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Contributors: Talent Interview Gavino Di-Vino Text – Roisin Mennell Editorials boys & girlsPhotographer – Ho Yee Yeung Creative Director – Alicia Ryalls-Payne Stylist – Jasmine Tutt ModelsYvone Sartz Leo Petrarca Nikos Martini Ariel Thompson 2049Photographer – Ho Yee Yeung Creative Director – Alicia Ryalls-Payne Stylist – Jasmine Tutt ModelKamile Katherine Beleskaite Trend ShootPhotographer- Zhahé Akomanyi Photography Assistant- Klaudia Nevins Creative Director – Alicia Ryalls-Payne Stylists – Jasmine Tutt & Ho Yee Yeung ModelsHyowon Lee Sarah Saleh Ayo Ade FRAGMENTPhotographer & Creative Director – Ho Yee Yeung Fashion & Film Photographer – Ho Yee Yeung Text – Roisin Mennell Contributors – Michelle von Mandel Sam Daniels Nat Mackie Monzie In Conversation Text – Roisin Mennell Contributors – Nicholas Riley-Bentham Paul Scott Lucas Canino 2


Editor Alexandra Gibbs Art Director Olie Moffat Creative Director Alicia Ryalls-Payne Fashion Editor Jasmine Tutt Photography Director Ho Yee Yeung Journalist Roisin Mennell

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CONTENTS 8 KEEP YOUR EYES OUT FOR 10 MAKING THE WORLD STOP: AN INTERVIEW WITH GAVINO DIVINO 16 BASQUIAT BOOM FOR REAL 18 BOYS&GIRLS 26 THE TROUBLE WITH CHARITY SHOP CHIC 30 FILM AND FASHION 34 2049 50 ART DECADE 52 TREND 66 FRAGMENT 74 IN COVERSATION 80 TEAM PICKS

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Creating the first issue of Material Magazine has been a bit of a whirl-wind; so much is currently happening in the world of politics and social issues, it’s hard to talk about pop culture and fashion with the same kind of passion and sincerity. We like to think our readers will feel the underlying vibe that we’re all working towards a more accepting and creatively diverse future, whether it be in our own careers or to help inspire others. Not to dwell on the negatives, we are currently living through a real golden age for celebrating film from the past to present day. The aesthetics of a film can transcend its own product; influencing fashion, music, literature, and so on. In our Film and Fashion interviews, we spoke to many young creatives who completely understand that their own style wouldn’t be complete without a hint of their favourite tv show or film. I know personally that if it wasn’t for the exaggerated two-piece suits seen on X-Files, I may never have fully appreciated the appeal of power dressing. In the Blade Runner editorial, we look towards the release of the long awaited second instalment to Ridley Scott’s sci-fi cult classic. The 1980s has been seen in high fashion for the past year, but it’s important to remember where the original, era-defining style came from. We were also really excited to talk to some up and coming design students, seeing how forward-thinking our generation is, and how the world of pop culture we all know and love will continue to thrive in the future. When we created Material, we wanted a fashion and culture magazine that was truly authentic; that didn’t shy away from difficult conversations or dance around what’s really affecting our generation. However, we also wanted our readers to be inspired, to be encouraged to explore everything the creative world has to offer, whether it be reading one of our recommended books, or exploring a new exhibition. Fashion is, and always will be important. Not to be seen as vapid, it’s the most direct way to express yourself, which is an amazing thing we have the privilege to explore. As long as our readers feel the smallest bit more inspired than they did before picking up this issue, we know we’ve accomplished what we set out to do.

A LETTER FROM THE E D I TO R

Alexandra Gibbs 7


The World of Anna Sui Fashion and Textiles Museum, 83 Bermondsey Street, SE1 3XF

Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion Victoria and Albert Museum, Cromwell Road, SW7 2RL

A first for retrospective exhibitions in the UK: American fashion designer Anna Sui becomes the Fashion and Textiles Museum’s focus this summer. Since her first catwalk show in 1991, Sui has created a signature rock ‘n’ roll romanticism within her work, which reinvents pop culture for the new generation. From Detroit to New York- Sui has become a classic American name in the fashion industry- shaping a design universe which comprises garments, textiles, accessories, beauty and interiors, a world which has equally shaped the course of fashion history. This major exhibition showcases each and every aspect of the Anna Sui world, featuring 100 looks from the designer’s archive with archetypes from Surfers, to Hippies, Mods and Punks. The World of Anna Sui displays the captivating charm and flair of the designer’s creations, and documents a significant figure within the history of the fashion industry.

The anticipated, major exhibition of Spanish master couturier Cristobal Balenciaga marks the centenary of the opening of Balenciaga’s first fashion house in San Sebastian, Spain, and the 80th anniversary of the opening of his famous fashion house in Paris. It explores and showcases over 100 garments from the 1950s and 1960s- a historically iconic creative period for the designer. While features include revolutionary, innovative shapes such as the tunic and baby doll dresses, pieces created for fashion icons and actresses equally present the designer’s Haute Couture prowess. Garments stand besides archive sketches, photographs and catwalk footage- revealing details and processes which mark the exceptional skill of the designer. Importantly, the exhibition explores the legacy and influence of the designer and fashion house- and how this has affected 30 fashion designers of the past 50 years. Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion is a rich display of one of the industry’s most influential, innovative and pioneering designers who sculptured modern fashion through exquisite craftsmanship and creativity.

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KEEP YOUR EYES OUT FOR

Perfume: A Sensory Journey Through Contemporary Scent East Wing Galleries, Somerset House, Strand London, WC2R 1LA Perfume: A Sensory Journey Through Contemporary Scent investigates the hidden talents, tales and techniques of modern perfumers. Set to transform the East Wing Galleries of Somerset House, scent based installations create an immersive, captivating exploration of the work of ten perfume pioneers from the past two decades, showcasing the inspirations and skills in today’s scent scene. Each exhibited perfumer, through creativity and ingenuity, challenges long-held conventions in scent-design- from creation and communication to gender and good taste- pushing their craft into new, exciting directions. With scent in the spotlight, visitors can expect to contribute their individual interpretations to each of the exhibited fragrances in notebooks presented to the audience on arrival. Each fragranced space exists as a multi-sensory journey, including visual, auditory and tactile references to the identity and influences of the perfumer. A fully functioning perfume

laboratory stocked with over 200


ingredients interacts and plays with the individual’s senses further- as visitors can gain instruction from professionals, take part in hands on workshops and see up close the true skill and science of the modern perfumer.

