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HOWARD WALWYN

HOWARD WALWYN FINE ANTIQUE CLOCKS

FINE ANTIQUE CLOCKS

HOWARD WALWYN FINE ANTIQUE CLOCKS

123 Kensington Church Street, London W8 7LP +44 (0)20 7938 1100 | howard@howardwalwyn.com www.howardwalwyn.com

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Member of the British Antique Dealers’ Association

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INTRODUCTION It gives me great pleasure to offer you this catalogue which coincides with twenty five years since I began buying and selling clocks on Kensington Church Street. Our star pieces include a very rare small early architectural walnut longcase clock by James Clowes circa 1675, two exceptional longcases by Thomas Tompion and an untouched month duration example by Joseph Knibb. There is also a fine early table clock by Tompion N° 16 which is illustrated in R.W. Symonds’ book on England’s most famous clockmaker. Other highlights from the Golden Age include an early ebony turntable spring clock by John Ebsworth circa 1675, a Queen Anne period ebony striking table clock and a month-duration burr walnut longcase by Daniel Quare, Tompion’s greatest rival. Whether the pieces illustrated in our catalogue are by famous Royal makers or lesser known names, they have all been carefully selected for their exceptional quality, originality and beauty. Many are entirely fresh to the market. We offer a full guarantee as to the authenticity and good working order of all our clocks. Any restorations that might be necessary after 200 plus years of use have been sympathetically carried out by the finest clock and cabinet makers. It is our sincere hope that you will come to our gallery on Kensington Church Street where you can see these wonderful timepieces in both a contemporary and period setting. You can be assured of a very warm welcome. Alternatively, do telephone or email us at any time for further information and check out our website. We shall also be exhibiting at the Masterpiece, LAPADA, and BADA Antiques Fairs in the coming year. A très bientôt Howard Walwyn

(All the bracket clocks illustrated are measured excluding their handles and finials)

HOWARD WALWYN FINE ANTIQUE CLOCKS

123 Kensington Church Street, London W8 7LP +44 (0)20 7938 1100 | howard@howardwalwyn.com www.howardwalwyn.com


JAMES CLOWES LONDINI FECIT A very rare Charles II period architectural walnut longcase clock from the first fifteen years of the English pendulum clock. The latched finned six pillar movement which strikes the hours on a single bell has bolt and shutter maintaining power and the characteristic large early countwheel on the outside of the backplate. The superb 10 inch square brass dial is signed on the dial plate below VI James Clowes Londini fecit. It has four winged cherub’s head corner spandrels, inset datework above VI, pierced and faceted blued steel hands and finely engraved narrow chapter and seconds rings. The slender proportioned early architectural case has beautiful matching figured walnut veneers and fine patination. It also has a very unusual octagonal walnut lenticle to show off the seconds swinging pendulum controlled by the recently invented anchor escapement in the movement. The mouldings of the case are in long-grain walnut as one would also expect on such an early case. The rising hood with its pedimented top has attached barley twist pillars to the front and rear and has a metal catch within the case to hold the hood in a raised position while the movement is wound. Date: circa 167o - 1675. Height: 79 ¾ in (202.5 cm) * James Clowes was born circa 1643 in Astbury, Cheshire and was the brother of John Clowes. He became a Free Brother in the Clockmakers’ Company as a ‘Great Clockmaker’ in April 1671 prior to his brother John. He had a number of illustrious apprentices including Edmund Card, Edward Burgess and John Johnson. This rare clock would have been one of the very first that James Clowes made. It has all the hallmarks of an architectural walnut longcase from the first fifteen years of the pendulum clock. Interestingly, we know of only one other 10 inch walnut longcase clock with architectural pediment and octagonal lenticle by this maker. Reference: Dawson, Drover & Parkes, Early English Clocks, p.266 pl.362, p.310 pls. 444-445, p.429, p.423 pl.607 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of Britain: 1286 – 1700, pp.126-127 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.160 HW5076

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JOHANNES EBSWORTH LONDINI FECIT A rare Charles II period ebony and gilt-mounted table clock with turntable base by this pre-eminent early maker.

The clock comes complete with a beautiful tulip engraved winding key.

The 8-day movement which strikes the hours on a single bell has a restored verge escapement and short bob pendulum. The beautifully mellow 9 ½ inch dial has cherub head and foliate corner spandrels and a chapter ring with narrow inside quarter marker band and a similar outer band for the minutes. The date work is inset above VI o’clock and there is an engraved Tudor Rose in the matted dial centre.

Date: circa 1675-1680 Height: 18 in (46 cm) including turntable Depth: 9 in (23 cm) Width: 15 ¾ in (40 cm)

The elegant shallow proportioned case is constructed primarily of oak and veneered with ebony on a restored turntable base. The square dial is flanked by capped barley twist columns and surmounted by finely pierced ebony frets to the entablature. The shallow caddy top has an original gilt brass mount with the monogram MR, probably of the original owner. The superb backplate and original countwheel are exquisitely engraved with tulips and foliage which are typical of the best engravers’ work of the early period. The two brass ratchets and exquisitely wrought steel clickwork for the time and strike trains are also set on the backplate below the maker’s signature, Johannes Ebsworth Londini fecit.

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* John Ebsworth was in the first rank of early makers who were working during the last quarter of the 17th century. He was appointed Master of the Clockmakers’ Company in 1697 and he made a number of very fine longcase, bracket and lantern clocks. There are clocks by him in various museums and public collections around the world. Few early turntable clocks were made and even fewer have survived in such good condition. Reference: Dawson, Drover & Parkes, Early English Clocks, pp.172-190 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of Britain: 1286 – 1700, p. 172 B. Loomes, Watchmakers of the World: Complete 21st Edition, p.238 HW4925


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THOMAS TOMPION LONDINI FECIT N° 241 A previously unrecorded longcase clock by Thomas Tompion in an elegantly proportioned case. The case is constructed of oak and pine and veneered with walnut and mulberry with convex cushion mouldings. There is a skirting to the base and the hood has a caddy top with mounts supporting three brass ball finials. The 11 inch square brass dial is mounted with cherub head spandrels attached with two screws. There is a silvered Roman chapter ring, subsidiary seconds dial and a chamfered aperture to view the day of the month. The 5 pillar 8-day duration movement is in very original condition. It is fully latched and includes bolt and shutter maintaining power. The hours are sounded on a bell via an inside locking plate and there is a cut out on the backplate to release the anchor. The movement is numbered 241 on the backplate and this is repeated on the top rail of the trunk door. Date: circa 1694 Height: 84 in (213.5 cm) excluding finials Height: 88 ½ in (225 cm) including finials * Thomas Tompion was the doyen of English clockmakers. Born in Ickwell Green, Bedfordshire in 1639, he moved to London in 1671 and became a Free Brother in the Clockmakers’ Company. In 1674 he established his business at the sign of The Dial and Three Crowns in Water Lane now called Whitefriars Street, and met Dr Robert Hooke, an eminent physicist and mathematician, who helped him with his movement designs. Through this association, Tompion came to the notice of Charles II and from that time held an unrivalled position in English horology. Tompion died in 1713 and is buried at Westminster Abbey. It is very exciting to discover an unknown Tompion longcase which is numbered on both the case and movement. We can now confidently fill one of the missing gaps in the Tompion oeuvre Number 241. For a similar Tompion longcase clock with mulberry veneers see pages 466 and 467 ‘The Guggenheim Tompion’ N° 223 in the Tompion book by Evans, Carter, Wright. Provenance: A private collection in the North of England. An old trade label inside the trunk door of the case states: “This clock stood for many years at Halswell Hall Devonshire the ancestoral [sic] home of the late Lord Wharton.” Reference: Dawson, Drover and Parkes, Early English Clocks, p.482 fig. 385 The Chatsworth House Tompion walnut longcase. Jeremy Evans, The Dial and Three Crowns, p.76 Evans, Carter, Wright, Thomas Tompion 300 Years, pp.466-467 The Guggenheim mulberry Tompion longcase. HW5859

