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H. PATRICK BAYER

ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO 2013-2014

UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS ENSA PARIS VAL DE SEINE HW ATELIERS JEAN NOUVEL HELIX ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN

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1 2 3 4 5 6

6-17

WEAVER AUDITORIUM_ HELIX ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN

18-31

ROTH TRAILHEAD_ 3

32-49

CHICAGO LYRIC OPERA_ 4

50-59

MONACO MOTORS_ 3

60-75

KU SADP COMMONS_ 4

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DENSITY + MIXITY_ 5

RD

YEAR | DIRT WORKS DESIGN + BUILD

TH

RD

YEAR

TH

TH

YEAR

YEAR | COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO

YEAR | ENSA PARIS VAL DE SEINE


[

p a t r i c k b a y e r c . v. [EDUCATION]

]

hpatrickbayer@gmail.com mobile | +33 (0)7 85 70 55 91

Ecole Nationale Superiore D’Architecture Paris Val De Seine Graduate Year and Internship

2014

University of Kansas [GPA 3.42] MArch_Master of Architecture [EXPERIENCE]

2008-2014

HW | Ateliers Jean Nouvel [Intern Architect] Member of the project team for the Louvre Abu Dhabi. Currently assisting with the design and detailing of the facade system and also the design and detailing of the moucharabieh (sunscreens). In progress of writing a script with parametric modeling tools to optimize and automate the modulation and modeling of the moucharabieh. Projected internship experience areas include work on competitions, intensive computer modeling, work on plans/sections, and preparing presentations. Helix Architecture + Design [Intern Architect] Member of the design team for the renovation of Weaver Auditorium at the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences. While working directly under the Project Architect, used Rhino and Grasshopper to design complex curved acoustical interiors. Created visualization for this project using V-Ray for Rhino. Gained experience in the areas of: Schematic Design, Interviews, Competitions, Design Development, Construction Documents, Construction Administration, and Client Presentations. Tevis Architectural Group [Intern Architect] Assisted in projects including: a design-build office building, a campus code study, a residence, nursing home, dentist office, multiple animal shelters, and a large middle school addition. Gained experience in schematic design, design development, and construction document phases. Kiewit Power Engineers [Support Electrical Designer] Assisted in 6 power plants of various scales and types. Supervised a team of 4 interns to create a set of documents for a gas-fired power plant.

[SKILLS_TECHNICAL]

AutoCAD (advanced) Revit SketchUp Adobe Creative Suite

[SKILLS_GENERAL]

Public speaking and presentations Leadership and management Acoustical design considerations Complex geometry and parametric design

Graphic communication and sketching Event and conference organization Architectural Visualization Construction and detailing

[TRAVELS]

Paris Versailles Rome

Detroit Savannah Chicago

[LANGUAGES]

Rhino Grasshopper 3DS Max V-Ray

Switzerland Berlin Toronto

Kerkythea Podium Microstation Plant4D

NavisWorks Artlantis Vasari GIS

Cincinatti Washington D.C. Pheonix

feb_2014-present

summer_2013

summer_2011&12

dec_2007-may_2009


[INVOLVEMENT] L’Assemblee des Delegues des comites de residents [ADCR Representative] Represented La Fondation des Etats-Unis to the larger student government of the other houses at Cite Universitaire in Paris. American Institute of Architecture Students [KU Chapter President] Responsible for leading the AIAS KU and coordinating our executive board’s actions toward the mission of AIAS. Represented our chapter at a school, regional and international level.

2013-2014

2012-2013

American Institute of Architecture Students [Midwest Quad Chair] Led the effort to plan a 300-person regional architecture conference in Kansas City based on Sustainability and Urban Farming. Managed a budget of approximately $27,000.

fall_2012

American Institute of Architecture Students [National Governance Committee] Assisted with the review/updating of the national by-laws and rules of the board.

nov_2011

American Institute of Architecture Students [KU Chapter Vice-President] Created presentations for general session meetings and specialized task meetings. Presented to groups of 20-60 students, professors, and professionals. Organized a chapter schedule and oversaw the tasks of the chapter leaders on the executive board.