The Untold Story of Tupac Shakur: All Eyez On Me In UK Cinema 30 June 2017 “Legends never die”: a biopic telling of the true, untold story of prolific rapper, actor, poet and activist Tupac Shakur. Directed by Benny Boom, the 2017 anticipated release follows Shakur from his early days in New York City to his evolution into being one of the world’s most recognized and influential voices in culture, before his untimely death at the age of 25. Against all expectations, Shakur’s raw, authentic talent, powerful lyrics and revolutionary mind-set propelled him into becoming a significant, cultural icon- with a legacy which continues to evolve long after his passing. ALL EYEZ ON ME stars Kat Graham, Lauren Cohan, Hill Harper, Jamal Woolard, Danai Gurira and Demetrius Shipp Jr. as Tupac Shakur.

Syria: A Conflict Explored IWM London, Lambeth London SE1 6HZ

Road,

An unforgettable, imperative and informative exhibition series, Syria: A Conflict Explored, aims to offer a new level of clarity and understanding on the origins, escalations and human impact of the ongoing conflict in Syria. A part of the Imperial War Museum’s new Conflict Now programming strand, this season of exhibitions and events features the first UK exhibition by award-winning Russian documentary photographer Sergey Ponomarev and an exhibition documenting ‘Syria: Story of a Conflict’- a balanced and objective introduction to the complexities of the conflict which began in 2011. In Ponomarev’s display, 60 unforgettable colour photographs from two recent bodies of work are exhibited. ‘Assad’s Syria’ offers a rare insight into what life was really like for people living in Governmentcontrolled areas of Syria in 20132014, while ‘The Exodus’ captures the determination, endurance and suffering of people from Syria and elsewhere who sought asylum and a better life in Europe in 20152016. The intimate displays carefully explore the causes and effects of a bitter conflict, through collections of objects, personal stories and film.

Pink Floyd: Their Mortal Remains Victoria and Albert Museum, Cromwell Road, SW7 2RL “Imaginatively, fascinatingly curated, beautifully designed and stunningly realised” (Daily Telegraph): The first international retrospective of one of the world’s most influential and iconic bands hits the V&A this festival season. A major, immersive exhibition- this audio-visual journey is an unparalleled exploration of Pink Floyd’s unique and extraordinary worlds- chronicling the music, graphic identity and staging of the band from their 60s debut to the present day. A transporting, utterly sensory experience: the exhibition stunningly curates the 50-year journey of one of the world’s most iconic rock groups. Through unique, personal artefacts, never-beforeseen in-depth interviews and eyepopping artworks, this interesting, affecting exhibition offers a truly rare and exclusive glimpse into the world of Pink Floyd.

Words by Roisin Mennell

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It’s all in the fur coat moment

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GAVINO DIVINO first set to stage at the Camden and Edinburgh Fringes in August 2016, with a vibrant, infectious self-written and directed comedy show hitting all the right notes for humor, reality and heartfelt truths. Divino is now featuring in BBC 3’s ‘Queer Britain’, exploring what the queer landscape has to teach about identity, acceptance and equality. Taking a moment between studying Russian and Spanish, Divino sits back at the Royal Academy of Arts to talk relationships to fashion, standing out from the crowd and what it means when you put on that fur coat.

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In the veiled beauty of the Academician’s Room at the RA, art and color create a breathable language which exudes from the 19th century walls. As he reclines on a plush, turquoise sofa, Gavino’s enigmatic tone and tantalizing stories seem to naturally radiate in the paint-adorned, embellished space. In his chosen outfit- a Louis Feraud Haute Couture inspired ensemblestriking red, open-tux jacket and matching velvet trousers, he could have stepped straight off the set of an artist’s portrait or indeed the Couture catwalk. I ask of his relationship to fashion and where it all began, and he unfolds a story of non-glamorous beginnings in Wigan and an adolescent journey of learning: finding culture, finding glamour figures and finding women and fashion. “I knew that I wanted to be a part of that, but I just thought of it as an external thing that I couldn’t be part of because I’m not a woman, I don’t live in New York or one of these places.” Living in Wigan, in the years around 2010, he discovered Dynasty, the 80s-culture hit filled with furs, makeup and glamour. In the grit of a Northern town, things didn’t look like that, “There was no glamour. There was lads and girls going out in King Street and I didn’t 12

fit into that.” The deep feeling of unfitting: wanting more than what this limited aspiration promised, would become a very powerful attribute- even if it felt dejecting in that time. In a fitting moment- of transformation- he describes a rug-like sheepskin he caught a glimpse of at his Dad’s house, which he casually slipped on as if with the lavishness of a fur shawl. This whimsical, fleeting moment carried through in attitude after moving out to live with his Auntie, “I jokingly said to my Auntie I’d love a fur coat. So, they bought me a 1930s Musquash fur coat for Christmas for £50 on eBay- I know that because I saw the receipt on the email. And I put it on and I felt fabulous, divine.” This transformation was limited despite its charm and honesty. Wearing a girl’s coat would be provocative, not of the norm and even detrimental, “I wanted to conform”. Later life in a hostel propelled Gavino’s surroundings from middle-class survival to a benefits Britain scenario, a gritty and even testing time, yet what prevailed appears to be a passionate intricacy of a person who strived for


more, who strived for art and culture beyond the constraints of his reality. “I remember being at the Royal Academy and talking eruditely about art, that was something I never thought I could be a part of”. Cutting away from what Divino describes as ‘Bourgeois sensibilities’ meant pushing away from deeply-rooted conformity pressures, a push which set him apart in a real, complete sense, “I had a lot of anger and a lot of hate towards that conformity and that lack of ambition to be different and to stand out.” He recognized, ever increasingly, a culture of ignorance’s which provoked enduring, oppressive difficulties. Following an open day in London, he remembers returning home to a drunkard, miserable place synonymous with crime and recurring bourgeois sensibilities: “I think that was where I was, but actually in moments of that, it gave me the freedom to be myself.”

thought, if they do say things if they are staring at me, good. Because they should be because I’m fabulous.” Snapping his fingers, he revels in the remarkable, fur-coat moment, “So then, my adolescent hobble: became a strut.” And that was it: “You really need to be courageous with things, because, anything is available to you if you want it”.