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THOMAS TOMPION LONDINI FECIT, N° 16 A fine Charles II period Phase I ebony veneered quarter striking bracket clock by Thomas Tompion. The 6 inch square gilt-brass dial is signed Tho. Tompion Londini Fecit to the lower edge and has finely chased gilt-brass winged cherub spandrels adorning the corners. The engraved silvered chapter ring has both Roman and Arabic chapters and Tompion’s sword hilt half hour markers. The elaborately pierced and finely sculpted blued steel hour and minute hands which are set off by the finely matted centre are typical of his work. The substantial twin fusee 8-day key wound movement has latched dial feet and further latches for the six ringturned movement pillars and it fills the entire case. It has an original verge escapement with knife edge suspension and numbered pear shaped pendulum bob. The hours are struck upon a single bell and the restored quarters are sounded on a second bell. The backplate is exquisitely engraved with deeply cut Dutch tulip heads in various stages of opening. The rectangular reserve below the centre is signed Tho Tompion Londini Fecit, and it has Tompion’s punch number 16 on the upper left hand side of the backplate. Restoration appears to be limited to the quarter work and the later (circa 1930) inclusion of shutters.

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The small and beautifully proportioned Phase I case has an oak carcass and is veneered in ebony. It has an original gilt sound fret, escutcheons, case mounts and gilt brass thistle bud Tompion carrying handle. The case is numbered on the left hand side of the bottom rail under the opening front door. From recent research it has become clear that Thomas Tompion made very few clocks like this example to his Phase I design with a full striking train. The great majority are timepieces with repeat work. The present clock is fully illustrated in R.W. Symonds’ book Thomas Tompion His Life and Work. Date: circa: 1682 Height: 12 ½ in (31.75 cm) excluding handle Width: 9 ½ in (24 cm) Depth: 6 ¾ in (17 cm) Provenance: This clock was sold by Anthony Woodburn to an American collector in 2007. Reference: Dawson, Drover and Parkes, Early English Clocks, p.442 figs.643-645 Jeremy Evans, The Dial and Three Crowns, p.71 Evans, Carter, Wright, Thomas Tompion 300 Years, p.598 R. W. Symonds, Thomas Tompion His Life and Work, p.146 fig.113, p.193 fig.173


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THOMAS TOMPION LONDINI FECIT An exceptional type 1 period prenumbered flower and bird marquetry longcase clock with 8-day movement, inside countwheel strike and bolt and shutter maintaining power. The exquisite 10 inch square dial has subsidiary seconds below XII and a finely matted centre with inset datework above VI. The elegant early oyster olivewood, boxwood and green bone inlaid case has exceptional bird and flower marquetry panels, roundels and corner spandrels set within an ebony ground. There is a turned ebonised pearwood lenticle with a glass in the centre of the trunk door to view the swinging pendulum. The clock has a rising hood with ebonised Solomonic columns front and back, and ebonised capitals and bases. Date: circa 1680 – 1685 Height: 76 ⅞ in (195 cm) Width: 17 ½ in (44.5 cm) Depth: 9 ⅞ in (25 cm)

* The case of this small elegant Type 1 prenumbered longcase bears many similarities to that of the Powis Tompion illustrated in Thomas Tompion: 300 Years. There it is claimed that the Powis case was almost certainly made by Jasper Braem and the same can be said of this case which is illustrated and discussed at length by Jeremy Evans in Thomas Tompion at the Dial and Three Crowns. For a time, Jasper Braem was a sub-tenant in a part of Tompion’s Fleet Street property known as ‘The Three Crowns’ prior to it being renamed ‘The Dial and Three Crowns’ in 1690. Braem was a cabinet and clock case maker of Dutch extraction and there is strong evidence he made marquetry longcase cases for his landlord in the 1670s and 1680s. This was in addition to inlaying the Duchess of York’s bed “done with several coloured woods in Resemblance of flowers, leaves etc …” at Windsor Castle. Reference: Jeremy Evans, The Dial and Three Crowns, pp.28 – 31, figs.41 & 42 Evans, Carter, Wright, Thomas Tompion 300 Years, pp.500-503: The Powis Tompion

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JOSEPH KNIBB LONDON A fine Charles II period hour striking and repeating spring table clock in a Phase III domed case veneered with ebony surmounted by a thistle and scroll brass carrying handle. The 6 ½ inch square brass dial with finely matted centre has a silvered chapter ring and winged cherub corner spandrels. The blued steel pointers are finely pierced and faceted and the dial plate is signed by the maker below VI. Above XII there is a strike/silent lever. The 8-day duration movement is fully latched with five finely turned baluster pillars. There is a verge escapement and the hours are sounded on a bell via an inside pivoted rack. The quarters are repeated on a further bell. The backplate is also signed in an arc Joseph Knibb Londini Fecit and is well engraved with tulips and scrolling leaves.

*Joseph Knibb, is noted for the slim and elegant proportions of the cases of both his table clocks and longcases. His movements are equally desirable thanks to their slender plates, fine delicate wheelwork and the ingenuity of his various striking mechanisms. This Phase III ebony table clock is smaller than usual. For more biographical information on Joseph Knibb see page 15. Reference: Dawson, Drover & Parkes Early English Clocks, pp.438-441, pp.446-449 R.A. Lee, The Knibb Family – Clockmakers, p.85 pl.81, p.87 pl 84, p.88 pl.85 HW5852

Date: circa 1685 Height: 11 ½ in (29.5 cm) Width: 9 ½ in (24 cm) Depth: 5 ¾ in (14.5 cm)

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JOSEPH KNIBB, LONDON An exemplary month duration Charles II period walnut longcase clock by this famous Royal maker. The latched finned six pillar movement which strikes the hours on a single bell has bolt and shutter maintaining power and has the characteristic large early countwheel on the outside of the backplate. The superb 10 inch square brass dial is signed on the dial plate below VI Joseph Knibb London. It has four winged cherub’s head corner spandrels, inset datework below XII, pierced and faceted blued steel hands and finely engraved narrow chapter ring. The slender proportioned early caddy top case has beautiful matching figured walnut veneers and original untouched patination. The hood with its pedimented top has attached barley twist pillars to the front and rear and has a metal catch within the case to hold the hood in a raised position while the movement is wound. Date: circa 168o - 1685 Height: 82¾ in (210 cm) Width: 17 in (43.25 cm) Depth: 9 in (22.75 cm)

*Joseph Knibb, the most famous member of the celebrated Knibb clockmaking family, was born circa 1640. He was apprenticed to his cousin Samuel in about 1655 and after serving seven years worked first in Oxford and then moved to London in 1670 where he was made free of the Clockmakers’ Company. He must soon have built up a good reputation for himself as it is recorded that he supplied a turret clock for Windsor Castle in 1677 and payments were made to him in 1682 on behalf of King Charles II. Joseph Knibb made many longcase and table clocks for domestic use. He was a particularly inventive maker and experimented with several different types of striking and repeating mechanisms. Reference: Dawson, Drover & Parkes, Early English Clocks Ronald A. Lee, The Knibb Family * Clockmakers Hw5839

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DANIEL QUARE & STEPHEN HORSEMAN, LONDON N° 266 A fine and sophisticated George I period quarterrepeating spring table clock by one of the most celebrated partnerships of the early eighteenth century. The elegant ebony veneered case which stands on moulded block feet has matching escutcheons to the door rails and rises to an inverted bell top terminating in a knopped brass carrying handle. The exceptionally high quality movement is of eight day duration with verge escapement and rise/fall regulation to the spring suspended pendulum. The pull quarter repeat mechanism operated from the side of the case strikes the hours on a large bell and the quarters on a smaller bell. The backplate is elaborately engraved with foliage, Ho Ho birds, fruit, angels and serpent heads around the bold signatures Dan: Quare & Ste: Horseman LONDON. The rectangular brass dial is mounted with a silvered chapter ring and subsidiary dials for strike/silent and rise/fall regulation flanking the signatures Daniel Quare and Stephen Horseman, London N° 226. The finely matted centre includes a false pendulum aperture and an aperture to view the day of the month. The steel hands are finely pierced. Date: circa 1715 Height: 15 in (38 cm) * Daniel Quare, one of the most eminent English clockmakers and worthy contemporary of Thomas Tompion, took Stephen Horseman into partnership around 1709. They continued making clocks and watches for Royalty, the aristocracy and the wealthy until Quare’s death in 1724. The fine quality and proportions of this ebony veneered case has many similarities to the later table clocks with two subsidiary dials by Thomas Tompion. Reference: Cesckinky & Webster, English Domestic Clocks, p.282 figs.304-305, pp.287-290 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of Britain 1286 – 1700, pp.406-407 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.634 HW5400

Photograph: An original receipt for the repair of a spring clock by Quare & Horseman made out to Dr Bandy Esq and dated June 14th 1718. Three guinees in full for D. Quare & S. Horseman.