2011-2012

American Institute of Architecture Students [KU Chapter Firm Outreach] Responsible for connecting students in the organization with professionals in the community through firm visits, guest lectures, and skype conferences.

2010-2011

AIAS Freedom By Design [KU Project Manager] Designed and built solutions for handicap-accessibility problems among low-income members of the Lawrence/Topeka community.

spring_2010

KU Student Housing [Senior Staff Resident Assistant]

2009-2013

[PUBLICATION]

Rammed Earth Conservation, “From the Ground Up” [Roth Trailhead] Lawrence Journal World, “Trail Entrance to Honor Teachers” [Roth Trailhead]

june_2012 may_2012

[AWARDS]

Best American Building of 2013 Awards_Kansas Nominee [Roth Trailhead] Monsters of Design Award, Best in Show [Roth Trailhead] AIA Kansas Honor Award [Roth Trailhead] AIAS Chapter Leader of the Month City of Kansas City, MO: Resolution 120965 - AIAS Midwest Quad Fall 2012

jan_2014 fall_2012 fall_2012 sep_2012 nov_2012

[REFERENCES]

Jay Tomlinson, FAIA John Gaunt Kapila Silva Angela Gunn Lonnie Shanks Greg Zullig Chad Kraus

Founding Principal_Helix Architecture + Design Kansas City Dean, Professor_University of Kansas Faculty Advisor_AIAS University of Kansas Project Architect_Tevis Architectural Group Senior Project Manager_Tevis Architectural Group Lead Electrical Designer_Kiewit Power Engineers Studio Professor [3rd Year]_University of Kansas

jtomlinson@helixkc.com jgaunt@ku.edu kapilads@ku.edu agunn@tevisarchitects.com lshanks@tevisarchitects.com greg.zullig@kiewit.com ckraus@ku.edu


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KCUMB WEAVER AUDITORIUM Professional | Helix Architecture + Design, Kansas City Role | Intern Architect on project team Areas of Focus | Design of complex acoustical interiors for an Auditorium. Focused on computational design for its utility in the specific project. Project Architect | Brad Kingsley, AIA Programs | Rhino + Grasshopper, Vray, Revit, Photoshop

The renovation of this auditorium building was part of an overall campus master plan for the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences. The goals for this specific project were to divide the large auditorium in two parts in section, creating two lecture halls. These two lecture halls were designed as a dialogue of contrasts: one lecture hall being very organic, remniscent of the curves of human anatomy, and the other being very angular. The design intent was for a soft, curving, sinuous space with subtle details. The organic quality of this specific lecture hall was achieved through an in-depth consideration of the surfaces. The interior and exterior walls of the lecture hall became complex-curving sinuous surfaces. The curves, both in plan and in section, were driven by use factors, acoustics, and material properties. The acoustic surfaces wrap the entire exterior of the auditorium, following along an exterior path. The surfaces die into the wall just before extending as a ribbon to hold the projector screen.

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CONTEXT

MASTER PLAN

KCUMB WEAVER AUDITORIUM Weaver Auditorium is located on the corner of Independence Avenue and The Paseo in Kansas City, Missouri. The building, however, is oriented toward the campus facing away from the city. Included in the master plan was a complete renovation of the interior. The renovation plays an interesting role in the rebranding of the overall campus of KCUMB. The use of color, the design of the spaces, the furniture, and the experience of the space would form the standards by which the rest of the campus would develop. This added a bit of

weight to the project to make sure that it was in line with the campus essencing and goals. My specific area of impact was on the main level. The auditorium, which has not been well used due to it’s massive size, will be divided to create lecture halls on the first and second floors. This level will include the lecture hall, a lobby and breakout area, study alcoves, and a row of flexible instruction spaces. Effort was made to salvage any usable material for reuse in the new design.

