away from waikway at a 2% slope.

99.84

8%

17%

33% T.W. 98.05 B.W. 97.55 .55



97

Stairs to be constructed as shown with a 150mm rise and 300mm tread

 



PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Norfolk Golf and Country Club Landscape Construction II Fall 2010 Heather Pelz (778) 870-4159 heather.pelz@gmail.com



PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

FIRST TEE 100.20

Existing Elevation

100.00


150

  Project Title

Jerseyville Community Centre



2501 Jerseyville Road South Jerseyville, Ontario

2000

640

1

   

640

640

Fence Section Plan

1:20

Notes



200 60





4000

1200



 

80 

500 



170 535 110

1. The contractor shall check and verify all dimensions and conditions on the project and immediately report any discrepanices to the owner before preceding with work. 2. All dimensions are in millimetres unless otherwise stated. 3. This drawing is an instrument of professional services and is intended for the use only in connection with the project covered by the consultant agreement. 4. All base information provided by Arty Davis Design Inc.





 

1000



295

273



2

3 Fence Section Elevation

Masonry Column Section-Elevation

1:20

1:16 4

09.27.2010 Site Plan Resubmittal

3

04.21.2010 Site Plan Resubmittal

2

03.17.2010 Site Plan Resubmittal

1

02.17.2010 Site Plan Submission

No.

Date

Item

Revisions

HP Drawn

HP Checked

# Project No.

Sept 27, 2010 Date

Sheet Title

Fence Details

Scale

As Shown

Sheet No.

L3

Jerseyville Community Centre Landscape Construction II Fall 2010 heather.pelz@gmail.com

(778) 870-4159 Heather Pelz


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