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KU SADP Commons | Group Documentation [h. patrick bayer] [timothy g. ostrander] [d’andre q. curtis]

Arch 609 Comprehensive Studio Professor Steve Padget, AIA, LEED AP Spring 2013 University of Kansas School of Architecture, Design, + Planning


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[preface] KU SADP Commons is a student architectural design project, assigned by and completed under the guidance of Professor Steve Padget, AIA, LEED AP. The project is the focus of Arch 609: Comprehensive Studio at the University of Kansas School of Architecture, Design and Planning. The design is done in three parts: individual predesign, individual design, and group design. At the mid-way point during the semester, students presented their individual designs. After a critique, they formed groups. These groups had two basic choices: to choose one individual design to develop further as a group or to combine individual designs into one group design. H. Patrick Bayer, Timothy G. Ostrander, and D’Andre Q. Curtis chose one individual design to develop further. This document therefor presents the pre-design and individual design work of H. Patrick Bayer, followed by the group development of that design.


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[table of contents] Pre-Design_ Bayer Project Introduction Personal Design Philosopy Project Goals Campus Sustainability Plan Goals of General Education KU SADP Mission

7 9 10 11 12 13

Programming Program + Principles Campus Enrollment Statistics_ By School Campus Enrollment Statistics_ By Class Project Budget Space Budget Adjacencies Design Parameters Conceptual Iterations

15 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Site Analysis Campus Design + Construction Campus Landscape Master Plan Shadow Studies Sun Angles Wind Temperature Precipitation Trajectories Pedestrian Paths Stormwater

27 29 30 36 37 38 39 39 40 41 42

Precedent Studies Building Addition Form + Section Ecomachine Culture + Identity Design Ventilation Principles

45 46 47 48 49 50


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Mid-Critique_ Bayer Design Process Concept + Parti Culture Process, Production, Iteration Section Development Plan Development

53 54 55 56 57 58

Realization Visualization Floorplans Section_ Longitudinal Exploded Axonometric_ Structure + HVAC HVAC_ Third Party Resource Structure_ Third Party Resource Exploded Axonometric_ Program Egress Sun + Ventilation Daylighting Auditorium Acoustics Rainwater Harvesting

61 62 68 70 71 72 74 79 80 82 84 86 88

Final Design_ Bayer, Ostrander, Curtis Final Critique_ May 8 Presentation + Group Introduction Site Plan Floor Plans Visualization Elevations Sections Axonometric Wall Sections

91 92 94 96 100 114 120 128 129

Post-Critique_ Redesign + Reflection Bayer Ostrander Curtis

143 144 150 154


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Pre-Design_ Bayer Project Introduction Personal Design Philosopy Project Goals Campus Sustainability Plan Goals of General Education KU SADP Mission

7 9 10 11 12 13

Programming Program + Principles Campus Enrollment Statistics_ By School Campus Enrollment Statistics_ By Class Project Budget Space Budget Adjacencies Design Parameters Conceptual Iterations

15 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Site Analysis Campus Design + Construction Campus Landscape Master Plan Shadow Studies Sun Angles Wind Temperature Precipitation Trajectories Pedestrian Paths Stormwater Precedent Studies Building Addition Form + Section Ecomachine Culture + Identity Design Ventilation Principles

27 29 30 36 37 38 39 39 40 41 42 45 46 47 48 49 50


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[project introduction] Recently, the University of Kansas School of Architecture and Urban Design merged with the University of Kansas School of Design, creating the University of Kansas School of Architecture, Design, and Planning. This merger aims to support a more interdisciplinary and collaborative design process and a blending of design professions. This project will support this transition.

Personal Design Philosopy Project Goals Campus Sustainability Plan Goals of General Education KU SADP Mission

9 10 11 12 13


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[personal design philosophy_ bayer] Through a playful, intuitive, and iterative design process, complex problems may be broken down into a series of simple and logical deductions. This process is highly rooted in production and analysis; coming up with many possible solutions to any given problem very quickly. The mind works quicker than the hand, and these iterations help the designer find the ultimate solution latent within each problem. Design, in this way, is evolutionary. Those ideas that crumble under scrutiny are left behind or stowed away for future use. Those ideas that are strongest continue or merge with other strong ideas to form solutions. Anything is possible. This reality is beautiful but also terrifying. We must not limit our thinking to allow for innovation, but we must ensure that this change is well directed. Every solution must add value to the context in as many ways as possible: regenerating the ecosystem, supporting social equity, growing the economy, empowering the overlooked and underserved populations.


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[project goals]

SADP Commons must create an intercollaborative and innovative learning environment for the University of Kansas School of Architecture, Design, and Planning. As the culture and methods of this field evolve, the facilities and services must also evolve. This space will serve an important role in forming the identity of the School on a campus level. This space will respond to the natural and man-made context to restore the environment. Special attention must be made to studio culture, advances in technology, and interdisciplinary collaboration. The project goals can be simplified as such: Facilitate educational activities ranging from studio, to classroom, to lecture etc. Promote creativity, productivity, energy, and health. The designed solution must be a tool for research and education. Collect, purify, and reuse water at the scale of the surrounding buildings and street. Generate all electricity needed for the School of Architecture, Design, and Planning through sustainable energy technologies. Unify the identities of the various departments with a collective culture. Engage the larger community of the KU Campus. Add value to the context in the areas of: environment, culture, economy, productivity, education, and social equity (gender, physical, socio-economic, etc.)


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[campus sustainability plan] MISSION The University of Kansas is committed to fostering a culture of sustainability. Our administrative leadership and campus-wide collaborative efforts empower students, faculty, and staff to make decisions that protect our natural ecosystems, create economic prosperity, and treat all people with equality and respect. Through campus and community partnerships, KU strives to integrate sustainability into education, research, campus operations and public service. BUILT ENVIRONMENT The University of Kansas is committed to a sustainable built environment through research, education, building design, construction, renovation, and operations to reduce environmental impacts on site, to the surrounding community and the world. We strive to create buildings that enhance the lives of their users, minimize natural resource consumption, generate their own energy, provide a healthy indoor environment, and process building wastes in ways that mimic natural processes.