Working at Oxfam exposed Divino to a treasure chest of vintage fashion, “through vintage fashion you can construct your identity in a way that high street shops don’t allow you to do”. He recites Dynasty as the first, major style influence. A zealous attachment to Hollywood film soon followed. Gavino speaks deeply of a fascination with glamour; it’s as if the word defines a fantastical world in itself- a handsome, enticing, palatial realm of fiction and aspiration. “I wanted it. For me that glamour was desirable. To me that glamour meant power and it meant Wearing the Musquash fur coat for the first stepping away from that Wigan world”. Learning time, for a competition, fittingly answered the languages and absorbing glamour meant lingering ‘what am I going to wear’ question, “I running away, from a cold and shallow place put it on and I stepped out and then I thought- to one which resembled the kinds of words somebody is going to say something- actually I and film Gavino was so intensely connected by, “Film characters are impossible characters that can’t exist in real life. But actually I always wanted to be that film character.” “I thought I could never look that fabulous because I’m not a woman. I have to be boring and I have to wear Reebok classics like all the other boys. For me it was about glamour underpinning intellectualism. I didn’t want to just be an intellect walking around in socks and sandals. I didn’t want to just be a glamorous bimbo falling out of an LA club. I wanted both.” PULL QUOTE: “I didn’t want to just be an intellect walking around in socks and sandals. I didn’t want to just be a glamorous bimbo falling out of an LA club. I wanted both.” A relationship to glamour and later specifically fashion opened a pathway of discovery, one which invoked new experiences, stand-out moments and the crucial discovery of an ego, “that fur-coat moment, walking out of that hostel- in a fur-coat- going to the bus station to go to college… I walked in there and I had unusual clothes, I think everybody else shopped on the high street, so I walked in there and had these vintage clothes and people were 13


immediately like ‘oh my god he has the coolest clothes ever’”. He discusses a two-month period during college before living in the hostel as both experimental and defining, “my ego could grow and I could start being more experimental with the vintage clothes I was wearing- start wearing more female styles… I basically just wanted to look rich: but not rich in the way that somebody might go out and buy a belt that has an ‘H’ on to look like somebody from The Only Way is Essex, I wanted to look rich in the classic, glamorous way”. The fashion became a platform, a baseline to build upon and invent character, attitude and style day after day, increasingly in new and interesting ways which asked for attention and recognition. He tells me an amazing Halloween story. “I watched Ugly Betty, amazing, so I loved Hilda. And I just wanted to be this kind of, this really slutty Latina woman- like- prostitute. I just loved that image. I went into my sixth form college as a street prostitute called Quenitaand I spoke Spanish all day- and, I walked around with oversized dollar bills tucked into my clothes, I was wearing a bra and tiny shorts. The principal came up to me and she is the queen of bourgeois awfulness and she said to me ‘well that’s not very Halloween’”. He revels in how outrageous the act was, “’Halloween baby I’m just going to work!’ So I twerked in front of her- and, I think that was the birth of my belief in myself as an artist, that was me becoming an artist- I’d done something”. He describes, then, how this pinnacle-like moment led to a lonelier, darker time of realization: realizing he was not a celebrity and people weren’t accepting, that the conformity and normality around bred such an intrinsic sense of anger. “I think I was trying to be myself at first, then I was trying to be better than everyone else. Then I came to London… that was another phase. Now I’ve been here for almost 3 years and now I’m understanding my purpose of being in London, which is great. I’m finally becoming personally successful, in the sense that people are noticing me”. “I’d have to hold myself back, if I stayed in that world. That’s not who I am. It was pushing, pushing, pushing to find me and actually now I am me I can just be happy and comfortable, 14


because I’ve found all of those, gleaned all of those lovely resources and I’m still building those references, but now I’ve put it in a way that’s comfortable for me, which is healthy.” I ask Divino about modern fashion, in the sense of references and influences: he is like a visual scrapbook of vintage icons, fashion pieces and colors and tells me he recently got inspired by a vintage camera strap from a men’s suit shop and the way it was carefully attached to the mannequin. He says he’d be especially attracted to a modern designer taking influence from history- that’s something he would explore and be connected to. It’s a collage of references which make up an eclectic, elegant style. I’m interested to hear his opinions on the current landscape of fashion, whether he engages with it and what he imagines for the blending of men’s and women’s fashion in the future. “I’m not that impressed with androgyny. When I look at a man, wearing a military cut suit, like this jacket I’m wearing today; it’s a woman’s jacketbut it’s a woman’s jacket taking influences from a man’s military coat.”

“People do limit themselves, and I think that’s kind of what I want to show- it started somewhere! I wasn’t born with Revlon lips and these nails, I had to go against the grain and create my own things. I’d like other people to do it. Wouldn’t that be amazing to have a whole room of people that you’d inspired to just be themselves in whatever way that looks like. So that’s one of my goals, definitely”. With upcoming Auntie shows and new shows developing, an adventure to Russia planned and dreams of acting each floating in Gavino’s artistic sphere, it is clear he is a self-defined and compelling individual, with an intrinsic connection and destiny for what he does. He quotes “’Art should comfort the disturbed and disturb the comfortable.’ I think that is what my art has become.” Written by Roisin Mennell Gavino’s next AUNTIE show hits the Hackney Picturehouse on Friday 23 June; doors: 7.30, tickets: £5.

“If I want to go and wear a Hermes jacket for ladies I don’t think twice about putting it onsince the fur-coat moment. I’d say that a strongwilled individual can wear whatever they want, but for mainstream fashion, it would be great if men could wear color and be flamboyant. Every red carpet who’s in the pictures? All the women- because they’re allowed to wear color. You don’t see what the men are wearing because they’re all in suits. I’m sure that there’d be some men who maybe don’t want to wear that uniform. But they don’t have the courage to do that, which is bad, which means that there’s a problem with the fashion system if it’s not catering to everybody.” Gavino talks richly and passionately of his upcoming projects and the continuation of his West-African inspired show AUNTIE, “I have now become the person on the stage, who I used to idolize. I used to be in my room doing runway walks, walking like Naomi Campbell, but I wouldn’t let anybody else know. Now I’ve grown into a person whose confident enough to do that Naomi walk and wear those fabulous, glamorous clothes.” 15


