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Hous t on E n d ow m e n t a philanthropy endowed by jesse h. and mary gibbs jones

Enduring Benefits


Hous t on E n d ow m e n t a phila nthropy en d owe d by j e s s e h . a n d m a ry gibbs j on e s

Improving life for the people of the greater Houston area for 73 years

2010 Annual Report 3


Two of Jaume Plensa’s seven ‘Tolerance’ sculptures, a series that celebrates Houston’s diversity and international character

4


g The Foundation Grants 9

con t e n t s 5 7 Arts & Culture

29

Education

49

Environment

63

Health Human Services

77 The Founders

101

Board of Directors

109

Staff

114

Affiliations

117

Financial Report

119

Grant Application

125

Index to Grantees

127

5


The first Jesse H. Jones and Mary Gibbs Jones scholarship recipients at Prairie View A&M University, 1946

6


g

The f o u n d a t i o n Jesse H. and Mary Gibbs Jones established Houston Endowment on September 25, 1937, to improve life for the people of the greater Houston area. Since then, the foundation has helped achieve and sustain positive and observable progress in the community through its grants to nonprofit organizations, particularly to those that produce enduring benefits for those they serve. During the first years of their marriage in the 1920s, the Joneses donated more than $1 million to help initiate and develop institutions and organizations that would nurture Houston’s people and encourage the city’s growth. After they established Houston Endowment, Mr. Jones transferred ownership of his buildings and businesses—including the Rice Hotel, the National Bank of Commerce, the Houston Chronicle and the famous Mayfair House in New York City— to the foundation. In response to the Tax Reform Act of 1969, the buildings and businesses were sold and the proceeds were invested in securities. The sale of the Houston Chronicle to the Hearst Corporation completed the process. From the gifts and bequests of Mr. and Mrs. Jones, Houston Endowment’s assets have grown to more than $1.5 billion, enabling the foundation to donate $69,722,878 in 2010. Since Mr. and Mrs. Jones established Houston Endowment 73 years ago, the foundation has donated more than $1.5 billion ($2.7 billion in current dollars) to charitable organizations and educational institutions to help fulfill their vision of a vibrant community where the opportunity to thrive is available to all.

7


Executive director Jennifer Gillespie-Malone teaches a child about flowers and plants at The Nature Discovery Center

8


g

gr an ts 2010

Grant distribution by program area Houston Endowment supports nonprofit organizations and educational institutions that produce and maximize enduring benefits for the people of the greater Houston area. During 2010, Houston Endowment donated $69,722,878 within five program areas to help create a community where the opportunity to thrive is available to all.

A rts & C u lt u r e

$

17,299,500

25%

Ed u cati o n

$

22,189,778

32%

E n v ir o n m e n t

$

5,827,600

8%

H e a lth

$

12,159,000

17%

H u m a n S e rv ic e s

$

12,247,000

18%

T o ta l

$

69,722,878

100%

9


Fostering artistic achievement and providing meaningful experiences Dancers rehearse at Houston Ballet’s new Center for Dance building

10


arts & culture Appreciation

$

4,195,000

Creation

$

8,654,500

Culture

$

955,000

History

$

2,760,000

Strategic Partnership

$

540,000

Other

$

195,000

Total

$

17,299,500

25%

11 11


g Yo u n g Au d i e n c e s I n c . o f H o u s to n According to studies, academic scores improve when the arts are used to illuminate learning. Todd Frazier, executive director of Young Audiences Inc. of Houston (YAH), says, “There are all types of learners in the classroom. Some learn by listening, others by visualizing, acting,

arts & culture

touching or creating. The arts open doors to all learners.” Consequently, YAH has grown from providing arts programs to schools to also being a collaborative partner with organizations that use the arts to achieve goals with children. In 2010, YAH’s 78 teaching artists enchanted, inspired and educated more than 330,000 children in schools, libraries, community centers and hospitals throughout greater Houston. Frazier explains, “We teach rhythm and melody to help special needs children develop motor and verbal skills and increase their attention spans. We work with at-risk kids through theater and dance and help them build teams and develop life skills. But the majority of our work is done in the classroom.” YAH school-based programs are tailor-made to reinforce core curriculum classroom instruction and to align with state-mandated curricula and tests. YAH offers one-stop shopping for organizations and schools seeking arts programs. A service provider, teacher, principal, superintendent or PTA leader can browse the YAH Web site or a 125page catalogue and select from programs featuring dance, music, theater, puppetry, storytelling, literary arts or visual arts. One program can be arranged for a day, or a comprehensive program including music, art and dance can be set up for a full school year. “Visiting artists partner with teachers to develop and support an arts-integrated component of a course,” says Frazier. “The arts tie things together and make concepts tangible, whether it’s painting wave patterns in science class or using music and opera to teach poetry, creative writing and literary skills. YAH keeps the arts in schools and also boosts student success: When children are singing, writing music or performing in a play, they want to attend and participate.” For evidence Frazier points out, “One of the Houston ISD schools with the highest attendance rates, the lowest dropout rates, the most National Merit Scholars and the highest SAT scores is the High School for the Performing and Visual Arts.” Arts programs encourage creative thinking and problem solving; they remove social, demographic and cultural boundaries in the classroom; and they build future audiences who will support and enjoy the arts and who will include the next generation in the discovery and appreciation of uplifting and enriching experiences. Frazier states, “The mission of Young Audiences is to educate and inspire children through the arts, to make the arts an integral part of the school curriculum and to advance the arts through professional development and community partnerships.”

12


arts & culture

Young Audiences artist Danny Russo teaches screen-printing to students at Edgar Odell Lovett Elementary School

The arts open doors to all learners.

13


arts & culture Ars Lyrica Houston performs at Zilkha Hall, Hobby Center for the Performing Arts, on New Year’s Eve 2010

Baroque music is an important part of our cultural heritage. 14


g Ar s Lyri c a H ousto n Ars Lyrica Houston (ALH) presents musical masterworks and long-hidden gems composed from the beginning of the 17th century to the end of the 18th century to music lovers in Houston and around the world. “The period encompasses everything from the late Renaissance to focus on vocal and instrumental music that audiences don’t hear every day of the week.” For example, ALH performed John Blow’s ‘Venus and Adonis,’ the first opera composed in English, and more recently presented Claudio Monteverdi’s large-scale ‘1610 Vespers.’ ALH is the resident period-instrument ensemble at the Hobby Center for the Performing Arts, where each year it presents five concerts based on selected themes. Kinga Ferguson, ALH’s executive director, says, “Each concert is packaged in an interesting way, so audiences can relate and make connections with other arts, history and their own lives.” On New Year’s Eve 2010 at the Hobby Center, ALH presented ‘Musical Resolutions,’ which included appropriate Baroque concerti, suites and a cantata performed by soloists from ALH’s core group of local musicians,

arts & culture

Baroque and up to early classical music,” explains ALH’s artistic director Matthew Dirst. “We

followed by a reception with champagne and hors d’oeuvres. ALH’s creative approach clearly attracts audiences. Ferguson says, “We’ve been performing at the Hobby Center for four seasons, and audiences have grown from an average of 100 people per concert to more than 300.” ALH also performs in venues throughout the community, presents lectures and tours nationally. It sends musicians into schools to perform with medieval, Renaissance and modern harps that not only delight the children but also teach them about history, art, culture and literature as they sing, dance and take turns playing the beautiful instruments. ALH also produces recordings: its world premiere recording of J. A. Hasse’s ‘Marc Antonio e Cleopatra’ was the only U.S. recording to be nominated for a Grammy award in the opera category. Another recording is already in the works. Dirst says, “Ars Lyrica means lyric art, which means we do things that appeal to people who appreciate beautiful song, both vocal and instrumental, presenting pieces requiring anything from a chamber group of six to a full orchestra with two choirs. Houston Early Music has brought groups to town for many years, but there was very little going on locally until Ars Lyrica, Mercury Baroque and the Bach Society also embraced the period.” Each organization fills a special niche, and Houston Endowment supports all four. Dirst continues, “Baroque music is an important part of our cultural heritage, especially for those with roots in Europe. Aspects of European culture surround us in architecture, art and books, and there’s no reason why we should forget about the music. It mines the emotions and the world in a way that is unique and delightful all on its own.” 15


g FRIENDS OF th e TE X A S H ISTORIC AL CO M M ISSION arts & culture 16

The Bernardo Plantation was the first large-scale plantation established in Texas. Jared Groce, who was the wealthiest member of the Old Three Hundred settlers to receive land grants in Stephen F. Austin’s colony, began building it in 1822 on the Brazos River just south of where Hempstead is today. It was the westernmost cotton plantation in the South, and its success established the slave- and cotton-based economy of Texas years before the state won its independence from Mexico, became an independent nation or was annexed by the United States. Some believe the first cotton crop in Texas was grown at the Bernardo Plantation. Amateur archeologists discovered remnants of the site in a pasture owned by a local businessman, who had agreed to let them explore and study his land. Jim Bruseth, director of the archeology division of the Texas Historical Commission (THC), says, “They found a few artifacts and realized how important the site was. They contacted me and other professional archeologists asking for help. I quickly offered assistance because of the unique role Bernardo Plantation played in the early formation of Texas.” In addition to establishing the state’s economy, the Bernardo Plantation was used in 1836 by Sam Houston and his men as a staging ground 10 days before their victorious march against Santa Anna at San Jacinto. The Twin Sisters cannons—the army’s only artillery—were shipped and delivered to Sam Houston at the Bernardo Plantation via the Brazos River. With financial support from the Friends of the Texas Historical Commission and assistance from Community Archeology Research Institute, Inc., Bruseth and his team have found nails, glass, buttons, bullets and lanterns, and they have determined the exact locations of the plantation’s buildings. “We have found the remnants of the main house’s four fireplaces, whose bricks were handmade by the slaves on the plantation,” says Bruseth. Groce owned the area’s largest number of slaves, who played a significant part in Texas history. Until emancipation and the subsequent bankruptcy of the plantation, its economic success using slave labor to maintain large-scale cotton production attracted other entrepreneurs and settlers to the area. The plantation’s slaves produced and served the food that nourished Sam Houston and his army before their pivotal battle. Bruseth says, “An exciting part of our project is uncovering the slave quarters and doing research to find the people related to the enslaved workers on the plantation. Their African ancestors’ contribution to the fight for Texas independence is an important part of our history that’s largely untold.” The THC hopes to develop museum exhibits with artifacts from the plantation, publish a book, tell the plantation’s story in school textbooks and cultivate a deeper understanding about slavery in Texas. Bruseth says, “I hope one day the Bernardo Plantation can become a place where people can visit and learn about the struggle for Texas independence from the perspective of the plantation owner and the enslaved workers. Both groups made important contributions to the formation of Texas.”


arts & culture

Archeologists uncover and record one of Bernardo Plantation’s sandstone chimneys, whose stones were laid by slaves in 1822

They found a few artifacts and realized how important the site was. 17


grantee + purpose

year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

Appreciation Am e ri c an Festival fo r th e Arts Houston, TX

Toward providing music education and performance opportunities to students through the Summer Music Conservatory

2009

Toward music education and performance programs for instrumentalists and vocalists of all ages

100,000 $

50,000

2010

150,000

75,000

2010

40,000

40,000

2010

50,000

50,000

2010

50,000

50,000

2008

300,000

100,000

2010

100,000

100,000

2009

60,000

30,000

2010

25,000

25,000

2010

35,000

35,000

2010

75,000

25,000

2010

70,000

35,000

2007

5,000,000

1,000,000

2010

145,000

85,000

$

Art Li es Houston, TX

Toward a journal and Web site about contemporary visual arts in Texas Assoc iati o n fo r Co m m u n it y B roadc asti n g Houston, TX

C harles W. M oo re Fou n dati o n I n c . Au s t i n , T X

Toward www.placenotes.com, a Web site that helps people discover places in Houston of cultural, architectural and ecological importance Th e C h i ld re n ’s M us eu m , I n c . Houston, TX

Toward exhibits and programs Co nte m po r ary Arts M us eu m H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward presenting regional, national and international contemporary art, and toward educational and outreach programs

arts & culture

Toward Houston’s public television and radio stations

C re ative Alte rnatives I n c . Houston, TX

Toward accessible and affordable art classes, particularly for children in low-income neighborhoods and schools D i o nysus Th e atre Houston, TX

Toward productions by a performing arts troupe composed of disabled and able-bodied performers G l assti re Houston, TX

Toward an interactive Web site that provides information and commentary about the visual arts in Texas HITS Th e atre Houston, TX

Toward performances and musical theater training for children ages six to 19 H o pe Sto n e I n c . Houston, TX

Toward presenting original dance, music and theatrical performances, and toward outreach programs for at-risk and underserved youth H ousto n Ballet Fou n dati o n Houston, TX

Toward the Center for Dance building to house the ballet company and its staff, academy, props and costumes H ousto n C e nte r fo r Ph otog r aphy Houston, TX

Toward promoting the appreciation of photography through exhibitions, publications and educational programs

19

H ousto n C h i ld re n ’s C h o rus I n c . Houston, TX

Toward music education programs and choral performances by children

2009

60,000

30,000


grantee + purpose

year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

H ousto n G r an d O pe r a Assoc iati o n , I n c . Houston, TX

Toward the ‘Making a Difference Nexus Initiative,’ a large-scale effort to expand and diversify audiences

2008

5,000,000

1,500,000

2010

8,000

5,000

2008

105,000

35,000

2009

40,000

20,000

2010

50,000

25,000

Toward performing and visual arts programs, and toward building renovations

2009

60,000

30,000

Toward performing and visual arts programs

2010

30,000

0

2008

30,000

10,000

2007

105,000

35,000

Toward preserving and exhibiting the art collection of John and Dominique de Menil

2009

100,000

100,000

Toward preserving and exhibiting the art collection of John and Dominique de Menil

2010

100,000

0

2010

200,000

100,000

2010

90,000

45,000

2008

75,000

35,000

Toward public art and educational programs that promote neighborhood revitalization, historic preservation, community engagement and African-American history and culture

2009

200,000

100,000

Toward public art and educational programs that promote neighborhood revitalization, historic preservation, community engagement and African-American history and culture

2010

200,000

0

H ousto n You n g Arti st’s Co n c e rt Houston, TX

Toward performance opportunities for young musicians between the ages of four and 18 H ousto n Youth Sym ph o ny & Ballet Houston, TX

Toward recruiting and developing young musicians and providing them with the opportunity to perform in professional venues Ja zz E duc ati o n I n c . Houston, TX

arts & culture

Toward teaching theory, composition, improvisation, drumming and professional development skills to school-age youth through the Summer Jazz Workshop K at y Artre ac h K at y, T X

Toward creating art projects to address the educational and social development of at-risk children, children and adults with special needs, victims of crime and the elderly K at y Vi sual & Pe rfo rm i n g Arts C e nte r K at y, T X

Man hat tan Th e atre C lu b , I n c . N e w Y o r k , NY

Toward including Houston schools in an Internet-based program where students from around the country collaborate on writing and producing a play Man n e d S pac e Fli g ht E duc ati o n Fou n dati o n I n c . Houston, TX

Toward providing disadvantaged schoolchildren with educational activities and tours of Space Center Houston M e n i l Fou n dati o n I n c . Houston, TX

Th e M us eu m o f Fi n e Arts , H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward collecting, exhibiting, preserving and interpreting visual art M us i qa Houston, TX

Toward a musical ensemble that promotes and presents contemporary classical music Nam e less Sou n d Houston, TX

Toward presenting contemporary and experimental avant-garde music and providing art education programs to children in public schools, community centers and homeless shelters Proj ect Row H ous es Houston, TX

20


grantee + purpose

year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

Rive r Oak s C ham b e r O rc h estr a Houston, TX

Toward a development director

2010

25,000

0

Toward classical orchestral concerts for children and adults

2010

35,000

35,000

2008

30,000

10,000

2010

25,000

25,000

Toward a pilot theater program for children in Fifth Ward elementary schools

2009

260,000

130,000

Toward Blaffer Gallery exhibitions, publications and educational outreach, and toward renovations to the gallery

2010

350,000

50,000

2010

400,000

0

Toward a chamber orchestra that provides training and performance opportunities for musicians between the ages of 11 and 18

2010

50,000

0

Toward a development director to sustain a chamber orchestra that provides training and performance opportunities for musicians between the ages of 11 and 18

2010

75,000

0

Toward placing professional writers in schools to help children learn literacy and writing skills

2007

300,000

100,000

Toward enhancing teachers’ writing and editing skills and improving curricula

2010

40,000

0

Toward placing professional writers in schools to help children learn literacy and writing skills

2010

200,000

0

2010

150,000

75,000

Th e S hak es pe are G lo b e C e ntre Southwest I n c . Houston, TX

Toward youth residencies and free performances of Shakespeare’s plays in various venues, particularly in schools Te x an-Fre n c h Allian c e fo r th e Arts Houston, TX

Toward promotional materials and educational programs for public schools and the public about Bernar Venet’s outdoor sculpture exhibition in Hermann Park Houston, TX

U n ive r s it y o f H ousto n C le ar Lak e Houston, TX

Toward engaging and increasing audiences for art programs in the Bay Area Vi rtuos i o f H ousto n Houston, TX

arts & culture

U n ive r s it y o f H ousto n

Write r s i n th e Sc h oo l s Houston, TX

You n g Au d i e n c es I n c . o f H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward providing music, dance, visual arts and theater programs to schools and other venues that serve children

$

4,195,000

3,000,000 $

3,000,000

Total — Appreciation Creation Alle y Th e atre Houston, TX

Toward renovating the theater building, and toward new works and enhanced productions

2008

Toward theatrical performances of literary classics, modern masterpieces, musicals and new works, and toward educational and community outreach programs

2010

100,000

100,000

2010

60,000

30,000

$

Ar s Lyri c a H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward presenting Baroque chamber music, operas and oratorios

21


grantee + purpose

year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

Art Cou n c i l I n c . N e w Y o r k , NY

2007

150,000

50,000

2009

90,000

45,000

2010

50,000

50,000

2009

80,000

40,000

2010

30,000

0

2010

50,000

50,000

2009

15,000

15,000

2008

225,000

75,000

2010

30,000

0

2010

75,000

75,000

2009

50,000

25,000

2010

550,000

75,000

Toward creating and presenting culturally diverse performing arts programs for children and families

2009

25,000

25,000

Toward creating and presenting culturally diverse performing arts programs for children and families

2010

60,000

0

2009

220,000

170,000

Toward supporting individual artists in Houston Art Le ag u e o f H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward visual art exhibitions, educational programs and community outreach Arts Allian c e C e nte r at C le ar Lak e Na s s au B ay, T X

Toward an alliance of organizations that presents visual, performing and literary arts exhibitions and performances and provides classes for adults and children in the Bay Area Au ro r a Pi ctu re S h ow Houston, TX

arts & culture

Toward a micro-cinema that promotes non-commercial film, video and new media artists Bac h Soc i et y at C h ri st th e K i n g E van g e li c al Luth e r an C h u rc h Houston, TX

Toward presenting historically accurate performances of Johann Sebastian Bach’s music and the music of other composers who follow his tradition Catastro ph i c Th e atre I n c . Houston, TX

Toward presenting contemporary and experimental plays Cou ntry Pl ayh ous e Houston, TX

Toward productions and educational programs at a neighborhood theater Da Cam e r a Soc i et y o f Te x as Houston, TX

Toward performances of thematically presented chamber music, contemporary music and jazz by leading local, national and international artists, and toward educational outreach and touring activities Dan c e o f As ian Am e ri c a M i s s o u r i C i t y, T X

Toward promoting cultural appreciation through Chinese dance and providing young dancers with professional training and performance opportunities D ive r s e Wo rk s I n c . Houston, TX

Toward presenting contemporary visual, literary and performing art that explores artistic, cultural and social issues, and toward Tierney Malone’s ‘Third Ward Stories’ exhibition Earth e n Vess e l s I n c . d ba San d r a O rgan Dan c e Co m pany Houston, TX

Toward contemporary ballet programs and performances E n s e m b le Th e atre Houston, TX

Toward theatrical performances, professional training and educational outreach by local and national playwrights and artists who focus on African-American experiences, and toward facility upgrades E xpress Th e atre Houston, TX

Foto Fest I n c .