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[goals of general education] Enhance the skills and knowledge needed to research, organize, evaluate, and apply new information and develop a spirit of critical inquiry and intellectual integrity. Acquire knowledge in the fine arts, the humanities, and the social, natural, and mathematical sciences and be able to integrate that knowledge across disciplines. Improve the core skills of reading, writing, and numeracy, and enhance communication by clear, effective use of language. Understand and appreciate the development, culture, and diversity of the United States and of other societies and nations. Become aware of contemporary issues in society, technology, and the natural world, and appreciate their complexity of cause and consequences. Practice an ethic of self-discipline, social responsibility, and citizenship on a local, national, and international level.


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[ku sadp mission] Think. Plan. Design. Build. These words form the bedrock foundation of the School’s educational mission. We expect our graduates to be able to think critically, to plan intelligently, to design creatively, and to build efficiently - in the various combinations appropriate for our professional disciplines. The unfailing satisfaction of those here who teach and provide student services lies in the knowledge that, based on this foundation, our graduates will have the appropriate preparation for outstanding professional careers and fulfilling lives. Favored as we are by KU’s extraordinary natural environment overlooking the City of Lawrence, we offer a distinctive sense of place and inspiring educational environment. Our students are drawn here from far-flung locations and diverse backgrounds - and are assured of the opportunity for a fulfilling college experience and first-rate preparation for professional careers. John C. Gaunt, FAIA Dean


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Pre-Design_ Bayer Project Introduction Personal Design Philosopy Project Goals Campus Sustainability Plan Goals of General Education KU SADP Mission

7 9 10 11 12 13

Programming Program + Principles Campus Enrollment Statistics_ By School Campus Enrollment Statistics_ By Class Project Budget Space Budget Adjacencies Design Parameters Conceptual Iterations

15 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Site Analysis Campus Design + Construction Campus Landscape Master Plan Shadow Studies Sun Angles Wind Temperature Precipitation Trajectories Pedestrian Paths Stormwater Precedent Studies Building Addition Form + Section Ecomachine Culture + Identity Design Ventilation Principles

27 29 30 36 37 38 39 39 40 41 42 45 46 47 48 49 50


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[programming] This process allows us to analyze the requirements of the given design problem and assign these requirements a quantifiable solution, usually enclosed space (building square feet). Different functions will require different types of enclosed spaces, and these spaces will have different spatial relationships with one another.

Program + Principles Campus Enrollment Statistics_ By School Campus Enrollment Statistics_ By Class Project Budget Space Budget Adjacencies Design Parameters Conceptual Iterations

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24


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[program + principles] [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]

Landscape, Lecture Hall, Café, Foundation Studios, Exhibition Space, Clean Fabrication, Living Machine, Computer Lab, Classrooms, Multi- purpose, Student Organization administrative and event space. Restorative Response to Context (Man Made and Natural) Detailing (High Tech Materials and Components with Natural Systems) Environmental Design Performance Factors as Form Givers Building as Species within Habitat

Triple Bottom Line: Sustains Culture by integrating the curricular, research and sustainability agenda of the School and University with the built environment. It will serve everyone (students, faculty, ambulatory, physically challenged, sight/hearing impaired … ) to the greatest extent possible. Sustains the Environment through the demonstration of how human practices and technology can provide for a sustainably healthy place for human habitation. The entire project will be designed for “Net-Zero” Energy and Water and will Restore the Watershed. Sustains the Economy of the site and community through attracting more users and visitors through the facilities and by generating its own energy and by harvesting/ reusing its own water.


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[campus enrollment statistics_ by school] SCHOOL Liberal Arts and Sciences School of the ArtS Architecture, Design and Planning Business Education Engineering Health Professions Journalism Law Medicine Music Nursing Pharmacy Social Welfare Applied English Center University Specials Graduate Specials Less Combination Schools TOTAL

HEAD COUNT 13,994 691 986 1,673 1,723 2,748 4 831 465 1 505 0 696 540 95 140 44 (559) 24,577

PERCENT 56.9% 2.8% 4.0% 6.8% 7.0% 11.2% 0.0% 3.4% 1.9% 0.0% 2.1% 0.0% 2.8% 2.2% 0.4% 0.6% 0.2% (2.3)% 100.0%


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[campus enrollment statistics_ by class] CLASS Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors Undergraduate Specials Graduate TOTAL

HEAD COUNT 4,929 3,877 4,078 5,468 356 5,869 24,577

PERCENT 20.1% 15.8% 16.6% 22.2% 1.4% 23.9% 100.0%


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[project budget] OCCUPANCY NSF GSF UNIT COST CITY COST FACTOR WEIGHTED UNIT COST ESCALATION

1000 22690 37952.5 $115.00 0.981 $112.82 6%

CONSTRUCTION EST. $4,538,507.96

ITEM A. Adjusted Building Costs B. Fixed Equipment C. Site Development Subtotal Inflation D. Total Construction Cost E. Site Acquisition F. Movable Equipment G. Professional Fees H. Contingency I. Administrative J. TOTAL

COST $4,364,537.50 $436,453.75 $654,680.63 $5,455,671.88 $327,340.31 $5,783,012.19 $500,000.00 $578,301.22 $346,980.73 $578,301.22 $57,830.12 $7,844,425.48


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[space budget] Programming Assumptions 1. Assume student enrollment at the School of Architecture, Design, and Planning of 986 based on Fall 2012 Enrollment. 2. Assume primary lecture hall occupancy of 200. 3. Assume secondary lecture hall occupancy of 100. 4. Program for 80% occupancy in instructional areas. 5. Early programming estimates. Calculations based on overall population estimates. UNIT GROSSING SIZE UNITS NSF FACTOR GSF Instructional Areas 3960 1.65 200 2400 12 1. Primary Lecture Hall 1980 1.65 1200 12 100 2. Secondary Lecture Hall 3712.5 1.65 2250 15 150 3. Foundation Studios 1.65 3960 2400 12 200 4. Small Classrooms Ancillary Instruction 5. Exhibition Space 6. Computer Lab 7. Clean Fabrication Lab 8. Building Technology Lab

30 50 50 50

50 30 30 30

1500 1500 1500 1500

1.65 1.35 2 2

2475 2025 3000 3000

Assembly Area 9. Cafe 10. Student Org. Offices

28 15

50 80

1400 1200

1.5 1.65

2100 1980

2000

2

4000

3840

1.5

5760

Sustainability 11. Living Machine Exterior Areas 12. Parking

128

30

TOTAL 22690 NSF 37952.5 GSF BUILDING EFFICIENCY 0.598 = 59.8%


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[program_adjacencies]