The UK’s first large scale Jean-Michel Basquiat exhibition will be opening at the Barbican on the 21st September, showcasing work by the artist from his initial SAMO graffiti days, to his collaboration with Pop Art icon Andy Warhol. A leader of New York’s Neo-expressionism movement, Basquiat explored his relationships with Jazz, race, text, and popular culture. As well as being an artist, poet, and musician, Basquiat’s eclectic nonchalance in his attitude towards fashion has established him as being an icon for those in the fashion industry. After dropping out of school and moving from his Brooklyn home to live on the streets of Manhattan in the late 70s, Basquiat’s first artistic venture came from a collaboration with graffiti artist Al Diaz, where they created the tag SAMO, meaning ‘same old’. They often used poetic yet sarcastic phrases alongside the tags, such as “SAMO 4 MASS MEDIA MINDWASH”, which was noticed by the SoHo art scene. By 1980, Basquiat and Diaz had fallen out, which was expressed through “SAMO IS DEAD”. Basquiat craved the transition into being respected as a Gallery artist, but Diaz wasn’t interested in publicity. Neo-expressionism of the 1980s explored textural and expressive imagery, with heavy uses of colour and symbolism; a reaction to the Minimalism of the 60s. The movement also had heavy links to the commercial selling of art, partly inspired by the Pop artists that came before them. This ambition to earn money and recognition for their art eventually led to criticism about its authenticity. When looking at Basquiat’s work, the raw energy may seem instinctive, but the use of imagery and text was actually very thought out. 1982’s ‘Charles the First’ uses his classic crown motif, which could symbolise the authority he wants to convey, or the hierarchy he experienced when dealing with the art scene. The text reading “Most young kings get their head cut off” is the artist expressing the pressure he was under to be the revolutionary talent the media was portraying him to be. Keith Haring was a close friend of his, saying “He had to live up to being a young prodigy”. The use of “Cherokee” displays Basquiat’s interest in voodoo culture, as is seen in his use of the griot motif. The griot is a West African wandering philosopher, which is perhaps how Basquiat saw himself; a social commentator. With the rise of success, and possibly influenced by his new collaborator Andy Warhol, who helped expose him to an exclusive social circle, Basquiat became known for his expensive taste. Those in the New York art scene during the 80s remember him for always being impeccably dressed, yet his indifference towards his fame was seen through his Armani suits he would work in, then proceed to all of his glamorous events covered in paint. He

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BOOM FOR REAL

appreciated the creative expression that personal style allows, and was forward-thinking when it came to high fashion. He was a big fan of Issey Miyake, and walked for the Comme des Garcons SS87 show, which has been referenced in fashion ever since. Known for being shy and introverted during interviews, Basquiat preferred his visuals to speak for him, through his work and his look. However, people often focused on his personality and private life, such as dating pre-fame Madonna, rather than discuss the complexities of his work. Tackling issues such as police brutality, his Haitian heritage, and issues within popular culture, it’s likely the press didn’t want to confront the harsh truths


Basquiat was confronting. On the other hand, art critics often focused in on his race, ignoring all the other elements and influences of his work; Basquiat said of this “I’m not a black artist, I am an artist”. Basquiat’s cultural impact is still felt now, possibly more than ever, with movements such as Black Lives Matter still fighting against racial injustice in the US. Although Basquiat had an unfortunate demise, dying of a heroin overdose at the age of 27, the young prodigy is an icon for minority artists worldwide. The exhibition will be an opportunity to see work which is so rarely seen in person, continuing to inspire people for many decades to come. -Alexandra Gibbs

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boys&girls&boys&girls boys&girls&boys&girls boys&girls&boys&girls boys&girls&boys&girls boys&girls&boys&girls boys&girls&boys&girls boys&girls&boys&girls boys&girls&boys&girls boys&girls&boys&girls boys&girls&boys&girls boys&girls&boys&girls boys&girls&boys&girls boys&girls&boys&girls boys&girls&boys&girls boys&girls&boys&girls boys&girls&boys&girls boys&girls&boys&girls 18


(OPPOSITE) BLACK AND WHITE SHIRTS- GUESS (THIS PAGE) JUMPER DRESS- H&M - BLAZERS-M&S PINK SHIRT- SUZURAN BLUE JEANS- LEVIS PHOTOGRAPHER: HO YEE YEUNG STYLISTS: JASMINE TUTT & ALICIA RYALLS-PAYNE

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Are we really moving forward to a genderless fashion? From the early stages of birth, you’re marked pink or blue- girl or boy- which leads on to life stuck within these confinements of what you can and cannot wear. However, it’s 2017 and leading onto 2018, and there’s still that odd stare from strangers on the streets. Brands with their gender neutral friendly collections are becoming more visible, except, we’re finding it’s

the women rocking the masculinitypower dressing in suits to menswear fashion. Nevertheless, the men are left with nothing. Society conceives men swapping to femininity or a woman’s wardrobe still ‘unacceptable’- unless you’re a brave soul- and there are people, especially if you’re interlinked with fashion and the creative industry. Our minds work differently. To bring this to light, this editorial brings you the interchange. 21


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DENIM SHIRT- ZARA TROUSERS- RIVER ISLAND

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SWEATER- STYLENANDA 24


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Charity shop, granny-chic, has been a trend that’s grown rapidly over the past few years, mostly due to Alessandro Michele’s eccentric take on Gucci. The looks are exciting and feel fresh compared to the majority of designer’s work currently, and the meteoric rise in sales for the fashion house is evident proof that consumers are impressed. However, as someone who was brought up buying from charity and second hand shops, for the tiniest fraction of the price, I’m just not finding the Gucci phenomenon that relatable. Fashion, inevitably, moves in circles; when the underground creates a new trend, that speaks to them as individuals and conveys their idealisms, high-end designers pick it up, then produce their version, ready to be bought up for thousands of pounds by those who can afford it, who, in most cases, don’t have any real idea about where it initially originated from. This is the case with Punk and New York’s Hip-Hop scenes in the 70s, New Romantics in the 80s, and streetwear in present day, with Vetements selling hoodies for upwards of £500. The integrity of the original scene is completely lost. When brands like Gucci come along, who seem to have a youth-centric approach to clothing, with their playful and somewhat avant-garde designs, it’s always a shame to see such over-saturation. Every ‘fashion blogger’ has a pair of slip on fur lined loafers and a Soho Disco bag. When watching the most recent runway show, you can see instantly that the brand produce accessible bags and belts that anyone can incorporate into their wardrobe. In terms of marketing, they’re a huge success. Due to the ‘Gucci look’ becoming such a trend, it’s all over the high-street; people are striving for the look without really understanding where Michele gained his inspiration. Maybe I sound a bit elitist, but whenever a trend becomes this big, it loses its edge. To put it bluntly, Gucci was cool in the first few collections. Then as it’s gone on, I’ve seen little change in the design direction with every piece looking like it could be from any of Michele’s collections for the brand. Maybe that’s the point, that the pieces are fluid, and it’s all about building the

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THE TROUBLE WITH CHARITY SHOP CHIC