22

Houston, TX

Toward citywide exhibitions and educational programs at FotoFest 2010, a biennial international photography exhibition


grantee + purpose

year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

2010

40,000

20,000

2009

12,000

12,000

2010

85,000

0

2008

60,000

20,000

2010

100,000

100,000

2010

20,000

10,000

2010

100,000

100,000

2010

150,000

75,000

2008

75,000

25,000

2010

15,000

15,000

2010

25,000

25,000

2008

80,000

25,000

2010

60,000

30,000

2010

200,000

100,000

Fou n dati o n fo r M o d e rn M us i c I n c . Houston, TX

Toward presenting and promoting contemporary classical music through concerts, competitions, recordings and educational outreach Fre n eti co re Houston, TX

Toward creating, presenting and promoting original productions of dance, film, theater, music and visual arts Galvesto n Arts C e nte r I n c . G a lv e s t o n , T X

Toward presenting innovative contemporary art and providing educational and outreach programs Houston, TX

Toward presenting Gilbert & Sullivan comic operas G re ate r H ousto n Co m m u n it y Fou n dati o n Houston, TX

Toward ‘Tolerance,’ a group of seven stainless steel sculptures by Jaume Plensa on the south bank of Buffalo Bayou G u lf Coast - A Jou rnal o f Lite r atu re an d Fi n e Arts Houston, TX

Toward producing a biannual literary journal and teaching publishing skills to graduate and undergraduate students in the University of Houston’s Creative Writing Program H ousto n Ballet Fou n dati o n Houston, TX

Toward ballet performances and educational and community outreach programs

arts & culture

G i lb e rt & Su llivan Soc i et y o f H ousto n

H ousto n C e nte r fo r Co nte m po r ary C r af t Houston, TX

Toward presenting art objects made primarily of fiber, metal, glass, clay and wood, and toward residencies, workshops, demonstrations and after-school and summer programs for students H ousto n C ham b e r C h o i r Houston, TX

Toward performances, outreach and educational activities by a professional choral ensemble H ousto n Early M us i c M ag n o l i a , T X

Toward presenting internationally recognized ensembles and soloists performing vocal, instrumental and chamber music from the Middle Ages through the 18th century, and toward educational outreach programs H ousto n Fri e n ds o f C ham b e r M us i c I n c . Houston, TX

Toward bringing world-renowned touring chamber music ensembles to Houston, presenting master classes and demonstrations and providing free or discounted tickets to students and seniors H ousto n I nte rnati o nal Dan c e Coaliti o n Houston, TX

Toward Dance Salad Festival, a weeklong presentation by local, national and international companies H ousto n M etro po litan Dan c e C e nte r I n c . Houston, TX

Toward dance classes, educational outreach and performances H ousto n M us i c Hall Fou n dati o n Houston, TX

Toward ‘Uniquely Houston,’ Hobby Center’s educational and community outreach program

23


grantee + purpose

year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

H ousto n Re pe rto i re Ballet Houston, TX

2010

10,000

10,000

Toward educational and community outreach programs

2010

100,000

100,000

Toward a plan to reach financial stability

2010

5,000,000

3,000,000

Toward creative writing programs and presentations that promote the literary arts

2009

60,000

60,000

Toward creative writing programs and presentations that promote the literary arts

2010

50,000

50,000

Toward contemporary visual art exhibitions by regional artists, residency programs and educational events

2007

120,000

40,000

Toward contemporary visual art exhibitions by regional artists, residency programs and educational events

2010

130,000

0

2010

150,000

75,000

2010

145,000

85,000

2010

75,000

75,000

2010

200,000

100,000

2010

10,000

10,000

Toward presenting fully staged and costumed classical operas, and toward outreach programs for students and seniors

2009

65,000

65,000

Toward presenting fully staged and costumed classical operas, and toward outreach programs for students and seniors

2010

65,000

0

2010

150,000

0

2009

20,000

10,000

Toward performances and educational programs for young dancers in north Harris County H ousto n Sym ph o ny Soc i et y Houston, TX

I n pri nt I n c . Houston, TX

Lawn dale Art an d Pe rfo rman c e C e nte r

arts & culture

Houston, TX

Mai n Stre et Th e ate r at Autry H ous e Houston, TX

Toward theatrical productions for adult and young audiences, and toward training and outreach programs for young people Masqu e r ad e Th e atre Houston, TX

Toward musical theater performances, toward educational and training programs for K-12 students, and toward relocation expenses incurred because of a fire Th e M e rcu ry Baroqu e E n s e m b le Houston, TX

Toward educational outreach programs and performances of 17th- and 18th-century music using period instruments and historically accurate techniques M i lle r Th e atre Advi so ry Board I n c . Houston, TX

Toward presenting free performing arts programs to the public at Miller Outdoor Theatre M us i c i n Co nte x t Houston, TX

Toward musical performances on historically appropriate instruments O pe r a i n th e H e i g hts Houston, TX

O r an g e S h ow Fou n dati o n Houston, TX

Toward preserving and exhibiting The Orange Show monument and the Beer Can House, toward presenting the Houston Art Car Parade, and toward educational programs that promote visionary art Pso ph o n ia Houston, TX

Toward creating and presenting contemporary dances and offering residencies and performances to students in schools 24


year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

2008

15,000

5,000

Toward presenting nationally and internationally acclaimed performing artists and companies

2009

100,000

100,000

Toward presenting nationally and internationally acclaimed performing artists and companies

2010

100,000

0

2008

100,000

50,000

2009

100,000

50,000

2010

150,000

75,000

2010

50,000

25,000

2008

90,000

30,000

2009

15,000

7,500

2008

60,000

30,000

2010

50,000

50,000

Toward musical theater productions and innovative educational and community outreach programs

2009

100,000

100,000

Toward musical theater productions and innovative educational and community outreach programs

2010

100,000

0

2009

30,000

15,000

Toward presenting free performances of two Shakespeare plays at Miller Outdoor Theatre during the 2008, 2009 and 2010 Houston Shakespeare Festivals

2008

30,000

10,000

Toward building awareness of the Texas Musical Festival, a four-week orchestral fellowship program for young professional musicians

2009

15,000

15,000

grantee + purpose Soc i et y fo r Pres e rvati o n & E n cou r ag e m e nt o f Barb e r s h o p Quartet S i n g i n g Am e ri c a Houston, TX

Toward perpetuating and presenting barbershop harmony-style singing through performances and educational outreach Soc i et y fo r th e Pe rfo rm i n g Arts Houston, TX

Southwest Alte rnate M e d ia Proj ects I n c .

S pac etak e r Houston, TX

Toward support services to help local artists manage and advance their careers Stag es I n c . Houston, TX

Toward presenting contemporary plays and musicals for adults and children Te x as Accou ntants & Law ye r s fo r th e Arts Houston, TX

Toward free accounting and legal services for artists and arts organizations Te x as Fo lk li fe Reso u rc es

arts & culture

Houston, TX

Toward promoting the creation and appreciation of film, video and new media

Au s t i n , T X

Toward documenting, preserving and presenting Texas folk art in Houston, particularly through the ‘Accordion Kings & Queens’ workshop and concert at Miller Outdoor Theatre and ‘The Big Squeeze,’ a documentary film about an accordion contest Te x as M e d i c al C e nte r O rc h estr a Houston, TX

Toward classical music performances by volunteer musicians who are primarily health care professionals Th e ate r LaB H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward presenting contemporary plays Th e atre Su bu rb ia I n c . Houston, TX

Toward a volunteer-run community theater that presents contemporary and classic plays, and toward relocation and renovation expenses Th e atre U n d e r Th e Star s I n c . Houston, TX

Tr avest y Dan c e G rou p Houston, TX

Toward modern dance performances, new choreography and educational outreach U n ive r s it y o f H ousto n Houston, TX

25


grantee + purpose

year approved

2010 allocation

total grant

Vo i c es B re ak i n g Bou n dari es Houston, TX

Toward multidisciplinary arts programs that provide performance and educational opportunities for artists and audiences with diverse perspectives and backgrounds

2009

30,000

60,000 $

8,654,500

25,000 $

25,000

Total — Creation Culture H o loc aust M us eu m H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward collaborating with the Houston Symphony to present Lawrence Siegel’s ‘Kaddish,’ a series of musical vignettes about the Holocaust

2010

$

arts & culture

H ousto n Arts Allian c e Houston, TX

Toward researching, documenting, preserving and presenting information about the city’s cultural and ethnic diversity through the City Folklife and Traditional Arts Program

2010

160,000

80,000

Toward educating students about the Caribbean through a teachers’ guide that supports the 2010 Houston International Festival

2009

25,000

25,000

Toward educating students about the Silk Roads through a teachers’ guide that supports the 2011 Houston International Festival

2010

25,000

0

2010

900,000

400,000

2010

200,000

100,000

2009

10,000

5,000

2010

100,000

100,000

2008

225,000

75,000

2010

50,000

50,000

2010

20,000

10,000

2010

150,000

75,000

H ousto n Festival Fou n dati o n I n c . Houston, TX

H ousto n M us eu m o f Afri c an Am e ri c an Cu ltu re Houston, TX

Toward purchasing and renovating a facility for a museum that collects, conserves, studies, interprets and exhibits materials about African-Americans in Houston, Texas and the United States, and toward management and program development H ousto n M us eu m o f Natu r al Sc i e n c e Houston, TX

Toward exhibitions and educational programs about the natural world I n stitute o f H i s pan i c Cu ltu re o f H ousto n , Te x as Houston, TX

Toward the annual Hispanic Folkloric Festival at Miller Outdoor Theatre Jo h n P. M cGove rn M us eu m o f H e alth & M e d i c al Sc i e n c e Houston, TX

Toward developing new interactive health and science educational programs for teachers and students in the greater Houston area M u lti cu ltu r al E duc ati o n an d Cou n s e li n g th roug h th e Arts Houston, TX

Toward promoting social, cultural and academic development in inner-city youth through classical and ethnic arts education programs and performances Pac i fi c a Fou n dati o n Houston, TX

Toward a marketing plan for KPFT Radio S pri n g B r an c h I n d e pe n d e nt Sc h oo l D i stri ct Houston, TX

Toward exhibitions, classes and outreach programs at the Spring Branch ISD Altharetta Yeargin Art Museum Tale nto B i li n g u e d e H ousto n Houston, TX

26

Toward presenting, preserving and promoting Latino arts and culture


grantee + purpose

year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

10,000

10,000

U n ive r s it y o f N o rth Te x as Den ton, TX

Toward publishing and distributing an updated second edition of ‘The Murals of John Thomas Biggers, American Muralist, African American Artist’ by Dr. Olive Jensen Theisen

2009

$

955,000

25,000 $

25,000

2010

55,000

55,000

2010

250,000

250,000

2009

500,000

500,000

2010

45,000

45,000

2008

275,000

75,000

2010

25,000

25,000

2010

225,000

150,000

2010

25,000

25,000

2010

1,000,000

1,000,000

Total — Culture History Bat tles h i p Te x as Fou n dati o n I n c . Houston, TX

2010

$

C e nte r fo r Afri c an Am e ri c an M i litary H i sto ry I n c . Houston, TX

Toward consultants to help complete fundraising for the museum’s renovations and move to the Houston Light Guard Armory building C e nte r fo r Tr an s po rtati o n an d Co m m e rc e G a lv e s t o n I s l a n d , T X

Toward matching funds to make available FEMA funds needed to repair the Galveston Island Railroad Museum damaged by Hurricane Ike Fri e n ds o f Li b r ari es an d Arc h ives o f Te x as I n c .

arts & culture

Toward including more diverse and low-income youth in the Overnight Educational Program, where participants ages seven and up sleep aboard the Battleship ‘Texas’ and learn about military life and the operations and history of the ship

Au s t i n , T X

Toward restoring and renovating the Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building, a repository of the state’s historic treasures Fri e n ds o f th e Te x as H i sto ri c al Co m m i ss i o n I n c . Au s t i n , T X

Toward archeological research at the historic 1,500-acre Bernardo Plantation in Waller County, and toward community outreach programs about the contributions and culture of the plantation’s slave community Galvesto n H i sto ri c al Fou n dati o n I n c . G a lv e s t o n , T X

Toward revitalizing and preserving the architectural, cultural and maritime history of Galveston Island through redevelopment, stewardship and special events G re ate r H ousto n Pres e rvati o n Allian c e , I n c . Houston, TX

Toward promoting the preservation and appreciation of Houston’s architectural, cultural and historical resources H e ritag e Soc i et y Houston, TX

Toward preserving and presenting nine historic structures that date from 1832 to 1905 in Sam Houston Park, and toward restoring the foundation of the 1847 Kellum-Noble House, the only structure original to the park H ousto n Arts an d M e d ia Houston, TX

Toward documenting and presenting unusual and little-known aspects of Houston’s history through film, video and books J u lia I d eso n Li b r ary Pres e rvati o n Partn e r s I n c . Houston, TX

Toward renovating and expanding the historic Julia Ideson Library building

27


grantee + purpose

year approved

2010 allocation

total grant

Le ag u e C it y H i sto ri c al Soc i et y I n c . L e ag u e C i t y, T X

Toward providing students with hands-on experiences at the 1898 West Bay Common School Museum

2010

10,000

10,000

Toward preserving, exhibiting and demonstrating artifacts that show the importance of printing to the development of the civilized world and to the advancement of freedom and liberty

2009

75,000

75,000

Toward preserving, exhibiting and demonstrating artifacts that show the importance of printing to the development of the civilized world and to the advancement of freedom and liberty

2010

150,000

0

2010

25,000

25,000

2010

25,000

25,000

2010

250,000

250,000

2009

175,000

75,000

2010

100,000

50,000

2008

300,000

100,000

M us eu m o f Pri nti n g H i sto ry Houston, TX

arts & culture

Nati o nal Trust fo r H i sto ri c Pres e rvati o n i n th e U n ite d States Wa s h i n g t o n , D C

Toward scholarships for 30 Houston area participants to attend the National Preservation Conference in Austin, and toward a session at the conference to examine key preservation issues and successes in and around Houston Pal ac i os Are a H i sto ri c al Assoc iati o n Pa l ac i o s , T X

Toward planning and design services at the City by the Sea Museum for an exhibit of artifacts from La Salle’s ship ‘La Belle’ San Jac i nto Bat tleg rou n d Assoc iati o n Houston, TX

Toward purchasing and preserving land that is part of the San Jacinto battlefield San Jac i nto M us eu m o f H i sto ry Assoc iati o n La P o r t e , T X

Toward collecting and preserving materials and presenting educational programs and exhibitions about the early history and culture of Texas Te x as State H i sto ri c al Assoc iati o n Den ton, TX

Toward educational programs and services that promote Texas history U n ive r s it y o f H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward conducting an oral history project, publishing ‘Houston History’ magazine and writing a comprehensive history about Houston through the Center for Public History

$

2,760,000

30,000 $

30,000

Total — History Strategic Partnership Fres h Arts Coaliti o n Houston, TX

Toward building audiences through collective marketing efforts and promotional events for small to mid-size arts organizations

2010

$

H ousto n Arts Allian c e Houston, TX

Toward sharing patron databases among local arts organizations, and toward connecting skilled business professionals with arts organizations

28

2008

285,000

140,000


grantee + purpose

year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

2010

20,000

10,000

2010

160,000

160,000

2008

600,000

200,000

2010

45,000

0

H ousto n M us eu m D i stri ct Assoc iati o n Houston, TX

Toward collaborative projects among 18 museums to promote and increase awareness of the institutions within the area I n d e pe n d e nt Arts Co ll abo r ative Houston, TX

Toward planning a Midtown multi-use performing and visual arts complex I n d iana U n ive r s it y B l o o m i n g t o n , IN

Toward an annual survey to determine the impact and quality of Houston art schools and programs Partn e r s fo r Livab le Co m m u n iti es I n c . Wa s h i n g t o n , D C

$

540,000

50,000 $

50,000

Total — Strategic Partnership Other G re ate r H ousto n Co m m u n it y Fou n dati o n Houston, TX

Toward a Sesquicentennial Park statue of former Secretary of State James A. Baker III

2010

$

H ousto n Pu b li c Li b r ary Fou n dati o n Houston, TX

Toward supporting and improving Houston’s public libraries

2010

150,000

100,000

2010

20,000

20,000

2010

25,000

25,000

arts & culture

Toward enriching life for older Houstonians and recent immigrants by engaging them with local arts and culture organizations

Nati o nal Ass e m b ly o f State Arts Ag e n c i es Wa s h i n g t o n , D C

Toward a national conference in Austin that will focus on research, programs and policies that enable the arts to contribute to economic recovery, educational excellence and community vitality Rive r Pe rfo rm i n g an d Vi sual Arts C e nte r Houston, TX

Toward barrier-free, multisensory arts enrichment programs for children with disabilities, chronic illnesses or economic disadvantages

Total — Other

total arts

&

culture

$

195,000

$

17,299,500

29


Improving opportunities for more students to complete college Students study and learn at Mirabeau B. Lamar High School

30


education Effective Leadership Governance

$

Public Education Leadership

$

Highly Qualified Teachers

$

335,000 3,990,000 1,210,000

32%

Program Innovation Early Childhood Education

$

Middle School

$

College Preparation and Enrollment

$

Community and Open-Admission Colleges

$

Other

$

Jesse H. and Mary Gibbs Jones Scholars Program

$

Other

$

850,000 358,000 1,100,000 2,588,600 130,000 5,827,178 5,801,000

Total

$

22,189,778

31


g Co llabo r ative fo r Ch i ld ren Almost half the children in Houston’s Sunnyside neighborhood live in poverty; only one-third of the adults have a high school diploma. Prospects ordinarily would be dim for these children; in neighborhoods with similar conditions, many kids do not finish high school. However, through ‘College Bound from Birth’ (CBfB)—a comprehensive, neighborhood-based program— Collaborative for Children (CC) is improving children’s chances in Sunnyside. “When children don’t get what they need during their first years, they reach kindergarten behind and very rarely

education

catch up,” says Carol Shattuck, executive director of CC. “We’re trying to make sure children in very low-income neighborhoods have what they need at the beginning.” In collaboration with 17 partner organizations, CBfB focuses on early education, family support and expanding access to health care to help ensure that children are ready for school by kindergarten, that they are reading and math literate by third grade and that they ultimately graduate from high school and go to college. “Our focus has been more on childcare providers because they have the least resources,” explains Shattuck. “We take caregivers from Sunnyside to accredited facilities and show them what’s possible in an early childhood program. We teach them about early brain development and how to interact with young children. Instead of thinking of themselves as caretakers who only change diapers and feed children, they now see themselves as teachers who can help children develop and grow.” Before CBfB’s intervention, 57 percent of the participating Sunnyside childcare programs were rated “Inadequate.” None were rated “Good.” Now almost 60 percent are rated “Good.” In addition to helping children become ready for school, childcare center staff and CBfB experts partner with families and help them understand the importance of talking to, reading to and playing with their children. CBfB also helps parents with information about labor and delivery, newborn care, nutrition and financial planning. When necessary, CBfB partners with crisis management and job training services so families are able to provide a nurturing home for their children. CBfB also makes sure children are connected with a primary care physician. CBfB health care “navigators” help families with the registration and renewal of Medicaid and CHIP services, guide them through health care systems and show them how to make and keep appointments. CBfB is influencing the lives of more than 900 young children living in Sunnyside. Shattuck says, “If we don’t take action at the beginning of children’s lives, we’ll have a future where they will not be able to get the education they need to be successful. As a result, Houston and Texas will be poorer and less competitive.” She adds, “We want all children to walk across the stage, get their high school diploma and go on to college. We want them to be lifelong learners who have the skills to change our world for the better.”

32


education

Natasha Bogney at Kandy Stripe Academy helps children in the licensed childcare center build their vocabulary, understand their world and prepare for a successful education

We teach them about early brain development and how to interact with young children. 33


education Education Pioneers graduate and YES Prep Gulfton school director Andy Goldin stands by a hallway chart acknowledging students each week who receive no demerits, attend school and turn in homework every day

We are in the leadership development business.

34


g Educ ati o n Pi o n eer s I n c . Education Pioneers Inc. (EP) provides talented, skilled leaders for school districts, schools and organizations that help students succeed. The need for them is urgent: Approximately half of the ninth graders in most area schools will not graduate from high school. “If we’re going to make transformative changes in education, we must have extraordinary leaders to push that change forward,” says Ann Ziker, executive director of EP in Houston. “We need to increase the supply of highly qualified people who are performance minded, driven by results and have a EP recruits people in the process of making career choices, primarily those who are earning a graduate degree or who have finished a graduate program within the past couple of years. “Our program is open to applicants with any imaginable background,” explains Ziker. “We’re competing for talent that the education sector has historically lost.” EP is beating the competition. It accepted only the top 12 percent of those who applied to participate in the 10week intensive summer fellowship that in 2010 placed 20 interns in Houston area organizations

education

thirst for change. We are in the leadership development business.”

that support schools. Ziker says, “The interns lead projects with specific deliverables. They also attend a series of leadership development workshops that teach them about what’s going on in the field of education and that offer coaching and feedback so they can grow and develop through the program.” EP focuses more on administration and systems innovation than it does on the classroom. One participant leveraged her background in marketing, sales and communication to improve the way a school system presented food in the cafeteria to students. “She realized healthy children with healthy bodies are an important part of creating healthy learners,” says Ziker. “She tackled the obesity epidemic.” Andy Goldin, an EP participant with a business degree, finished the program, became a school director and successfully drew on his training to more effectively manage facilities, staff and budgets. “Those are not things we have historically trained teachers to do,” says Ziker. “It takes more than great teachers to build a thriving school system. We’re building a pipeline and helping people launch their careers as leaders in this sector by providing them with the support and tools they need.” She adds, “EP focuses on building organizations that contribute to the success of systems and that help transform the performance of schools that have not served low-income kids well in the past. We hope the work our interns and graduates do cascades down to schools so a much higher percentage of our kids complete high school and are positioned to go to college.”