Primary Lecture

Se co nd ar y

Le ctu re

Ex hi b i tio n

fe Ca

Classrooms

Student Org. Off.

s dio Stu d. un Fo

Li vin gM ac hi ne

ng rki a P

ab .L mp Co

Clean Fab. Lab

B. Te c h .L ab


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Primary Lecture Hall Secondary Lecture Hall Foundation Studios Small Classrooms Exhibition Space Computer Lab Clean Fabrication Lab Building Technology Lab Cafe Student Org. Offices Living Machine Parking Courtyard

Ventilation Daylight Artificial Light Acoustics Water View Angles Power/Controls Access Fire Suppression Structure Materiality

[program_design parameters]

explanation_ Each programmatic area is labeled with the set of design parameters that is most important to those activities will occur in the space. For example, ventilation, daylight, and water are important to the living machine to keep the plants alive. By breaking the program down this way, we begin to see similarities between areas that are not intuitive. These similarities may begin to manifest themselves later in the building form.


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[program_conceptual iterations] 1|

2|

primary lecture hall secondary lecture hall computer lab classrooms foundation studios clean fabrication lab exhibition space living machine cafe student organization offices parking building technology lab

3|


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Pre-Design_ Bayer Project Introduction Personal Design Philosopy Project Goals Campus Sustainability Plan Goals of General Education KU SADP Mission

7 9 10 11 12 13

Programming Program + Principles Campus Enrollment Statistics_ By School Campus Enrollment Statistics_ By Class Project Budget Space Budget Adjacencies Design Parameters Conceptual Iterations

15 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Site Analysis Campus Design + Construction Campus Landscape Master Plan Shadow Studies Sun Angles Wind Temperature Precipitation Trajectories Pedestrian Paths Stormwater Precedent Studies Building Addition Form + Section Ecomachine Culture + Identity Design Ventilation Principles

27 29 30 36 37 38 39 39 40 41 42 45 46 47 48 49 50


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[site analysis] Thorough investigation of the site must be done before any architectural design. Through this investigation, we determine the performance parameters and design restrictions. The more factors a design must respond to, the better the design will be.

Campus Design + Construction Campus Landscape Master Plan Shadow Studies Sun Angles Wind Temperature Precipitation Trajectories Pedestrian Paths Stormwater

29 30 36 37 38 39 39 40 41 42


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[campus design + construction] The University of Kansas is dedicated to academic excellence and the construction of facilities that will provide all the physical requirements for academic excellence. The University believes in the importance of aesthetics, and it recognizes the obligation to create and preserve beauty in all its various forms. The opportunity exists to combine the functional and the beautiful in architectural and landscape design, to achieve a unity which will suggest the character and philosophy of the University as a whole, and to provide a source of pleasure and inspiration for all who come to the campus. Traditional, significant features on main campus include buildings that incorporate the following exterior features:

Red roofs; constructed with tile, metal or slate materials; often sloped rather than flat. Buff or natural colored building materials; in stone, brick or precast concrete. Medium bronze finishes on metal window, door frames, railings and trim. Standardized street lighting.

The design of spaces and forms should consider the relationship of all campus structures with the specific character of the surrounding topography. KU building designs should strive for harmony in relation to the immediate site, adjacent structures, and overall campus massing and context by considering:

scale, form, massing and shapes color, texture and character of materials points of access, openness, degree of transparency and fenestration careful design of the spaces between buildings, and distance from streets.


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[campus landscape master plan] Exerpts from the KU Campus Master Plan allow a deeper look into the planned and desired campus vegetation. Although many of the plants on this list are native, many are also introduced due to their specific qualities. As one of the project goals includes regeneration of the environment, specific considerations must be made to accomodate for a natural yet engineered biodiversity.


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34


35


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[site_shadow studies] winter

8a

10a

12p

2p

4p

6p

8p

spring

summer

autumn


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CLIMATE ANALYSIS [site_sun angles]

HEATIN COOLIN ANNUA WATER Naismit into th

http://www.clrsearch.com/Lawrence-Demographics/KS/Weather-Forecast-T


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HEATING DEGREE DAYS: 5,265 COOLING DEGREE DAYS: 1,304 ANNUAL PRECIPITATION: 35” WATERSHED: On the boundary Naismith and[site_wind] Jayhawk watershed into the Wakarusa and Kansas Riv

m/Lawrence-Demographics/KS/Weather-Forecast-Temperature-Precipitation HEATING HEATING DEGREE DEGREE DAYS: DAYS: 5,265 5,265http://www.clrsearch.com/Lawrence-Demogra winter spring

COOLING COOLING DEGREE DEGREE DAYS: DAYS:1,304 1,304 ANNUAL ANNUAL PRECIPITATION: PRECIPITATION:35” 35” WATERSHED: WATERSHED: On On the the boundary boundary between between the the Naismith Naismith and and Jayhawk Jayhawk watersheds, watersheds, which which feed feed into into the the Wakarusa Wakarusa and and Kansas Kansas Rivers, Rivers, respectively. respectively.

eather-Forecast-Temperature-Precipitation eather-Forecast-Temperature-Precipitation summer

autumn


39

[site_temperature]

[site_precipitation]


40

[site_trajectories]

[1” = 70’]


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[site_pedestrian paths + nodes]

[1� = 70’]


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[site_ stormwater]

rs ate wW Ka d he

ru ka Wa sa ed

rsh

te Wa

[1” = 70’]


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Pre-Design_ Bayer Project Introduction Personal Design Philosopy Project Goals Campus Sustainability Plan Goals of General Education KU SADP Mission

7 9 10 11 12 13

Programming Program + Principles Campus Enrollment Statistics_ By School Campus Enrollment Statistics_ By Class Project Budget Space Budget Adjacencies Design Parameters Conceptual Iterations

15 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Site Analysis Campus Design + Construction Campus Landscape Master Plan Shadow Studies Sun Angles Wind Temperature Precipitation Trajectories Pedestrian Paths Stormwater Precedent Studies Building Addition Form + Section Ecomachine Culture + Identity Design Ventilation Principles

27 29 30 36 37 38 39 39 40 41 42 45 46 47 48 49 50


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[precedent studies] Architecture is self-referential. Every architectural design is based upon previous architectural designs. An investigation of precedent allows us to capitalize on the successes of other designers while learning from the failures. Careful consideration must go into the analysis of the ideas and strategies, instead of simply the design.