Gucci aesthetic. Maybe they know it sells, so why change? Not to sound too negative, I do love his designs. As I was going through the website, I was amazed by the detail of the gowns, and how they create this 1970s meets Renaissance dream-look perfectly. However, it all comes down to the price. I honestly still haven’t really gotten my head around the fashion industry’s ridiculous prices, but that’s another conversation. Some people in the UK buy from charity shops because their financial situation means they have to do so. Even though vintage stores have upped their prices in the last five years due to their popularity, they’re still often the cheaper, and more environmentally friendly option. Then there’s Gucci selling £600 versions of a vintage-inspired jumper, inspired by ‘ordinary’ people, only accessible to the few. The fact that they use real fur is a whole other issue, but it does feel like the brand isn’t as youth-friendly as it initially seemed to be. It always feels a little bit embarrassing when a brand is trying so hard to appeal to a younger generation, when they’re clearly still a bit out of touch. The best example of this is the recent Gucci memes, which fell flat in the eyes of lots of people. The brand was also recently in the headlines for appearing to plagiarise CSM student Pierre Louis Auvrey’s

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concept of high fashion models with alienlike, CGI bodies and heads, which Gucci used in recent campaigns. Michele responded to the claims that they never intended to copy, but fellow students, including designer Charles Jeffrey, defended Auvrey in Instagram comments. The whole idea that brands take inspiration from people who can’t afford designer clothes, then use their style to make their own money, isn’t anything new in fashion, so maybe my argument against the Gucci hype isn’t completely justified. Saint Laurent under Hedi Slimane’s direction took 60s & 70s rock n roll basics and put a luxury price tag on them, re-igniting the appeal of looking to vintage for inspiration. In the grand scheme of things, Gucci is one of the more exciting luxury houses at the moment, in comparison to less experimental brands. However, I’d love to see Michele make the next Gucci collection recognisably different from the rest. Designers are always going to take inspiration from the underground, it’s just about whether it’s done with taste and integrity. -Alexandra Gibbs

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An insight into today’s creatives and their film and fashion influences.

MICHELLE VON MANDEL www.michellevonmandel.com Instagram: @perfumepervert Graduating MA Art and Science student from Central St Martins exhibiting ‘The Scent of the 90s’ at the degree show 2017. Michelle explores the culturally nostalgic fragrances that were popular in the 90s alongside her art work which includes textiles, print, photography and painting. With all her pink panache, she explored in her project exactly what was wrong with the nineties. What was the last fashion item you purchased? This skirt. I got a matching jacket to go with it. What is your go-to film inspiration? Clueless. What is your favorites destination to buy clothes? Reformation in New York and LA. They don’t have it over here but I think they do pop-up exhibitions in London sometimes. What is your favorite film? Zoolander. Who is your favorite designer or upcoming label? Hussein Chalayan. What is style for you? Having fun, effortless, wearing what you feel like wearing, for me it’s expressing my personality and how I’m feeling on the day. On days I’m not here you’ll probably find me in a onesie. 30


NAT MACKIE

Is fashion genderless?

Instagram: @natmackie

What is style for you?

BA Fashion Design Student at Ravensbourne developing a contemporary trouser project and focusing on styling within short films. What was the last fashion item you purchased?

I think it’s sort of becoming a character, for example one day I’ll dress very Northern Soul and the next put on like a kimono. I sort of see it as dressing up as that character or that muse. So, style to me is becoming a character.

A band T-Shirt: Tory Party Prison.

Go-to fashion piece?

What is your go-to film inspiration?

Probably high-waisted suit trousers, a nice posh pair of trousers I think are great. That seems like something I would just instantly go to without thinking about it.

I like the film Weekend by Godard, it’s just really bizarre and doesn’t make any sense.

It’s becoming more genderless. From a design point of view, you make clothes on the body shape, obviously, the ratio of hip to waist on women is a lot more than a man in terms of the actual creation of the clothes. But in terms of the style I think it’s becoming more genderless.

Who is your favorite designer or upcoming label? Dries Van Noten. 31


MONZIE

euqinom7.blogspot.com Instagram: @euqinom7designs Fashion Designer, Fashion Video Artist and BA Fashion Accessory Design and Prototyping student developing a futuristic backpack project, exploring mountain climbing as inspiration and the daredevil world. Favorite destination to buy clothes? I mainly go to sample sales. So KTZ had one recently, Dover Street Market and Commes Des Garcons had one, Lazy Oaf. I wouldn’t go shopping on the high street, I’d get bored quickly- I need something that stimulates. I need something that’s really wacky and different. Favorite Film? Total Recall. I’m really into the future, VR and futuristic technology, I believe that Total Recall kind of predicted the future a long time ago and when I was a child there was a favorite scene where she changed her nails and my nails are actually that color right now. There was bits in that film that I could incorporate into style and inspiration. Who is your favorite designer or upcoming label? Hussein Chalayan. What is style for you? Being able to tell a story and express myself without talking, I wouldn’t say its role play, but it’s kind of like a running movie, it’s being able to wear what you feel and be your true self through what you’re wearing. Self-expression to the highest degree. What kind of cultural moment are we having?

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I don’t really live in the moment of trends or now. If I had to say what kind of moment I’m living in, as opposed to everyone, I’m moving towards VR and futuristic stuff, apple, the iPhone, everything is going into wearable technology I

really do believe that. We’re not there yet but I think we’re moving towards a digital world and a world where everything can be free but can also be very controlled. I think we’re moving towards that era, a digital era. Go-to style icon? Grace Jones. When it comes to fashion and clothes, Grace Jones doesn’t even have to wear clothes. Her character, charisma, personality is like a story, it is clothing. Grace Jones gives everyone that confidence boost, she’s just a powerhouse. She doesn’t have to wear anything and she’s still fashionable. Go-to fashion piece? Harness straps at the moment. And eyewear.


SAM DANIELS Instagram: @sskad

London creative and London College of Communication student on the beauty of the mundane and wearing what you want. What is your go-to film inspiration? I really like realistic, boring films, where nothing really happens but you just get sucked into it, where it shows the beauty in everyday life. Richard Linklater is a sick director, he does lots of really long takes of people just sitting on a bus or hanging out, really mundane stuff but it shows beauty. Favorite film? The film that I loved when it came out- I was obsessed with A Single Man- beautiful, all the color changes and then the clarity when it all comes together.

worn by certain people, but I think people should wear what they want. What is style for you? Comfort, definitely. Go-to style icon? I really like Sasha Lane and what she’s doing at the moment. She really inspired me to get dreadlocks. Erykah Badu is sick with her headwraps. I’d say my Mum, I’m a fan of my Mum’s clothes when she was my age. I guess in a way she had my style when she was younger because I have loads of her handme-downs. Go-to fashion piece? At the moment I’m loving the one earring thing, that’s my go to. A little earring to go with whatever you’re wearing makes an outfit.