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MAIN STRATEGIES

SURFACE LOGIC

KCUMB WEAVER AUDITORIUM The acoustic surfaces of the lecture hall were designed parametrically in grasshopper/ rhino. This strategy allowed us to easily change the forms throughout the design process, allowed us to generate and visualize the three-dimensional forms rapidly, and created a strong framework for detailing and custom fabrication methods. The finished information was imported into Revit for documentation.

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In anticipation of a cross-sectionbased construction method, the logic for the surfaces was based on a lofted surface from many curves. For the design process, these curves were equally spaced. Potentially, one could export each of these curves (however many necessary) and use a CNC to construct the exact necessary cross-sections. These cross sections would then hold the lathe for the plaster finish.

The logic behind the surfaces is then quite simple: to define the edges, divide those edgest, generate cross sections, then use those cross sections to create the surface. Being concave surfaces, these would need to be acoustically absorptive to avoid undesirable sound focusing and reflections. The material chosen for the task was an acoustic plaster.


Connect these curves with the final lofted surface

Use these intersection points to create arcs at certain radii

Intersect these planes with the control curves

Divide control curve and create normal construction planes

Auditorium interior acoustic surfaces

Surface control curves

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MAIN STRATEGIES

CURVE RESOLVEMENT KCUMB WEAVER AUDITORIUM

The design process took place firstly by hand, finding the rules of the form. By sketching axonometrics and sections, we were able to quickly discuss what our goals were for the experience of the space and how each element of the geometry would affect that. Once we arrived at some clear rules for the generation of form, we continued in grasshopper to evaluate. The cross-sections, originally NURBS curves, would have a different radius in section at any given point along the curve. The material, however, has a minimum radius of 4 feet. A redefinition usind arcs instead of NURBS curves was necessary once this material was chosen. For creating these surfaces with arc cross sections, two options were possible. The first option would have a constant radius in section throughout the entire length of the surface. This would mean that, in section, the edge point would displace gradually along a circle of 4 feet in radius. The result of this was not smooth enough, and tended to move away from our biological inspiration. A second alternative was found in reimagining the radius as 4 feet or greater. This meant that the arc was defined by a curve offset from the wall no greater than 4 feet. As the cross sections sweep their way across the surface, this edge point moves back steadily toward the wall. This alows us greater control over this edge and more freedom to control the seam that it creates with the wall. This also keeps the edge from interfering with head-heights at every point along the exterior paths in the auditorium.

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A

B

NURBS Curve Definition

Radius = 4’-0” always

Radius ≥ 4’-0”

Section A

Section B

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ROTH TRAILHEAD 3rd Year | Group Project: Dirt Works Studio [design+build] Role | Project Manager Client | University of Kansas Field Station Budget | $48,000 _ Completed For | $27,000 Areas of Focus | Applied material research of rammed earth, materials and construction methods, detail and tolerance, sustainability + economy, attention to site and program. Awards | Best American Building of 2013 [kansas nominee] Monsters of Design Award [best in show] AIA Kansas Honor Award Publications | Rammed Earth Conservation Lawrence Journal World Professor | Chad Kraus Collaborators | Engineering - Apex Engineers Architect - Alan Belot, AIA

Our goal was not only to design and build a piece of architecture that would enhance the natural state of the prairie, but to specifically explore the material rammed earth for its phenomenological and sustainable properties and document this research for public use. People have been building with earth since we have been building at all, and many ancient rammed earth structures still stand today. On the other hand, there are almost no building codes or standards for this material in the United States. Therefor, it often goes unnoticed and unused. For this project, rammed earth gave us a wonderful way to translate the geology and history of the natural site. It gives us a way to learn about detailing and construction, and to translate that knowledge to those that visit the built project. The design of the Roth Trailhead concentrates on a few basic tectonic elements, including a punctuated rammed earth wall proportioned on the Fibonacci sequence; a path guiding visitors along the wall, a sun-shading canopy hovering atop the wall, and an outdoor classroom that opens onto the prairie beyond.