35


g Co lleg e fo r All Te xan s Fou n dati o n Hispanics and blacks in Texas enroll in the state’s colleges and universities at lower rates than white students, yet together they account for a larger portion of the overall population. As Texas’s minority population increases, the percentage of students enrolled in higher education will fall from 5 percent to 4.6 percent by 2015 if action is not taken. Fewer higher education degrees and certificates earned will result in a workforce less capable of participating in the technology-dependent and knowledge-based economy that is increasingly the norm, relegating

education

workers to an economy unable to adequately sustain their larger numbers. Texas already lags behind other large states in the number of students who enroll in its colleges and universities (the national average is 5.4 percent), in degrees awarded, in federal research funding and in nationally recognized educational programs. In response, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board established the ‘Closing the Gaps’ plan in 2000 to address all four issues, including increasing the higher education enrollment rate to 5.7 percent by 2015. The College for All Texans Foundation raises private funds to help the Coordinating Board meet its goal of improving higher education and access to it. Research is essential to the effort. “The Texas Higher Education Policy Institute (THEPI) is the branch of the Coordinating Board that provides focused research on critical policy issues,” explains Dr. Raymund Paredes, commissioner of higher education. “Through the Institute, we have the capacity to conduct sustained research on critical education issues, to understand them clearly and to develop policies around the research.” He adds, “Being able to convert research into policy is rare.” The research does not sit on a shelf. For instance, THEPI has determined that reducing the number of courses offered to new students decreases confusion and encourages participation. Combining reading and writing classes in remedial courses for unprepared freshmen improves retention. Increasing faculty productivity and centralizing purchases through state systems reduces costs and ultimately tuition. “We identified areas where we can save up to $4 billion over the next four or five years assuming the measures we recommend are implemented,” says Paredes. “We could not have identified these savings without the Institute.” THEPI’s fact-based findings and recommendations are provided directly to members of the Texas Legislature and to the governor. The ‘Closing the Gaps’ plan fueled by THEPI research is working. “Our goal is to enroll 630,000 more students by 2015; right now we have about 480,000 more than when we began in 2000,” says Paredes. “Texas colleges and universities graduate about 180,000 a year, but our goal is 210,000, so the Institute is looking at how to improve retention and persistence toward obtaining a degree.” The potential benefits are enormous. Paredes says, “If we achieve our goals by 2015, more than one million new jobs will be created, tax revenues will increase by the billions, Texas will be much stronger, more appealing and more competitive, and the quality of life will improve for just

36

about everyone.”


education

The ‘Closing the Gaps’ plan helps increase higher education enrollment and graduation rates

Being able to convert research into policy is rare. 37


grantee + purpose

year approved

2010 allocation

total grant

Effective Leadership–Governance Assoc iati o n o f Gove rn i n g Boards o f U n ive r s iti es an d Co lleg es Wa s h i n g t o n , D C

Toward improving college and university governance in Texas through educational programs for regents, trustees, presidents, chancellors and senior administrators

2008

$

30,000 $

10,000

C e nte r fo r Re fo rm o f Sc h oo l Syste m s I n c . Houston, TX

Toward a four-day intensive induction program for new school board members, and toward follow-up programs for previously trained, sitting board members

2010

250,000

125,000

2010

200,000

200,000

Th e U n ive r s it y o f Te x as at Austi n Au s t i n , T X

Toward training community college board members in good governance practices and student success initiatives through the Board of Trustees Institute

335,000

150,000 $

150,000

Effective Leadership–Public Education Leadership E duc ati o n Pi o n e e r s I n c . Oak l a n d , C A

Toward attracting talented graduate students to careers in public education through summer fellowships in Houston area public schools and education reform organizations

2009

Toward attracting talented graduate students to careers in public education through summer fellowships in Houston area public schools and education reform organizations

2010

300,000

0

2010

25,000

25,000

Toward tuition reimbursement to encourage Master of Business Administration and Education Entrepreneurship graduates to seek full-time employment in Houston’s low-performing schools

2007

2,960,000

2,960,000

Toward initiating a Master of Business Administration and Education Entrepreneurship degree program and two other advanced certificate programs to train and credential principals to create and lead successful schools

2007

4,240,000

730,000

2010

100,000

100,000

2010

50,000

25,000

$

education

$

Total — Effective Leadership–Governance

National Association of E le m e ntary School Pri nci pals Fou n dation A l e xa n d r i a , VA

Toward a national conference in Houston for pre-K through eighth grade school leaders Ri c e U n ive r s it y Houston, TX

S pri n g B r an c h E duc ati o n Fou n dati o n Houston, TX

Toward developing campus-based case studies to help principals learn how to effectively manage complex enterprises Te x as I n stitute fo r E duc ati o n Re fo rm Au s t i n , T X

Toward research to sustain and advance standards-based reforms in Texas’s public schools

Total — Effective Leadership–Public Education Leadership

$

3,990,000

10,000 $

10,000

Effective Leadership–Highly Qualified Teachers Co m m u n iti es Fou n dati o n o f Te x as I n c . Da l l a s , T X

Toward a symposium of teacher quality and effectiveness

2010

$

39


grantee + purpose

year approved

2010 allocation

total grant

Th e N e w Te ac h e r Proj ect, I n c . B r o o k ly n , NY

Toward reviewing Houston ISD’s human resources infrastructure, policies and practices to improve the district’s ability to recruit, place and retain effective teachers in every classroom

2010

200,000

200,000

2008

450,000

150,000

2008

2,800,000

850,000

Te ac h fo r Am e ri c a I n c . Houston, TX

Toward recruiting, training and placing outstanding teachers in Houston’s low-income, inner-city schools, and toward strengthening programs that encourage area alumni to assume leadership positions in public schools U n ive r s it y o f H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward improving teacher preparation programs by sponsoring research and development activities at Texas universities through the Center for Research, Evaluation and Advancement of Teacher Education (CREATE)

education

$

1,210,000

1,700,000 $

850,000

$

850,000

250,000 $

250,000

108,000

108,000

Total — Effective Leadership–Highly Qualified Teachers Program Innovation–Early Childhood Education Co ll abo r ative fo r C h i ld re n Houston, TX

Toward programs that help young children succeed in school and in life, and toward ‘College Bound from Birth,’ a multi-year, neighborhood-based project to increase high school graduation rates and college attendance through programs that support families, caregivers and teachers and that provide children with access to health care

2010

$

Total — Program Innovation–Early Childhood Education Program Innovation–Middle School H ousto n I n d e pe n d e nt Sc h oo l D i stri ct Fou n dati o n Houston, TX

Toward developing, coordinating and implementing a large-scale tutoring program in four high schools and five middle schools

2010

$

Te x as A&M Fou n dati o n C o l l e g e S tat i o n , T X

Toward establishing a consortium of local school districts to investigate and define challenges to middle school student performance

2010

$

358,000

225,000 $

75,000

2008

225,000

75,000

2008

225,000

75,000

Total — Program Innovation–Middle School Program Innovation–College Preparation and Enrollment Ald i n e I n d e pe n d e nt Sc h oo l D i stri ct Houston, TX

Toward ‘Preparing to Dream,’ a program to encourage students to enroll and succeed in college

2008

$

Cypress-Fai rban k s I n d e pe n d e nt Sc h oo l D i stri ct Houston, TX

Toward ‘Preparing to Dream,’ a program to encourage students to enroll and succeed in college Goos e C re e k Co n so li date d I n d e pe n d e nt Sc h oo l D i stri ct B ay t ow n , T X

40

Toward ‘Preparing to Dream,’ a program to encourage students to enroll and succeed in college


grantee + purpose

year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

2010

15,000

0

2008

225,000

75,000

2008

30,000

10,000

2007

2,290,000

515,000

2008

225,000

75,000

2008

600,000

200,000

H ousto n H i s pan i c Fo ru m Houston, TX

Toward Career and Education Day, a free daylong event that provides students and parents with information about college admission, financial aid and careers H ousto n I n d e pe n d e nt Sc h oo l D i stri ct Houston, TX

Toward ‘Preparing to Dream,’ a program to encourage students to enroll and succeed in college Li n da Lo re lle Sc h o l ar s h i p Fu n d I n c . Houston, TX

Toward a conference to help Houston area students successfully apply for college admission and financial aid Nati o nal Co lleg e Acc ess N et wo rk I n c . Wa s h i n g t o n , D C

Toward ‘Preparing to Dream,’ a program to help five Houston area school districts implement strategies that encourage motivated, academically capable, low-income students to enroll and succeed in college Houston, TX

Toward ‘Preparing to Dream,’ a program to encourage students to enroll and succeed in college Th e U n ive r s it y o f Te x as at Austi n Au s t i n , T X

Toward improving college access and success through a study that supplies information to schools and school districts about the college attendance of their high school graduates

Total — P  rogram Innovation–College Preparation and Enrollment

$

1,100,000

400,000 $

74,000

2007

400,000

91,000

2008

1,912,500

637,500

2007

400,000

67,500

2010

100,000

100,000

2009

20,000

20,000

2009

20,000

20,000

education

S pri n g B r an c h I n d e pe n d e nt Sc h oo l D i stri ct

Program Innovation–Community and Open-Admission Colleges Alvi n Co m m u n it y Co lleg e A lv i n , T X

Toward improving student success by implementing ‘Achieving the Dream’ strategies

2007

$

B r a zos po rt Co lleg e Lak e Jack s o n , T X

Toward improving student success by implementing ‘Achieving the Dream’ strategies Co lleg e fo r All Te x an s Fou n dati o n : C los i n g th e Gaps Au s t i n , T X

Toward the Texas Higher Education Policy Institute of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board to conduct research on, and disseminate information about, practices that lead to higher levels of student success in Texas’s community colleges and universities Co lleg e o f th e Mai n l an d T e xa s C i t y, T X

Toward improving student success by implementing ‘Achieving the Dream’ strategies Co m m u n iti es Fou n dati o n o f Te x as I n c . Da l l a s , T X

Toward an analysis of college access and completion programs in Houston and Texas Galvesto n Co m m u n it y Co lleg e G a lv e s t o n , T X

Toward improving student success by implementing ‘Achieving the Dream’ strategies H ousto n Co m m u n it y Co lleg e Syste m Houston, TX

Toward improving student success by implementing ‘Achieving the Dream’ strategies

41


grantee + purpose

year approved

2010 allocation

total grant

Le e Co lleg e B ay t ow n , T X

2007

400,000

76,000

2007

400,000

100,000

2007

400,000

100,000

2007

400,000

100,000

Toward improving student success by implementing ‘Achieving the Dream’ strategies

2007

400,000

100,000

Toward developing the Urban Academic Village, a pilot project to improve student engagement, retention and success

2010

2,740,000

0

2008

400,000

100,000

2007

400,000

100,000

Toward infrastructure and support for ‘Achieving the Dream,’ a unified approach to improving student success at seven community college systems and four universities in the greater Houston area

2006

4,500,000

673,000

Toward infrastructure and support for ‘‘Achieving the Dream,’ a unified approach to improving student success at seven community colleges and four universities in the greater Houston area

2007

550,000

104,600

Toward disseminating results from a longitudinal study that identifies the educational aspirations, challenges and needs of high school seniors and first-year community college students

2010

25,000

25,000

2007

400,000

100,000

Toward improving student success by implementing ‘Achieving the Dream’ strategies Lo n e Star Co lleg e Syste m Th e W o o d l a n d s , T X

Toward improving student success by implementing ‘Achieving the Dream’ strategies Pr ai ri e Vi e w A&M U n ive r s it y P r a i r i e V i e w, T X

Toward improving student success by implementing ‘Achieving the Dream’ strategies San Jac i nto Co lleg e D i stri ct Pa s ad e n a , T X

Toward improving student success by implementing ‘Achieving the Dream’ strategies Te x as South e rn U n ive r s it y Houston, TX

education

U n ive r s it y o f H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward expanding ‘Achieving the Dream,’ a unified approach to improving student success at seven community college systems and four universities in the greater Houston area U n ive r s it y o f H ousto n-Downtown Houston, TX

Toward improving student success by implementing ‘Achieving the Dream’ strategies Th e U n ive r s it y o f Te x as at Austi n Au s t i n , T X

Wharto n Cou nt y J u n i o r Co lleg e Wha r t o n , T X

Toward improving student success by implementing ‘Achieving the Dream’ strategies

Total — P  rogram Innovation–Community and Open-Admission Colleges

42

$

2,588,600


grantee + purpose

year approved

2010 allocation

total grant

Program Innovation–Other MIND Res e arc h I n stitute Sa n ta A n a , C A

Toward improving elementary and middle school student performance in math by implementing a supplemental instruction software program in Houston area schools

2010

$

100,000 $

100,000

Th o mas B . Fo rd ham I n stitute Wa s h i n g t o n , D C

Toward a study to investigate and document conditions needed to build and sustain meaningful public school system reform in Houston and in other large cities

2010

30,000

30,000 $

130,000

$

5,827,178

$

5,827,178

250,000 $

250,000

Total — Program Innovation–Other Jesse H. and Mary Gibbs Jones Scholars Program J ess e H . an d Mary G i bbs Jo n es Sc h o l ar s Prog r am Houston, TX

2010

$

5,827,178

Total — Jesse H. and Mary Gibbs Jones Scholars Program Other Fre d e ri c k s bu rg E duc ati o n I n itiative I n c . F r e d e r i ck s b u r g , T X

Toward placing a project-based aerospace and rocketry course into more Houston area high schools

2009

$

education

Toward college and university scholarships for graduating Harris County high school seniors

H ousto n Bap ti st U n ive r s it y Houston, TX

Toward upgrading the information technology system to accommodate current operations and future growth

2010

1,500,000

0

Toward the Leadership Institute for Nonprofit Executives to train nonprofit leaders in organizational, financial and strategic management practices

2007

85,000

30,000

Toward placing Leadership Rice students in summer internships at nonprofit organizations in the greater Houston area

2010

42,000

21,000

Toward developing and administering a local survey to explore the public’s perspectives about the arts, education and health, and toward a national conference to review the results and launch future annual surveys

2010

475,000

475,000

Toward preparing undergraduate students for management positions in nonprofit organizations through the American Humanics Nonprofit Certificate Program

2008

75,000

25,000

Toward becoming a nationally recognized research university by implementing strategies that increase the number of students earning Ph.D. degrees

2010

5,000,000

5,000,000

Ri c e U n ive r s it y Houston, TX

U n ive r s it y o f H ousto n Houston, TX

Total — Other

$

5,801,000

total education

$

22,189,778 43


Jesse H. and Mary Gibbs Jones

s c h o la r s P r o g r a m 2010 g education

In 2010, 323 graduates from high schools in the greater Houston area were selected as Jones Scholars. Houston Endowment established the Jesse H. and Mary Gibbs Jones Scholars Program in 1958, when it gave $2,000 scholarships to graduating seniors in high schools in the Houston Independent School District. The program later grew to include all Harris County school districts, and Jones Scholars are now eligible to receive up to $16,000 in scholarship funds toward a baccalaureate degree. Jones Scholars are nominated by each high school, and a Rotary Club of Houston committee makes final selections based on academic achievement, economic need, leadership skills, community service and character. Although Houston Endowment furnishes the funds, it does not accept applications or select Jones Scholars. Seniors in all participating high schools in Harris County can apply at their school to become a Jones Scholar. Since the program’s inception, 10,181 area students have been named Jones Scholars. While universities in Texas have attracted the largest number, Jones Scholars have matriculated at approximately 350 schools throughout the nation, have pursued careers in fields of every endeavor and have enhanced life in the communities where they live.

44


Aldine Independent School District Aldine High School

Rosalio Ayala Evelyn V. Hernandez Jessica Orobio My Nga T. Vo George W. Carver High School

An T. Nguyen Paul H. Uy

Jimmy J. Gomez José L. Manríquez Anna S. Nyakwol Ivania B. Rivas Hall Education Center

Ashlie N. Cantu Douglas MacArthur High School

Erik Menera Erica L. Morales Priscilla Nguyen Ursula Nguyen Chester W. Nimitz High School

Kaitlin E. Barnes Sharifa Z. Callender Skyesha F. DeGrasse Alejandra Europa Alief Independent School District Alief Elsik High School

Antonio Hernandez Harika Medi Vania N. Nwokolo Azizat A. Ojelade Ernest L. Owens Alief Hastings High School

Tolani A. Are Bianca A. Bamgbade Nhu-Thuy T. Do Di P. Huynh Celenia Y. Lara

Cypress-Fairbanks Independent School District Cy-Fair High School

Alief Taylor High School

Joseph Y. Kwan Michael V. Nguyen Tieu-Nha T. Nguyen

Ryan J. Efaw Audrey C. Lee Michael Tran Rachel L. Walker

Channelview Independent School District

Cypress Creek High School

Channelview High School

Kyrsten E. Bunck Eric T. Chin Mansi S. Upadhyay Andrew J. Yi

Anthony D. Nutt Jose A. Reyna Takeya S. Stelly Clear Creek Independent School District Clear Brook High School

Cody J. Adams Andrew L. Kocen Ryan P. Sweezey Clear Creek High School

Benjamin L. Berezin Anda C. Brown Catherine J. Uong Clear Lake High School

Aakash D. Batra Michael S. Chang Meagan A. John Jenny M. Le Vikraman Parthiban Clear Springs High School

Tanzie A. Judge Robert E. Pritchett Peter T. Vu Crosby Independent School District Crosby High School

Julie B. Burns Cortney C. Nelson

Cypress Falls High School

Hanan K. Loubani Jonathan M. Matar Victoria A. Middleton Joanne Neira Chandani V. Patel

education

Dwight D. Eisenhower High School

Alief Kerr High School

Thien C. Nguyen

Cypress Ridge High School

Namrata S. Daru Zachary A. Fojtik Thien-An H. Nguyen Chau N. Truong Cypress Springs High School

Andy Fan Ariana L. Kalziqi Diana M. Lainez Stephanie S. Martinez Andrew A. Wilson Cypress Woods High School

Jordan E. Buckley Ashley Chan ParxAnn M. Counts Joshua P. Kohlschmidt Sairam B. Krishnan Sophia T. Nguyen Cameron T. Pavloske

45


Jersey Village High School

Robert E. Lee High School

Jefferson Davis High School

Lauren E. Filaroska Paramjit K. Gill Xuan Hanh T. Lam Veronica K. Tverbakk

Sherla O. Edmeade Tara M. Kennedy Corey M. Reel

Diamantina Espinosa Juan L. Flores Nina K. Lopez Karen S. Sanchez

Langham Creek High School

Johnny Lagunas Austin R. Shaver Nygel J. Wallace

Ross S. Sterling High School

education

Khubyar P. Behramsha Dalton P. Dinderman Jude A. Gonsalves Maria N. Ton Brandon J. Wang Windfern High School

Lance R. Harper Amanda P. Ney

E. L. Furr High School

Stephen F. Austin High School

Victor A. Cardenas Brent L. Staples

Homero Benavides Kimberly S. De Leon Yeymi Gomez Cristian Morales Gonzalo Perez

Deer Park High School

Bellaire High School

–South Campus

Mahlette Mammo Mengwei Ni Lingyi Peng Annirudh S. Prasad Zhuyi (Judy) Sun Shengzhou Tan Alice L. Turski Marysuna Wilkerson

Galena Park Independent School District Galena Park High School

Angela Diaz Guadalupe Torres North Shore High School

Cynthia Alejandre Gabriela Diaz Gloriana Gonzalez Nirvana A. Ramtahal Erika L. Rivera Nataly Torres Goose Creek Consolidated Independent School District Goose Creek Memorial High School

Yobani Lopez Candice M. Thompson 46

Houston Independent School District

Deer Park Independent School District

Shea L. Elliott Nadia N. Hartley Tyler N. Jenkins Alexcis R. Mendoza Jack F. Reed

DeBakey High School for Health Professions

Brian T. Duong Ya-Chun Lin

Carnegie Vanguard High School

Tatyana Moraczewski Chavez High School

Yesenia F. Estrada Briseida Gamez Mariela Gaona Martin G. Guevara Sonia Guevara Amanda Meza Contemporary Learning Center

Jardi D. Barrera Jose L. Hernandez

High School for Law Enforcement

Jessenia L. Sosa High School for the Performing & Visual Arts

Matthew A. Jamison Maya R. Sederholm Sam Houston High School

Felix O. Aguirre Elizabet Arroyo Jose I. Arroyo Yessenia Perales Gabriela R. Ramirez Jesse H. Jones High School

Tametria C. Brown Barbara Jordan High School for Careers

Sarai Camarillo Alma Lorena De Leon Noelia Garcia Kashmere High School

Darius D. Wilborn


Mirabeau B. Lamar High School

Ross S. Sterling High School

Huffman Independent School District

Zuhdi E. Abdo Yaribey Clavel-Lobaina Yesenia Flores Michelle K. Gilhousen MaiLing M. Matthews Wilber G. Rodriguez Demetria D. White

Genevia L. Hawkins Edgar Moreno-Rodriguez

Jeffrey L. Campbell

S. P. Waltrip High School

Humble Independent School District

Nicholas R. Arcos Jaqueline A. DeLeon Ky’erra M. Dorsey Marcely Hernandez

Robert E. Lee Senior High School

James Madison High School

Kanavis J. Alston Oscar A. Carranza Gabriela Gil Silvia V. Méndez Erica R. Oliver Charles H. Milby High School

Anna L. Castro Juan M. Corona Carlos A. Favela Coral Rios Joseph S. Warchesik Reach Charter High School

Booker T. Washington High School

Chelsea S. Jackson Simone B. Washington Westbury High School

Daniel E. Faerman Karla M. Hercules Zaynab B. Muhammad Elizabeth T. Olorunsogo Anngelica T. Taylor Westside High School

Jonathan E. Gentsch Niloufar Hafizi Isadora Italia Edward Lee Alexander G. Michael Andrew E. Oriani Emily M. Rains

Laura Real Phillis Wheatley High School John H. Reagan High School

Javier Hernandez David Moctezuma Lynn T. Phan Vianey Rangel G. C. Scarborough High School

Reynaldo Ortiz Mirna M. Ovalle Sharpstown High School

Chikamuche T. Anyanwu Ijeoma O. Anyanwu Dan Fernandez

Megan S. Byrd Escat Jimenez Leon Reginauld Raglin Evan E. Worthing High School

Xavion D. Brown Delisha C. Ford Jack Yates High School

Kaylon B. Beck Chardai R. Thomas

Atascocita High School

Alexander M. Bohn Brianna K. Castle Paige C. Dickerson Sharmin N. Rahman Kellie R. Wright Humble High School

Martin E. Felder Jessica Menchaca Ozoemena T. Nnamadim Jeric S. Reynolds Kingwood High School

education

Roger S. Hung Sonia Lopez Quan M. Nguyen

Willie J. Hargrave High School

Andrew D. Ayala Elizabeth M. Brewer Elizabeth R. Chechak Charles C. Purgahn Katy Independent School District Cinco Ranch High School