Is fashion genderless? I think it should be genderless. I think you can wear what you want, really. There’s a lot of cultural ties to why a certain thing might be

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PHOTOGRAPHER: HO YEE YEUNG STYLISTS: JASMINE TUTT & ALICIA RYALLS-PAYNE

BLAZER-PRECIS PETITE - DRESS-H&M STUDIO 34


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(TOP) JACKET-MODEL’S OWN - BELT-MANGO (BOTTOM) TROUSERS-NOA NOA - SHOES-ZARA

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SHIRT 38 - TOPSHOP - SKIRT-H&M


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A R T D E C A D E As Chris Brown announces revealing documentary release date and The Amy Winehouse Exhibition returns to Camden, we discuss art and its attachment to personal identity.

Art consistently provokes creativity, personality and emotional power. It is this emotional power, which, often triggers or nourishes new and existing work. The discussion of what it is which specifically defines art is a complicated and fascinating one. Classically, painting, sculpture and photography have each been framed within the art context, yet film and fashion seem to flirt with the term, filtering in and out, taking influence or appreciation when and where necessary. Perhaps it is the idea that art only exists to be. Fashion and film exist with a label of commercial purpose whereas art holds freedom close to its array of paintbrushes, palettes and canvases. In the current frame of culture: the landscape mapped out before us, we see incessant controversies linked with diversity, representation and perspective. Photographer Wolfgang Tillmans, recently interviewed by Lou Stoppard for ShowSTUDIO, described his personal perspective and the way in which others associate his ‘white male’ characteristics as part of a vast reported dominance of white male artists. Tillmans reminded the viewer of his experience as a gay man, suggestive of a diverse quality which allows him to shift from this so-called white male dominance. Despite his identity and experience, he makes a point, saying: “I never wanted to be defined as a gay artist making gay art.” The suggestion, that to present work as an established artist your cultural makeup must be questioned, seems both topical and problematic. Within the relationship of art and creator, it is not always cultural makeup which is questioned, but a complex issue of personal life. The feeling of controversy recurs in this conception.

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Set for release in June, the insightful documentary ‘Welcome to my Life’ aims to explain the life and career journey of Chris Brown, from his perspective. Directed by Andrew Sandler, the film is rumoured to offer long-awaited answers and interviews from fellow music artists and friends including Jennifer Lopez, Mary J Blige and Mike Tyson; who, it seems, unite with Brown’s 10,394,809 YouTube subscriber fans to overlook his past and present altercations with the law. Brown was recently addressed personally by YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki, a letter signed “You amaze us and inspire us every day. Keep it coming.” The


rapper has been officially accepted into YouTube’s Diamond Club- an honour given to channels with 10 million subscribers. This follows success from various singles and collaborations since Brown’s last album “Royalty” which was released in 2015. Entitled in honour of his daughter, the cover features a poignant image of the rapper cradling his baby girl, a warm, heart-felt picture. Uncovering the lyrics, it is disturbingly juxtaposing to see how Brown implements a subconscious acceptance of women and girls as objects. Songs such as ‘Back to Sleep’, ‘Liquor’ and ‘Proof’ are depressing examples: “F**k you back to sleep girl, don’t say a word, don’t you talk”, “I could beat it up like a real n***a should”, “‘Fore you leave, give me sex first.” Despite misogyny and violence presented as recurrent themes in his lyrics: Spotify detail the artist as having a substantial 14,440,502 monthly listeners. At the 2012 Grammy Awards, just 3 years after being charged with felonious assault of Rihanna, Brown snapped up the award for ‘Best R&B Album’. During the award show he performed a medley of ‘Beautiful People’ and ‘Turn up the Music’, a performance which saw a share of his 14 million plus fan base, particularly the female fans, express their views towards the artist in a Twitter frenzy. The damaging effects from the toxicity of Brown’s lyrics were phenomenal. “I’d let Chris Brown beat me up any time ;) #womanbeater.” “I don’t know why Rihanna complained. Chris Brown could beat me any time he wanted to.” “I’d let Chris Brown punch me in the face.”

Roksanda Illincic Spring/ Summer 2017- Picture Credit: Vogue.com

Lethal recurrence of repugnant messages within hip hop music is not exclusive to Brown as an artist. The culture historically lends labels to women including “b**ch” and “h*e”- simply defining females as objects and stripping away any affirmations of them as human. This all depends on the context. Rap, crucially, alike any music genre is a means of expression. With links to poetry, jazz and indeed rock the evolution of hip hop music is enduring and miscellaneous. The association of art and identity can therefore be complex and controversial. So, what are the impacts of linking the two? Within the territory of Chris Brown’s music fans, it appears women and girls, the very objects and victims in his lyrics, are in fact the most immune to recognising their destructive essence. Legal action with the rapper’s former partner Karrueche Tran is ongoing, as she is expected to testify against him following alleged incidents of physical assault and threats. While his lyrics remain consistent with misogynistic themes, it appears increasingly disconcerting that young, impressionable females cannot recognise the problems of engaging with this language. In the performer’s own words, as quoted in his upcoming biopic trailer, “I’d rather be an inspiration than a role model.” It is perhaps a reflection on the strength of fan culture which allows celebrity status and success to act

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as an excuse for the promotion and ignorance of damaging messages- in line with equally damaging actions. This continual acceptance is one which blurs the lines between identity as influence on art and identity and art acting as one expression. The idea that we allow marketing, appearance and music production to overshadow underlying violent messages is despairing and even melancholy. But identity and art can merge in different ways. They can grow together and be at war with each other, or act as an ironic accessory to success. Amongst the colourful commotion of Camden’s rich markets, residing away from the flavoursome air, the Jewish Museum holds dear a poignant and personal visual story of Amy Winehouse. Since a record-breaking international tour, the exhibition has returned to a place which seemingly existed during a time of warmth, family life and a core of musical influence during Amy’s life. Co-curated by brother Alex Winehouse, the exhibition ‘Amy Winehouse: A Family Portrait’ documents the late singer’s personal belongings and passions for music, fashion, London and surprisingly- Sudoku and Snoopy. An intimate and moving exhibit- the displays aim to reveal the woman behind the music- stripping away the clutter of media stories, conflicts with drugs and relationship breakdowns. The 2015 “AMY” film directed by Asif Kapadia similarly stripped down the fame, explaining a raw, deep sense of Amy’s persistent conflict with herself. Away from erratic relationships with her father Mitch and partner Blake Fielder-Civil, we see the real relationship Amy had in her life: the one with music. It seemed necessary, a pure and emotional relationship, as she said “I wouldn’t write anything unless it was directly personal to me just because I wouldn’t be able to tell the story right. Because I wouldn’t have done it.” As a writer and singer, Amy was a complicated soul who had an outlet. This outlet, in good times, created a way for her to question and accept her identity- to release emotion and as she described herself “I can pick up a guitar and play for an hour and feel better”. Perhaps in this sense, the art form and identity are emotionally interlinked. The award-winning album ‘Back to Black’, for example, clearly stands as proof. After heartbreak and drug turmoil the singer used the events which had shaped her to create something incredible. She says in the film, “I don’t think I knew what depression was. I knew I felt funny sometimes and I was different. That’s why I write music.”