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MAIN STRATEGIES

PARTI + TECTONICS ROTH TRAILHEAD

The design can be thought of as two parts: the wall (the earth, the heavy) and the canopy (the sky, the fleeting). The two elements form a dialogue of contrasts between each other while both individually telling a story about the site. We can imagine the wall as a slice of the land that has simply been slid out like a drawer from a cupboard. The layers of the rammed earth therefor are the different soil strata of the site. This represents the rich history that can be found underneath our feet; a depth of knowledge infinitely vast can be found if we know where to look. The wall is punctuated in increments according to a fibonacci sequence, an homage to the ratios of natural fractal patterns. The axis is broken in the middle to create a place instead of merely a path. This break activates both sides of the wall instead of just one, then tapers off to lead to the nature trails depicted on the wall’s signage. The wall is

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resolute. The horizontal layers of the rammed earth register the gently sloping hill of the prairie site. The canopy is a dynamic and angular plane hovering over the wall. It has a black steel frame and shou sugi ban cedar louvers. The burnt cedar is a reference to the periodic prairie fires that the prairie depends on for its continuance. The canopy is divided into three triangles. Each triangle has structure running from the vertices to the centroid, and each centroid connects to a steel column embedded in the wall segment. Each triangle is its own structural unit, and the triangles stop just short of meeting, leaving a small parallel gap that eccentuates the lightness of the fleeting surface in contrast with the heavy earthen wall. The canopy louvers cast shadows on the wall in angles that intersect the lines of the rammed earth layers.


1”x6” Cedar lumber - shou sugi ban finish Secondary structure 2-ply 3/16” welded steel members Primary structure 2-ply 3/16” welded steel members

4’x1’ Stepped Footing (2) Steel members welded to top plate connector Top plate fins welded to top of square tubing Rammed earth Primary structure to secondary connection pieces

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PROCESS

DESIGN + BUILD ROTH TRAILHEAD

Our studio began by individual interviews with our professor, after which we were given roles based on our strengths. I was given the role of Project Manager, and charged with having a hand in every part of the project while creating the schedule and bringing the project in under budget.

and the geology departments at KU to to particle size analysis and compression testing of many samples before finding the optimal soil mixture and ramming method.

Once in our roles, we had a very fast-paced design process that took Professor Kraus’s conceptual design through construction documents in a matter of weeks. The process was one of rapid modeling and iteration, followed by defense-style debates.

We constructed the project, generally, in two teams. One team on site and one team in the warehouse. While the team on site set up the formwork, mixed the soil, rammed the soil, poured the puddled earth cap, and removed the formwork for reuse, the team in the warehouse was busy welding the steel members and cutting/burning the louvers for the canopy.

While designing, we had to also be researching rammed earth. We worked with the engineering

By this method, we had little down time and could expedite the entire construction process.

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SECTION DEVELOPMENT

MATERIAL + TOLERANCE ROTH TRAILHEAD

Puddled earth cap HSS 6”x6”x3/8” square tube column

1/4” Milled steal signage Rammed earth w/ (2)mats #4 rebar @ 18”O.C. each way 12”x12”x3/4” Steel base plate

1” screen clean gravel Concrete permeable paver

(2) mats #4 rebar @ 18” O.C. each way Backfill 5/8” A36 - F1554 Anchor bolts #4 rebar @ 18” O.C. each way

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CHICAGO LYRIC OPERA 4th Year | Group Project: Bayer, Barnthouse, + Chan Areas of Focus | Resolvement of complex program and plan, cultural space design, urban-scale issues, acoustical design, form. Professors | Stephen Grabow + Wojciek Lesnikowski Programs | SketchUp, Rhino, Revit, 3dsMax, Adobe Creative Suite

Our team began the project with inspiration from the painting “The Sea of Ice� by Caspar David Friedrich. The painting depicts a number of ice slates in a tenous balance and harmony with one another, coliding to form the subject of the scene. We made a parallel between this process and the process of coordinating our various programmatic volumes. The process of designing this Opera is not an attempt to sculpt a beautiful form to hold the program, but to coordinate and orchestrate the various forms into a harmonic composition. The eventual structure would be then, an arrangement of its various parts. Chicago itself and the urban spaces therein can be a metaphor for this process. The trajectories of infrastructure cut through the city, forming individual spaces as they pass. Each area, while possessing its own character, adheres to these trajectories. At our site, the trajectories of infrastructure meet the boundaries of three intersecting branches of river. Each reaction to a programmatic, site, structural, or acoustic consideration creates a unique trajectory within this composition. The primary views pull the composition in one way, and orient dependent functions to one side, while the back-of-house functions demand a logical and compact arrangement. The axis of the river orients the entirety, but the access pulls the composition to one side. We kept this idea of collaboration and conflict throughout the project and allowed this to impact each design decision.