Building Addition Form + Section Ecomachine Culture + Identity Design Ventilation Principles

46 47 48 49 50


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[precedent_building addition] RUDOLPH HALL, YALE

Rudol architecture geometry in p building. The i

Rudolph Hall at Yale University is an excellent example of an architecture school addition building. The addition is not the same geometry in plan or section, but fits well in proportion to the original building. The interior spaces are completely open, allowing students to view critiques happening in the central spaces.

CASE STUDY_building addition

RUDOLPH HALL, YALE CASE STUDY_building addition

RUDOLPH HALL, YALE

Rudolph Hall at Yale University is an excellent example of an architecture school addition building. The addition is not the same geometry in plan or section, but fits well in proportion to the original building. The interior spaces are completely open, allowing students University is an excellent example of an to view critiques happening in the central spaces.

Rudolph Hall at Yale architecture school addition building. The addition is not the same geometry in plan or section, but fits well in proportion to the original building. The interior spaces are completely open, allowing students to view critiques happening in the central spaces.


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[precedent_form + section] GUND HALL, HARVARD Gund Hall at Harvard University is an example both of creative form-making in section and special attention to the pedestrian scale. The interior environment is completely interconnected by a terracing roof plane. While the wedge shape seems disproportionate from some angles, the view from the quad is appropriate.


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[precedent_ecomachine] OMEGA CENTER FOR SUSTAINABLE LIVING, BNIM The Omega Center for Sustainable Living by BNIM Architects is an example of restorative design and eco-machine. Their focus on environmentally-based design generated a building form that qualified as both environmentally and experientially exceptional. Bob Berkebile of BNIM, in a presentation about the Omega Center for Sustainable Living at the AIAS Midwest Quad Conference in Fall of 2012, boasted that it is the only sewage treatment facility to be home to a yoga company.


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[precedent_culture + identity] WESCOE BEACH, UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS There is no more important cultural place-maker at the University of Kansas than Wescoe Beach. It is regularly home to events, performances, and other gatherings. The steps of Wescoe Hall form a stage, and the open, shaded plaza forms a place to dwell. The relationship of the plaza, raised plinth, and sidewalk provides for excellent people-watching spots.


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[study_design ventilation principals]


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Mid-Critique_ Bayer Design Process Concept + Parti Culture Process, Production, Iteration Section Development Plan Development Realization Visualization Floorplans Section_ Longitudinal Exploded Axonometric_ Structure + HVAC HVAC_ Third Party Resource Structure_ Third Party Resource Exploded Axonometric_ Program Egress Sun + Ventilation Daylighting Auditorium Acoustics Rainwater Harvesting

53 54 55 56 57 58 61 62 68 70 71 72 74 79 80 82 84 86 88


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[design process] Like abstract expressionist art, true architecture lies within the process of its creation. The physical building design is simply the ghost of this process, communicating the efforts of the designer by means of utility, beauty, and economy.

Concept + Parti Culture Process, Production, Iteration Section Development Plan Development

54 55 56 57 58


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[concept + parti] I envision the design as an organism: each program space being an organ, and the living machine being the spine that connects all of them. The living machine forms the primary circulation space while simultaneously purifying the water, generating passive ventilation, and serving as a main educational attraction. This spine wraps the south-east border of our site, both for maximum daylight and minimum intrusion on possible outdoor restorative landscape/courtyard.


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[culture] The proposed design would replace Marvin Studios entirely. The building is assumed for the purposes of this project to have been demolished/salvaged. Marvin Studios, the “Mud Hut,” was built out of compressed earth blocks as part of an applied material research project. Currently, KU’s “Dirt Works Studio” does applied material research in rammed earth. The main wall of the living machine, therefor, will be a rammed earth wall. In addition to being culturally, historically, and contextually appropriate, the wall will be used for its thermal massing properties.


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[process, production, iteration] Once the programmatic, site, and sectional concepts were established, production began. Exploring structural, material, architectural, and experiential considerations very quickly led to a number of sound deductions. The most notable outcome from this process was the merging of the “secondary lecture hall” with the “exhibition space.” This space now snakes through the other spaces in section, allowing multiple levels for seating and pin-ups with the possibility of lectures and events.


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[section development] The section in this case was developed before the plan, essentially leading to the generation of the plan. The sun heats the water of the living machine and the thermal mass of the rammed earth, creating an upward flow of air through convection. This negative pressure draws cool air from the courtyard side of the structure, where the air has been cooled by shade and evapotranspiration.


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[plan development] The design in plan pays special attention to ventilation, topography, and views. The footprint is kept to an abolute minimum to maximize natural ventilation and daylighting. Floor to ceiling heights are set to match Marvin Hall and Art & Design. A gap is left on the ground level, allowing the following benefits: Views to the horizon, a downward terracing area for restorative landscaping, a seating area for multipurpose outdoor use located underneath the exhibition space and lecture hall, and aesthetic importance or attention placed on the exhibition space. Floorplan #1

Floorplan #2


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Mid-Critique_ Bayer Design Process Concept + Parti Culture Process, Production, Iteration Section Development Plan Development Realization Visualization Floorplans Section_ Longitudinal Exploded Axonometric_ Structure + HVAC HVAC_ Third Party Resource Structure_ Third Party Resource Exploded Axonometric_ Program Egress Sun + Ventilation Daylighting Auditorium Acoustics Rainwater Harvesting

53 54 55 56 57 58 61 62 68 70 71 72 74 79 80 82 84 86 88


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[realization] The realization of the project includes consideration of many different design parameters and the integration of performance details to the conceptual massing. Since this design will not be built, we may only speculate performance criterion using reliable third-party resources.