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DANIEL QUARE, LONDON A good month duration longcase clock by this famous Royal clockmaker, the case in finely figured walnut with excellent colour and patination. It also retains its original intricately pierced brass sound frets to the front and sides of the hood, a rare feature. The substantial month duration movement is an example of Quare’s finest work. The striking and going trains are reversed with reverse wind and the clock sounds the hours on a single bell. The 11 inch (28 cm) square brass dial is mounted with finely cast crown and cherub head spandrels. The engraved chapter ring and subsidiary seconds dial have a silvered finish and the dial centre is finely matted with an aperture to view the day of the month above VI. Date: circa 1710 Height: 90 in (228 cm) * Daniel Quare is one of the great names from the finest period of English clockmaking and a worthy contemporary of Thomas Tompion, George Graham and Daniel Delander. He was born circa 1647 and became a Brother of the Clockmakers’ Company in 1671. He went on to serve as Master in 1708. In about 1707 he took on Stephen Horseman as a partner and he continued the business after Quare’s death in 1724. Daniel Quare’s reputation rests largely on the fact that he was a great innovator. He and Tompion were the first to make some highly important walnut longcase clocks of year duration showing the equation of time and other complications. One of these is now in the Ilbert Collection in the British Museum. He was also successful in a judgement made by James II in 1688 for a Patent for a repeating watch, his rival being the Rev. Edward Barlow. Among his other inventions was a portable barometer and many superb examples exist in important collections today. Quare was an arch rival to Thomas Tompion but as a practising Quaker he would not sign any oaths of allegiance. This prevented his appointment as Clockmaker to the King. Nevertheless, he was a regular visitor at the Royal Palace and was ‘free of the back stairs’. He had a highly successful business and counted many members of the nobility and foreign ambassadors amongst his clientele. Reference: F.J. Britten, The Wetherfield Collection, pp.76-77 fig.89 Dawson, Drover and Parkes, Early English Clocks, p. 283 col. pls. 15 & 16, p. 293 pls. 409 – 411. B. Loomes, Clockmakers of Britain 1286 – 1700, pp.406-407 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.634 Tom Robinson, The Longcase Clock, Antique Collectors’ Club, p. 175, fig. 8/24  HW5851

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THOMAS WARDEN, LONDON A fine William III period ebony and gilt mounted hour striking bracket clock which bears many similarities to the work of Daniel Quare.

a shallow dome top, the case is surmounted by a Quare style double S scroll carrying handle and finely cast gilt mounts. To each side of the case there are oval glazed windows set within and below fine repoussé brass frets.

The 7 inch square dial is mounted with a silvered chapter ring and winged cherub spandrels to the four corners. The dial centre is matted with a chamfered date aperture and it has finely pierced and facetted blued steel hands. There is a strike/silent lever above XII.

Date: circa 1695 Height: 12 ½ in (32 cm) Width: 9 ½ in (24 cm) Depth: 7 in (18 cm)

The verge movement runs for eight days and strikes the hours on a bell. There is also pull repeat-work for sounding the hours and quarters on 2 bells. The backplate is exquisitely engraved with scrolling foliage and bears the maker’s signature Tho Warden London inside a central cartouche set above the two external clicks.

* Thomas Warden is recorded on page 506 of Brian Loomes’ Clockmakers of Britain 1286-1700 as working in London up to 1697 when he failed to sign the Oath of Allegiance to the King. From the style of the dial, movement and case, it is almost certain that Thomas Warden had working links with Daniel Quare.

The oak case, which is veneered with ebony, stands only 12 ½ inches high and is in the classic style of table clocks by Daniel Quare. Standing on four brass bun feet and with

HW5892

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JOHN TITHERTON, LONDINI FECIT A rare Charles II period olivewood and parquetry longcase clock of beautiful proportions.

Date: circa 1675-1680 Height: 77 ½ in (97 cm)

The case is principally constructed of oak and veneered with olive wood oysters and ebony and holly star inlays to the trunk and base. The hood is flanked by barley twist columns rising to the flat top and the principal mouldings on the case are ebonised.

* John Titherton was a maker about whom we know surprisingly little apart from the fact that he was working in London up until his death in 1695. His longcase clocks are rare as we only know of two made by him. This exceptional early clock bears many similarities to those made by Joseph Knibb and Jacobus Markwick at this period. The quality of the veneers and the fine proportions of the olivewood parquetry case, the beautiful skeletonised dial and the exceptional eight pillar movement plus its Knibbish rise/fall regulation and pork pie bell attest to this.

The 11 inch (28 cm) square dial is mounted with early winged cherub spandrels, silvered skeletonised chapter ring and a subsidiary second’s ring. The centre is finely matted with a dual aperture above six o’clock for the day of the month and the month. The dial plate is signed John Titherton Londini Fecit. The steel pointers are finely pierced and faceted. The exceptional 8-day duration movement has eight fully latched, finned and knopped pillars separating the unusually large rectangular plates. The hours are sounded on a pork pie bell via an outside locking plate.

Reference: Brian Loomes, Clockmakers of Britain 1286-1700, Mayfield Books, p.490 HW5475

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WILLIAM KNOTTESFORD LONDINI A rare James II period floral marquetry, 8-day longcase clock of beautiful proportions and colour. The case is constructed primarily of oak and veneered with walnut and panels of floral and foliate marquetry. The cross grain trunk door mouldings are in walnut. Standing on four bun feet the clock retains its original base and there is a walnut moulded lenticle to the trunk door. The hood is flanked by walnut barley twist columns and there are walnut veneered panels below the cornice and in each section around the hood door. The 10 inch square brass dial is mounted with winged cherub corner spandrels and a silvered brass chapter ring and the dial centre is finely matted. There is also a chamfered aperture to view the day of the month above VI. The maker’s signature is inscribed William Knottesford Londini on the dial plate below VI. The blued steel hands are finely pierced and faceted and there is a subsidiary seconds dial below XII o’clock.