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MAIN STRATEGIES

PROGRAM + FORM CHICAGO LYRIC OPERA

The design process of the Chicago Lyric Opera started with an in-depth analysis of the vast programmatic requirements. A simple model was made of just the volumes needed, and each group member created three iterations for discussion. The arrangement that was most natural was almost symmetrical, even after taking into consideration all of the required adjacencies of specific back-of-house functions. This iteration was condensed into a basic geometric volumes, and the access from only one side pulled the entrance area of the lobby to one side. These forms were then after sculpted to respond to various site factors including views, sun and ventilation strategies, and structure. The end form, having first been composed and therafter

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deformed, was reminiscent of our inspiration painting from earlier. The composition keeps a logical plan while acheiving a sculptural building form. The lobby, facing the intersection of two rivers, allows views down both axes. The back of house, still almost symmetrical, is in three levels with a central shaft for light and air. The end form appears to have successive colliding volumes, which reveal interior programs. The first volume from the river is the lobby, the second one is the opera cafe/restaurant/rentable event space/ and the top peak reveals the flytower. The entrance is signified by another colliding plate that comes out toward the street.


Metal panel facets

Glass facade elements

Steel Space-frame structure

Auditorium

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MAIN STRATEGIES

PLAN + SECTION CHICAGO LYRIC OPERA

The result of this process of colliding programmatic volumes is quite interesting: the program creates a very logical, orthoganal, and symmetrical plan while the other shaping factors create a more angular section. The plan of the auditorium itself is derived from optimal viewing angles of the stage in collaboration with angles to simultaneously enhance the sound toward the back of the seating area and avoid negative sound reflections. This only angular element meets the orthagonal program spaces on the interior with a corridor for access and egress. The individual floor lobbies are balconies that hang over the grand lobby space,

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connected with a grand staircase remniscient of traditional opera. The bar on one side provides a place to linger between acts. The VIP lounge is located just next to the auditorium entry on each level, and egress stairs hug the left and right stages. Entrance under the balconies allows a progression of grand views, both up to the balconies and out toward the river. The angles in section allow for sun control to passively control the spaces from season to season, with automated openings for ventilation. Parking is held under the entrance plaza, allowing an even entry experience for all visitors and patrons.


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MONACO MOTORS 3rd Year | Individual Project Areas of Focus | Form-finding based on restrictive urban site, context, and programmatic requirements. Professor | Dennis Sander

Monaco has a rich history of motorcar racing and luxury. The birthplace of the Grand Prix hosts high-speed races along its sinuous roads each year. These races pass through the mountains and drivers must do pin-point turns to manouver the tough terrain. The project, a luxury car dealership, is designed for this culture and inspired by this culture. The parameters of designing for the movement of a car make the form twist and turn along different radii. The aerodynamic curves of a sportscar are reflected in the curving and muscular form of the designed object. Not only an aesthetic parallel is drawn, though. Highperformance vehicles derive their forms from a measured and guided reaction to performance factors. It was in this spirit that I imagined the dealership as an object to be designed. The factors to optimize the form included complex site restraints, environmental factors, structural systems, views and lighting, programmatic requirements, human and comfortability needs, and logistics of keeping and presenting vehicles. The site, located in Monaco, France, is a sliver of land in between two roads and over a tunnel. It has an immediate neighbor to the south-west, and views directly to the sea and to the castle to the north-east.