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Elsewhere, in the realms of fashion, it is clear how designer’s use their personal sense of style, cultural influence and design aesthetics to fabricate the presence of their brand. Roksanda Illincic, Serbian fashion designer with a distinctly sophisticated, effortless and feminine design aesthetic, has utilised her distinct taste for surprising colour combinations and sumptuous textiles to become


a leading, woman-centred voice in fashion. At the recent ‘Founder Files’ late at The Design Museum, Kensington, Illincic discussed the importance of individuality and knowing your sense of style. In the discussion with Creative Entrepreneurs’ Carolyn Dailey she described how the iconicity and distinctness of her collections is central to her personal taste, architectural influences and cultural beginnings in Serbia, implemented in her Mount Street store, which she describes as a “window of what the whole [Roksanda] world is abouthow it makes you feel, how it smells, the way it is constructed, the colours”. Her designs, impactful silhouettes assembled in vivid structures of colour and texture, demonstrate how a clear influence of place and people establishes identity, and how that identity, in the Roksanda brand, creates enduring and appealing fashion ready-to-wear: “Clothes need to be beautiful- to be worn and loved by a woman not just for a thing of beauty or a gallery.” In this sense, the art and identity are completely interlinked, each taking profound influence from one another and building commercial and creative outcomes. In whichever way we engage with these artists, or art itself, a personal relationship is inevitable. The art form: photography, music or fashion can be both consuming and profoundly influencing. Impacts of artists can be absolute and enriching, yet sometimes testing. The relationships we have with art, and how we choose to engage with it, can be equally personal, testing and questionable. However we consume or be influenced by the art we connect with, it is important to question and discern identity, as it becomes increasingly clear that the two parallels: art and identity, are ever more attached.

Chris Brown: Welcome to my Life, premiers June 8. Amy Winehouse: A Family Portrait Exhibition at the Jewish Museum, 16 March- 24 September. Written by Roisin Mennell

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TREND

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JACKET- VINTAGE - BELT- ASOS PHOTOGRAPHER: ZHAHÉ AKOMANYI STYLISTS: JASMINE TUTT & HO YEE YEUNG

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THIGH HIGH BOOTS- TOPSHOP

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SHIRTS- MARKS AND SPENCER - TROUSERS- ZARA MEN

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IN CONVERSATION: NICHOLAS RILEY-BENTHAM

PAUL SCOTT

LUCAS CANINO 74


Psychology of the Gaze: Discussing photography inspired by film, who holds the power in image making and the relationship between film and fashion. The lawless, rooftop-partying no man’s land of New York in the early 2000s was an inspiring and intrinsically influential moment for photographer Nicholas Riley-Bentham. He sits down at Broadway Market to discuss photography and fashion, alongside opinions from skater photographer Paul Scott and outdoor photographer/ videographer Lucas Canino. ... What makes a great (fashion) photograph? Nick: I don’t think I’ve ever taken a great fashion photograph. But, I can definitely see, from the people I’ve worked for- I’ve worked for Peter Lindbergh- and Peter has this ability to take the viewer into the photo and make them enthralled within it. I think that Brett Lloyd is one of the best fashion photographers and that’s why I worked for him for so long. Everything he would do, his keen eye for the actual fashion and knowing how it sits well on people, how they look, he has such an understanding of the texture and how it works with the body, how it should be presented. I think for a fashion photograph, ultimately, for it to be timeless it has to have something that can draw you in and allow you to connect with the subject. Lucas: I think a great photograph is transportive, pulling viewers – if only for a second – from the comfort or structures of their own experience into that of another, be it the photographer or the subject. Paul: Something that makes me look again and that I can instantly see the action or notice what’s going on, good composition that’s easy on the eye, my background of skateboarding and action sports has meant I have always had the harshest critics in skateboarders and also having to project my photography and video / filmed images to a wider audience, nowadays less so in print or on a television and more on an iPhone screen 90% of the time … But a story/ a special moment should be the most important thing in a photograph, and also a memory for me, I can see it and think back to when I shot it, who was there, whether it was a good trick or place or the way I shot it looks good, the reaction of the skater when I showed him on the back of the camera, and if in my head I need

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to edit it much to make it better or that I had nailed the photo in the RAW ( RAW format not a jpeg ) and would be able to just take it Raw from camera and send it to a magazine if it was for that or for an Instagram channel which I shoot for a lot… Once its printed someone might keep that photo for years and years in a book or magazine and view it again and again, whereas online its scrolled and forgotten in a moment, with a 10% chance of being looked at again if you’re lucky.

Does photography take influence from film? N: Narratively wise but not in any style of shooting or cinematically wise. More in terms of storytellingjump cuts, how you can move scene to scene seamlessly. L: It does, and photography influences film. To me, the influence of film on photography is most apparent today in the cinematic colour tones and wide aspect ratios that many photographers are using to help inject a film-like look into their imagery. There is also much more emphasis across genres on crafting a compelling story for photoshoots. Going in the other direction, filmmakers are increasingly framing their shots with a photographic eye, with much more interesting composition and experimentation with depth of field. It’s no accident that this comes at a time that film and photography technologies are swiftly converging. P: There used to be a style of films and a style of photography and yes they crossed the line a little in composition and angles but again, everyone is a photographer now, with the IPhone and right app, or cameras getting smaller and more easy to use… The Film look or to look like film are both terms I get asked weekly or over and over when doing colour grading work, or the image someone asks me to reference is like they want it to look like this film or that film, so you tone it towards slight orange and teal tones and yellow or green hints in the highlights of Ektachrome film or the ever so popular Kodak Portra style of slight green tone, now made even more popular by the huge influx of Sony A7s or Sony fs7/5 cameras in the market, that have a natural green tone to the image.