The high quality 8-day duration movement has five ringed pillars and the hours are sounded on a bell via an inside locking plate. Date: circa 1680-1685 Height: 76 ⅝ in (194 cm) Width: 16 in (40.5 cm) Depth: 9 ¾ in (25 cm) *William Knottesford was apprenticed to Henry Child in 1656-1657 and was freed in March 1663. He was made Warden of the Clockmakers’ Company in 1681 and became Master in 1693. His clocks were always of exceptional interest and quality and this is only the third example of his work we have handled. Reference: Brian Loomes, Clockmakers of Britain 1286 – 1700, p.311 Dawson Drover Parkes, Early English Clocks, p.102, p.341, pl.242244, 492, 493 HW5754

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JOSEPH WINDMILLS, LONDON A rare documented Queen Anne 8-day walnut longcase clock by this famous London clockmaker. The oak case is veneered with fine quality figured walnut veneers and there is a gilt wood lenticle to the trunk door. The sides of the trunk are panelled with book matched veneers and are fully crossbanded. The walnut veneered hood is surmounted by a removable carved gilt cresting (possibly later) and it has turned walnut columns with gilt wooden capitals and bases and there is a delicate sound fret below the cross grain walnut cornice moulding. The 11 inch square brass dial is mounted with cherub and foliate spandrels, silvered chapter ring and a subsidiary seconds ring below XII. The centre is finely matted with ringed winding holes and there is an aperture to view the date. The maker’s signature J Windmills London is engraved between VII and V on the chapter ring and the well pierced and blued steel hands appear to be original. The top quality 8-day duration latched movement has six pillars and the hours are sounded on a bell via an inside countwheel. Date: circa 1695-1700 Height: 87 in (221 cm) with cresting Height: 80 ¾ in (205 cm) without cresting * Joseph Windmills was made a Free Brother in the Clockmakers’ Company in September 1671. He was a prolific maker with large workshops and he had numerous apprentices after 1687 in Tower Street. He was appointed Warden of the Clockmakers’ Company in 1699 and became Master in 1702. By 1714 he had gone into partnership with his son Thomas. Late 17th century walnut clocks of this intrinsic quality and aesthetic appeal by famous makers are increasingly rare and hard to find. There are clocks by Joseph and his son Thomas Windmills in many important public collections around the world. This fine clock is illustrated as plate VIII in J.A. Neale’s book Joseph and Thomas Windmills. The clock is also illustrated in an article by Arthur Oswald in Country Life, September 5th 1963, when it was at Papplewick Hall, Nottinghamshire. Reference: Dawson, Drover & Parkes, Early English Clocks, p.376, pl.537 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of Britain: 1286 – 1700, pp.531-532 B. Loomes, The Early Clockmakers of Great Britain, p.585 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.849 J.A. Neale, Joseph and Thomas Windmills, The AHS, 1999, pl.VIII

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ANTHOINE GUIGUER, LONDON A fine William III period pewter inlaid tortoiseshell striking and quarter repeating bracket clock of 8-day duration.

Date: circa 1695 Height: 15 ½ in (39.5 cm) excluding handle

The elegant dome top case is veneered with red tortoiseshell with ebony mouldings, pewter inlays and very delicately engraved pewter sound frets. The 7 inch rectangular brass dial is mounted with winged cherub head spandrels and a silvered chapter ring. The centre is finely matted with an aperture to view the day of the month and a dummy pendulum aperture. The maker’s signature is engraved at the top within scrolling foliage.

* Anthoine Guiguer was made a Free Brother of the Clockmakers’ Company in 1687 and is recorded as having an “illicit” apprentice James Girod. From his name it is most probable that he was of French Huguenot origin and working in London.

The twin fusee 8-day duration movement has a restored verge escapement, hour strike with strike/silent and pull quarter repeat mechanism, the quarters being sounded on six bells and the hours on a separate bell. The backplate of the movement has a wheatear border and flower and bird engraving.

Tortoiseshell veneered table clocks were made for a very short period in the last quarter of the 17th century and it is rare to find one in such pristine condition. Reference: Brian Loomes, Clockmakers of Britain: 1286 - 1700, p. 234 Brian Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.329

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CHARLES GRETTON LONDON A small and rare ebony panelled James II period longcase clock. The case with plain base stands on replaced bun feet and rises via a long moulded and panelled trunk door to the flat top rise up hood flanked by barley twist columns with brass Corinthian capitals. The 8-day, five pillar movement has an anchor escapement and the hours are sounded on a bell via an outside locking plate. The 10 inch square dial is mounted with winged cherub spandrels and a silvered chapter ring and seconds ring. The centre is finely matted with an aperture to view the day of the month. The signature Charles Gretton London is applied to an original silvered plaque screwed to the dial plate beneath VI. Date: circa 1685 Height: 77 in (195 cm) * Charles Gretton was an eminent maker working in London during the last quarter of the seventeenth century and the first quarter of the eighteenth century. He became Master of the Clockmakers’ Company in 1701. The fact that Gretton’s signature is applied to a plaque suggests he was possibly the retailer rather than the maker of this clock. He may have acquired the clock from another maker’s bankrupt stock, upon another maker’s death or quite simply a loyal customer requisitioned him to buy it on his behalf. Very few early panelled ebony veneered longcase clocks were made and even fewer have survived. We found this clock after the publication of Denis Radage’s magnum opus on Charles Gretton and it is the only early 10 inch dial ebony veneered longcase which we have seen by this maker. Reference: Brian Loomes, Clockmakers of Britain: 1286 – 1700, p.229 Brian Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.324 Radage, Meinen, Radage, Charles Gretton Clock & Watchmaking through the Golden Age, pp.80-81, p.172, fig.2.134 HW5567

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CLAUDIUS DU CHESNE LONDINI FECIT An exceptional semi-miniature George I period ebonised and brass moulded moonphase table clock by this well-known Huguenot maker. The 8-day movement, which strikes the hours on a single bell, has an original verge escapement, short bob pendulum and pull quarter repeatwork on six bells. There is a subsidiary dial in the arch for the phases of the moon. The maker’s signature Claudius Du Chesne Londini Fecit is on an arched plaque above the moon dial and below it are two subsidiary dials for rise/fall and sonne/ silance [sic]. The 4 ½ inch dial has fine foliate engraving on the dial plate and a silvered chapter ring with fleur-de-lys halfhour markers. The date indicator is inset above VI and there is a crescent shaped aperture for the false pendulum within the finely matted dial centre. The elaborate backplate is profusely engraved with flower and foliate scrolls, a well-executed wheatear border and a stylised classical figure surmounted by an eagle. The lenticular shaped pendulum bob is also engraved. The elegant case is constructed primarily in oak and veneered with ebonised pearwood. It has a white metal inverted bell top with a knopped brass carrying handle, four gilt ball finials and gilt brass mouldings. It stands on four turned brass bun feet. The clock has a bespoke ebonised brass moulded wall bracket with key drawer to match. Date: circa 1725 Height: 11 ½ in (29 cm) Width: 6 ½ in (16.5 cm) Depth: 4 ½ in (11.5 cm) *Claudius Du Chesne was a Frenchman who was born in Paris in the 1660s and came to London as a Huguenot refugee in 1685. He was made a Free Brother of the Clockmakers’ Company in September 1693 and he also signed the Clockmakers’ Company oath of allegiance in 1697. He died in 1730 having had workshops in Dean Street, Soho and Long Acre. He made a number of exceptional long duration longcases, musical table clocks and miniature spring clocks in the first quarter of the 18th century. He is widely regarded as one of the finest French Huguenot makers working in London. There is a very similar miniature moonphase table clock by Du Chesne in the Lyme Park collection. Provenance: A European collector Reference: R. Barder, The Georgian Bracket Clock 1714 – 1830, p.26, pp.39-40, pl I/9, pl II/10&11 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of Britain 1286 - 1700, pp.165-166 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.227

HW5856

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FRANCIS GREGG, RUSSELL STREET, COVENT-GARDEN A fine Queen Anne period faux tortoiseshell chinoiserie lacquer longcase clock with two train brass dial hour striking movement.

The substantial high-quality 8-day two train movement strikes the hours on a single bell and comes with its original brass bob pendulum and 2 brass weights.

The 12 inch square dial has an applied silvered Roman and Arabic chapter ring and a subsidiary seconds dial below XII. The dial centre is finely matted and has a round date aperture. In the dial corners there are double cherub and crown spandrels. The maker’s signature Francis Gregg, Russell Street, Covent-Garden is engraved between VII and V on the chapter ring. The original hands are finely wrought and of blued steel.