Sharmita Bhattacharya Andrew W. Edelman Wenjun Ge Stephanie J. Hufnagel Katy High School

Travis J. Cook Jonathon D. Fisher Nicholas P. Peltz Matthew S. Perry Mayde Creek High School

Sarah K. Kotlar Andrew F. Mowrey Ivette N. Ramirez Morton Ranch High School

Nadia S.I. Kalley George B. Leal Thanh Ly Maríajosé Rosales

47


Seven Lakes High School

North Forest Independent School District

Spring High School

Andrew P. Golding Kelsey J. Mitsdarffer Reid L. Rabalais Courtney D. Ursery

North Forest High School

Maxwell J. Flagge Lauren S. Harrison Devin R. Salazar Jonathon R. Shasteen

James E. Taylor High School

Lindsay K. Langford Ellen Liu Kevin A. Maurin

education

Klein Independent School District

Pasadena Independent School District J. Frank Dobie High School

Westfield High School

Nirali M. Desai Kiara A. Harris Bridgette P. Jagdeo Jisha Jose Jonathan Lo

Nancy A. Do Terry B. Lam Stacey Y. Loi

Klein High School

Emily E. Anderson Alain Castellanos Adam H. Chu Alexander K. Nguyen Francis L. Vu Klein Collins High School

Alicia K. Brighton Joseph M. Goodwin Ashley V. Irving Clayton W. Smith Lindy T. Truong Klein Forest High School

Josephine N. Do Zhen Quen Ng Luc S. Nguyen Kaitlyn M. Philo Jose A. Valladares Klein Oak High School

William J. Gardner Renee H. Lai Mathew M. Peterson Alexa H. Samuel Muhammad W. Sheikh La Porte Independent School District La Porte High School

Edgar Estrada Mayra A. Gutierrez Heather L. Prigmore 48

Joseph E. Frilot Kadeen E. Lyons

Pasadena High School

Juan L. Rodriguez Amy M. Story My N. Tang Pasadena Memorial High School

Jake J. Bailey Annette M. Isidori Rayven J. Moore Trang T. Nguyen Sam Rayburn High School

Pavel A. Baez Ezequiel Calderon, Jr. Crystal N. Niermann South Houston High School

Hoang N. Luu Deyanira Sanchez Martina Vega Sheldon Independent School District C. E. King High School

Carl Wunsche High School

Samuel L. Mingo Eli Mondrag贸n Linda Tran Spring Branch Independent School District Memorial High School

Seong J. Hong Esther L. Jung Matthew V. Tran Northbrook High School

Anh T. Ngo Tania C. Sustaita Spring Woods High School

Christina C. Caballero Wendy M. Mejia Patricia B. Silva Stratford High School

April M. Rider Kristina E. Taylor Katherine A. Teeters

Allie S. Funderburk Mehwish Mahmood

Priscila C. Cevallos

Spring Independent School District

Tomball Independent School District

Westchester Academy

Dekaney High School

Tomball High School

Jacqueline Canales Roberto De Los Santos Kateri Perez

Sabrina G. Bosiacki Jessica C. Craige Lauren E. Murphey Avjot S. Sidhu


49


Cultivating a livable community with a healthy, sustainable environment The Houston Canoe Club enjoys Greens Bayou Corridor Coalition’s improvements to Greens Bayou

50


environment Parks

$

1,970,000

Air Quality

$

1,000,000

Water Quality

$

135,000

Energy Efficiency and Resource Usage

$

85,000

Natural Environment

$

2,005,000

Built Environment and Urban Development

$

325,000

Domestic Animals

$

65,000

Other

$

242,600

Total

$

5,827,600

8%

51 51


g Th e Natu re Co n servan c y o f Te xa s

environment 52

The Nash Prairie, only 50 miles southwest of Houston, is the most pristine remnant of coastal prairie in the United States. “It is globally significant,” says Jeff Weigel, director of strategic initiatives for The Nature Conservancy of Texas (TNCT). “We have wanted to protect it for 40 years; it has been on the top of our priority list. We were thrilled when we struck a deal with the owners—St. Mary’s Episcopal Church and the hospital district in West Columbia.” Both institutions maintained the land they had inherited as a hay meadow even after they realized the prairie was ecologically unique and significant. “Most remnant prairies can trace their preservation back to the tradition of keeping hay meadows to grow feed for livestock on farms,” explains Weigel. “Cutting hay and periodic fires are completely compatible with the preservation of plants and grasses because it removes the tops, not the roots. The owners realized that, and so they cut the hay only once or twice a year and preserved the native prairie.” As evidenced by what naturalists call “pimple mounds” in the bumpy topography, the land has never been plowed. More than 300 species of native plants and grasses—more than twice the number found on the most biologically diverse prairie remnants in Louisiana and Texas—grow on the Nash Prairie, making it a living museum, laboratory and seed bank. Seeds from the Nash Prairie are being used to restore prairie at the Armand Bayou Nature Center, the Brazos Bend State Park, the San Jacinto Battleground, the Gulf Coast Bird Observatory in Lake Jackson and the Aransas, Brazoria and San Bernard National Wildlife Refuges. Nash Prairie seeds are stored at Kew Gardens in London as part of the Millennium Seed Bank Project. In addition to restoring prairies, the seeds produce plants and grasses that use less water when they are grown in area lawns and gardens. “The plants evolved here and adapted to the local climate. They grow in wet years and in dry years,” says Weigel. The prairie today is green and flourishing even in the midst of the current drought. This is due to the deeply rooted vegetation that helps the land hold water: when it rains, the ditch that drains plowed fields on the opposite side of the road flows with water while the ditch next to the prairie remains dry. Healthy widespread prairies once prevented regional flooding, and with their preservation and restoration they could do so again. “Coastal prairie once blanketed huge areas and stretched from west Louisiana to beyond Corpus Christi,” says Weigel. “There are scattered remnants here and there, but the Nash Prairie is considered by the experts to be the best remaining example.” The Nash Prairie gives a glimpse of what Texas looked like before it was settled. TNCT protects ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people, and the Nash Prairie is no exception. It will soon be open to visitors as a preserve. Weigel says, “We’re at the starting line. We got the opportunity to protect the Nash Prairie, and now we are going to take care of it, just like the previous owners, who were stewards of the land, did before us.”


environment

Father Peter Conaty of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church and his wife, Susan, who recognized the value of the Nash Prairie and protected it, show a visitor (right) a “pimple mound”

It is globally significant.

53


environment Air Alliance Houston protects the public’s health by coordinating communication between industry and communities about events involving pollution

We want to remove the stigma and the dangers of dirty air from the Houston region.

54


g Ai r allian ce H ousto n Almost half of the nation’s oil and petrochemical production capacity comes from refineries and plants located in Harris County, according to Matthew Tejada, executive director of Air Alliance Houston (AAH). Coal plants, incinerators and the expanding Houston port with its increased movement of goods in trucks, trains, ships and airplanes add to the attendant

dial moves forward throughout the nation. Until you make it happen in Houston, you’re playing on the fringes.” AAH works to reduce pollution and improve public health through research, advocacy and education and by building productive relationships with communities, industry, policymakers and schoolchildren. In 2010 AAH’s interactive ‘Ozone Theater’ educated more than 6,200 students in 323 area elementary schools about pollution. AAH also “activates the idea of advocacy” in middle school children by making them aware of their power to act. “Showing these kids that they have a voice,

environment

pollution, producing a range of debilitating health problems associated with dirty air. Tejada says, “If we reduce pollution in Houston by linking air quality with people’s health, then the

that they can ask the football coach to hold practice indoors when they know it’s a high ozone day, is really a civics lesson,” says Tejada. AAH tackles air pollution on many fronts. For example, it works with local industries to help them understand the importance of notifying citizens about “pollution events.” Tejada says, “When something happens inside a facility, sensors pick it up, and computers send messages to plant managers and operators, but that message doesn’t leave the fence line. We’re working with the East Harris County Manufacturers Association to remove that roadblock. Communities can be immediately informed through their fire and police departments about an incident so they can act to protect their health. We hope to set up and replicate standards by which industry communicates to communities.” To keep everyone current about air quality, AAH is collaborating with the American Lung Association of the Central States to create a map accessible by smart phone that indicates dangerous areas of pollution. Using it as they would a weather map, people can make informed decisions about going outside. AAH is also coordinating a network of organizations that work along the Gulf Coast to protect health from environmental risks. Tejada says, “The area’s air is slowly getting cleaner, but we still have serious health problems and hot spots of air pollution, which beg us to be more coordinated in our approach. If a national organization needs local voices and support for an initiative, it can contact the network and have 20 organizations ready to act with a base of knowledge.” Tejada explains, “Our well-researched, well-reasoned approach to air pollution has opened doors to industry, government and communities. Whether people live in Bellaire or Galena Park, we want them to breath clean air and not to worry about their kids’ health. We want to remove the stigma and the dangers of dirty air from the Houston region.”

55


g U n iver sit y o f H ousto n

environment 56

The University of Houston’s Green Building Components (UHGBC) initiative at the Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture catalyzes collaboration within the architecture, engineering and construction industries to develop and commercialize environmentally beneficial building components and systems. The UHGBC reduces the energy used to manufacture traditional building materials by replacing them with innovative products that also ameliorate the environmental impact of constructing, renovating and operating buildings. “We tackle building components through sustainable and renewable product design, which has a farreaching effect when the components are developed and distributed—not just to architects, but to building owners, consumers and contractors,” says Joseph Meppelink, director of applied research at UH and the university’s point person in the UHGBC. “This is an applied research program with immense implications.” UHGBC requests proposals, primarily from UH faculty, for innovative products that have the potential for market success. Selected projects are developed with seed funding from UHGBC and with the help of partners from local industry and professional service firms. Since UHGBC began in 2008, seven of its 16 selected projects have been brought to market and are poised to provide services and improve the environment. For instance, to address the problem of all the discarded pallets and crating material left in villages after supplies have been delivered overseas to disaster victims, professors from UH and Prairie View A&M University developed shipping pallets for supplies that can be assembled afterward into temporary housing for those left homeless following natural and social disasters. Another team developed aluminum strips to cover the failing polymer gaskets that hold together the all-glass exterior curtain walls popular in 1980s buildings. Not only do the reinforcing strips make it unnecessary to remove all the glass and infrastructure when the gaskets fail, but they also provide new rails that can hold shading devices and solar panels. “The products we develop solve many problems,” explains Meppelink. The products also embody common sense. Rooftop solar panels can now be quickly installed by attaching them with four bolts to PV-Pods, which are hard plastic tanks of water that can hold panels in place even during high winds. The PV-Pod replaces expensive and intricate aluminum frames and concrete blocks, which can easily damage roofs, with a system that allows panel installation in minutes using only a garden hose, four bolts and a wrench. Powerlots, a large, graceful canopy that converts hot parking lots into solar and water collectors, provides outlets for plug-in electric vehicles even as it reduces the “heat island” effect associated with large expanses of concrete. In addition to their enormous environmental benefits, the commercialized UHGBC products make money for the university and its partners while boosting local employment. Meppelink says, “We’re an incubator that’s helping companies put sustainable technologies on the ground. We want to create products that respond to the needs of the 21st century, teach sustainable design to our students and create good jobs for the community.”


environment

The City of Houston purchased 17 Solar Powered Adaptive Container for Everyone (SPACE) portable units developed by UHGBC to use as emergency off-grid field offices for police and first responders and to provide power for recharging critical communication, medical and personal devices during hurricanes

The products we develop solve many problems. 57


grantee + purpose

year approved

2010 allocation

total grant

Parks Bu ffalo Bayou Partn e r s h i p Houston, TX

Toward acquiring land to connect existing parks and trails from Shepherd Drive to the Port of Houston Turning Basin

2008

$

1,500,000 $

500,000

G re e n s Bayou Co rri do r Coaliti o n Houston, TX

Toward a custom geographic information system platform to create multilayered, digitized maps depicting proposed enhancements to the Greens Bayou watershed, and toward developing the organization

2010

70,000

70,000

2008

1,500,000

500,000

2009

1,500,000

750,000

2008

225,000

75,000

2008

225,000

75,000

H e rman n Park Co n s e rvan cy Houston, TX

Toward implementing conservation, education, accessibility and user amenity improvements through the Green Pedestrian Trail project Houston, TX

Toward acquiring land and developing new parks along bayou corridors and in underserved neighborhoods M e m o rial Park Co n s e rvan cy I n c . Houston, TX

Toward improvements to the 1,500-acre park as indicated by the Conservation Master Plan SPARK Houston, TX

Toward constructing community parks on Houston’s public school campuses

$

1,970,000

300,000 $

150,000

2010

300,000

300,000

2010

600,000

300,000

2010

225,000

125,000

2010

125,000

125,000

Total — Parks

enviroment

H ousto n Park s Board

Air Quality Ai r Allian c e H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward reducing air pollution and protecting public health through community outreach, education and advocacy

2010

$

C it y o f H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward adding instruments to mobile air monitoring equipment to increase the detection and analysis of air toxins and particulate matter, and toward maintaining the equipment and training staff to operate it E nvi ro n m e ntal D e fe n s e Fu n d I n co rpo r ate d Au s t i n , T X

Toward ‘Clean Air for Houston,’ an initiative to reduce pollution from the Houston Ship Channel, in hot spot neighborhoods and from area school buses E nvi ro n m e ntal I nteg rit y Proj ect Wa s h i n g t o n , D C

Toward efforts to reduce air pollution from Houston area petrochemical plants Pu b li c C itiz e n Fou n dati o n , I n c . Au s t i n , T X

Toward ReEnergize Houston, an internship program at three area colleges to engage students in the transition toward a clean energy economy and the adoption of campus sustainability policies, and toward developing issue papers to inform Texas Sunset Commission members about state environmental agencies

Total — Air Quality

$

1,000,000

59


grantee + purpose

year approved

2010 allocation

total grant

Water Quality Bayou Pres e rvati o n Assoc iati o n , I n c . Houston, TX

Toward improving water quality, implementing a model stream restoration project, providing information about area bayous and watersheds and improving regional watershed management

2010

$

75,000 $

75,000

Legacy Lan d Trust I n c . Houston, TX

Toward permanently protecting land through conservation easements, particularly river and bayou corridors that feed into the Lake Houston watershed, and toward No Child Left Inside, an educational program for middle and high school science students

2010

200,000

0

2010

60,000

60,000

Te x as A&M Ag ri Li fe E x te n s i o n S e rvi c e , Te x as A&M U n ive r s it y Syste m C o l l e g e S tat i o n , T X

enviroment

Toward conserving water and creating wildlife habitat in Houston by promoting sustainable residential, commercial and community landscapes through the WaterSmart Web site and educational programs

$

135,000

85,000 $

85,000

Total — Water Quality Energy Efficiency and Resource Usage E nvi ro n m e nt Te x as Res e arc h an d Po li cy C e nte r I n c . Au s t i n , T X

Toward assessing Houston’s potential for adopting energy efficiency initiatives, toward training and placing college students in area environmental organizations and toward educating building professionals, policymakers and the public about the benefits of energy-efficient choices

2010

$

U n ive r s it y o f H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward the Green Building Components initiative, a program to design, develop and commercialize sustainable, renewable building components and systems for the architecture, engineering and construction industries

2010

0

400,000 $

85,000

50,000 $

50,000

Total — Energy Efficiency and Resource Usage Natural Environment Au du bo n Te x as Da l l a s , T X

Toward restoring quail and other bird populations by preserving grasslands and habitat in the greater Houston area

2010

$

Th e Co n s e rvati o n Fu n d A N o n pro fit Co rpo r ati o n A r l i n g t o n , VA

Toward conservation programs in the greater Houston area

2009

100,000

50,000

2008

225,000

75,000

2010

150,000

75,000

2010

10,000

10,000

Galvesto n Bay Fou n dati o n Webster, TX

Toward preserving, protecting and enhancing Galveston Bay through advocacy, conservation, education and research G u lf Coast B i rd Obs e rvato ry I n c . Lak e Jack s o n , T X

Toward protecting birds and their habitats around the Gulf of Mexico 60

HawkWatc h I nte rnati o nal I n c . Sa lt Lak e C i t y, UT

Toward researching and monitoring migratory raptors at Smith Point in Galveston Bay


grantee + purpose

year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

2010

200,000

100,000

2010

400,000

200,000

2010

1,000,000

1,000,000

2010

50,000

50,000

2008

175,000

75,000

2009

250,000

100,000

2010

500,000

0

2008

70,000

30,000

2008

225,000

75,000

2010

50,000

0

2010

75,000

75,000

2010

40,000

40,000

H ousto n Arbo retu m & Natu re C e nte r Houston, TX

Toward protecting and enhancing the 155-acre urban nature sanctuary and educating people about the environment H ousto n Wi ld e rn ess I n c . Houston, TX

Toward the ‘Partners in Conservation Initiative,’ a project to secure state and federal funds to support public-private conservation partnerships in greater Houston K at y Pr ai ri e Co n s e rvan cy Houston, TX

Toward permanently securing 500 acres of the Warren Ranch as part of the Conservancy’s effort to protect the Katy Prairie’s coastal prairie ecosystem Lan d Trust Allian c e I n co rpo r ate d Wa s h i n g t o n , D C

Legacy Lan d Trust I n c . Houston, TX

Toward expanding educational programs and permanently protecting land through conservation easements Nati o nal Fi s h an d Wi ld li fe Fou n dati o n Wa s h i n g t o n , D C

Toward increasing the Attwater’s prairie chicken population in Texas from 75 to 1,000 by 2018

enviroment

Toward increasing local conservation and building organizational capacity by helping area land trusts prepare for accreditation through the Land Trust Accreditation Commission

Th e Natu re Co n s e rvan cy o f Te x as Sa n A n t o n i o , T X

Toward purchasing the Nash Prairie in Brazoria County, the most pristine remnant of the region’s coastal prairie ecosystem, and toward establishing the property as a reserve Th e Natu re D i scove ry C e nte r I n c . Bell aire, TX

Toward improving traveling exhibitions presented in science education programs in Houston area schools Stu d e nt Co n s e rvati o n Assoc iati o n , I n c . C ha r l e s t ow n , N H

Toward recruiting, training and placing students to work with Houston area government agencies and nonprofit organizations as interns on conservation projects, and toward expanding the program to include City of Houston recreation centers and parks Te x as Lan d Co n s e rvan cy Au s t i n , T X

Toward a land stewardship director to conduct outreach, evaluate projects and monitor and manage protected properties in greater Houston Te x as Ri c e I n dustry Coaliti o n fo r th e E nvi ro n m e nt Pi erce , TX

Toward constructing freshwater wetlands in the Anahuac and Brazoria National Wildlife Refuges Tu rtle I s l an d Resto r ati o n N et wo rk Houston, TX

Toward conservation and educational programs to protect the endangered Kemp’s ridley sea turtle and other turtles in the Gulf of Mexico

Total — Natural Environment

$

2,005,000 61


grantee + purpose

year approved

2010 allocation

total grant

Built Environment and Urban Development C e nte r fo r H ousto n ’s Futu re I n c . Houston, TX

Toward identifying critical regional issues and solutions

2008

$

150,000 $

75,000

H ousto n To m o rrow Houston, TX

Toward generating and distributing information about, and analysis of, regional urban planning, land use, transportation and sustainability efforts

2008

250,000

100,000

Toward generating and distributing information about, and analysis of, regional urban planning, land use, transportation and sustainability efforts

2010

200,000

0

Toward expanding the organization’s scope, reach and influence and improving its ability to generate and distribute information about, and analysis of, regional urban planning, land use, transportation and sustainability efforts

2010

200,000

0

2010

75,000

0

2008

225,000

75,000

2008

225,000

75,000

Nati o nal Ac ad e my o f Sc i e n c es

enviroment

Wa s h i n g t o n , D C

Toward a two-day workshop in Houston to help local public, private, nonprofit and academic stakeholders identify and implement strategies and resources that support sustainable urban development Sc e n i c Te x as , I n c . Houston, TX

Toward enhancing the appearance of streets, thoroughfares and highways through public policy analysis, landscaping and tree preservation U rban Harvest I n c . Houston, TX

Toward creating and maintaining gardens, orchards and wildlife habitat, and toward presenting educational programs

$

325,000

25,000 $

25,000

Total — Built Environment and Urban Development Domestic Animals C itiz e n s fo r An i mal Protecti o n I n c . Houston, TX

Toward shelter and adoption services for neglected, abused and homeless animals, and toward educational programs that promote responsible pet ownership

2010

$

H ousto n H u man e Soc i et y Houston, TX

Toward operating a full-service animal adoption and care facility and eliminating animal cruelty and overpopulation

2010

50,000

0

2009

80,000

40,000

S pay-N eute r Ass i stan c e Prog r am I n c . Houston, TX

Toward a mobile clinic that provides free sterilization to dogs and cats that belong to low-income families

Total — Domestic Animals

62

$

65,000


grantee + purpose

year approved

2010 allocation

total grant

Other Baylo r Co lleg e o f M e d i c i n e Houston, TX

Toward improving public health through community outreach about environmental health hazards and educational programs for health care professionals about the effects of exposure to environmental toxins

2008

$

300,000 $

100,000

C itiz e n s’ E nvi ro n m e ntal Coaliti o n E duc ati o nal Fu n d Houston, TX

Toward a coalition of organizations that provides education and information about greater Houston environmental concerns

2010

30,000

30,000

2010

50,000

50,000

2010

50,000

50,000

2010

12,600

12,600

E nvi ro n m e ntal Su ppo rt C e nte r I n c . Wa s h i n g t o n , D C

Toward capacity-building services for small to mid-size environmental organizations in the greater Houston area Houston, TX

Toward reducing urban blight through neighborhood cleanup projects and community education programs M osai c a I n c . Wa s h i n g t o n , D C

Toward providing capacity-building assistance to Talento Bilingue de Houston for its ‘Planeta Verde Now’ project, an initiative that uses culturally specific art activities to build a conservation ethic among Latinos in greater Houston

Total — Other

$

242,600

total environment

$

5,827,600

enviroment

H ousto n C le an C it y Co m m i ss i o n I n c .