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MAIN STRATEGY

STRUCTURE + FORM MONACO MOTORS

Due to the roads on either side of the lot and the tunnel running underneath, we were given only very specific lines on which we could land structurally. Instead of simply extruding up from these lines or landing columns upon them, I chose to only land on specific points on thos specific lines. By restricting the project to points instead of lines, an entirely new geometry was found for the challenge. Inspired by the structure of suspension and butterfly bridges, I then designed a series of structural arcs that connected these points in compression. These arcs were then connected to one another in tension, and sections were balanced according to XYZ direction. They could then be capable of holding the building envelope and encasing a volume. The resulting design is then sinuous and muscular, with an inherent sense of movement and agility.

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MAIN STRATEGIES

PLAN + SECTION MONACO MOTORS

The spaces of Monaco Motors include three levels of showroom and two levels of office. Special consideration was taken in section to assure that a light of sight is guarded between and and all levels for security purposes and to ensure collaboration between those employees on the showroom floor and those in the offices upstairs. Each floor hosts a structural system of veirendeel trusses to allow inclusion of all building systems within the interstitial space between floors. The facade is kept entirely in insulated single-curvature glass. This preserves the purity of the form and the various views. The glass is designed as a double facade system, which would be superheated between the two layers during the day. This heat would then be stored for use in energy. The all-glass facade serves to make visible the cars on the interior, inviting visitors and pedestrians to enter the space.

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VISUALIZATION

DRIVER’S PERSPECTIVE MONACO MOTORS

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KU S.A.D.P. COMMONS 4th Year | Group Project: Bayer, Ostrander, Curtis Areas of Focus | Resolvement of complex program, extensive performance criteria, regenerative architecture, detailing in design. Professor | Steve Padget, AIA

SADP Commons creates an intercollaborative and innovative learning environment for the University of Kansas School of Architecture, Design, and Planning. As the culture and methods of this field evolve, the facilities and services must also evolve. This space would serve an important role in forming the identity of the School on a campus level. Special attention was made to studio culture, advances in technology, and interdisciplinary collaboration. The project goals can be simplified as such:

• • • • • • •

Facilitate educational activities ranging from studio, to classroom, to lecture etc. Promote creativity, productivity, energy, and health. The designed solution must be a tool for research and education. Collect, purify, and reuse water at the scale of the surrounding buildings and street. Generate all electricity needed for the School of Architecture, Design, and Planning through sustainable energy technologies. Unify the identities of the various departments with a collective culture. Engage the larger community of the KU Campus. Add value to the context in the areas of: environment, culture, economy, productivity, education, and social equity (gender, physical, socio-economic, etc.)

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MAIN STRATEGIES

SITE DESIGN KU SADP COMMONS

The site, connecting Marvin Hall and the Art and Design Building at KU, will replace Marvin Studios addition. The goal to unify the two schools is an important site consideration, and the new building would connect the interior spaces while creating a new shared outdoor space. The site is located at the beginning of Jayhawk Boulevard, on axis with one of the main pedestrian paths leading to and from the student housing. Therefor, many students walk past or through this site on their way to class everyday. This makes the site an optimal location for reaching out to the larger campus of KU. It could serve to arouse curiousity in the school, showcase student work, and educate about design and sustainability practices. The site is also located directly on the boundary between the Kaw and Wakarusa watersheds. The

south drains to the Wakarusa River and to the North drains to the Kaw River. I have proposed to use this site as a beacon and educational tool to inspire curiosity in sustainability and to give an understanding of basic sustainability principles. The placement on the watershed will be used to support a living machine, which will be used to purify the wastewater for the new SADP Commons. The entire roof of the Art & Design building would be a solar array that would power the Art & Design Building, Marvin Hall, and the SADP Commons. The area that is now a parking lot would become a restorative landscape, used simultaneously to purify and slow runoff and to cool the local environment via evapotranspiration. This space is activated by points of entrance on each side.

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MAIN STRATEGIES

PROGRAM DIAGRAMMING KU SADP COMMONS

I began designing with a careful consideration of the program elements, first individually based on environmental or other requirements and then together based on adjacencies.

good groundwork to begin thinking about the composition and form of these spaces.

on the combination of these two exercises. These conceptual iterations would evolve to become linear based on the connection to Marvin Hall, the Art and Design Building, and to environmental factors such as sun and wind.