Date: circa 1711 - 1714 Height: 102 in (259 cm)

The oak case, which has a central brass moulded lenticle to show off the swinging pendulum, is decorated with exceptionally fine lacquer work on a faux tortoiseshell ground. The trunk door is decorated with gilt figures set in an oriental landscape with trees, flowers, birds and boats. The sides of the case terminate in original carved gilt trusses at the top of the trunk. The hood is flanked by turned columns with brass capitals and bases and the hood door is subtly decorated with foliate and floral sprays. The unusual caddy top retains its original three gilt wood finials. The base with its double plinth is decorated with a bird, flying insects, trees and an exotic pavilion set within an oriental landscape.

*Francis Gregg was born circa 1677 and apprenticed through the Clockmakers’ Company to John Clowes. He had his first workshop in Russell Street, Covent Garden between 1711 and 1714 when he moved to ‘the Dial in James Street over against the Palace Gates’. We can thus date this clock to those first early years in his working life. His son, Francis Junior who succeeded him, went bankrupt in 1743. Lacquer longcase clocks of this quality and originality are comparatively rare. The fine subtle decoration and elegant proportions of this case make it particularly appealing. Reference: B. Loomes, Clockmakers of Britain 1286 – 1700, p.227 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.322 Tom Robinson, The Longcase Clock, p.119 fig.6/2, p.231 HW5686

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DANIEL DELANDER, LONDON A good early 18th century ebony timepiece bracket clock by this well known maker. The 4 ½ inch arched dial is mounted with a silvered chapter ring and gilt foliate spandrels to the four corners. The dial centre is matted and has a single winding hole and it has finely pierced blued steel hands. The maker’s signature Delander London is engraved on the dial above the winding hole and there is an inset date aperture below XII. The restored verge movement runs for 8-days. There is pull repeat-work for sounding the hours and quarters on 2 bells. The back plate bears the maker’s signature Dan Delander London in an oval cartouche and is exquisitely engraved with scrolling foliage and ho ho birds. The oak case of rare small size which is veneered with ebony, stands only 13 inches high and is in the classic style of table clocks by Delander and Quare. Standing on four moulded feet and with an inverted bell top, the case is surmounted by a knopped brass carrying handle. There are finely engraved brass sound frets front and back and fine repoussé brass frets with Indian head masks to the sides. Date: circa 1715 - 1720 Height: 13 in (33 cm) Width: 7 ¾ in (19.5 cm) Depth: 5 ¾ in (14.5 cm) * Daniel Delander was born circa 1678 and his workshop was situated in Devereaux Court and later between the two Temple gates. He had served the latter part of his apprenticeship under Thomas Tompion where he worked as a servant journeyman alongside George Graham. Hence the fact that there are a number of similarities between his work and that of the two greatest English clockmakers after Fromanteel. Reference: Dawson, Drover & Parkes, Early English Clocks, p.487 pl.722 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of Britain 1286 – 1700, p.157 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.208 HW5704

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DAVID HUBERT, LONDON An exquisite George II period spring table timepiece with alarm of rare small size. The beautifully patinated and refined burr walnut case stands on moulded block feet. It has an inverted bell top surmounted by a gilt brass carrying handle. The break arch brass dial has a silvered chapter ring flanked by foliate spandrels with a silvered subsidiary dial in the arch for the maker’s signature. Beneath XII is a false pendulum aperture set above a central alarm disc and below that there is an aperture for the day of the month. They are all set within the finely matted dial centre. The blued steel hands have delicate piercing. The single fusee 8-day duration movement has a verge escapement with alarm work. The back plate is beautifully engraved with flowers, foliage and a bird around the maker’s bold signature, David Hubert, London. Date: circa 1735-1740 Height: 13 in (33 cm) Width: 7 ¾ in (19.5 cm) Depth: 5 ½ in (14 cm) * David Hubert was a pre-eminent Huguenot maker working in the Strand, London from 1714. He had come to England from La Rochelle. He was free of the Clockmakers’ Company in 1714 eventually becoming Master. Examples of his work are included in the Clockmakers’ Company Collection at the Science Museum, the Ilbert Collection and the Iden Collection. Reference: Brian Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p. 397 Cescinsky and Webster, English Domestic Clocks, The Waverley Book Company, p.180, fig. 183 & 184 Anthony Bird, English House Clocks 1600-1850, pub. David & Charles, Front cover photo of David Hubert table clock HW4756

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RICHARD STREET, LONDON A fine Queen Anne period 8-day longcase clock by this important clockmaker and close associate of Thomas Tompion. The 12 inch square brass dial has a subsidiary seconds dial below XII and calendar aperture above VI within the finely matted centre. The elegant ebonised case has a caddy top surmounted by three spire topped finials and a double plinth to the base.

Company in 1687. His work is closely associated with that of Tompion, for whom he is believed to have made watches. Richard Street is best known for the longcase clock which was commissioned by Isaac Newton in 1708 for the Trinity College Observatory in Cambridge. It is possibly the first clock ever made with a subsidiary seconds dial in the arch.

Inside the trunk door there is a very well preserved original paper Equation of Time table bearing the maker’s signature Sold by RICH STREET Clockmaker at ye Dial & Two Crowns over againft St. Dunftans Church in Fleet-Street LONDON (illustrated below).

Both the movement and case of our fine clock have many similarities to those square brass dial longcase clocks in ebonised cases which Tompion was making at this time. The original Equation of Time table inside the trunk door makes this interesting piece very appealing to a collector.

Date: circa 1705 Height: 90 ½ in (230 cm) to top of caddy Height: 92 in (234 cm) excluding finials Height: 96 in (244 cm) including finials

Reference: Evans, Carter, Wright, Thomas Tompion 300 Years, pp.641-642 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of Britain 1286 – 1700, p.461 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.747

* Richard Street was a London clock and watchmaker, who was made a Free Brother in the Clockmakers’

HW5287

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JOHN ELLICOTT, LONDON A fine, late George II period walnut table clock by this celebrated Royal maker. The exceptional inverted belltop case with its knopped brass carrying handle has finely figured walnut veneers which are repeated in its cross grain mouldings. It stands on a double plinth base with moulded block feet and the front corners of the case are fluted and canted with stop chamfers. The fully restored verge movement is of 8-day duration and strikes the hours on a single bell. The brass dial has a finely matted centre with a dummy pendulum aperture, foliate corner spandrels, inset datework and a subsidiary dial in the arch for strike/silent. The blued steel pointers appear to be original. The maker’s signature John Ellicott London is on a raised silvered brass disc. The substantial movement largely fills the case and the backplate is exquisitely engraved with foliage and a wheatear border which is repeated on the fixing brackets. The maker’s signature John Ellicott, London is set within the centre of the backplate.

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Date: circa 1750 Height: 18 ¼ in (46 cm) Width: 13 ⅛ in (33.25 cm) Depth: 8 ⅝ in (21.75 cm) * John Ellicott was born in 1706 and established his business in Swithin’s Alley, Royal Exchange in 1728. He was the inventor of a compensation pendulum and he developed the use of the cylinder escapement. Like his peer George Graham, he became a member of the Royal Society, for which he wrote several papers. He was appointed Clockmaker to the King and he designed the London Hospital clock. He died suddenly in 1772 and was succeeded by his son. His work can be found in museums and royal collections throughout the world. Walnut table clocks of this quality and date are rarely found in such pristine condition. Reference: R. Barder, The Georgian Bracket Clock 1714 – 1830, pp.55-56 Cescinsky and Webster, English Domestic Clocks, pp.295-296, fig. 315 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.244 HW5784