63


Advancing prevention, wellness and access to primary care A mother and child benefit from support services at the Santa Maria Hostel

64


health Prevention

$

2,807,000

Child and Adolescent Health

$

215,000

Primary Care

$

5,362,000

Organizational Effectiveness

$

2,415,000

Other

$

1,360,000

Total

$

12,159,000

17%

65 65


g A sian Am eri c an H e alth Coaliti o n o f th e G re ater H ousto n Are a

health 66

The Asian American Health Coalition of the Greater Houston Area offers health care services in 14 languages at the Hope Clinic in southwest Houston. “Houston has the fourth largest and second fastest-growing Asian population in the nation,” explains Dr. Andrea Caracostis, executive director of the Hope Clinic. “When we moved to this facility in 2007, most of our patients were Asian, but we built a reputation and now serve everyone in this community: 42 percent are Asian and 40 percent are Hispanic. Our waiting room is multicultural.” Hope Clinic prevents language and culture from becoming yet another barrier to health care for low-income uninsured people. “We hired a Burmese medical assistant and an Iraqi translator when we were flooded with refugees from those countries,” says Caracostis. “This area has a lot of inexpensive apartments, and demand for our services is enormous.” In 2007 Hope Clinic had 3,600 patient visits. In 2010 it had more than 9,500. In addition to language, Hope Clinic removes financial, bureaucratic and other barriers to health care. It charges $20 per visit and turns away no one who is unable to pay. An onsite Medicaid worker helps patients navigate difficult application processes and avoid daunting trips to social service offices. Technicians and doctors conduct tests and provide immediate results whenever possible, which helps patients avoid return visits, long waits and trips to distant labs. Caracostis says, “Vietnamese women are more likely than any others to have cervical cancer and to die from it. Instead of having patients wait six to eight weeks for the results from a pap smear, we brought in equipment and trained doctors to do the test and to give immediate results.” She continues, “Preventive care, including Well Woman exams, is our top priority. Health care should be not about sick patients, but about a healthy patient coming through our doors to get preventive care.” To meet that goal, Hope Clinic has pediatric, family and internal medicine practitioners and an obstetrician on staff, but it also works with schools, businesses, cultural centers and other area nonprofit organizations to make changes in the community, not just in patients. “There are no parks, sidewalks or easy access to fresh fruits and vegetables in the neighborhood,” explains Caracostis. “Telling a person to eat right and exercise is not enough to combat obesity. So, for instance, we help area restaurant owners understand the value of offering whole grain rice instead of only white rice.” Hope Clinic also provides health care services, including access to immunizations, to the people who own and work at the more than 200 restaurants and other small businesses in the area. “We want to be the medical home for the people in this community in a culturally and linguistically competent and compassionate manner,” says Caracostis. “We know our services are needed, and the impact we have on people’s lives is huge.”


health

Dr. Ashu Paul (right) and Kai Mar, who doubles as a medical assistant and a Burmese translator, help a mother (seated) and her child at the Hope Clinic

Our waiting room is multicultural.

67


health Spring Branch Community Health Center medical assistant Lisa Lozano administers a vaccine to prevent tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (whooping cough)

We want a community free from vaccine-preventable diseases. 68


g H ousto n-Harri s Cou nt y Imm u n iz ati o n Reg i stry, I n c .

health

Creating a community free from vaccine-preventable diseases is a lot like housework, according to Anna Dragsbaek, president of Houston-Harris County Immunization Registry, Inc., also known as The Immunization Partnership (TIP). “If you keep a clean house, nobody notices. Likewise, keeping everyone vaccinated is invisible work. Nobody says, ‘Hey, we’re not having outbreaks!’ Instead, complacency and misinformation spread, and people forget how serious and deadly these diseases can be.” In response, TIP strives to eradicate vaccine-preventable diseases in greater Houston through education, advocacy and the support of immunization information systems. The organization began in 2003 with a $1 million Houston Endowment grant to establish a citywide registry to record children’s immunizations. “A vaccine is only as good as the paper it’s written on,” explains Dragsbaek. “If it can’t be documented, it’s like it never happened. Without a registry, it’s difficult to know who’s been vaccinated, especially when a child receives medical care from a variety of sources.” Around half of area children had documented vaccines when the registry began. Now around three-quarters, or about the national average, are on record as vaccinated. Dragsbaek says, “The state simultaneously started a registry, and when it was ready, we transitioned ours to theirs because having the data in one place is the whole point.” Because of TIP advocacy, the statewide registry records everyone’s vaccinations, not just children’s. TIP now shows local clinics how to manage records, make reports and create systems to remind parents about their children’s shots. Within one year, all participating clinics’ rates rose. “One clinic had a three percent immunization rate when we began,” says Dragsbaek. “Now it’s up to 40 percent. Other clinics are up to between 80 and 100 percent.” She points out that it takes only a small pocket of unvaccinated people to fuel an outbreak and mentions the 1990s measles epidemic as evidence. To educate the public, TIP offers a compelling 10-minute interactive exercise that can be presented at any event to show people in groups how their assigned imaginary vaccination status might cause them to infect friends and colleagues, particularly those unable to be vaccinated because of age, allergies or immunity disorders. The exercise also shows how disease can spread through a community. Because of TIP’s determined advocacy and its collaboration with statewide stakeholders, adolescents now are required to be vaccinated before attending school. “The rate for meningitis vaccinations in the seventh grade jumped from 54 percent to 96 percent because of our efforts,” says Dragsbaek. “Tragically a star college student recently died from bacterial meningitis, and we are working to get laws passed requiring all college students—not just those living in on-campus dormitories—to be vaccinated.” She adds, “The story of vaccine-preventable diseases isn’t told enough. We don’t want another child to die, another set of parents to bury their college student or another adult to suffer from the flu, shingles, pneumonia and a whole list of diseases that can be prevented with a vaccination. We want a community free from vaccine-preventable diseases.”

69


g Te xa s H e art I n stitute Cardiovascular disease kills more people in the United States than any other disease. “Nearly one in three will have a cardiovascular disease during their lifetime. Women are five times more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than from breast cancer,” says Dr. James Willerson, president of the Texas Heart Institute (THI). “Cardiovascular disease is badly underestimated.” Since the THI was established in 1962 by renowned heart surgeon Denton Cooley, it has achieved international acclaim for its research, prevention and treatment of heart and vascular diseases. For the past 20 years, THI has been ranked among the top 10 heart centers in the United States by ‘U.S. News and World Report’ and moved from fifth to fourth place in 2010.

health

The acclaim is deserved. THI has placed devices to reverse failing circulation and damaged hearts in more patients and has performed more heart transplants—in excess of 1,400—than any other institution. It was first in the U.S. to successfully transplant a heart; it was the first in the world to install an artificial heart; it was the first to demonstrate that patients at risk for heart attacks can be identified in advance by measuring the inflammation of plaque in arteries and to develop procedures and instruments to prevent incidents; and after extensive research it was the first to receive FDA approval to study and use adult stem cells to treat patients with advanced heart failure. Willerson says, “Since 2001, we’ve treated 175 people with their own adult stem cells. There’s no other program in the U.S. with similar experience. The preliminary results are very encouraging.” He continues, “Patients treated with their own stem cells have better blood flow to their hearts within two months and better contractions of their hearts within four months. Some who couldn’t walk any distance now go jogging on the beach.” Stem cells extracted from the patient are injected into the heart, where they develop into specialized cells that lead to the growth of new heart muscle and blood vessels while they replace damaged tissue. THI does not stop there. It has identified nine genes responsible for the familial risk of heart attack and stroke. “You can remain as thin as a pencil, drop your cholesterol to your shoe tops and have your blood pressure well controlled, but if you’ve got the wrong genes, you won’t outrun the risk. You can’t pick your parents,” explains Willerson. He adds, “We’re beginning to give attention to knocking out the most dangerous of those genes.” In addition to developing live-saving interventions, THI has trained almost 3,000 heart specialists who now practice around the world. “It would be difficult to find any major country where the leaders of cardiology and cardiovascular surgery didn’t spend some time at the THI,” says Willerson. “Our discoveries and commitment to help prevent cardiovascular disease and to educate health care professionals and leaders about cardiovascular medicine bring patients to the THI and recognition to this institution, the Texas Medical Center and our city.”

70


health

Dr. Emerson Perin administers stem cells to a patient at the Texas Heart Institute

Since 2001, we’ve treated 175 people with their own adult stem cells. 71


grantee + purpose

year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

Prevention A Cari n g Safe Pl ac e I n c . Houston, TX

Toward social services and housing programs for homeless and chemically dependent HIV positive men and women in the Fifth Ward

2010

$

130,000 $

65,000

AIDS Fou n dati o n H ousto n I n c . Houston, TX

2010

100,000

100,000

2009

100,000

100,000

2009

400,000

124,000

2010

35,000

35,000

2008

120,000

40,000

2010

225,000

225,000

Toward salary support for a development director to help build the organization’s ability to increase immunization rates and eradicate vaccine-preventable diseases in Houston and Texas

2010

100,000

0

Toward increasing immunization rates and eradicating vaccine-preventable diseases in Houston and Texas by expanding a registry, developing and coordinating educational programs and advocating for improved policies and practices

2010

200,000

0

2010

75,000

75,000

2010

200,000

200,000

2008

2,652,000

830,000

2009

914,000

457,000

Toward services for people with HIV/AIDS and prevention programs for the community AIDS Res e arc h Co n so rti u m o f H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward purchasing headquarters to house programs that provide research and treatment information for people with HIV/AIDS and that link them to medical and social services Am e ri c an H e art Assoc iati o n I n c . - South C e ntr al Affi liate Des Moines, I A

Toward DINE, a project to reduce obesity by offering calorie counts at the point of purchase in Houston restaurants C e n i ko r Fou n dati o n I n c . Houston, TX

Fu n dac i o n Lati n o Am e ri c ana Co ntr a E l S i da I n c . Houston, TX

Toward culturally, linguistically and age-appropriate HIV prevention programs for Hispanic teenagers

health

Toward a residential vocational treatment program that helps clients recover from substance abuse and become productive citizens

H ousto n Cou n c i l o n Alco h o li s m an d D rug Abus e I n c . Houston, TX

Toward staff and training to more efficiently and effectively accommodate the increased volume in calls from people in crisis seeking mental health and substance abuse services H ousto n-Harri s Cou nt y I m m u n iz ati o n Reg i stry I n c . Houston, TX

M e ntal H e alth Am e ri c a o f G re ate r H ousto n I n c . Houston, TX

Toward improving and increasing the care and treatment of people with mental illness through educational services and advocacy Rogos i n I n stitute I n c . N e w Y o r k , NY

Toward empowering Houstonians to develop and pilot innovative, community-based solutions to solve their neighborhoods’ most pressing health and human service problems Th e U n ive r s it y o f Te x as H e alth Sc i e n c e C e nte r at H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward assembling evidence-based information through surveys, research and analysis to help community leaders and policymakers make decisions about appropriate health care solutions Th e U n ive r s it y o f Te x as M . D. An d e r so n Can c e r C e nte r Houston, TX

Toward evaluating the efficacy of a culturally tailored intervention program to reduce obesity and the incidence of cancer in the African-American community

73


grantee + purpose

year approved

2010 allocation

total grant

You n g M e n ’s C h ri stian Assoc iati o n o f G re ate r H ousto n Are a Houston, TX

Toward a family-oriented weight management intervention program for overweight and obese children

2009

556,000

741,000 $

2,807,000

40,000 $

25,000

2010

50,000

50,000

2008

200,000

75,000

2008

350,000

50,000

2010

15,000

15,000

Total — Prevention Child and Adolescent Health Bo’s Pl ac e Houston, TX

Toward support for children who have experienced the death of a parent or sibling

2010

$

C h i ld re n ’s D e fe n s e Fu n d Bell aire, TX

Toward programs that promote the well-being of vulnerable children and families E ye Care fo r K i ds Fou n dati o n Houston, TX

Toward free eye exams and glasses for low-income, uninsured children

health

Fam i ly S e rvi c e C e nte r at H ousto n an d Harri s Cou nt y Houston, TX

Toward staff to accommodate growth in counseling, guidance and social services for families, children and individuals Th e Wo m e n ’s Fu n d fo r H e alth E duc ati o n an d Res e arc h Houston, TX

Toward building coalitions and initiating programs that improve the health of girls and women

$

215,000

20,000 $

10,000

Total — Child and Adolescent Health Primary Care Alb e rt Sc hwe itz e r Fe llows h i p I n c . Houston, TX

Toward fellowships to help medical and health care students develop skills to work with underserved populations

2010

$

As ian Am e ri c an H e alth Coaliti o n o f th e G re ate r H ousto n Are a Houston, TX

Toward primary health care services for low-income and underinsured families at the Hope Clinic in southwest Houston

2009

140,000

140,000

Toward primary health care services for low-income and underinsured families at the Hope Clinic in southwest Houston

2010

125,000

0

2009

50,000

50,000

2010

100,000

100,000

2010

112,000

62,000

B re ath o f Li fe C h i ld re n ’s C e nte r I n c . K at y, T X

Toward primary health care services for low-income and underinsured children in west Houston and Katy C ri s i s I nte rve nti o n o f H ousto n I n co rpo r ate d Houston, TX

Toward 24-hour telephone, Internet and texted crisis counseling and referral services D e press i o n an d B i po l ar Su ppo rt Allian c e D BSA G re ate r H ousto n Houston, TX

74

Toward free support groups for people with depression and bipolar disorder, and toward a study to develop strategies to decrease group dropout rates


year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

Toward primary health care services for low-income and underinsured people in the East End

2009

150,000

150,000

Toward primary health care services for low-income and underinsured people in the East End

2010

300,000

0

2010

200,000

0

Toward primary health care services for low-income and underinsured people in central and north Houston

2009

200,000

200,000

Toward primary health care services for low-income and underinsured people in central and north Houston

2010

300,000

0

2008

2,000,000

2,000,000

2010

400,000

200,000

2010

300,000

150,000

Toward expanding a clinic that provides health care services for low-income and underinsured people in the Clear Lake area

2009

250,000

250,000

Toward medical, dental and office equipment for a new community clinic to serve low-income and underinsured people in southwest Houston

2010

500,000

0

Toward a centralized clinic, headquarters building and hub for satellite clinics

2007

3,000,000

1,000,000

Toward expanding primary health care services for low-income and underinsured people in the Gulfton area, and toward Grand Aides, a program to recruit and train neighborhood grandparents to link community members with health care services

2009

450,000

372,000

Toward primary health care services for low-income and underinsured people

2010

150,000

0

2010

43,000

43,000

2010

35,000

35,000

2010

200,000

100,000

2010

200,000

0

grantee + purpose E l C e ntro d e Co r a zo n Houston, TX

Fo rt B e n d Fam i ly H e alth C e nte r , I n c . R i chm o n d , T X

Toward renovating facilities that house health care services for low-income and underinsured people in Fort Bend and Waller counties Fou rth Ward C li n i c d ba Goo d N e i g h bo r H e alth c are C e nte r Houston, TX

Harri s Cou nt y H os pital D i stri ct Fou n dati o n Houston, TX

H e alth c are fo r th e H o m e less-H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward primary health care, case management and social services for the homeless H ousto n Co m m u n it y H e alth C e nte r s I n c . Houston, TX

Toward primary health care services for low-income and underinsured people at Denver Harbor Clinic and in north Houston

health

Toward a new outpatient specialty care facility for low-income patients

Ib n S i na Fou n dati o n I n c . Houston, TX

Legacy Co m m u n it y H e alth S e rvi c es I n c . Houston, TX

NAMI G u lf Coast A lv i n , T X

Toward educational outreach, referrals, support services and advocacy for people directly and indirectly affected by mental illness Palm e r D rug Abus e Prog r am-H ousto n I n c . Houston, TX

Toward substance abuse recovery and prevention programs for adolescents Pl an n e d Pare nth oo d o f H ousto n an d South e ast Te x as , I n c . Houston, TX

Toward family planning services, reproductive health care and educational outreach San Jos e C li n i c Houston, TX

Toward primary health care services for extremely low-income and uninsured people

75


grantee + purpose

year approved

2010 allocation

total grant

TOMAGWA M i n i stri es I n c . T o mba l l , T X

Toward a new medical clinic to serve low-income and underinsured people in Tomball, Magnolia and Waller counties

2009

500,000

500,000 $

5,362,000

6,000,000 $

2,000,000

Total — Primary Care Organizational Effectiveness Harri s Cou nt y H e alth c are Allian c e Houston, TX

Toward creating and sustaining a comprehensive, coordinated system that meets the needs of uninsured and underserved people through an alliance of public and private health care providers

2009

$

K ri st Samaritan C e nte r fo r Cou n s e li n g an d E duc ati o n Houston, TX

Toward the marketing of fee-based psychological testing services to support counseling and mental health programs for those in need

health

2010

75,000

75,000

2010

500,000

340,000

2010

100,000

0

Toward analyzing and redeveloping business strategies to improve organizational sustainability

2010

60,000

0

Toward breast health services and treatment for all women regardless of ability to pay

2010

200,000

0

M o ntgo m e ry Cou nt y U n ite d Way I n c . Th e W o o d l a n d s , T X

Toward an electronic health information exchange to facilitate access to health care in Montgomery County N et wo rk o f B e havi o r al H e alth Provi d e r s I n c . Houston, TX

Toward increasing the number of students entering clinical behavioral health fields Th e Ros e Houston, TX

$

2,415,000

25,000 $

0

Total — Organizational Effectiveness Other B e th e Matc h Fou n dati o n M i n n e ap o l i s , M N

Toward laboratory processing fees to support the increase in bone marrow donors in greater Houston

2010

$

C h i ld h oo d Can c e r Fam i ly Allian c e I n c . Houston, TX

Toward emotional, educational and financial support for parents and families who have children with cancer

2010

45,000

30,000

2010

90,000

60,000

2009

125,000

50,000

Gath e ri n g Pl ac e I n c . Houston, TX

Toward a psychosocial clubhouse where adults with severe and persistent mental illness can acquire social, job and life skills and learn to live more independently M o ntros e Cou n s e li n g C e nte r , I n c . Houston, TX

Toward a chemical dependency program, and toward reviewing and enhancing outcome data to improve program effectiveness 76


grantee + purpose

year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

2010

20,000

20,000

2010

200,000

200,000

2010

1,000,000

1,000,000

2010

4,000,000

0

N e w Can e y N e w H o rizo n s I n c . N e w C a n e y, T X

Toward vocational, social and recreational programs for people with developmental disabilities in Montgomery County Santa Maria H oste l I n c . Houston, TX

Toward renovating a residential and outpatient substance abuse treatment center for women Te x as C h i ld re n ’s H os pital Houston, TX

Toward support of collaborative research in a program to be directed by Dr. Charles D. Fraser, Jr., in honor of L. E. Simmons’s service with the foundation Te x as H e art I n stitute Houston, TX

Toward hiring research scientists to continue and accelerate adult stem cell research and treatment

$

1,360,000

total health

$

12,159,000

health

Total — Other

77


Leading people toward independent and fulfilling lives A child with spina bifida has fun at Camp For All

78


human services Basic Needs

$

4,760,000

Vulnerable Populations

$

1,662,500

Safe Families

$

1,565,000

Children and Youth

$

1,220,000

Economic Development

$

1,755,000

Strong Communities

$

829,500

Other

$

455,000

Total

$

12,247,000

18%

79


g N e w H o pe H ousi n g I n c .

human services 80

New Hope Housing Inc. (NHH) stabilizes lives and prevents homelessness by offering attractive, affordable apartments to adults living alone on low incomes. “Most of the people who live in our buildings have an annual income of $13,000 or less,” explains NHH executive director Joy Horak-Brown. “Our apartments are perfect for retired people or for those with disabilities.” Sixty percent of NHH residents are 55 or older, 62 percent are disabled and 10 percent are veterans. According to Horak-Brown more than 8,000 affordable single room occupancy (SRO) apartments are needed to fill the demand in Houston. Currently only 1,300 exist, and almost half are owned and operated by NHH. “We doubled capacity in 2010 by opening three new properties. We went from operating 319 units to 634. But we can’t meet the need for affordable housing one building at a time. Constantly developing properties is the only way we can solve this problem,” says Horak-Brown. NHH operates six SRO apartment complexes. Each is meticulously maintained, monitored for security and architecturally appealing. The newest facility contains 166 units and has LEED Platinum certification. Pointing out the beautiful landscaping and design, Horak-Brown says, “Low-income housing like this is something anyone would want in their neighborhood.” Typical one-room apartments are between 225 and 325 square feet, rent for around $450 a month and include utilities, access to cable-TV, furniture, a private bath, microwave and refrigerator. Each complex features a library, access to computers, large, inviting communal living areas and kitchens, and outdoor grills, benches, covered porches and soothing fountains that encourage residents to gather and enjoy life together. Many of them would otherwise be isolated, struggling or even homeless. To help residents maintain stability, NHH staff connects those in need—particularly those transitioning from homelessness—with services from other organizations in the community. “This is affordable housing, not a social services program,” explains Horak-Brown. “But we make sure our residents have access to what they need to stay independent, including home health care, delivered meals, life skills training or a housekeeper.” Although the apartments are purposely located near amenities, vans are available to take people shopping or to appointments. Only 14 percent of NHH residents own a car. Remarkably, rental income covers all operating costs at each apartment complex. “NHH addresses the dire shortage of affordable housing in Houston in an efficient and effective manner,” says Horak-Brown. “Our dream is to provide many thousands of Houstonians in need with the opportunity to live in an affordable, exceptional home.”


human services

Residents enjoy an evening at one of New Hope Housing’s SRO apartments

Constantly developing properties is the only way we can solve this problem. 81


human services Volunteer Pat McCracken tutors Kalilou Sarr, a learner from Togo

Our mission is to transform individuals and communities through the doorway of literacy. 82


g Li t er ac y A dva n ce o f H o u sto n , I n c .

human services

“One in five adults in Harris County cannot read this sentence,” says Jane Holston, executive director of Literacy Advance of Houston, Inc., also known as Literacy Advance. “The inability to read and write is the common denominator in poverty, unemployment, crime and homelessness. Literacy is the key to getting a job, gaining citizenship, maintaining health, helping a child with homework and using a computer.” According to ‘The Economist’ magazine, a one percent increase in literacy rates brings a one-and-a-half percent increase in GDP and a two-and-a-half percent increase in labor productivity. In addition, improving an adult’s literacy skills directly influences his or her child’s education and quality of life. Conversely, 60 percent of all prison inmates can barely read and write; 85 percent of young people involved with the criminal justice system are functionally illiterate, as are half of the chronically unemployed. Poor health in lowincome families and billions of dollars in care costs are direct results of illiteracy. Holston says, “Our mission is to transform individuals and communities through the doorway of literacy.” Literacy Advance, established in 1964, is the oldest and largest community-based, volunteerdriven literacy organization in Houston. The organization delivers services through four programs: one-on-one instruction with tutors; small classes for learners who are not native English speakers; community presentations that encourage parents to attend school activities and enroll in literacy classes so they can play an active role in their child’s education; and replication of Literacy Advance’s services in other agencies that want to launch a program. In 2010, almost 8,000 individuals received services from Literacy Advance. More than 1,500 learners worked with a tutor or attended a class, and practically all of them indicated that they had achieved or made progress toward a personal goal. Holston explains, “Because of the demand, we’ve expanded our programs out to the community through partner sites—churches, schools, community centers and other nonprofit organizations. We provide the oversight and management.” Demand for services is daunting. Currently, 33 organizations want to start a program; more than 400 potential learners are waiting for a tutor. To engage potential learners until a slot opens, Literacy Advance hosts the ‘While You’re Waiting’ program at its main site to provide them with special classes and access to computers. Volunteers teach classes, and staff supports the teachers and the learners, who participate in programs at no charge. Holston says, “Our ultimate goal is to help individuals become selfsufficient and promote economic development for the community. Literacy Advance embodies the spirit of community service, where everyone who comes here makes a difference by improving literacy at home, in schools and in neighborhoods.”