Visualization Floorplans Section_ Longitudinal Exploded Axonometric_ Structure + HVAC HVAC_ Third Party Resource Structure_ Third Party Resource Exploded Axonometric_ Program Egress Sun + Ventilation Daylighting Auditorium Acoustics Rainwater Harvesting

62 68 70 71 72 74 78 80 82 84 86 88


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63


64


65


66


67


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[floorplan_ ground level]

2 1

3

4

5

6 7

5

1/64” = 1’-0”

1. Lobby/ Exhibition/ Multipurpose 2. Restrooms 3. Egress Stair 4. Living Machine 5. Small Classroom 6. Commons/Cafe 7. Student Org. Offices

project north

true north


69

[floorplan_ level two]

8

9 10

11

12

13 14

15

8. Small Classroom 9. Restroom 10. Egress Stair 11. Open Foundation Studios 12. Formal Exhibition 13. Primary Lecture 14. Computer Lab 15. Clean Fabrication Lab

1/64” = 1’-0”

project north

true north


70

[section_ longitudinal]


71

[exploded axonometric_structure + hvac]


72

[hvac_third party resource]


73


74

[structure_third party resource]


75


76

[structure_third party resource]


77


78

[structure_third party resource]


79

[exploded axonometric_program]

primary lecture hall

exhibition space

secondary lecture hall

living machine

computer lab

cafe

classrooms

student organization offices

foundation studios

parking

clean fabrication lab

building technology lab


80

[egress_ third party resource]


81

[exploded axonometric_egress]


82

[performance_ sun + ventilation]


83

[ventilation_ third party resource]


84

[daylighting_ visualization]


85

[daylighting_ third party resources]


86

[auditorium acoustics_third party resource]


87

[auditorium acoustics_section]


88

[rainwater harvesting]


89


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Final Design_ Bayer, Ostrander, Curtis Final Critique_ May 8 Presentation + Group Introduction Site Plan Floor Plans Visualization Elevations Sections Axonometric Wall Sections Post-Critique_ Redesign + Reflection Bayer Ostrander Curtis

91 92 94 96 100 114 120 128 129 143 144 150 154


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[final critique_ may 8] The pursuit of architecture to this level of detail is a task larger than any one person. To continue the design, our studio joined into groups of three. These groups of three then took one of two paths: choosing the strongest of the individual designs at the time of mid-critique or combining multiple designs. Our group is comprised of H. Patrick Bayer, D’Andre Q. Curtis and Timothy G. Ostrander.

Presentation + Group Introduction Site Plan Floor Plans Visualization Elevations Sections Axonometric Wall Sections

92 94 96 100 114 120 128 129


92

D’Andre Q. Curtis Project Manager / Graphics H. Patrick Bayer Project Architect Timothy G. Ostrander Lead Technical Designer

B

ayer

O

S.A.D.P Commons strander

C

Performance Arch

urtis

Scale: 1/16=1’0”

Program & Demographics • S.A.D.P Commons • Landscape Element (open) • Lecture Hall (175 persons) • Café (lobby / commons Space) • Foundation Studios (ARCH_108 + 109 integration) • Exhibition Space • Clean Fabrication (dust free fabrication, printing and plotting) • Living Machine (‘eco-machine’) • Art and Design Connection • Small offices • Parking (electric vehicles)

School of Architecture + Design + Urban Planning

Lawrence, Kansas

Undergradate Students: 766 Graduate Students: 220 Total: 986

Latitude: 38°58’18.012”N

Level 3

Bayer

Ostrander

4

Curtis

5

Longitude: 95°14’06”W

School of the Arts

Time Zone: UTC-6 hours

Undergraduate Students: 592 Graduate Students: 99 Total: 691

Climate Zone: Humid Continental

6

P erformance Arch

Site Location: Marvin Hall + Art & Design

Elevation: 980’

Zoned: U-KU (special purpose base district) *land development code

A B

1

2

C 3

D E Primary Lecture Hall Multi-Purpose Space Computer Lab Classrooms Foundation Studios

8

16

32

Clean Fabrication Lab

F

Site Plan

Exhibition Space

G

48

Living Machine Cafe Student Organizations Offices

KU: FIGURE GROUND

Parking

Site/Building Context: View 1

Site/Building Context: View 2

Site/Building Context: View 3

Building Technology Lab

Site/Building Context: View 4

Mechanical Room

History: Marvin Hall

History: Art + Design

Commons

Level 2

Gender Neutral Restrooms

H 4

1910- The decision by the University to create a program in architecture originated in 1910 when Montrose McArdle, a prominent St. Louis architect, was hired by Chancellor Frank Strong to assist John Stanton, the State Architect, to design a new administration and College building in accordance with George Kessler's master plan of 1904.

1920-The oldest was M.I.T., started in 1865; the second was Columbia, Goldsmith's alma mater, started in 1881. KU's beginning in 1912 makes it one of the oldest architecture programs in the country; the first graduate was Marcus Whitten in 1916. This group eventually became the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture the ACSA – of which KU became a member in 1920.

Site_Trajectories 1014

1010

1006 Outdoor Terrace 1002 1012

1008

Automobile Circulation Jayhawk

Prevailing Winds Pedestrian Circulation

MARVIN HALL

Trash/Loading Steel Installation B-Tech Yard Satellite Dish

Curtis Besinger – a 1930's graduate who went to Taliesin as an apprentice in 1939 and worked for Wright until the completion of the drawings for the Guggenheim Museum in New York City in 1955. Besinger taught at KU from 1955 until his retirement in 1984. Prior to his death in 2000, Cambridge University Press published his memoirs "Working with Mr. Wright" (for which Professor Padget did many of the illustrations).

1012

1012

1004

1006

1010

1967- following a five-year accreditation visit, the National Board (NAAB) recommended that the conditions were right for the Architecture Program at KU to become an autonomous school of the University.

1014

1008

BUDIG HALL

996

1002 998

Nodes_Pedestrian Circulation

992

1000

994

1975- The School hosted the Sixth Environmental Design Research Association Conference organized by Basil Honikman and Stephen Grabow with an international all-star roster of contributors and participants, including Hans Blumenfeld, Kevin Lynch, John Eberhard, Constance Perin, Gerald McCue, Geoffrey Broadbent, William Mitchell, Amos Rapoport, David Canter, Henry Sanoff, Mike Brill, Robert Geddes and a keynote address by Christopher Alexander 1980(s)- Under Deans Kahn and Max Lucas, the School received two additional bequests that created endowed professorships.

984

976

990 988 986

970

972

ANSCHUTZ lIBRARY

982

The School hosted two International Conferences on Built Form & Culture Research organized by David Saile and Bill Carswell. At that time, the KU Architecture Program was ranked in the top ten in the United States out of 104 schools.

968

Kaw

966

rshed

964

978

Facilitate educational activities ranging from studio, to studio, to classroom, to lecture etc.