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STEPHEN RAYNER, LONDON A fine William III period walnut and floral marquetry longcase clock of 8-day duration. The elegant slim caddy top case is veneered with walnut and decorated with coloured scrolling flowers and foliage set against an ebony veneered background. The case mouldings and the delicate sound frets are in finely figured walnut and very well patinated. The hood retains its original caddy top and has two brass ball finials. There is an oval brass lenticle in the middle of the trunk door to show the swinging pendulum. The 12 inch brass dial is mounted with a silvered chapter ring and has a finely matted centre with an inset date aperture above VI and subsidiary seconds dial below XII. The edge of the dial is engraved with a herringbone border and in the four corners there are gilt spandrels with cherubs holding up a crown and cross. The blued steel hands appear to be original. The high quality five pillar movement runs for eight days and has inside countwheel strike on a single bell. The clock is complete with a brass bob pendulum and two flat topped brass weights. Date: circa 1695 - 1700 Height: 93 in (236 cm) * Stephen Rayner is listed on page 459 of Brian Loomes’ The Early Clockmakers of Great Britain. He became a Brother in the Clockmakers’ Company in 1691 and is known to have worked until at least 1700. His workshop was said to be at Ye Dial, Bishopsgate Within. Reference: B. Loomes, Clockmakers of Britain 1286 – 1700, p.410-411 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.642 HW4747

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WILLIAM KIPLING, LONDON A highly decorative green and gilt lacquer table clock made for the Turkish market. The 8-day arched brass dial movement has Turkish numerals and the maker’s signature William Kipling, London on an inset cartouche within a painted surround of flowers and foliage set below the chapter ring. The movement strikes the hours and has a pull hour repeat lever. Date: circa 1745 Height: 19 in (48.25 cm) Width: 11 ¾ in (29.5 cm) Depth: 7 ½ in (19 cm) * William Kipling was apprenticed to Thomas Johnson in 1695 and he subsequently had his own workshops at Ratcliffe Cross between 1705 and 1750. He clearly had a thriving Middle Eastern market as many of his watches and bracket and lantern clocks had Turkish dials for buyers in the Ottoman Empire. Reference: B. Loomes, Clockmakers of Britain 1286 - 1700, p.308 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.447 Ian White, English Clocks for the Eastern Markets, p.344 HW5345

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THOMAS BROOKS FECIT A rare, large scale early shield dial tavern clock by this London maker. The case with its bombé shaped base and black and raised gilt lacquer chinoiserie decoration is one of the largest we have ever seen. It is decorated on to pine, as one would expect on a piece of George II lacquer furniture. The central trunk door features Father Time with his scythe in an exotic oriental landscape. The original ogee shaped base has floral and foliate decoration which is repeated on the case sides in the form of chrysanthemums. The panel below the trunk door slides from side to side and has a central glass lenticle for observing the swinging pendulum, a very rare feature. The flat wood dial consists of three vertical planks and has a bold ogee edge moulding with gilt foliate decoration and the maker’s signature Thomas Brooks Fecit. The chapter ring is very well laid out with Roman hours and outside five minute marks. The brass hands have heart shaped tips, the minute with counterpoise. The original eight day rectangular plated movement with finned pillars has a long pendulum with brass bob and oval lead weight. Date: circa 1735 Height: 63 in (160 cm) Width: 36 in (91.5 cm) Depth: 9 ¼ in (23.5 cm) * Thomas Brooks is listed on page 107 of Brian Loomes’ Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World 21st Century Edition as working in London after 1730 and freed of the Clockmakers’ Company in 1738. To date this is the first recorded tavern clock by this maker. Provenance: American Private Collection Reference: B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.107 HW5562

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JOHN PYKE, LONDON A good George III period miniature ebonised table clock, the 4 inch 8-day arched brass dial movement with hour strike, subsidiary calendar in the arch and a strike/silent at III. Date: circa 1770 Height: 9 ⅜ in (23.75 cm) excluding handle Width: 7 ¼ in (18.5 cm) Depth: 3 ¾ in (14.5 cm) * John Pyke’s work was consistently of very high quality and as a result he became Clockmaker and Watchmaker to the Prince of Wales. He was active in London between 1747 and 1780. This is the first miniature striking table clock we have seen by this maker. Provenance: An American private collection since the 1980s Reference: B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.663 HW5819

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R. THRELKELD, LONDON A rare George II period red walnut veneered timepiece of small size. The inverted bell-top case is surmounted by a finely knopped brass carrying handle and it stands on four wood block feet. The mouldings to the base and top are crisp and original and there is a well-cut sound fret in the door above XII. The elegant red walnut case has exceptional colour and patination. The 5 inch square brass dial has crown and sceptre spandrels to the four corners and a silvered chapter ring with Arabic 5 minutes, Roman hour numerals and fleur de lys half-hour markers. Within the matted brass dial there is a chamfered date aperture below XII, a mock pendulum aperture and silvered alarm disc in the centre. The blued steel hands are finely wrought. The fully restored 8-day timepiece movement has a crown wheel verge escapement and alarm work on a single bell. The backplate and backcock and alarm pulley are beautifully engraved with foliate scrolls and flowers and the dummy pendulum is also silvered and foliate engraved. Date: circa 1730 Height: 12 ¾ (32.5 cm) excluding handle * Ralph Threlkeld was born in 1686 in Brancepeth, Co. Durham. He was the nephew of Deodatus Threlkeld and, like his brother William, came to London but worked alone at the Sign of the Oyl Jar in the Strand 1728 – 1759. He was also a goldsmith. Reference: B. Loomes, Clockmakers of Britain 1286 – 1700, p.489 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.770 HW4869

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GEORGE PRIOR N° 1933, LONDON A rare and fine George III domestic longcase regulator made for the Middle Eastern market. The mahogany veneered case, standing on a double plinth with a raised panel above and well-figured veneers throughout, has an ogee shaped cornice to the hood with finely pierced brass frets and fluted canted corners. The substantial 8-day centre seconds movement with bottle shaped plates and six tapered baluster pillars which was purchased from Thwaites, is numbered on the front plate 1933 and includes Harrison’s maintaining power, high count pinions, six-spoke wheels and a Graham type deadbeat escapement with jewelled pallets. The wood rod pendulum has a massive brass bob with calibrated rating nut below. The ten inch ogee shaped dial is set within a finely engraved brass mask around the white enamel dial which has Turkish numerals and pierced brass hour and minute hands and a counterbalance steel centre seconds hand. Date: circa 1795 Height: 76 ½ (194 cm) * George Prior was based at 31 Prescot Street, Goldman Fields, London from 1762 to 1813. He specialised in making clocks for the Ottoman Market and is recorded as having collaborated with John Thwaites on several occasions. The latter worked in Bowling Green Lane for a number of other makers and retailers in London. Reference: B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.630 Ian White, English Clocks for the Eastern Market (AHS), pp.62-74 HW5284

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EARDLEY NORTON, LONDON A good George III period belltop mahogany table clock with original anchor escapement and 8-day hour striking movement with two subsidiary dials for strike/silent and rise/fall. The mahogany veneered case has exceptional untouched patination and colour and retains its original turned mahogany finials. The central finial block lifts out to reveal the number 1539. Date: circa 1770 – 1775 Height: 17 ½ in (44.5 cm) excluding finial Width: 12 ½ in (31.5 cm) Depth: 8 in (20.25 cm)

* Eardley Norton is a very well-known maker of fine longcase and table clocks and this pristine example is amongst his best work. In 1771 he patented a striking mechanism for clocks and repeating work for watches. He was active in the Clockmakers’ Company from 1770 until his death in 1792. Reference: R. Barder, Georgian Bracket Clock, p. 110 col. pl. 14 B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: Complete 21st Edition, p. 575 HW5352

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HANDLEY & MOORE, CLERKENWELL CLOSE A fine, mahogany tavern clock by this well-known London partnership. The case, of classic tavern clock style, has access doors to the movement on both sides of the trunk and a pendulum access door in the inverted base. The veneer to the front has a fine flame figure which is carried down from below the dial to the inward sloping foot. The white dial, turned from a single piece of mahogany and with a narrow, crisply shaped moulded edge, is signed by the maker on the very finely crazed ground above and below the centre. The chapter ring has Roman hour numerals, double minutes circle and outside five minutes marks. The original brass hands have elongated heart tips, the minute with counterpoise tail. The 8-day timepiece movement has substantial shouldered plates and a four wheel train with anchor escapement. It has a steel rod pendulum with brass faced bob and a rectangular lead weight. Date: circa 1800 – 1820 Height: 45 in (114.5 cm) Dial: 21 ž in (55 cm) * Handley & Moore were apprenticed to the well known Jno Thwaites and were at 39 Clerkenwell Close from 1801 - 1820. The partnership continued until the death of G. Handley in 1824. An example of their work is in the British Museum. Their bracket clocks are well known and we have seen some fine and frequently very large dial clocks but this is only the second tavern clock by this famous partnership which we have handled in over 35 years. Reference: B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.343 HW5826