The diagram on the top right shows each individual consideration’s importance for each programmatic area. The relative size of the square indicates approximately how important the factor is for that space. This gave me a

The diagram just below maps the program areas with relationship to one another, drawing lines between those program elements that must me proximate or otherwise directly affect one another.

The entire project is just under 40,000 gsf. These studies served as a basis or a startingoff point with which to think about the form of the building and the needs of each space.

The bottom right shows the first conceptual organizations of program shapes based

Primary Lecture Se

con

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rkin

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Exh

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Classrooms

Student Org. Off.

s

dio

Stu

Liv

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Fou

Ma

chi

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Pa

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ibit

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B. Te

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Lab

Clean Fab. Lab

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Materiality

Structure

Fire Suppression

Access

Power/Controls

View Angles

Water

Acoustics

Artificial Light

Daylight

Ventilation Primary Lecture Hall Secondary Lecture Hall Foundation Studios Small Classrooms Exhibition Space Computer Lab Clean Fabrication Lab Building Technology Lab Cafe Student Org. Offices Living Machine Parking Courtyard

Primary Lecture Hall Secondary Lecture Hall Computer Lab Classrooms Foundation Studios Clean Fab. Lab Exhibition Space Living Machine Cafe Student Org. Offices Parking Building Tech. Lab

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Primary Lecture Hall

Exhibition Space

Secondary Lecture Hall

Living Machine

Computer Lab

Cafe

Classrooms

Student Org. Offices

Foundation Studios

Parking

Clean Fab. Lab

Building Tech. Lab


Building Envelope

Green Roof

Light Well Green Roof

Circulation/Egress

Egress

Vertical Circulation

Mechanical

Return Air

H.V.A.C

Supply Air

Structure

Structure

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4

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6

A B 1

BA

2

3 C

D E

F G

AB

AA

BB

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H

Primary Lecture Hall

Clean Fabrication Lab

Parking

Multipurpose Space

Exhibition Space

Mechanical Room

Computer Lab

Living Machine

Commons

Classroom

Cafe

Gender Neutral Restrooms

Foundation Studios

Student Organization Offices

Offices


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A B 1

BA

2

3 C

D E

F G

AB

AA

BB

H

Primary Lecture Hall

Clean Fabrication Lab

Parking

Multi-purpose Space

Exhibition Space

Mechanical Room

Computer Lab

Living Machine

Commons

Classroom

Cafe

Gender Neutral Restrooms

Foundation Studios

StudentOrganizationOffices

Offices

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SECTION AA

SECTION AB

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Automated openings vent the servant space, creating a negative pressure on this side. This pulls fresh air through the program spaces and out of these vents. Automated louvers encased in insulated glass frames optimize the amount of sunlight for the living machine while balancing the temperature of the circulation/servant space

Veirendeel Truss system allows for open floor plan. Multiple structural members and principles are used throughout to reinforce education about these systems. Automated openings allow air to be pulled in through the program spaces. The air on this side has been cooled by the shade and by evapotranspiration. Raised access flooring allows for adaptability of the studio spaces. This building “spine” wall carries many of the building systems to the program spaces. Clad in rammed earth, it simultaneously pays homage to the “mud hut” and also serves as a thermal mass

Actively conditioned air, if needed, is pumped through a slot adjacent to the automated passive openings, allowing for the same airflow path. Path weaves in and around the continuous living maching in the circulation core. This promotes an educational experience inbetween classes.