1467 Jayhawk Blvd. 66045 6 floors, basement The School of Fine Arts was founded in 1891, combining the Department of Music, established in 1877, and the Department of Art, established in 1885. Courses in drawing, painting, piano, violin, voice and other fine arts had been offered since KU's earliest years, but none of the disciplines had a permanent home. For several decades music teachers were paid by student fees, and the visual arts were taught as second or third subjects by faculty hired for other courses.

B

Promote creativity, productivity, energy, and health. The designed solution must be a tool for research and education. Collect, purity, and rescue water at the scale of the surrounding buildings and street.

Between 1893 and 1917 the school was housed in the increasingly decrepit North College, the university's first building, until that was declared unfit for occupation. Rooms in the basement and first floor of the new Administration Building (later Strong Hall) were used by music; visual art had studios and classrooms on the top floor. By the early 1970s space in about a dozen campus buildings was being used, including Bailey Annex, Memorial Stadium, Flint Hall, Chamney House and Barn, the Wesley Building, and a duplex on 14th Street.

Generate all electricity needed for the School of Architecture, Deisgn, and Planning through sustainable energy technologies.

1

Unify the identities of the various departments with a collective culture.

The new building of red brick, an open plan over steel trusses, had 115,000 square feet; it absorbed "new" Fowler Shops, which had opened in 1949, adding about 26,600 square feet. Old mechanical engineering shops were razed to make way for the $5.75 million project, dedicated April 9, 1978. The building houses classrooms, shops, and studios for design, painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, industrial and interior design, weaving, metalsmithing/jewelry, and printing; faculty and staff offices and studios in art and design; and a faculty/student exhibition gallery.

2

C

3

D

Engage the larger community of the KU Campus.

E

1990- The School hosted the Graham Foundation Symposium on the Liberal Education of Architects organized by Dennis Domer and Kent Spreckelmeyer with a keynote address by Cornell Dean Bill McMinn and the participation of many other prominent educators, architects and administrators from around the country including John Hartray, Ralph Johnson, Robert Vickery, Malcolm Quantrill, Diane Ghirardo, Marvin Malecha, Richard McCommons, Ellen Dunham-Jones, Bob Bliss and Joseph Bilello.

Wate

974

980

A

The project goals can be simplified as such:

1930(s)- KU, along with Cornell, Princeton, Yale and Southern California, began to move away from the Beaux Arts method of teaching design with its emphasis on juried competitions in New York and historical styles promulgated by Paris.

1014

ART & DESIGN

MISSION: KU S.A.D.P

6

Project Goals

1922- Elizabeth Rivard became the first woman to graduate from KU with a degree in architecture and today, forty percent of the student body in the School are women.

Views

MUD HUT

5

1912- In the Fall of 1912 the first students enrolled in the new Architecture Program at the University of Kansas and in December of that year, Goldwin Goldsmith became the first Professor and Head of Architecture.

SITE & ANALYSIS: DIAGRAM

2010- The Department of Design from the School of Fine Arts was added to the School – now called the School of Architecture, Design, and Planning – bringing programs in interior design, industrial design, and reaffirming its connection to the fine arts.

S.A.D.P Commons must create an inter-collaborative and innovative learning environment for the University of Kansas School of Architecture, Design, and Planning. As the culture and methods of this field evolve, the facilities and services must also evolve. This space will serve an important role in forming the identity of the school on a campus level. This space will respond to the natural and man-made context to restore the environment. Special attention must be made to studio culture, advances in technology, and interdisciplinary collaboration.

Site_Stormwater

Today- Under the leadership of Dean John Gaunt, the former CEO of the architectural firm of Ellerbe Becket and a former student of Louis Kahn (and in the same class as Professor Sander and alumnus Tim McGinty), the student body in architecture is among the most highly selective undergraduates at the University. .

Axonometric Program Preliminary Iteration

Shadow Studies

F

Program_Design Parameters

G

View Angles

Water

Power/Controls

Artificial Light

Acoustics

Secondary Lecture Hall

4

5

Materiality

Primary Lecture Hall

Structure

8:00 a.m.

Daylight

Fall

Ventilation

Summer

Fire Suppression

Spring

Access

Winter

Process_Production,_Iteration

1.

6

Primary Lecture Hall Computer Lab

Secondary Lecture Hall

A

Foundation Studios

10:00 a.m. Classrooms Foundation Studios

2.

Small Classrooms Exhibition Space Computer Lab

Level 1

Cafe Student Org. Offices

Exhibition Space Living Machine

B

Clean Fabrication Lab Building Technology Lab

Clean Fabrication Lab

12:00 p.m.

H

Living Machine Parking Courtyard

Cafe

1

Precedent_Building Addition Student Organizations Offices

2:00 p.m.

Rudolph Hall, Yale

3.

Parking Building Technology Lab

Rudolph Hall at Yale University is an excellent example of an architecture school addition building. The addition is not the same geometry in plan or section, but fits well in proportion to the original building. The interior spaces are completely open allowing students to view critiques happening in the central spaces.

2

C

3

Bayer

D

4:00 p.m.

Ostrander

E Program Adjacencies

Axnometric_Program_Preliminary_Iteration

Process_Production_Iteration

Bayer Primary Lecture g kin Par

Sec ond ary

Ostrander

Classrooms

Student Org. Off.

s dio Stu

Liv ing

nd. Fou

Mac hin e

Lec tur e

Exh ibi tio n

e Caf

primary lecture hall

p. Com

Lab

B.

Clean Fab Lab

exhibition space

secondary lecture hall

living machine

computer lab

cafe

classrooms

student organization offices

foundation studios

parking

clean fabrication lab

building technology lab

Curtis

F

Once the programmatic, site, and sectional concepts were established, production began. Exploring structural, material, architectural, and experiential considerations very quickly led to a number of sound deductions. The most notable outcome from this process was the merging of the “secondary lecture hall” with the “exhibition space.” This space now snakes through the other spaces in section, allowing multiple levels for seating and pin-ups with the possibility of lectures and events.

H

Curtis

P erformance Arch

G P erformance Arch

S.A.D.P Commons

Tec h.

Lab


93

Performance Arch


94

[site plan] The proposed SADP Commons activates the axis of travel from Daisy Hill/Sunnyside Ave to Jayhawk Boulevard or to Budig Hall. The restorative landscape and green roof designs are specified in the callout plan, showing the roof of the Art & Design building as the new solar power hub of the new SADP campus.