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JOHN LORD, FARRINGDON A fine small Tavern Timepiece with a white dial and gilt and chinoiserie lacquered case. The decoration to the trunk door is of an oriental figure standing in front of various pavilions and trees. The trunk sides are filled with chrysanthemum sprays set within gilt lines. The gilt scrolling signature – John Lord, Farringdon - is written below the dial between the wellshaped gilt ear pieces. The round dial has a moulded and turned surround and has Roman numerals, single crossings to the minutes circle and Arabic outside five minutes. The brass hands are well pierced and gilded with heart shaped tips. The weight driven 8-day movement has A shaped plates, a five wheel train with anchor escapement and a steel pendulum rod with brass faced bob. Date: circa 1785 Height: 45 in (115 cm) Dial Width: 20 ½ in (52 cm) * John Lord is listed on page 492 of Brian Loomes’ Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition as working in Farringdon in Hampshire between 1784 and 1830. Tavern clocks of small proportions are comparatively rare.

HW5911

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HENRY JENKINS, LONDON An important palace quality George III period mahogany table clock, the 8-day brass dial movement chiming the hours and quarters on 12 bells. The brass dial has a silvered chapter ring with Roman numerals, Arab five minutes and unusual Tudor Rose five minute markers. The chapter ring is surrounded by quite extraordinary decoration. To the dial corners there are four winged cherub head spandrels, engraved foliate scrolls and an applied cast foliate border. Within the dial centre, the chamfered date aperture and the signed and engraved mock pendulum provide further decorative flourishes. There are also two subsidiary dials; strike/silent and rise/fall in the arch. The maker’s signature, Henry Jenkins London, is engraved on an applied silvered plaque. The blued steel hands are finely pierced and appear to be original. The exceptional mahogany case stands on four brass ‘foliate’ feet. The bell-top has fine cast brass mouldings. The cherub in the centre holding a horn is flanked by two doves. The finials are remarkably intricate and refined. Within the concave section of the bell-top there is a brass mount bearing the Royal Coat Of Arms. The motto of the Order of the Garter is clearly visible and reads Honi soit qui mal y pense which translates as ‘shame on he who thinks ill of it’. The substantial triple fusee movement chimes the hours and quarters on 12 bells. The backplate which is also signed by the maker, Henry Jenkins London, is engraved with foliate scrolls, as are the securing brackets and pendulum. Date: 1780 Height: 30 in (76 cm) Depth: 10 in (26 cm) Width: 16 in (41 cm) *Henry Jenkins is listed in ‘Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World’ as working in Cheapside, London from 1730 to 1780. In 1760 Jenkins published a small booklet titled ‘A description of several geographical and astronomical clocks’. Astronomical clocks were a subject Jenkins was entitled to pronounce upon; a superb example by him can be found in the British Museum’s collection of fine period English clocks. Given its extraordinary quality and the ‘Royal’ mount, it is possible this clock was a Royal gift to a member of the Swedish aristocracy where the clock resided for many generations.

HW4973

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BENJAMIN VULLIAMY, LONDON A fine George III longcase clock in an elegant architectural figured mahogany veneered case which has achieved a good mellow colour with excellent patination. There is a double plinth to the panelled base, long moulded trunk door and the hood is flanked by free-standing grooved pillars with brass reeds and brass capitals and bases. The twelve inch silvered square brass dial is finely engraved and includes an aperture to view the day of the month and a strike/silent option. The centre of the dial is signed by the maker, Vulliamy London. The high quality 8-day duration movement has five pillars, an anchor escapement and rack striking mechanism with the hours sounded on a bell. The ebonised wood rod pendulum has a large brass bob with a silvered calibrating rating nut beneath. Date: circa 1780 Height: 85 in (216 cm) * Benjamin Vulliamy was the second of the Vulliamy family who succeeded his father Justin. He was clockmaker to George III from 1772 and was responsible for a number of important precision clocks made for royalty and the aristocracy. Examples of his work can be found in museums and public collections throughout the world. He was the father of Benjamin Lewis Vulliamy and he died in 1811. Reference: B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.802 sn3899

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THOMAS MUDGE & WILLIAM DUTTON, LONDON A classic George III period mahogany drop dial wall timepiece by this famous partnership. The 13 ½ inch silvered one piece dial has Roman and Arabic numerals and is signed Thos. Mudge Willm. Dutton London. The heart shaped hands which are of blued steel are original. The high-quality timepiece movement has a half deadbeat escapement and steel pendulum rod with a heavy brass bob. The distinctive drop dial mahogany case has a substantial concave moulded brass hinged bezel, shaped ears to the sides of the central trunk with raised panel mouldings and a solid ogee moulded door to the base. Date: circa 1775 Height: 24 in (61 cm) Dial Width: 14 in (35.5 cm) Overall Diameter: 18 in (45.75 cm) * Thomas Mudge and William Dutton were amongst the greatest clockmakers of the second half of the 18th century and their early wall clocks with their distinctive case designs and innovative movements were only rivalled by those of Vulliamy some years later. The pre-eminence of Mudge and Dutton’s work is hardly surprising as both had been apprentices of George Graham. Thomas Mudge was born in Exeter in 1715 and apprenticed to Graham in 1730, becoming Free of the Clockmakers’ Company in 1738. William Dutton was born in 1722 in Marsden, Buckinghamshire and was apprenticed to Graham in 1738 and was made Free of the Clockmakers’ Company in 1746. By 1750 Mudge had opened his own premises at the Dial and One Crown in Fleet Street and when his former master died in 1751 he advertised the following: THOMAS MUDGE WATCHMAKER, late Apprentice to Mr Graham deceased, carried on Business in the same Manner Mr Graham did, at the Dial and One Crown, opposite the Bolt & Tun, Fleet Street. In 1755 Thomas Mudge took on Matthew Dutton as a partner and they made a number of outstanding marine chronometers, regulators and domestic clocks. In 1771 Mudge moved to Plymouth to develop his marine chronometers. The first was assessed at Greenwich for the Board of Longitude in 1774 and he was granted an award of £500 to encourage him to develop his new ideas. He died on 14 November 1794. William Dutton took his sons, Matthew and Thomas, into the business and their work continued well into the 19th century.

HW5732

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Thomas Mudge 1715 – 1794


VULLIAMY, LONDON N° 1122 A classic mahogany trunk dial wall clock by this talented but controversial Royal clockmaker. The 13 in. flat wooden white painted dial which retains its original brass heart shaped hands has a substantial square plated fusee movement with four spoke train and half dead beat escapement. The backplate is signed Vulliamy, London 1122, with typical backcock to support the heavy numbered brass bob and steel rod pendulum. The handsome well proportioned case, typical of Vulliamy’s cabinet workshop, has a drop trunk and is in beautifully patinated figured mahogany. The wooden dial retains its original ‘crackled’ painted surface, boldly turned mahogany surround and concave brass bezel. Date: circa 1835-1840 Height: 23 in (58.5 cm) Overall diameter: 15 ¾ in (40 cm) * This clock was made by Benjamin Lewis Vulliamy, the last generation member of the famous clockmaking dynasty. He was clockmaker to George III and the Prince Regent, later George IV. He died in 1854 ending the Royal Appointment held continuously by him and his forebears for 112 years. Reference: B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.802 Cedric Jagger, Royal Clocks, pp.201-208 HW5910