83


g Houston Rescue and Restore Coalition Human trafficking is the second largest and fastest growing criminal industry in the world. Drugs and weapons are primarily sold once; a person’s services can be sold over and over again,

human services

making human beings a far more lucrative commodity. “Houston is a major distribution center,” explains Maria Trujillo, executive director of Houston Rescue and Restore Coalition (HRRC). “Houston has an international airport and shipping port, it’s close to the Mexican border, and because of the diverse population, everyone blends in. Houston also has per square mile one of the largest sex industries in the nation. Strip clubs, massage parlors, bars and cantinas cover the city. Many are fronts for forced prostitution.” Enslaving people to provide labor is an even larger problem. “Restaurants, construction, door-to-door sales, domestic services, agriculture, nursing homes, nail salons and the garment industry are huge areas for human trafficking rings,” says Trujillo. “Victims are children, men and women escaping poverty or civil unrest, and they come from here in Houston and throughout the world. Our kids are the most vulnerable because naivete, low self-esteem and abuse make them more susceptible to clever traffickers.” Research indicates that within 48 hours of leaving home, one out of three runaway children falls victim to sexual exploitation. Through a coalition of law enforcement agencies and nonprofit and faith-based organizations, HRRC has mounted a modern abolitionist movement to educate the community and train frontline professionals to spot and rescue victims of human trafficking. HRRC teaches law enforcement officials, health care providers, social workers, educators, school counselors and others who come into contact with victims about signs of slavery, policies and procedures to follow, investigative techniques and resources for assistance. HRRC has developed protocols for 911 responders and has trained service providers, like cable installers, to detect signs. “Now when the Comcast guy comes in to adjust the cable, he knows to look for red flags, like doors that lock from the outside, blacked-out windows and surveillance cameras pointed in and down to see who’s leaving instead of who’s entering,” says Trujillo. HRRC also trains the public through community awareness presentations at schools, churches, community centers and local businesses. It annually presents a variety of events during Human Trafficking Awareness Month, and throughout the year it posts billboards on major highways and signs in airports, taxicabs and malls that say, “Stop Modern-Day Slavery in Houston,” and “No Human Life Should be for Sale.” HRRC also shows people what to do. Trujillo shares, “While in a nail salon, you can casually ask the technician, ‘Do you like your job? How long have you been here? Is your family here?’ If she’s uncomfortable, cowers or seems afraid, don’t make a scene. Instead, after leaving call the Hotline at 888-373-7888. Even if it’s only a gut feeling, report it. You don’t know when your call can be the difference between someone staying in slavery or finding freedom.”

84


human services

Executive director Maria Trujillo stands by a version of a poster for the Houston Rescue and Restore Coalition seen in malls, in cabs and on billboards

Even if it’s only a gut feeling, report it.

85


grantee + purpose

year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

Basic Needs–Basic Human Needs Ass i stan c e Le ag u e o f H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward a new building to accommodate the growth of ‘Operation School Bell,’ a program that supplies new school clothes for economically disadvantaged children

25,000 $

25,000

2010

25,000

25,000

2010

100,000

100,000

2010

100,000

50,000

2010

20,000

20,000

Toward emergency support and transitional housing for homeless and runaway youth

2008

300,000

100,000

Toward emergency support and transitional housing for homeless and runaway youth

2010

100,000

0

2008

50,000

25,000

Toward programs to increase the efficiency and capacity of faith-based assistance ministries emergency service providers

2010

300,000

150,000

Toward faith-based assistance ministries’ food pantry and homeless prevention programs

2010

430,000

430,000

2010

50,000

0

2010

50,000

25,000

2007

5,000,000

1,500,000

2009

100,000

50,000

2010

150,000

75,000

2010

$

B re ad o f Li fe I n c . Houston, TX

Toward providing homeless men and women overnight services, including food, shower and laundry facilities and a bed Cath e d r al H e alth M i n i stri es Houston, TX

C e nte r fo r Faith an d H e alth I n itiatives I n c . Houston, TX

Toward developing and coordinating partnerships and mobilizing volunteer support for nonprofit organizations that bring critically needed services to neighborhoods Co m m u n it y o f th e Stre ets Outre ac h Co rpo r ati o n Houston, TX

Toward transitional housing and social services for people who are homeless, in crisis or in transition Cove nant H ous e Te x as Houston, TX

human services

Toward helping homeless people become self-sufficient through a day shelter that provides hot meals, showers, laundry services and case management, and toward a residential transitional program for women recently released from prison

Fam i ly Pro m i s e o f M o ntgo m e ry Cou nt y I n c . Conroe, TX

Toward comprehensive social services for homeless families in Montgomery County G re ate r H ousto n Co m m u n it y Fou n dati o n Houston, TX

H o m e Ai d Am e ri c a I n c . Houston, TX

Toward transitional housing for temporarily homeless families and individuals H ous e o f Am os I n c . Houston, TX

Toward a food pantry that serves west Houston and Alief H ousto n Foo d Ban k Houston, TX

Toward purchasing and renovating a new facility to improve and increase the distribution of food to the hungry of the greater Houston area I nte rfaith M i n i stri es fo r G re ate r H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward delivering hot, nutritious meals to homebound seniors through the Meals on Wheels program K at y C h ri stian M i n i stri es K at y, T X

Toward assistance for families and individuals in crisis

87


grantee + purpose

year approved

2010 allocation

total grant

Loc al I n fant Fo rm u l a fo r E m e rg e n c i es I n c . Houston, TX

2008

75,000

25,000

2010

45,000

45,000

2010

50,000

25,000

2010

150,000

150,000

2008

400,000

100,000

2010

60,000

30,000

2010

300,000

150,000

2010

65,000

0

Toward emergency, transitional and long-term services for homeless men and women and their children

2010

100,000

50,000

Toward repairs to the Men’s Development Center, a facility that houses over 300 homeless men each night and offers recovery and transitional living programs

2010

100,000

100,000

Toward expanding services that provide food to the hungry

2008

200,000

100,000

Toward expanding services that provide food to the hungry

2010

230,000

0

2010

200,000

100,000

Toward emergency nutritional assistance for infants M i ss i o n o f Yahwe h I n c . Houston, TX

Toward a homeless shelter that helps residents achieve independent and self-sufficient lives My B roth e r’s K e e pe r Outre ac h C e nte r Houston, TX

Toward food, financial assistance, clothes and school supplies for people in need in west Houston N o rthwest Ass i stan c e M i n i stri es

human services

Houston, TX

Toward assistance for low-income families and individuals in need O pe n Doo r M i ss i o n Fou n dati o n Houston, TX

Toward shelter, emergency relief and substance abuse treatment for homeless and addicted men, and toward renovating and expanding the kitchen and food service area Palm e r M e m o rial E pi sco pal C h u rc h Houston, TX

Toward the Way Station, a program that provides a hot breakfast, basic health care and social services to homeless people S e rvi c e o f th e E m e rg e n cy Ai d Resou rc e C e nte r fo r th e H o m e less Houston, TX

Toward a continuum of services that help homeless people become self-sufficient South e ast Are a M i n i stri es Sou th Houston, TX

Toward emergency services for children and adults in crisis Star o f H o pe M i ss i o n Houston, TX

Targ et H u n g e r Houston, TX

U n ite d States Vete r an s I n itiative Houston, TX

Toward temporary, transitional and permanent housing and medical, social and employment services for homeless Houston veterans

Total — Basic Needs–Basis Human Needs

$

3,450,000

60,000 $

20,000

Basic Needs–Basic Social Needs 3 A B e re ave m e nt Fou n dati o n Houston, TX

Toward assisting low-income families with grief counseling and burials 88

2008

$


year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

2008

100,000

50,000

Toward reducing the recidivism of released inmates by bringing victims and perpetrators together for healing and rehabilitation

2008

50,000

25,000

Toward reducing the recidivism of released inmates by bringing victims and perpetrators together for healing and rehabilitation

2010

60,000

0

Toward support services for children and adults in need

2009

100,000

100,000

Toward support services for children and adults in need

2010

100,000

0

2008

300,000

150,000

Toward services that help homeless clients become employed and independent

2007

60,000

20,000

Toward services that help homeless clients become employed and independent

2010

50,000

0

Toward free civil legal services for working poor and indigent people

2009

50,000

50,000

Toward free civil legal services for working poor and indigent people

2010

50,000

0

Toward emergency financial assistance and referral services for low-income families and individuals in crisis

2010

150,000

75,000

Toward purchasing the building that houses the organization’s administrative offices, resale shop and food pantry

2010

210,000

210,000

Toward support services for low-income and underserved families in southwest Houston, with an emphasis on culturally and linguistically appropriate programs for Vietnamese-Americans

2008

130,000

60,000

Toward support services for low-income and underserved families in southwest Houston, with an emphasis on culturally and linguistically appropriate programs for Vietnamese-Americans

2010

60,000

0

2010

20,000

20,000

2008

225,000

75,000

grantee + purpose Acc e p ti n g C halle n g es to I m prove Ou r Nati o n Co m m u n it y D e ve lo pm e nt Co rp Houston, TX

Toward social services that help low-income Third Ward residents enhance their neighborhoods B ri dg es to Li fe Houston, TX

Cath o li c C hariti es o f th e Arc h d i oc es e o f Galvesto n-H ousto n

H e alth c are fo r th e H o m e less-H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward providing and expanding health care services for the homeless H ousto n Co m pass I n c . Houston, TX

H ousto n Vo lu nte e r Law ye r s Prog r am , I n c . Houston, TX

human services

Houston, TX

M o ntgo m e ry Cou nt y E m e rg e n cy Ass i stan c e Conroe, TX

VN Te amwo rk Houston, TX

Wo m e n ’s Resou rc e o f G re ate r H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward helping women and children develop social, financial and personal skills Ye llowsto n e Ac ad e my I n c . Houston, TX

Toward a social worker and parent liaison to provide assistance and social service referrals to low-income parents and students at the Yellowstone Academy

Total — Basic Needs–Basic Social Needs

$

855,000 89


grantee + purpose

year approved

2010 allocation

total grant

Basic Needs–Crisis Intervention South e ast Are a M i n i stri es Sou th Houston, TX

Toward emergency services for children and adults in crisis

65,000 $

65,000

2010

40,000

40,000

2010

50,000

30,000

2009

$

Wests i d e H o m e less Partn e r s h i p Houston, TX

Toward transitional housing programs that stabilize families facing homelessness and that keep their children in school Th e Wo m e n ’s H o m e Houston, TX

Toward long-term rehabilitation programs at a transitional residential center for women in crisis situations

human services

$

135,000

75,000 $

75,000

Total — Basic Needs–Crisis Intervention Basic Needs–Other Am e ri c an Re d C ross , G re ate r H ousto n Are a C hap te r Houston, TX

Toward disaster relief, transportation services, health and safety training programs and support for armed service members and their families

2010

$

C h i n es e Co m m u n it y C e nte r I n c . Houston, TX

Toward cultural, educational and social service programs for Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders in Houston

2010

120,000

60,000

2009

50,000

50,000

2010

60,000

60,000

2010

150,000

75,000

Coaliti o n fo r th e H o m e less o f H ousto n / Harri s Cou nt y Houston, TX

Toward support services for organizations that provide help for the homeless and that develop and implement strategies to prevent and end homelessness H u m b le Are a Ass i stan c e M i n i stri es H u mb l e , T X

Toward assistance and social services for low-income families and individuals in northeast Harris County Wes le y Co m m u n it y C e nte r , I n c . Houston, TX

Toward emergency and social service programs that help stabilize and empower low- and moderate-income people in near north Houston

Total — Basic Needs–Other

$

320,000

Total — Basic Needs

$

4,760,000

200,000 $

100,000

100,000

100,000

Vulnerable Populations–Disabilities Th e Arc o f G re ate r H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward advocating for and assisting individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, providing support services for families and creating awareness of available services in underserved communities

2010

$

Bay Are a Re hab i litati o n C e nte r

90

B ay t ow n , T X

Toward a facility to house the Opportunity Program, a project that provides vocational training for physically and mentally disabled adults

2010


grantee + purpose

year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

2008

75,000

25,000

2010

100,000

100,000

2010

255,000

255,000

2010

60,000

60,000

2010

50,000

50,000

2010

50,000

50,000

Cam p Fo r All Fou n dati o n Houston, TX

Toward barrier-free camping for chronically ill and/or disabled children and adults and their families C e nte r fo r H e ari n g an d S pe ec h Houston, TX

Toward purchasing the building that houses services for mild to profoundly deaf children E duc ati o nal Prog r am s I n s pi ri n g Co m m u n iti es I n c . Houston, TX

Toward expanding a program that trains and employs low-income individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities Fou n dati o n fo r th e Retard e d

Lati n o Le arn i n g C e nte r , I n c . Houston, TX

Toward a daycare facility for elderly and disabled adults in east Houston Re ac h U n li m ite d, I n c . Houston, TX

Toward programs and services at the Learning Activity Center for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in northwest Houston

$

740,000

100,000 $

100,000

Total — Vulnerable Populations–Disabilities

human services

Houston, TX

Toward residential care and daycare for people with intellectual or developmental disabilities

Vulnerable Populations–Chronic Illness B e ri n g O m ega Co m m u n it y S e rvi c es Houston, TX

Toward providing dental care, adult daycare, financial assistance and residential hospice services for people with HIV/AIDS

2009

Toward providing dental care, adult daycare, financial assistance and residential hospice services for people with HIV/AIDS

2010

100,000

0

2008

15,000

5,000

$

H ousto n Are a Park i n so n Soc i et y Houston, TX

Toward providing support services to improve the quality of life for people with Parkinson’s disease and related movement disorders

$

105,000

75,000 $

75,000

Total — Vulnerable Populations–Chronic Illness Vulnerable Populations–The Elderly I nte rfaith Care partn e r s , I n c . Houston, TX

Toward volunteer services that enable impaired people to stay independent and at home and that support caregivers

2009

Toward volunteer services that enable impaired people to stay independent and at home and that support caregivers

2010

75,000

0

2008

190,000

30,000

2008

80,000

40,000

$

J e wi s h Fam i ly S e rvi c e Houston, TX

Toward counseling and senior service programs OASIS I n stitute H ousto n O ld e r Adu lt E n ri c h m e nt Prog r am Houston, TX

Toward providing physical fitness, social and health education programs to older adults

91


grantee + purpose

year approved

2010 allocation

total grant

S h e lte ri n g Arm s Houston, TX

Toward a collaborative to increase access to services, improve the quality of care and enhance life for older adults and their caregivers

2010

200,000

200,000

Toward creating and implementing a media campaign that guides caregivers to the tools, skills and resources they need to assist elders

2010

200,000

200,000

Toward transportation and other support services for frail, elderly and health-impaired people in southwest Houston

2009

7,500

7,500

Toward transportation and other support services for frail, elderly and health-impaired people in southwest Houston

2010

20,000

0

2010

25,000

25,000

Vo lu nte e r I nte rfaith Careg ive r s Southwest Bell aire, TX

human services

W. Leo Dan i e l s Towe r s , I n c . Houston, TX

Toward helping senior and disabled residents maintain independence by providing nutrition, housekeeping and personal care services

$

577,500

50,000 $

50,000

2010

40,000

40,000

2010

300,000

150,000

Total — Vulnerable Populations–The Elderly Vulnerable Populations–Other B et te r Bus i n ess Bu re au o f M etro po litan H ousto n E duc ati o nal Fou n dati o n Houston, TX

Toward combating fraud among vulnerable populations through consumer awareness programs

2010

$

Fam i ly to Fam i ly N et wo rk Houston, TX

Toward providing information, referrals, training and support to families with children who have disabilities Te x as Apples e e d Au s t i n , T X

Toward research to determine the relationship between school discipline practices, dropout rates and involvement in the justice system by disproportionately large numbers of minority and special education students, and toward increasing awareness about the abusive practices of payday lenders and developing alternative loans for low-income people

Total — Vulnerable Populations–Other

$

240,000

Total — Vulnerable Populations

$

1,662,500

25,000 $

25,000

Safe Families–Education H ousto n Rescu e an d Resto re Coaliti o n Houston, TX

Toward a coalition that educates the public, trains professionals and empowers the community to recognize and address human trafficking

2010

$

Te x as Cou n c i l o n Fam i ly Vi o le n c e I n co rpo r ate d Au s t i n , T X

92

Toward providing family violence agencies with professional development, training, technical assistance and advocacy

Total — Safe Families–Education

2009

100,000

100,000 $

125,000


grantee + purpose

year approved

2010 allocation

total grant

Safe Families–Prevention C h i ld Bu i ld e r s Houston, TX

Toward programs that teach children to protect themselves from abuse, develop healthy relationships and become good parents

2010

$

100,000 $

100,000

$

100,000

25,000 $

25,000

Total — Safe Families–Prevention Safe Families–Intervention B r a zo ria Cou nt y Allian c e fo r C h i ld re n I n c . A ngleton, TX

2010

$

B ri dg e Ove r Trou b le d Wate r s I n c . Pa s ad e n a , T X

Toward an emergency and transitional shelter to help survivors of domestic violence progress from crisis to self-sufficiency

2010

100,000

50,000

2010

75,000

75,000

Toward direct services and resource referrals for South Asian women who are victims of domestic abuse and sexual assault

2009

40,000

40,000

Toward direct services and resource referrals for South Asian women who are victims of domestic abuse and sexual assault

2010

40,000

0

2010

75,000

75,000

2010

395,000

260,000

Toward residential and nonresidential programs to help survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault create and implement plans for stability and independence, and toward community awareness and educational programs

2007

150,000

50,000

Toward Children’s Court Services, a program to help non-offending family members and children who were witnesses to, or the victims of, a crime navigate the criminal court process

2010

50,000

50,000

Toward residential and nonresidential programs to help survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault create and implement plans for stability and independence, and toward community awareness and educational programs

2010

200,000

0

2009

35,000

35,000

Casa d e Es pe r anz a d e los N i n os I n co rpo r ate d Houston, TX

Toward specialized residential care for neglected and abused children and for children infected with HIV/AIDS Daya I n c . Houston, TX

human services

Toward emergency services for abused and neglected children, their siblings and their non-offending caregivers

D e Pe lc h i n C h i ld re n ’s C e nte r Houston, TX

Toward a comprehensive continuum of support, including foster care and adoption services, that protects children and strengthens families Harri s Cou nt y Do m esti c Vi o le n c e Coo rd i nati n g Cou n c i l Pa s ad e n a , T X

Toward professional staff to lead the development of a comprehensive strategic plan to address domestic violence in Harris County, and toward support for a communitywide audit of the services, opportunities and challenges involved in combating domestic violence H ousto n Are a Wo m e n ’s C e nte r Houston, TX