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[foundation plan] 4

5

6

A B 1

2

BA

3 C D E

F G

AB

AA

BB

H

Primary Lecture Hall

Clean Fabrication Lab

Parking

Multi-purpose Space

Exhibition Space

Mechanical Room

Computer Lab

Living Machine

Commons

Classrooms

Cafe

Gender Neutral Restrooms

Foundation Studios

Student Org. Offices

Offices


98

[ground floor plan] 4

5

6

A B 1

2

BA

3 C D E

F G

AB

AA

BB

H

Primary Lecture Hall

Clean Fabrication Lab

Parking

Multi-purpose Space

Exhibition Space

Mechanical Room

Computer Lab

Living Machine

Commons

Classrooms

Cafe

Gender Neutral Restrooms

Foundation Studios

Student Org. Offices

Offices


99

[second floor plan] 4

5

6

A B 1

2

BA

3

C D E

F G

AB

AA

BB

H

Primary Lecture Hall

Clean Fabrication Lab

Parking

Multi-purpose Space

Exhibition Space

Mechanical Room

Computer Lab

Living Machine

Commons

Classrooms

Cafe

Gender Neutral Restrooms

Foundation Studios

Student Org. Offices

Offices


100


101

[entrance view] The main entrance of the SADP Commons space is protected by the cantilevered classroom on the floor above. This cantilever extends out to engage the pedestrian flow of Jayhawk Boulevarde, creating a plaza space framed with permeable pavers. Over the restorative landscape and under the exhibition space in the distance, one can see out to the horizon. The pedestrian bridge to Marvin Hall is kept as minimal as possible, touching the historic building lightly.


102

[courtyard view] The courtyard is a restorative landscape, purifying the runoff from Jayhawk Boulevarde before it re-enters the Wakarusa watershed. The design takes inspiration from the winning proposal of the Gowanus Flowlands design competition. Water is retained in terraces, each planted with a specific variety of plants to remove pollutants on a step-by step basis. The terraced area in the foreground would host movable outdoor furniture to serve the cafe/commons space. This area and the area under the lecture hall can both host many seated occupants, and could be used for student events.


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[A&D connection] The bridge connection to the existing A&D Cafe allows a view of the horizon underneath. This new corridor is lit by a soft glow shining from the vertical translucent glazing of the gender-neutral restrooms. During the day, each individual restroom would then have a source of daylight. The double-height commons space is seen, containing the student organization office on the ground level and computer lab on the upper level. This location of student organization space would allow student groups from all design majors to collaborate and host events in the commons space. The rammed earth spine disappears to reveal the vertical circulation.


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[aerial view] This aerial view shows the design of the green roof, the site, and slate roof of the living machine/lecture hall. The site is punctuated by three celebration maple trees, matching the maple trees in front of Marvin Hall.


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[multipurpose_ casual lingering] The steps of the multipurpose area are shown here on a typical day. Students, visitors, and professors could linger at the steps to wait for their next class, eat a meal, or just watch other people.


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[multipurpose_ formal lecture] The student groups have pooled their resources in this view to bring Jean Nouvel in for a guest lecture. The glass wall of the foundation studios can hold a projected presentation, and students can sit on the steps or on chairs arranged on the platform.


112

[living machine] The servant spine of the entire project, the living machine, is shown here as a path of main circulation as well as a gallery of sustainable technology. The motorized louvers would be optimized to provide light to the plants, creating interesting patterns of light and shadow throughout the day.


113

[multipurpose_ pin-up] The multipurpose space is shown being used for student design critiques. The multiple levels are optimal for facilitating multiple small gatherings.

[multipurpose_ everyday] The steps of the multipurpose space are seen here on a typical day, being host to a number of exhausted design students. Student work is displayed in the exhibition space beyond.


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[elevation_east] This elevation shows the relationship between the auditorium, living machine curtain wall, and site. The curtain wall of the living machine would be very dynamic. Within each panel, motorized and automated louvers would change depending on information gathered from the interior and exterior regarding sun, temperature, and humidity. Each panel would have it’s own light sensor, creating a parametric design across this surface depending on the lighting at any given time.


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[elevation_west] This elevation more clearly illustrates the effect of the cafe/exhibition/multipurpose pathway that snakes its way from the main entrance to the existing A&D cafe. The interior program becomes expressed on the exterior through careful selection of materials, structures, and systems.


118

[elevation_south] This elevation shows the relationship of the proposed building with the Art & Design building. This relationship is a gentle bridge connection, allowing views and pedestrian traffic from project north to project south and out to the horizon. The Lecture Hall hovers above the terraced restorative landscape, allowing protected outdoor space.


119

[elevation_north] This elevation shows the main entrance of the proposed addition, the two openings, and the living machine (servant space) extending above the served space. The main entrance, though cantilevered quite far, is kept low to the earth. This allows a pedestrian bridge to the main circulation axis of Marvin Hall and provides a more comfortable entrance.


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[section aa_ served space] This compound section shows the vertical relationship between different functional areas of the served space. The exhibition space terraces down under the foundation studios, allowing the interior south partition of the foundation studios to be used as a projection screen for lectures and presentations. The Electric Vehicle parking and mechanical space are also seen in this view.


122


123

[section ab_ servant space] This compound section shows the entirety of the living machine/ servant space. This space holds many functions. The sun provides energy to the plants, and also warms the water of the living machine and the rammed earth wall. Thermal mass of the wall and water create stack ventilation. The living machine purifies grey water for use elsewhere. Skylights have parabolic reflectors to facilitate maximum solar gain in the living machine areas. The living machine is no longer simply a water purification system, but primary method of circulation and wayfinding. It is a living laboratory serving many functions that is put on display for the education of students.


124

Mechanical Ventilation Natural Ventilation Sound Reflections

L4 42’-0”

L3 27’-0”

L2 12’-0”

L1 0’-0” L0.5 -5’-0”


125

[section bb_ acoustics]


126

[section ba_ ventilation + water]

Convection Natural Ventilation Mechanical Ventilation


127


128

[axonometric] Building Envelope

Facade Enve

Green Roof

Light Well Green Roof

Roof Planes

Circulation/Egress

Floor Plate

Egress

Vertical Circulation

Mechanical

Return Air

H.V.A.C

Supply Air

Structure

Structure


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[wall sections] Much time was spent working out the logistics of the building envelope. Six specific wall sections were chosen, delegated, and developed. These wall sections took inspiration from current proprietary systems, namely from Kawneer and Knightwall Systems.