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MARKWICK MARKHAM AND PERIGAL, LONDON A fine and rare 18th century ormolu mounted tortoiseshell musical table clock of small size made for the Ottoman Market. The elaborate case which stands on foliate scroll feet rises above four corner urn finials to a cupola mounted with four panels of foliate lattice work and a flambeau urn finial at the top. The 4¼ inch arched dial is decorated with rich green and blue floral and foliate enamels against a silvered background. The two white enamel dials in the arch are for chime / not chime and a second subsidiary dial giving a choice of four tunes. The main dial has Turkish hour numerals and Arabic five minute markers. The beautifully pierced gilt brass pointers are fully engraved. The three train fusee movement has seven knopped pillars with a knife-edge verge escapement. The hours are sounded on a single bell and the tunes played every three hours on a run of eight bells and twelve hammers. The backplate, which is signed Markwick Markham Perigal, is profusely engraved with flowers and foliage. Date: circa 1785 Height: 14 in (37 cm) excluding finial Width: 9 ½ in (24 cm) Depth: 7 ½ in (19 cm)

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* The name Markwick Markham had died out in 1741 with the death of Robert Markham, the son-in-law of James Markwick. It continued to be used by a number of clockmakers producing clocks for the Ottoman Market probably for the sake of continuity and confidence with their Turkish clients. Among them Henry Borrell, William Kipling and Francis Perigal. This clock was almost certainly made by Francis Perigal who was working in Bond Street. He was Watchmaker to the King between 1770 and 1794. This clock is very similar to one made and sold by Borrell under the name Markwick Markham Borrell we previously owned. The latter is illustrated in Ian White’s English Clocks for the Eastern Market, fig 9.17. Reference: Ian White, English Clocks for the Eastern Market, fig. 9.17, p.347 Ord-Hume, The Musical Clock, Mayfield Books, plate IV/22 Brian Loomes, Clockmakers of the World – 21st Century Edition, p.508 HW5864


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AUBERT AND KLAFTENBERGER, LONDON A fine George III period mahogany regulator of small size. The refined case with a shallow moulded cornice, similar to the case work of Thomas Mudge, is veneered with mahogany of fine colour and patination. Standing on block feet, there is a double plinth to the moulded panelled base. The trunk door has a shallow arch top which is repeated on the hood. The latter has brass inlaid fluted canted corners to the front. The 10 inch brass dial is signed at the top Aubert and Klaftenberger, London. It has an Arabic minute dial which encloses two subsidiaries, an Arabic seconds dial and a Roman numeral dial for the hours.

The substantial 8-day latched movement is of the highest quality, with five knopped pillars, a deadbeat escapement and maintaining power. The wooden rod pendulum has a heavy lenticular brass bob and outsize brass ball shaped rating nut. Date: circa 1785 Height: 74 ½ in (189.25 cm) Width: 16 ½ in (42 cm) Depth: 9 ½ in (24 cm) * It is probable that this fine regulator was never signed by its original maker but was inscribed and sold by Aubert and Klaftenberger in the 1840s when they were making and retailing clocks in London.

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FRANCIS PERIGAL, LONDON A fine George III period hooded wall clock by this eminent maker. The mahogany case has a shallow arched moulded cornice with a pierced fretwork frieze, flanked by stop fluted canted corners and glazed sides. The original moulded under-curved bracket incorporates a key drawer and provides access to the pendulum bob for regulation. The 10-inch two piece silvered brass shallow arch dial with Roman numerals and well pierced hands has an aperture above VI to view the day of the month. There is a strike/silent option above XII and the dial is signed by the maker Francis Perigal, London in the ogee arch. The two-train bell striking spring-driven double fusee movement with five knopped pillars has an anchor escapement and a brass rod pendulum. Date: circa 1780 Height: 26 ¼ in (67 cm) Width: 15 ¾ in (40 cm) Depth: 8 ½ in (20 cm) * The Perigals were an eminent family of clockmakers spanning most of the 18th century. This distinctive clock, which is identical in design to those made by John Ellicott, was made by Francis Perigal who was working at the Royal Exchange until 1805. Reference: B. Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.606 HW5829

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WILLIAM ALLAM, LONDON A fine miniature lantern timepiece with alarm and retaining its original oak travelling case with two dome topped brass weights. The 3 ½ inch arched brass dial has a raised Roman silvered brass chapter ring, central alarm disc with Arabic numerals and a subsidiary dial in the arch for the maker’s signature: Willm Allam, London. The dial corners are exquisitely engraved with foliate decoration in place of the more usual applied raised corner spandrels. The dial centre is matted and it retains its original finely wrought blued steel single hand. The short duration plated movement retains its original crownwheel verge escapement and alarm train.

Remarkably the clock has survived with its original bespoke oak and cloth lined travelling case and is illustrated on page 353 of Brian Loomes’ book Lantern Clocks and Their Makers. Date: circa 1750 Height of dial plate: 5 in (12.5 cm) * William Allam was working in Bond Street, London in the mid to late 18th century. He was a member of the Clockmakers’ Company from 1743 to 1785. Reference: W.E.J. Hana, English Lantern Clocks, p.146 pl.107 B.Loomes, Lantern Clocks & Their Makers, p.353 fig.21.10 B.Loomes, Clockmakers of the World: 21st Century Edition, p.11 G. White, English Lantern Clocks, p.188 HW5850

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ABOUT My deep love of English clocks goes back to my late teens, but it was not until 1987 when I was in my mid-thirties that I gave up a secure career in teaching to become a ‘runner’: buying and selling clocks within the trade, rather than dealing from a retail premises. ‘Running’ was a great apprenticeship – one had to quickly develop a good eye and learn from one’s (occasional!) expensive mistakes. I still owe a great debt of gratitude to those fellow dealers, clockmakers and cabinetmakers from whom I have learnt so much over the years. Our clockmakers and restorers who work quietly and brilliantly are the unsung heroes of our business. Without their painstaking, sympathetic work and technical expertise we would not be able to preserve our ancient horological masterpieces in the way we do for future generations. I am also grateful to my wife Chiara for her longsuffering support and all the team at Number 123 Kensington Church Street who work so diligently behind the scenes, both in the gallery and at the antiques fairs. We are proud to handle some of the finest English clocks by the greatest English makers on the market today. Over recent years we have sold important clocks to museums both in the UK and around the world. In 2012 we sourced 25 clocks for the Dumfries House Trust in Scotland, whose patron is the Prince of Wales. Six years have already passed since we opened our new gallery at Number 123 Kensington Church Street in 2013. In addition to our permanent display of the best 17th, 18th and 19th century English clocks and barometers for sale in a beautiful period room setting, we also give regular talks on different aspects of English Horology and are able to hold in-house exhibitions of special clocks. For those clients and collectors further afield or unable to visit the gallery, please take the time to visit our state of the art website (www.howardwalwyn.com) which we update regularly with recent acquisitions and where we can inform you of upcoming events. Our annual attendance at the prestigious LAPADA, BADA and Masterpiece Fine Art and Antiques Fairs in London allows us to meet new clients and keep in regular contact with old friends and collectors. We are always keen to acquire the best antique English clocks and barometers by important clockmakers and can be contacted any time for an appraisal or valuation.

Brochure designed and produced by Dayfold Ltd Photography by Peter Hunnisett – photopanache.com


HOWARD WALWYN

HOWARD WALWYN FINE ANTIQUE CLOCKS

FINE ANTIQUE CLOCKS

HOWARD WALWYN FINE ANTIQUE CLOCKS

123 Kensington Church Street, London W8 7LP +44 (0)20 7938 1100 | howard@howardwalwyn.com www.howardwalwyn.com

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Member of the British Antique Dealers’ Association

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Profile for Howard Walwyn

Howard Walwyn Limited: Fine Antique Clocks  

Howard Walwyn has built a reputation over 30 years as an expert dealer in the finest English clocks and barometers, dating from 16th to the...

Howard Walwyn Limited: Fine Antique Clocks  

Howard Walwyn has built a reputation over 30 years as an expert dealer in the finest English clocks and barometers, dating from 16th to the...

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