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DENSITY + MIXITY PARIS 11EME ARRONDISSEMENT Graduate Academic | Individual Project Areas of Focus | Small-scale intervention within an urban-scale redevelopment. Developing a parcel with specific contstraints and goals. Professors | Michel DiMonchy, Guy Vaughan Programs | SketchUp, Rhino, Grasshopper, Adobe Creative Suite

In the urban development plan for Paris, the goal is to double the overall built density. As a continuation of the longer urbanism project previous, this two-week project had a few seemingly simple goals: to develop your assigned parcel to a built density of triple the area of your parcel, to leave half of the parcel open to the sky and at least half planted, to have at least fifty percent housing on your parcel, and to develop a continuous relationship with the parcels adjacent. The focus was on actual factors of urbanism: how to mix uses in a single plot, how to address the needs of each program without compromising privacy or other characteristics of space, how to enliven the urban fabric on the pedestrial level by careful treatement of the ground level, how to create a harmonious mixity between uses. In addition, how to use all of these factors to create a piece of architecture as opposed to just a project of development.

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MAIN STRATEGIES

PLAN DEVELOPMENT DENSITY + MIXITY

For this assignment, I was given the smallest parcel out of all 30+ students in the atelier. At just 186 square meters, my parcel sits adjacent to the proposed urban green space at a corner of two streets. Designing density into a small parcel has specific challenges. I started with a sketched typology study. Given that my parcel was approximately a square, the question then was, “How do we divide a square while leaving built and half unbuilt?” I found the 19 most intuitive shapes in plan, and began testing them based

Soleil/Vent

Voisins

Espace Interior

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on three basic requirements: access to light and fresh air, relationship with neighboring parcels, and the creation of usable interior space. The first possibilities to be discarded were those that created too much shadow in the courtyard (preventing plant growth) or restricted access of wind and views to desirable facades of the building. The second ones to be discarded  were those that created awkward spaces with my immediate neighbor to the south. These possibilities either

broke the alignment line on our park-facing block facade or created dark valleys between my lot and the other. The third options to be discarded were those that were inefficient uses of the interior space, as there was no room for wasted space in this small lot. Of the 19 possibilities, this left only one: to divide the lot in half and align the building with the southern neighbor. This met all of the requirements and, after accounting for circulation of minimum size, would lead to a building of just 9 levels.


Espace Parcel: 186 M2

Espace Programme: 65 M2 Espace Circulation: 186 M2

Espace Necessaire = 186 x 3 = 558 M2 Niveaux Necessaires = 558 M2 / 65 M2 = 8.6 = 9

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MAIN STRATEGIES

GROUND LEVEL DENSITY + MIXITY

To create a continuous pedestrian experience of our block and to form a cohesive composition of space, the decision was made to keep each ground floor as public use, and to aesthetically strive for the lightest and most transparent space possible. For the development of my parcel, I imagined a small cafe on the ground floor, with an entrance

toward the primary views and seating along the courtyard windows. Access to floors above is protected by a seperate entry and lobby space behind. The courtyard edge guards the line of existing buildings with erected cor-ten plates, punctuated along the line of the existing facade. This creates a

semi-enclosed public park, more than 70 percent planted. Private entry to the apartments and other program areas is through this park and the threshold is formed by a folded cor-ten plate. Transparency was acheived by pulling back the structure and using only glass panels to support the ground facade.

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1

2

3

A

4 5

B

C

2-PIECE [E. 5-8]

1

2

3

A

4 5

B

C

ATELIER ARTISTE [E. 3-4]

1

2

3

A

4 5

B

C

BUREAU PARTAGE [E. 1-2]

1

A

2

3

4 5

B

C

CAFE [R.D.C.]

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PHOTOGRAPHY

VILLA SAVOYE POISSY, FRANCE

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PHOTOGRAPHY

MEMORIAL TO THE MURDERED JEWS OF EUROPE BERLIN, GERMANY

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PHOTOGRAPHY

NEUE WACHE BERLIN, GERMANY

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PHOTOGRAPHY

ST. PETER’S BASILICA ROME, ITALY

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PHOTOGRAPHY

VIEW FROM BERN MINSTER BERN, SWITZERLAND

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PHOTOGRAPHY

CENTRE GEOURGES POMPIDOU PARIS, FRANCE

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H. Patrick Bayer | Architecture Portfolio 2013-2014  

A compilation of student and intern projects from the University of Kansas, ENSA Paris Val de Seine, and Helix Architecture + Design. Contai...

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