La Rosa-Th e Ros e Houston, TX

Toward direct services and resource referrals for Hispanic women and families who are the victims of domestic abuse and sexual assault

93


grantee + purpose

year approved

2010 allocation

total grant

Partn e r s fo r Harri s Cou nt y C h i ld re n I n c . Houston, TX

Toward providing clothes, hygiene items and other necessities to children under the care of Children’s Protective Services

2010

25,000

0

2008

130,000

65,000

2010

75,000

0

2010

900,000

300,000

S pau ld i n g fo r C h i ld re n Houston, TX

Toward securing foster care and adoption for special needs children in the custody of the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services Tah i ri h J usti c e C e nte r Fa l l s C h u r ch , VA

Toward pro bono legal services and protection for immigrant women and girls in Houston Te x as Wo man ’s U n ive r s it y

human services

Den ton, TX

Toward investigating the results of two actions, either filing a civil protective order or staying in a shelter, to determine the long-term outcomes for victims of domestic abuse and their children

$

1,025,000

100,000 $

0

Total — Safe Families–Intervention Safe Families–Treatment C h i ld Advoc ates I n co rpo r ate d Houston, TX

Toward training court-appointed volunteers to advocate for the legal rights of abused children

2010

$

D e Pe lc h i n C h i ld re n ’s C e nte r Houston, TX

Toward reducing the trauma of family separation and improving reunification by studying the effectiveness of alternative approaches to traditional foster care

2010

380,000

200,000

2009

100,000

50,000

Fo rt B e n d Cou nt y Wo m e n ’s C e nte r , I n c . R i chm o n d , T X

Toward housing, counseling and case management for survivors of domestic violence who have mild to moderate mental health issues

$

250,000

65,000 $

65,000

Total — Safe Families–Other

$

65,000

Total — Safe Families

$

1,565,000

120,000 $

40,000

Total — Safe Families–Treatment Safe Families–Other Esc ape Fam i ly Resou rc e C e nte r o f th e E xc han g e C lu bs o f H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward preventing child abuse and neglect by providing intervention, support services and educational classes for at-risk families

2010

$

Children and Youth–Development ArtB ri dg e Houston, TX

94

Toward art classes for homeless children living in shelters

2008

$


year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

2010

75,000

75,000

2010

100,000

0

2010

260,000

130,000

2010

991,000

0

2010

100,000

50,000

2010

125,000

75,000

2010

100,000

50,000

2010

25,000

25,000

2010

30,000

30,000

Toward providing children with partial and full scholarships to attend YMCA Downtown day camps

2008

150,000

50,000

Toward providing children with partial and full scholarships to attend YMCA Downtown day camps

2010

100,000

0

grantee + purpose B i g B roth e r s B i g S i ste r s o f N o rth Te x as Houston, TX

Toward one-on-one mentoring programs that help Houston area at-risk children increase self-esteem, achieve goals, improve behavior and succeed in school Co m m u n iti es i n Sc h oo l s Bay Are a , I n c . Houston, TX

Toward social services to help Clear Creek and Dickinson ISD students stay in school and succeed in life Co m m u n iti es i n Sc h oo l s H ousto n , I n c . Houston, TX

Toward social services to help Alief ISD students stay in school and succeed in life Th e E duc ati o n Fou n dati o n o f Harri s Cou nt y

E lves & M o re Sp r i n g , T X

Toward providing bikes to children who obtain an academic and/or behavioral goal K i ds H o pe USA I n c . Z eel a n d, M I

Toward matching mentors from area congregations with at-risk students in Houston’s public elementary schools S e arc h I n stitute M i n n e ap o l i s , M N

Toward sending teams of students and adults from nine Houston area low-income high schools to the annual Healthy Communities-Healthy Youth conference

human services

Houston, TX

Toward increasing and improving after-school programs for children in Harris County

Wo n d e rwo rk s Houston, TX

Toward a summer enrichment program that provides high school students with in-depth, college-style courses in arts, architecture, literature and media Wo rk s h o p H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward development and after-school programs for youth in the Third Ward You n g M e n ’s C h ri stian Assoc iati o n o f G re ate r H ousto n Are a Houston, TX

$

525,000

50,000 $

50,000

Total — Children and Youth–Development Children and Youth–Parenting Avan c e I n c . Houston, TX

Toward programs that strengthen families, enhance parenting skills and encourage the development of children and their educational success

2010

$

W. Osc ar N eu haus M e m o rial Fou n dati o n Bell aire, TX

Toward free services to help parents obtain information and referrals about dyslexia and other reading difficulties

Total — Children and Youth–Parenting

2008

50,000

100,000 $

100,000

95


grantee + purpose

year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

Children and Youth窶的ndependence Ald i n e Youth O rgan iz ati o n U n ite d to H e lp Houston, TX

Toward support services and new development programs for at-risk young people and their families

150,000 $

50,000

2007

150,000

50,000

2010

75,000

0

2009

100,000

100,000

2010

50,000

50,000

Toward services to help parents, teachers and other adults teach children social skills that prepare them to succeed in school and in life

2009

50,000

50,000

Toward teaching children social skills that prepare them to succeed in school and in life

2010

100,000

0

2009

45,000

15,000

2009

80,000

40,000

2010

50,000

50,000

2007

75,000

25,000

2010

80,000

40,000

Toward encouraging interest and achievement in math, science and technology by sponsoring Houston area high school teams to design and build robots for competition

2007

150,000

50,000

Toward encouraging interest and achievement in math, science and technology by sponsoring Houston area high school teams to design and build robots for competition

2010

50,000

0

2008

$

Co m m u n iti es i n Sc h oo l s Bay Are a , I n c . Houston, TX

Toward truancy and dropout prevention programs in Dickinson and Clear Creek ISDs Cove nant H ous e Te x as Houston, TX

Toward staff and programs that help homeless and runaway youth obtain jobs and maintain self-sufficient lives

human services

Th e Fo rg e fo r Fam i li es I n c . Houston, TX

Toward building a new center to house development and life skills training programs for at-risk children in the Third Ward G i rl s I n co rpo r ate d o f G re ate r H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward programs that help at-risk girls lead successful, independent and fulfilling lives H ousto n Ac h i e ve m e nt Pl ac e Houston, TX

H ousto n Livestoc k S h ow & Ro d eo I n c . Houston, TX

Toward assisting students with agricultural science education through the Calf Scramble Program K i c k D rugs Out o f Am e ri c a Fou n dati o n Houston, TX

Toward helping at-risk middle school students resolve conflict, set and achieve goals, and avoid drugs and gangs through martial arts training M o ntgo m e ry Cou nt y Youth S e rvi c es I n c . Conroe, TX

Toward crisis counseling, shelter programs and prevention services that strengthen families and help young people stay out of trouble and in school O u r Pro m i s e fo r West Bay town I n c . B ay t ow n , T X

Toward social and human services that develop youth, strengthen families and build neighborhoods Reso lve It I n c . K e mah , T X

Toward intervention and support programs that present at-risk teens with alternatives to violence, drug abuse, delinquent behavior and leaving school U. S . Fou n dati o n fo r th e I n s pi r ati o n an d Recog n iti o n o f Sc i e n c e & Tec h n o logy M a n ch e s t e r , N H

96


grantee + purpose

year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

2008

150,000

50,000

2008

95,000

25,000

You n g Li fe Houston, TX

Toward school-based clubs for at-risk youth, and toward recruiting, training and deploying interns to lead clubs and promote new clubs in underserved urban areas Z i na Garri so n All Cou rt Te n n i s Ac ad e my Houston, TX

Toward providing inner-city children with tennis lessons and life-building skills

$

595,000

200,000 $

0

Total — Children and Youth–Other

$

0

Total — Children and Youth

$

1,220,000

90,000 $

30,000

Total — Children and Youth–Independence Children and Youth–Other Houston, TX

Toward establishing and managing an urban farm to provide students with life skills training

2010

$

Economic Development–Literacy

human services

Pro -Vi s i o n M i n i stri es I n c .

Adu lt Re ad i n g C e nte r , I n c . Pe a r l a n d, T X

Toward literacy programs and citizenship classes for adults in Pearland

2008

$

H ousto n RE AD Co m m i ss i o n Houston, TX

Toward staff to recruit and support coalition member agencies that promote and improve literacy in greater Houston

2010

70,000

0

Toward expanding services to help more people learn to read, write and communicate effectively in English

2008

275,000

75,000

Toward developing infrastructure to help more people learn to read, write and communicate effectively in English

2010

25,000

0

Toward services to help people learn to read, write and communicate effectively in English

2010

75,000

0

2010

15,000

15,000

2010

75,000

75,000

Lite r acy Advan c e o f H ousto n , I n c . Houston, TX

Lite r acy Te x as Fort Wort h , T X

Toward providing resources, programs, technical assistance and professional development for literacy organizations and coalitions Lite r acy Vo lu nte e r s o f Fo rt B e n d Cou nt y I n c . S u ga r La n d , T X

Toward replacing the roof on a facility that houses literacy programs for adults in Fort Bend County

Total — Economic Development–Literacy

$

195,000

97


grantee + purpose

year approved

2010 allocation

total grant

Economic Development–Financial Stability N e i g h bo rh oo d C e nte r s I n c . Houston, TX

Toward free tax preparation services to increase the number of low- and moderate-income families receiving the Earned Income Credit

2010

$

650,000 $

650,000

$

650,000

350,000 $

350,000

Total — Economic Development–Financial Stability Economic Development–Continued Learning Capital I nvesti n g i n D e ve lo pm e nt an d E m ploym e nt o f Adu lts I n c . Au s t i n , T X

human services

Toward providing comprehensive social, educational and placement services that enable low-income adults in Houston to obtain highly skilled and highly valued jobs

2010

$

Galvesto n Cou nt y Eco n o m i c Allian c e Fou n dati o n I n c . T e xa s C i t y, T X

Toward programs to reduce unemployment and encourage community and economic development in Galveston County

2010

40,000

40,000

2008

450,000

150,000

Pri so n E ntre pre n eu r s h i p Prog r am Houston, TX

Toward reducing recidivism by teaching inmates business skills, matching them with a volunteer mentor and providing reintegration and employment services

$

540,000

325,000 $

100,000

Total — Economic Development–Continued Learning Economic Development–Future Workforce G e n esys Wo rk s Houston, TX

Toward expanding a program that provides underserved Houston area high school students with training, certification and employment in technical services, and toward a study to determine the long-term impact of the program

2008

$

M e m o rial Ass i stan c e M i n i stri es I n c . Houston, TX

Toward comprehensive employment services for unemployed and underemployed people

2008

50,000

225,000 $

150,000

100,000 $

100,000

Total — Economic Development–Future Workforce Economic Development–Other ACCION Te x as I n c . Sa n A n t o n i o , T X

Toward providing small loans and support services for small business owners in Houston who do not have access to traditional credit sources

2010

$

Care e r an d Recove ry Resou rc es I n c . Houston, TX

Toward computer training, literacy classes and job placement programs for deaf and hardof-hearing people

2009

140,000

70,000

Toward providing interview-appropriate clothing to low-income women seeking employment

2009

50,000

50,000

Toward providing interview-appropriate clothing to low-income women seeking employment

2010

50,000

0

D ress fo r Succ ess H ousto n Houston, TX

98


grantee + purpose

year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

2010

227,000

0

U rban E ntre pre n eu r Partn e r s h i p I n c . K a n s a s C i t y, M O

Toward identifying and recommending strategies to help Houston area nonprofit organizations become more sustainable and entrepreneurial, and toward helping minority businesses become more viable and profitable

$

220,000

Total — Economic Development

$

1,755,000

300,000 $

0

2010

100,000

0

Toward programs that improve life for children and strengthen families

2009

50,000

50,000

Toward programs that improve life for children and strengthen families

2010

50,000

0

2010

80,000

50,000

Strong Communities–Communities C ri m e Sto ppe r s o f H ousto n , I n c . Houston, TX

Toward purchasing a facility to consolidate services that empower residents and business owners to create and maintain safe neighborhoods

2010

$

N e i g h bo rh oo d C e nte r s I n c . Houston, TX

Toward improving educational outcomes for Gulfton area students through a cradle-tocareer initiative SHAPE Co m m u n it y C e nte r I n c . Houston, TX

human services

Total — Economic Development–Other

Te x an s Tog eth e r E duc ati o n Fu n d Au s t i n , T X

Toward developing and implementing social service and educational programs in a lowincome Houston area apartment complex to help residents improve life for themselves, their families and their community

$

100,000

150,000 $

50,000

Total — Strong Communities–Communities Strong Communities–Housing Ave n u e Co m m u n it y D e ve lo pm e nt Co rpo r ati o n Houston, TX

Toward developing affordable housing and encouraging economic development in Houston’s near north side

2008

$

Fo rt B e n d Co m m u n it y Re vitaliz ati o n Proj ects S u ga r La n d , T X

Toward purchasing office and warehouse space where staff can meet clients and accept, store and dispense materials to repair homes for low-income families in Fort Bend County

2009

75,000

75,000

2010

5,000,000

0

N e w H o pe H ous i n g I n c . Houston, TX

Toward developing four single room occupancy apartment communities for very lowincome individuals

Total — Strong Communities–Housing

$

125,000

99


grantee + purpose

year approved

2010 allocation

total grant

Strong Communities–Government Participation C it y Hall Fe llows I n c . Pa s ad e n a , C A

Toward fellowships for 10 area college graduates to work full-time for a year in Houston’s municipal government

2008

$

300,000 $

75,000

C it y o f H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward reviewing and making recommendations about the length, number and staggering of City of Houston officials’ terms in office

2010

4,500

4,500

2010

100,000

50,000

2008

150,000

50,000

2008

180,000

40,000

Toward a speakers series featuring presentations by leading figures from the arts, sciences, humanities, politics and public affairs

2010

30,000

0

Toward expanding the Progressive Forum’s Web site

2010

60,000

0

2009

25,000

25,000

2010

150,000

50,000

2008

120,000

30,000

2010

70,000

35,000

C los e U p Fou n dati o n A l e xa n d r i a , VA

human services

Toward fellowships for low-income Houston ISD high school students to attend a weeklong experiential program in Washington, D.C., that explores the role of citizenship in a democracy H ousto n I nte rfaith S po n so ri n g Co m m it te e , I n co rpo r ate d Houston, TX

Toward developing leaders in Hispanic communities Le ag u e o f Wo m e n Vote r s o f H ousto n E duc ati o n Fu n d Houston, TX

Toward staff support to meet the increased demand for voter education and information programs Prog ress ive Fo ru m Bell aire, TX

Te x as O n e Vo i c e A Co ll abo r ative fo r H e alth & H u man S e rvi c es Houston, TX

Toward a network of public, private and nonprofit organizations that identifies needs, recommends changes and works together to improve health and human service systems throughout the community Te x as South e rn U n ive r s it y Houston, TX

Toward undergraduate and graduate internships in the Texas Legislature and other state and municipal agencies U n ite d Nati o n s Assoc iati o n o f th e USA I n c . Houston, TX

Toward educating Houstonians about the structure, functions, accomplishments and needs of the United Nations Wo rld Affai r s Cou n c i l o f H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward the Educational Outreach Program, a project to inform students and teachers about foreign policies and global issues

Total — Strong Communities–Government Participation

$

359,500

50,000 $

25,000

Strong Communities–Other C e nte r fo r th e H e ali n g o f Rac i s m Houston, TX

100

Toward expanding programs in schools, businesses, churches and community centers that combat racism through educational experiences and training sessions

2008

$


grantee + purpose

year approved

total grant

2010 allocation

2010

20,000

20,000

2010

200,000

200,000

Le ad e r s h i p H ousto n I n c . Houston, TX

Toward scholarships for nonprofit and public sector professionals participating in programs that educate emerging leaders about issues affecting Houston N e i g h bo rh oo d C e nte r s I n c . Houston, TX

Toward services that facilitate access to citizenship for immigrants

$

245,000

Total — Strong Communities

$

829,500

30,000 $

10,000

Other Am e ri c an Le ad e r s h i p Fo ru m Houston, TX

Toward the Nonprofit Leadership Collaborative’s 2008, 2009 and 2010 annual symposiums that help improve leadership in local nonprofit agencies

2008

$

Association of Fundraising Professionals-Greater Houston Chapter Bell aire, TX

2010

5,000

5,000

Toward strengthening nonprofit organizations through free consulting services provided by retired business executives and management professionals

2009

15,000

15,000

Toward strengthening nonprofit organizations through free consultant services provided by retired business executives and management professionals

2010

15,000

0

2010

800,000

400,000

2010

50,000

25,000

Toward educational programs to advance philanthropy E xecutive S e rvi c e Co rps o f H ousto n I n c . Houston, TX

human services

Total — Strong Communities–Other

U n ite d Way o f G re ate r H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward supporting health and human service agencies and programs that help children, youth, families, seniors and individuals Vo lu nte e r H ousto n Houston, TX

Toward linking volunteers with service organizations

Total — Other

$

455,000

total human services

$

12,247,000

101


102


g

the founders

J e ss e H . a n d Ma r y G i b b s J o n e s

103


the founders Mary Gibbs Jones sells Jesse Jones a war bond during World War II

104


g

After donating more than $1 million during their first years of marriage to help create and develop institutions and encourage the city’s growth, Jesse and Mary Gibbs Jones established Houston Endowment in 1937 to formalize and perpetuate their philanthropy. They both knew they would prosper only if their community thrived.

the founders

organizations that would nurture Houston’s people and

Jesse Jones was born on April 5, 1874, just nine years after the end of the Civil War, and grew up on his family’s prosperous tobacco farm in Robertson County, Tennessee. Although the Joneses would eventually live in one of the grandest homes outside of Nashville, poverty surrounded them. Jesse’s father, William, always kept the farm’s smokehouse doors open so their struggling neighbors could help themselves when food was scarce. Jesse’s Aunt Nancy, who moved in with the Joneses after his mother died when he was six, always kept track of who took food so she could make sure they were eventually repaid. From their charitable but frugal example, young Jesse saw that a loan worked better than a handout and that most neighbors honored their obligations when given sufficient time. When able, they helped others. Jesse saw how his family’s beneficence helped his community, and with enormous success and unparalleled influence, he applied these early lessons throughout his life in business, public service and philanthropy. At age 20, Mr. Jones moved from Tennessee to Dallas to work at his uncle M.T. Jones’s largest lumberyard. M.T. owned sawmills, lumberyards and timberland throughout Texas and lived in Houston, the home base of his vast operations. Mr. Jones would later recall in a speech, “It may be that my uncle and I were too much of the same temperament to be entirely congenial, but after he found that I had energy and interest for business, as well as for play, we got on better and, I am glad to say, were fast friends long before he died at St. Paul’s Sanitarium in June 1898. In fact, he named me one of his executors and that took me to Houston, the headquarters of his business.”

103


Mr. Jones’s 1898 arrival, the 1900 Galveston hurricane and the discovery of oil at Spindletop in 1901 changed Houston’s future. The hurricane shifted the region’s inevitable development from Galveston

the founders

to Houston; Spindletop marked the beginning of the area’s evolution into the nation’s petrochemical capital; and Jesse Jones began building the city that would accommodate the explosive growth. He started building small homes south of downtown that he sold on unique, long-term installment plans. Then he began building Houston’s first skyscrapers, including the 10-story Houston Chronicle Building, which brought him a half interest in the newspaper, and the Texas Company Building, which helped make Texaco and the petroleum industry a permanent part of the city’s business community. He continued to add office buildings, movie theaters and hotels to the central business district in time for the opening of the Houston Ship Channel in 1914.

Downtown Houston, 1930s

In addition to Houston’s foremost developer, Mr. Jones became a prominent civic leader. He raised

city. However, World War I changed his mind. When

Houston’s half of the funds for the Ship Channel (the

President Wilson asked Mr. Jones to become director

federal government paid the rest in one of the nation’s

general of military relief for the American Red Cross,

first public/private partnerships) and was the first

he accepted at once and delegated management of his

chairman of the Houston Harbor Board. The opening

businesses and buildings to his colleague Fred Heyne.

of the Ship Channel internationalized Houston almost

Within months, Mr. Jones had recruited nurses

overnight and elevated the South’s still struggling post- and doctors for the battlefields, organized hospitals, Civil War economy. Mr. Jones’s success with the Ship Channel caught

and established rehabilitation centers for the wounded.

President Woodrow Wilson’s attention. President

The Red Cross called him “big brother to 4 million men

Wilson offered him ambassadorships and cabinet

in khaki.” He was also an early advocate for women’s

positions, but Mr. Jones turned the president down

rights and lobbied President Wilson to give Army

so he could continue to build his businesses and his

nurses military rank and authority.