Do you think the photographer has the power over an image? L: The photographer makes a series of conscious and unconscious choices that are a form of power,

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including what is and what isn’t in the frame and which images makes it into the final edit. It is as much about what is not being shown as what is seen. Once the image goes into the public sphere, however, it takes on something like its own agency. The power of a great image is found in a triangulation of the photographer’s, subject’s and viewer’s values, actions and environments. It is not simply one or two of these being affected, but about all of them sharing in a process. P: They do in a lot of senses, news and documentary photography as in REAL Life totally unstaged in anyway or as it happens is amazing and powerful, but even that is faked or made to try and feel real after the real even has happened unfortunately. Photoshop and image editing has heavily changed the power a photographer has on their images, if they light it a certain way it can be changed or relit and skin smooth, backgrounds altered, even people removed and photo-shopped out to give it more power or style. Older photos from the FILM generation often hold their power on the viewer years and decades later because there less edited and hold their style and composure as they were taken, I love old war photography and things that were taken as they happened, even myself now shooting a lot of skateboarding we might get one go at getting that trick and then that’s it, it can’t be done again or landed again, that one push of the cameras was all you got, yes it is filmed and the video can be seen over and over, but the one click of the button and bang of the flashgun for me is amazing that “wow that looks dope” coming from the skaters mouth to me is like a bolt of lightning and you know you have gold in your camera right there, that’s something almost more powerful than the 100s of likes a photograph might go on to get on social media later that day or when posted out there online. The viewer of photos has changed not just the subject in the image, you shoot consciously with the viewer in mind a lot more, who are you trying to reach and less so about the story or person in the photo now, does it meet the brief the client wants the audience to be and less about the image and more hoping the audience like it or love it.

How important is the relationship between you as photographer and the subject? N: Key, totally. It’s important to everything. That’s


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why casting is so important -because it’s ultimately the person in there. The reason why I think Brett is a genius is because Brett knows the fashion and he likes the beautiful boys but he can almost disconnect himself from the boy and make them play a character for him, but concentrate on the fashion, whereas Lindbergh doesn’t care about the fashion he concentrates purely on the subject and so builds a rapport with the subject. So when he’s shooting, he’s not even looking at the camera he’s talking to his subject the whole time, which is what a director does. I tend to do that when I shoot, I care more about the subject than what they’re dressed in. My way of working with the stylist is ‘make them look cool’ and then introduce them to me as this person that looks cool and then I’ll find the thing in them. P: If you shoot with a host of people over and over again like I do myself there’s a massive trust between you both, they know and trust you judgement on angle and lighting and to (in the digital world) be set up fast and to get a good result if they can get there trick right, in my case fast, or to be able to put the hours in kneeling at the bottom of a stair set for example in the middle of winter as they struggle to land the trick, you become

a director like on a film set pushing your actor to perform and to not give up. Many great fashion photographers like Duffy had huge relationships outside of the camera studio and by getting to know there subject well found personal touches or ways to see someone when in front of the camera too… There’s something great about behind the scenes photos which often I love to take myself too, those moments of a subject that are natural- a smile, a look and reaction to something happening around them, and often those photos being candid are better than the staged or planned photo you got that day or at that spot. L: In my field, it is not as important as the connections between the subject, their environment and what they’re doing. That said, I like my subjects to be aware of, but not thinking about me. It is important to acknowledge that the presence of a camera and photographer influences the subject.

Do you think fashion and film are interlinked? N: Films used to define fashion. The amount of people that started dressing a certain way because Marlin Brando got a leather jacket on the back of a motorbike, everyone wanted to be that. The way James Dean was- that kind of thing, people would wear their hair like that and that’s when it really influenced fashion. There’s loads of Japanese movies by this guy whose in Old Boy and he did this one and Yohji Yamamoto did the fashion for it and it was amazing. These gangsters all wearing these amazing suits. But when you listen to Yohji Yamamoto describing himself he’s like ‘I’m a costume designer not a fashion designer’ and you see how it works. He’s dressing a character and the fashion informs the role they play. Again, Marlin Brando in a leather jacket- he’s a bad boy. P: Trends in clothing and in films and the way things are presented in colours or a place is shown in a film can have an influence on people. The way they viewed a location in a film or the way someone dresses when going somewhere they may take a note of that style without really thinking about it. Often the way someone dresses is seen as “oh you look like so and so in that film” the way there

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dressed or the mannerisms they may use or just generally the look of what they’re wearing too. L: I can imagine that they are. There is, of course, the famous story about plummeting undershirt sales after Clark Gable showed his bare chest in It Happened One Night, but beyond that, fashion, as a highly visible cultural artefact that carries meaning across a host of categories – species, gender, nationality, class – is a major element of stories we tell about ourselves and about others.

What should be or is being strived for in fashion and documentary photography? N: There’s a lot of Japanese photobooks, a lot of them are getting more literal, but a lot of people like Araki’s early work before his wife died, afterwards he became very obsessed with bondage and it became very driven by emotion, but before that it didn’t need to have a big explanation it could just exist. I think that’s something that’s really important is photographs don’t have to mean a thousand words they can just exist they can just be and they can just run as part of a series. It doesn’t have to tell you how to think or how to feel, if you can just feel from it. And I think that’s the most important thing about making imagery, sometimes is to disconnect. It’s really hard with fashion when you’re having to shoot something for a purpose, ‘we have to shoot this because it’s Gucci and we advertise them in the magazine’- it’s hard to put that in a non-literal sense because it’s there for a purpose. Making non-linear work that’s there to create an emotion is really hard, but I am trying to do it with still life, because you can explore the textures of something rather than it. So it doesn’t have to be that you’re advertising this bag but you can look at the texture of the bag and the way it’s made and how you can look at that in different scenarios. It’s blurring a line between is photography art or is it there for a commercial purpose. When you look at J.W. Anderson’s collection at the Hepworth Gallerythat was something where fashion became art. P: In my case, it’s like a massive gash has been cut, everyone wants to rip off the skateboarder style and clothing a lot, individual-ness is something special now, as a skateboarder for 25 years and more, I have seen fashion trends almost always come from skateboarding- look at now- rolled up trousers and thin vans and then street wear labels who rip off a style so

much too…I think comfort and dressing for just throwing on what you wear is less so able to be ripped off, and that’s often what I find, people have just pulled on what is comfortable and to hand not always what must be worn with a label or badge to fit in. Style or the way you carry something can be faked so easily and that often doesn’t sit so naturally. I love that documentary style where things are natural and candid a lot, not even the street photographers nowadays are as candid as they often appear to be, older style images are great where it was shot longer angle and the person really was naturally behaving or being themselves. Fashion photography now relies heavily more on where it’s going or being viewed, does the photo work on a smaller screen or work on Instagram, can it get 100s of likes just for who’s in the photo not what they’re wearing. L: Both fashion and photography are at their best when they surprise, confound and challenge. The primary difficulty is reconciling this ideal with commercial practices and a world in which citizens move within tightly curated visual landscapes.

Photo credit: Nicholas Riley-Bentham. By Roisin Mennell

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Material Magazine Issue 1  

Authentic, accessible fashion magazine, with thought-provoking content. Maintaining strong high fashion influence, including innovative and...

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