C B A

D

E F


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Final Design_ Bayer, Ostrander, Curtis Final Critique_ May 8 Presentation + Group Introduction Site Plan Floor Plans Visualization Elevations Sections Axonometric Wall Sections Post-Critique_ Redesign + Reflection Bayer Ostrander Curtis

91 92 94 96 100 114 120 128 129 143 144 150 154


143

[post-critique_ redesign + reflection] After the final critique, we were asked by Professor Padget to individually re-think the design of our project and submit some changes that we would make if we had more time to develop the design further. Bayer Ostrander Curtis

144 150 154


144

H. Patrick Bayer Project Architect


145

[rethink + redesign _ bayer]


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147

[bayer redesign_ lecture hall + south end] The cantilevered lecture hall works very well for many purposes. It protects the area of opening where the restorative landscape spills down the hill, it helps establish a new axis of pedestrian traffic, and the act of lifting that entire programmatic volume speaks a language of importance (the lecture hall being the “gem” of the project, a very special place). The form of the lecture hall and the structural/programmatic relationship between the lecture hall and the rest of the design could be better. If I could develop this idea, I would explore placing the lecture hall in-line with the structural grids 4,5, and 6. This would allow the structure to tie back easily into the overall system, which would more easily translate into a consistant architectural vocabulary on the exterior as well as a more refined interior arrangement of space. The current south end is a missed opportunity. This area is located at the current loading dock to many of the design/sculpture studios. This loading dock is nicknamed “the overlook” because of the beautiful view of the horizon from the top of Mount Oread. If I could develop this area further, I would cantilever some space to create a small lobby on the second floor. This would also relate better to the vocabulary of the north (main) end of the design.


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[bayer redesign_ details + omissions] Certain things were not developed far enough, and certain decisions were accidentally ommitted from the final critique presentation. These are listed below:

Row of gender-neutral restrooms: the walls between restrooms would be used for plumbing, so the optimal arrangement would have the fixtures mirrored alternately about these interior partitions. The doors would adjust accordingly. Diaper changing stations must be called out (“If it ‘aint’ documented, it ‘aint’”-Professor Padget). Doors missing in the commons space: six doors are added, located about the center of the exterior wall. These doors swing outward for egress. Must re-address spaces affected by new lecture hall: the initial investigation of the lecture hall design included a first glance at some changes that would need to occur to accomodate the new form. The new shape of the north section of the ground level would more easily lend itself to this new configuration of classroom/restroom space under the multipurpose steps.


150

Timothy G. Ostrander Lead Technical Designer


151

[rethink + redesign _ ostrander]


152

1

Level 2

2

3


6

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A B

There are a few moments that I would address in terms of a redesign. Two separate suggestions were made during the review regarding simple fixes within the plan: The first was in terms of egress where the direction in which the door swing of the Lecture Hall is swinging in. They need to swing out as proper egress applies.

C D E Primary Lecture Hall Multi-Purpose Space

The second applies to the single use restrooms. As a point of plumbing ease, it would be most beneficial to place restroom fixtures on adjacent walls as opposed to their own wall, thereby building half as many piping components to install and maintain.

Computer Lab Classrooms Foundation Studios Clean Fabrication Lab

F

Exhibition Space

G

Living Machine Cafe Student Organizations Offices

Parking Building Technology Lab Mechanical Room Commons Gender Neutral Restrooms

H 4

5

6

The third aspect targets the language of the design as a whole at the point of the south facing wall and area by the Clean Fab. It would be advantageous to continue the language of the North entrance and Lecture Hall to cantilever the second level. It completes the suggestion of reaching out into the landscape as the north entrance to Jayhawk blvd.


154

D’Andre Q. Curtis Project Manager / Graphics


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[rethink + redesign _ curtis]


156

UP

UP

UP

UP

B

BEFORE

AFTER

BEFORE

AFTER


157

ReDesigns of Group Design: Dre Curtis

(1)Rammed Earth Wall- Ifeel the rammed earth wall could have been used more constrcutively. It reads as a structural wall in the plans but in reality is a cavity wall with rammed earth paneling. Rammed earth tends to be a solid. Used as a mass. Moreover, I feel there needs to be a door embedded in the rammed earth wall for maintaine access. The exterior facade could also be used a passage way to Budig.

(2)Parking- The parking should be just as developed as any of the other program. Design is just as important as access. There was a critique on the parking. I composed a re-design.I decided to add more 45 degree parking spaces for easier access for the electric vehicles.


158

3.

BEFORE

AFTER

4.

A+D BridgePerfect Location

BEFORE

AFTER


159

(3)Commons Space Doors- There should be doors exiting the Commons Space. With out doors to the exterior, one will have to walk to the other side of the building just to find an exit. It is more than convenient to have these doors in this location. It will be an easier entrance to the landscape area. As a sidebar there could be more door locations around the entire building that allows one to come and go as they choose.

(4)S.A.D.P Connection to Marvin Hall-I do not think it is necessary to have the bridge connection between S.A.D.P and Marvin Hall. I am of the opinion the S.A.D.P bridge is not adding anything significant. It is used as an outdoor overhead space, which is not saying to much. The connection to Art + Design is sufficient enough.

1.Done Differently: Rammed Earth Wall 2.More Completely: Parking 3.Added: Common Space Doors 4.Subtracted: S.A.D.P Connection to Marvin Hall ‌ with my group design.


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[sources] Allen, Edward, and Joseph Iano. The Architect’s Studio Companion: Rules of Thumb for Preliminary Design. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2012. Print. Architectural Acoustics, David M. Egan, J. Ross Publishing, 2007 http://www.bnim.com/work/omega-center-sustainable-living http://www.e-architect.co.uk/images/jpgs/america/paul_rudolph_hall_s241109_1.jpg http://www.gwathmey-siegel.com/images/portfolio/projects/200515/large/0515_pi20.jpg http://www.gsd.harvard.edu http://sadp.ku.edu


Undergratuate Thesis | KU SADP Commons  

KU SADP Commons is a student architectural design project, assigned by and completed under the guidance of Professor Steve Padget, AIA, LEED...

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