Page 9

Can a New Logo Create New Customers? My favorite Drucker book is his anecdotal business autobiography, Adventures of a Bystander. For a compilation of the best of his business writings I recommend The Essential Drucker.

peter drucker poses the question: What is the purpose of business? He then helps you arrive at the most logical answer: To create new customers. In his lifetime Drucker wrote over 40 books and dozens of articles designed to help management achieve this goal. Yet, I cannot find a single word that he has written on the design, use, and value of logos. So I am wondering, is there a correlation between good logo design and performance. And to determine this we must seek the advice of a new guru: Paul Rand, one of the most influential US designers of the 20th Century. Here’s his short Wikipedia bio: Paul Rand was an American art director and graphic designer, best known for his corporate logo designs, including the logos for IBM, UPS, Enron, Morningstar, Inc., Westinghouse, ABC, and Steve Jobs’s NeXT. He was one of the first American commercial artists to embrace and practice the Swiss Style of graphic design. Rand was a professor emeritus of graphic design at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut from 1956 to 1969, and from 1974 to 1985. He was inducted into the New York Art Directors Club Hall of Fame in 1972.

‘Logos, Flags, and Excutcheons’— http://www.paul-rand.com/foundation/thoughts_logosflags/#. VMe_6l4cGVg For those who want to dive deeper try to find a used copy of Rand’s Design, Form, and Chaos.

Here’s what Rand says about logos: The belief that a new or updated design will be some kind charm that will magically transform any business, is not uncommon. A redesigned logo may have the advantage of implying something new, something improved – but this is short-lived if a company doesn’t live up to its claim. Sometimes a logo is redesigned because it really needs redesigning – because it’s ugly, old fashioned, or inappropriate. But many times, it is merely to feed someone’s ego, to satisfy a CEO who doesn’t wish to be linked with the past, or often because it’s the thing to do. As an example: To cut a link to its past, RadioShack first changed its name from RadioShack to The Shack in 2009. This didn’t work, so they changed it back to RadioShack. This didn’t work, so they changed its logo in the Summer of 2013.

‘Let’s Play. Not.’— http://www. underconsideration.com/brandnew/archives/new_logo_and_retail_concept_for_radioshack.php#. VMfD1l4cGVh

Brand New is a website devoted to corporate brand identity. They review logo designs and provide a forum to share opinions. Here is their opinion of RadioShack’s new logo: If there has ever been a logo equivalent to a boob job and pumping collagen into lips, this is it. … It’s an “R” in a circle, you can’t really screw that up — it’s just that evolution-wise it’s a pretty clumsy step. HN hownet

9

HOWnet Magazine March 2015  

The webzine of HOWnet, aimed at assisting wireless companies worldwide increase their sales, increase their ARPU, reduce their COA, and impr...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you