Houston Ship Channel

106

canteens and ambulance networks throughout Europe,


After the war, Mr. Jones accompanied the president to the Paris Peace Conference and helped reorganize the Red Cross In addition to real estate development and

international relief agency it is

philanthropic activities, Mr. Jones served as finance

today. He wrote to Mr. Heyne

chairman of the Democratic National Committee and

from Paris, “I am very sorry not to

helped bring the party’s national convention to Houston

be home during this opportune time, in 1928. It was the first major political convention to be for no doubt I could accomplish a held in the South since before the Civil War and was one

American Red Cross recreation center for soldiers in Europe during World War I

good deal if I could bring myself to

of the first to be heard widely on the radio. An associate

believe that my real duty did not lie

wrote Mr. Jones after the location was announced, “You

here. The situation of the world is

most alarming and chaotic, and I do not know how it is going to be adjusted. Surely there can be no peace unless people have the necessities of life—food and clothes.”

the founders

from a loosely knit group of local societies into the permanent

have caused the South and Texas to receive greater recognition than any other individual in the history of this country.” Mr. Jones continued to realize his vision of a great city and in 1929 completed a 35-story Art Deco building

After the peace treaties were signed, Mr. Jones

for the Gulf Oil Company and his National Bank of

returned to Houston, embarked on the most ambitious

Commerce. Shortly after the building was completed,

phase of his building career and married Mary Gibbs

the nation plunged into the Great Depression. When

Jones in 1920. Mary Gibbs, a doctor’s daughter, was

two failing Houston banks were about to bring down

born on April 29, 1872, in Mexia, Texas, and grew up

many others throughout the region, Mr. Jones gathered

with nine brothers and sisters in a home filled with

the city’s leaders for three days and nights to work out

music and books. With her family’s encouragement, a plan that allowed the stable banks and several local she attended Methodist College in Waco, Texas, at a companies to rescue the two faltering banks. As a result time when few women went to college or finished high

of Mr. Jones’s leadership and determination, no banks

school. Mary’s exposure to literature, music, education

in Houston failed during the Great Depression. After

and other cultures through extensive travel kindled

the successful meeting, Mr. Jones wrote to one of his

an interest in learning and the arts that would flourish

colleagues, “I believe that all we have done, are doing and

throughout her life. While Mr. Jones was building in

must continue doing is necessary for the general welfare, and

midtown Manhattan and filling up Houston’s Main

we cannot escape being our brother’s keeper.” Mr. Jones’s

Street with the city’s tallest buildings, its most ornate

work did not go unnoticed.

movie palaces and its grandest hotels, the couple began making substantial donations to colleges, hospitals, orphanages, museums and other civic institutions. 107


(left) Jesse Jones with a World War II Commerce Department promotional poster (right) Jesse Jones at the Houston Shipbuilding Corporation yard during World War II. He told the workers during his speech, “You men in overalls are just as important as the men in khaki.”

Mr. Jones’s business acumen and civic leadership were called upon during the depths of the Great Depression when President Herbert Hoover asked him in 1932 to serve on the board of the newly created Reconstruction Finance Corporation (RFC). After his inauguration, President Franklin Roosevelt expanded the RFC’s powers and made Mr. Jones its chairman. Under equip more than 2,000 plants that manufactured

the founders

his leadership, the RFC disbursed more than $10 billion everything from airplanes and battleships to penicillin (about $120 billion in today’s dollars) to reopen banks, and synthetic rubber, an industry the RFC developed save homes, farms and businesses, rescue the railroads from the lab. In 1940, after Congress passed a special and bring electricity to rural areas. Fannie Mae and the resolution allowing Mr. Jones to become secretary of Export-Import Bank are only two of the many enduring commerce while maintaining his RFC position, the agencies created by Mr. Jones and the RFC. Remarkably, ‘Saturday Evening Post’ reported, “Next to the President, the funds allocated for the massive RFC recovery efforts no man in the government and probably in the United States were returned to the United States Treasury, along with wields greater powers.” Today scholars give Jesse Jones a $500 million profit. Vice President John Nance Garner a tremendous amount of credit for his role in saving once said about Mr. Jones, “He has allocated and loaned capitalism during the Great Depression and mobilizing more money to various institutions and enterprises than any industry in time to fight and win World War II. other man in the history of the world.”

After 15 years of public service in Washington, D.C.,

As World War II loomed, Mr. Jones shifted the RFC’s the Joneses returned to Houston in 1947 and began to focus from domestic economics to global defense and focus on philanthropy. They felt education was the key used the corporation’s enormous clout to build and to a healthy community and established scholarship programs to help students attend college. The programs included minority students and always were divided equally between men and women. By the time Mr. Jones passed away on June 1, 1956, the foundation had helped more than 4,000 students attend 57 colleges and universities. In her later years, Mrs. Jones brought opera to Houston radio, served on the general council of New York’s Metropolitan Opera and helped First Lady Mamie Eisenhower support military widows. She joined Houston Endowment’s board in 1954, and one year later the foundation made a $1 million grant to build the Mary Gibbs Jones College at Rice Institute (now Rice University) so women, for the first time, could live on campus. More than 30 scholarship programs were named for Mrs. Jones, and since her death on August 20, 1962, many more Houston Endowment grants have carried her name as a 108

tribute to her public service and philanthropy. Jesse Jones with President Franklin Roosevelt, being sworn in as secretary of commerce


In a 1936 speech to the Princeton-Harvard-Yale Conference on Public Affairs, Mr. Jones said, the founders

“Success is measured by the service you render and the character of citizen you make rather than by the amount of money you amass.� The Joneses devoted their lives to service and were exemplary citizens. Seventy-three years ago, they began donating the money they amassed to Houston Endowment so they could, in perpetuity, continue to help create a thriving community where they had prospered.

109


g

BOARD of DIR ECTORS of directors who are elected to three-year terms. Directors, who can serve up to four terms, typically are chosen from business and civic leaders in Houston.

board of directors

Houston Endowment is governed by a self-perpetuating board

D. K e n t A n d e r so n Elected January 18, 2000 Kent Anderson is a graduate of Rice University and the Colgate Darden Graduate School of Business at the University of Virginia. He is president of Anderson Family Partnership, a private investment company. In his 30-year banking career, Mr. Anderson served as special consultant to the chairman of Compass Bank, chairman and chief executive officer of Post Oak Bank, chairman and chief executive officer of First Interstate Bank and president of Allied Bancshares. He is in his third decade as a trustee of Rice University and has been a recipient of the university’s Gold Medal Award. Mr. Anderson previously served on the boards of Pulte Homes, Sam Houston Race Park, Central Houston, Texas Bankers Association, Texas Chamber of Commerce, Texas Research League, Texas Presbyterian Foundation, the Greater Houston Partnership, the Houston Ballet, the Houston Symphony, the Children’s Museum of Houston and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. He was one of the inaugural recipients of the Men of Distinction Award, which recognizes Houstonians who have distinguished themselves through excellence in community service. Other honors include serving as president of The Coronado Club, participating in the Joint Civilian Orientation Conference and receiving the National Humanitarian Award from The National Jewish Hospital. Mr. Anderson served in the U.S. Air National Guard and received the American Spirit of Honor Medal.

111


a n n e c h ao Elected February 2, 2010

board of directors

Anne Chao graduated from Wellesley College and received master’s and doctoral degrees from Rice University, where she lectures in the History Department in the field of modern Chinese history. Dr. Chao serves on the governing boards of the Alley Theatre, the Houston Ballet, the Houston Public Library Foundation and St. John’s School. She serves on the advisory boards of Inprint, Teach for America, Rice University Asian Studies, the Rice University Shepherd School of Music and the Rice University Center for the Study of Women, Gender and Sexuality. LINNET DEILY Elected February 13, 2007 Linnet Deily graduated from The University of Texas at Austin and received a master of arts in international management from The University of Texas at Dallas. She currently serves on the boards of directors of Chevron Corporation and Honeywell International Inc. She has served as deputy U.S.trade representative and U.S. ambassador to the World Trade Organization, vice chairman of the Charles Schwab Corporation and chairman and chief executive officer of First Interstate Bank of Texas. Ms. Deily currently serves on the boards of the Houston Zoo, the Greater Houston Partnership, St. Luke’s Episcopal Health System, The Jung Center of Houston and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Ms. Deily previously served on the board of regents of The University of Texas System. l a r ry R . Fau lk n e r , pre sident Elected January 31, 2006 Larry Faulkner has been president of Houston Endowment since 2006. He is a graduate of Southern Methodist University (B.S., 1966) and The  University of Texas at Austin (Ph.D., 1969). In an academic career spanning four decades, he served on the chemistry faculties of Harvard University, the University of Illinois and The University of Texas. At Illinois he was also head of the Department of Chemistry, dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and provost. In 1998, he returned to The University of Texas at Austin as the 27th president and served into 2006. He is co-author (with Allen J. Bard) of the prominent text ‘Electrochemical Methods: Fundamentals and Applications’ and is co-inventor of the cybernetic potentiostat, which had a lasting impact on the design of commercial analytical instruments. He has been recognized with awards from the American Chemical Society, the Electrochemical Society, the Society for Electroanalytical Chemistry and the U.S. Department of Energy. In 2003, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He serves currently on the boards of ExxonMobil Corporation and Temple-Inland.

112


Doug l as L . Fos h e e Elected February 2, 2010

A n t h o n y W. Ha ll , J r . , chair Elected January 28, 2003

board of directors

Douglas L. Foshee is chairman, president and chief executive officer of El Paso Corporation. Previously he served in executive positions at Halliburton, Nuevo Energy Company, Torch Energy Advisors Inc. and ARCO International Oil and Gas Company. Mr. Foshee earned a master of business administration degree from the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Business at Rice University and a bachelor of business administration degree from Southwest Texas State University. He is vice chairman of the National Petroleum Council. Mr. Foshee also serves on the boards of Rice University, KIPP, Texas Business Hall of Fame Foundation, Central Houston, the Greater Houston Partnership and the Council of Overseers for the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Business at Rice University. Mr. Foshee has received the Ellis Island Medal of Honor and the World Affairs Council of Houston’s Jesse H. Jones and Mary Gibbs Jones International Citizen Award, and he was named a Distinguished Alumni at Texas State University.

An attorney now in private practice, Anthony Hall previously served as the chief administrative officer and city attorney for the City of Houston. He is a graduate of Howard University in Washington, D.C., and the Thurgood Marshall School of Law at Texas Southern University. Mr. Hall has served as a representative in the Texas Legislature, a council member-at-large on the Houston City Council and chairman of the board of directors of the Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County. Mr. Hall serves on the board of directors of El Paso Corporation and is a past member of the board of directors of Coastal Corporation. He is chairman of the Boule Foundation and is past national president of Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity. He serves on the boards of the Houston Symphony, the Boy Scouts of America–Sam Houston Area Council, Junior Achievement of Southeast Texas, Inc., the Ensemble Theatre and the Texas Cultural Trust. Mr. Hall is a Vietnam veteran who attained the rank of captain and received the Purple Heart and three Bronze Stars. j e ss e h . j o n e s II Elected February 13, 2007 Jesse H. Jones II is the grandnephew of Jesse H. and Mary Gibbs Jones. He graduated from The University of Texas at Austin and currently has interests in several wireless communication ventures in the southwest and in a snack food company in Georgia. Mr. Jones is former chairman of the Houston Ballet Foundation and is currently serving as board chairman of the Foundation for DePelchin Children’s Center and the Society for the Performing Arts. He also serves on the boards of the Texas Freedom Network, Houston Arts Alliance and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and is a board member and treasurer of the Houston Public Library Foundation. He has served as president of DePelchin Children’s Center and was on the boards of the Alley Theatre, Houston Achievement Place, ChildBuilders, the Mental Health Association and Planned Parenthood.

113


Dav i d lou i s M e n d e z Elected January 31, 2006

board of directors

David Mendez is the chairman and chief executive officer of JPMorgan Chase’s Commercial Banking South Region, which includes Texas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. He began his career at the bank after graduating from The University of Texas at Austin in 1975. Mr. Mendez serves on the boards of Texas Children’s Hospital, the Center for Houston’s Future, the Houston Downtown Parks Corporation and the Dean’s Executive Board of the University of Houston’s C. T. Bauer College of Business. His recent accomplishments and civic contributions include chairman of the Center for Houston’s Future for 2004–2005, member of the board of trustees and executive committee of the United Way of the Texas Gulf Coast, where he served as a co-chairman of the 2003–2004 citywide fundraising campaign, and member of the executive committee of the Greater Houston Partnership. He has served on the Galveston-Houston Diocese Bishop’s Finance Council, 2004 Super Bowl Host Committee and the board of directors of Catholic Charities. He was honored by the Houston Area Women’s Center with its 2005 Making a Difference Award and in 2007 was honored by the Jewish Community Center at its annual Children’s Scholarship Ball.   pau l b . m u r ph y, J r . Elected January 31, 2006 Paul B. Murphy, Jr., is chief executive officer of Community Bancorp LLC, a recently formed company that will make investments in the banking industry. He was previously chief executive officer of Amegy Bank of Texas. A graduate of Mississippi State University, he also earned a master of business administration degree from The University of Texas at Austin. He began his banking career at Allied Bank of Texas and helped found Southwest Bank of Texas, the predecessor to Amegy Bank. Mr. Murphy serves on the governing boards of Hines Real Estate Investment Trust, Inc.; the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, Houston Branch; The Kinkaid School; The Children’s Museum of Houston; and the Mississippi State University Foundation. He is active in the Young Presidents Organization and is a member of the Governor’s Business Council.

114


g Independent Members of the Investment Committee board of directors

L . E . S i m m o n s graduated from the University of Utah, studied at the London School of Economics and received his master’s from Harvard Business School. He is president and founder of SCF Partners and serves on the board of directors of Zions Bancorporation. He is on the board, and former chairman, of Texas Children’s Hospital; a trustee of Rice University and former chairman of the Council of Overseers for its Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Management; and a trustee of The Gordon and Mary Cain Pediatric Neurology Research Foundation. He also serves on the Harvard Business School Visiting Committee, the London School of Economics North American Advisory Council and the Scripps Cardiovascular Institute Advisory Board. He is on the boards of directors of The Kinkaid School, the Boy Scouts of America-Sam Houston Area Council, the Texas Heart Institute and the Methodist Hospital Research Center. B ruc e Z i m m e r m a n is chief executive and chief investment officer of The University of Texas Investment Management Company (UTIMCO), one of the largest university endowments in the nation. A graduate of Duke University and the business school at Harvard University, he began his career at Bain and Company and served in a variety of management roles at Texas Commerce Bank (now JPMorgan Chase). Mr. Zimmerman served as chief investment officer at Citigroup before joining UTIMCO and currently serves on the board of the Commonfund.

With the completion of his service, Houston Endowment’s board and staff offer their sincere appreciation to Scot t W i s e for the valuable contributions he made as an independent member of the foundation’s investment committee.

115


g

STAFF as of May 2011

staff

Larry R. Faulkner

President

Anna B. Leal

Vice President and Grant Director

116

Sheryl L. Johns

Executive Vice President

George V. Grainger

Director of Research and Planning


Grant Staff

Lydia L. Hickey

Grant Manager

elizabeth G. Love

Grant Officer-Environment

Harriet W. Garland

Grant Manager

E. Jane Kennedy, CPS

Grant Manager

Debbie A. McNulty

Grant Officer-Arts & Culture and Human Services

Meghna Goswami

Grant Officer-Human Services

La Shaunda Kirkpatrick

Administrative Assistant

M. A. Toni Moreno

Jones Scholars Program Officer

George V. Grainger

Senior Grant Officer-Education

staff

Constance G. Bickham

Jones Scholars Program Manager

David Lake

Grant Officer-Arts & Culture

Leslie C. Wang

Grant Officer-Human Services

117


Finance and Administration Staff

staff

Deborah Bessire

Human Resource Manager

Douglas E. Garst, CPA

Real Estate Officer

Rosa H. Cervantes

Investment Accountant

Jerry N. Leonard

Accounting Assistant

Peggy J. Reid, CPA

Controller

118

Dana DuPriest

Steven L. Fenberg

Executive Assistant to the President

Community Affairs Officer

Paul W. McKinney

Office Assistant

Thomas C. Nall, Jr.

Information Officer

Kaye B. Williams

Jane A. Wirth

Administrative Assistant

Administrative Assistant


g

A FFI L I ATIONS Houston Endowment is affiliated with a variety of professional associations and opportunities for the foundation’s board and staff to learn from, and collaborate with, colleagues from other grantmaking and nonprofit organizations. Houston Endowment and members of its board and staff support or maintain memberships in these organizations: Association of Small Foundations BoardSource

affiliations

organizations that support philanthropy. Participating with these groups provides

Center for Effective Philanthropy Conference of Southwest Foundations, Inc. Council on Foundations Environmental Grantmakers Association The Foundation Center Foundation Financial Officers Group Grantmakers for Education Grantmakers in Health Grantmakers in the Arts Grant Managers Network Hispanics in Philanthropy Independent Sector The Investment Fund for Foundations National Scholarship Providers Association The Philanthropy Roundtable Technology Affinity Group Texas Environmental Grantmakers Group

119


g

financial report

121


g FINANCIAL REPORT I nve stm e nt s

financial report

During 2010, the value of Houston Endowment’s investments increased from $1.428 to $1.516 billion. The $88 million net increase includes investment income and the increase in the market value of the investments less grant payments, and investment and operating expenses. Total investment return (income plus capital appreciation), after investment fees, for the year was 11.3 percent. The average annual compound return for the past five years, net of fees, was 5.3 percent; for the past 10 years it was 5.5 percent. At year-end, the foundation’s endowment was invested as follows:

9.5% Private Equity

19.8% Domestic Equity

122

21.7% International Equity

13.3% Absolute Return Strategies

9.7% Natural Resources

6.8% Real Estate

14.7% Fixed Income

4.5% Cash


g r a n t s pe n d i n g i n m i lli o n s o f do ll a r s

100

financial report

90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

g r ant spe n di ng In 2010, Houston Endowment’s allocation for grants was $101 million. Each year’s grant allocation is based on five percent of a three-year average of the endowment’s market value. The goals of this spending policy are to provide a relatively stable pattern of spending on grants, despite fluctuations in security markets, and to preserve the inflation-adjusted value of the endowment in perpetuity. Grant allocations for any given year will differ from the total grants approved and total grants paid during that year. In 2010, the board of directors approved 929 grants totaling $70.3 million, some of which will be paid in future years. Also, $71.5 million was paid on 1,908 grants, some of which were approved in prior years. In addition to its regular grantmaking program, Houston Endowment matches, on a two-forone basis, personal gifts made to charitable organizations by the foundation’s directors and staff. In 2010, $442,651 in grants was paid under the matching gift program. Under a directed grant program that allows directors and other program participants designated by the board to designate certain amounts in grants to charitable organizations of their choosing, $587,000 in grants was paid in 2010. The foundation also made grants of $80,000 to organizations that support philanthropy and the charitable sector. 123


Financial Statements financial statements

The foundation prepares financial statements on a modified basis of cash receipts and disbursements that generally follows accounting principles used for federal excise tax purposes. Unaudited summary financial information is presented below. Once audited financial statements for the years ending December 31, 2010 and 2009, are complete, they will be posted on the foundation’s website at www.houstonendowment.org. S tat e m e n t s o f A s s e t s a n d F u n d B a l a n c e

As of December 31, 2010 B o o k Va l u e

As of December 31, 2009

Ma r k e t Va l u e

B o o k Va l u e

Ma r k e t Va l u e

Assets

Cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments

$

69,256,894

$

69,381,511

$

129,962,990

$

129,782,588

Marketable securities: Equity investments

672,159,865

697,962,814

703,428,230

651,584,623

Fixed-income investments

206,450,206

218,672,945

183,992,610

198,499,496

1,469,459

2,627,566

212,595

1,474,983

Total marketable securities and related receivables

880,079,530

919,263,325

887,633,435

851,559,102

Other investments

382,384,110

466,942,556

357,022,632

386,980,456

16,557,309

58,941,205

16,562,817

58,980,198

1,053,999

1,097,634

1,002,304

1,004,233

$ 1,349,331,842

$ 1,515,626,231

$ 1,392,184,178

$ 1,428,306,577

$

$

$

$

Accrued interest and dividends

Real property Other assets (net of depreciation) Total assets

Fund Balance

Appropriated for grants payable in future years Unappropriated fund balance Total fund balance 124

62,423,275

62,423,275

64,165,735

64,165,735

1,286,908,567

1,453,202,956

1,328,018,443

1,364,140,842

$ 1,349,331,842

$ 1,515,626,231

$ 1,392,184,178

$ 1,428,306,577


Years ended December 31 2010

2009

Revenues

Dividends Interest Partnership income Royalties and rents Other income

$

14,101,407 7,646,783

$

17,231,020 7,616,950

1,510,999

1,807,246

3,747,734

3,691,125

97,995

432,676

27,104,918

30,779,017

14,464,577

13,580,926

4,820,312

3,570,693

350,000

(831,046)

19,634,889

16,320,573

financial statements

S tat e m e n t s o f R e v e n u e s , E x p e n d i t u r e s a n d C h a n g e s i n F u n d B a l a n c e

Expenditures

Investment expenses Administrative expenses Federal excise taxes

Excess of revenues over expenditures before grant payments Grant payments

7,470,029

14,458,444

71,539,950

61,669,606

Excess of expenditures over revenues

(64,069,921)

(47,211,162)

1,392,184,178

1,465,037,925

21,217,585

(25,642,585)

$ 1,349,331,842

$ 1,392,184,178

Fund balance at beginning of year Realized capital gains (losses) Fund balance at end of year

125


g

Houston Endowment makes grants to nonprofit organizations that are recognized as charitable organizations by the Internal Revenue Code. The foundation supports organizations that serve Harris County and contiguous counties.* Grants are never made outside of the United States or to individuals. Houston Endowment provides funds to organizations that support and promote arts and culture, education, the environment, health and human services. The foundation also supports projects throughout the state that are central to Texas history. The foundation does not fund religious activities, fundraising events or galas.

grant application

g r a n t appl i c at i o n

In 2010, Houston Endowment implemented an online grant application and reporting system. The foundation prefers to receive applications via the online Grant Management System, but will continue to accept paper applications until October 15, 2011. Paper applications must be completed using the new application questions. To see the questions and to find more information about submitting online applications, please click on “Application Guidelines� at www.houstonendowment.org or call 713-238-8100. *Brazoria, Chambers, Fort Bend, Galveston, Liberty, Montgomery and Waller counties.

127


g

index

129


index 130

3 A Bereavement Foundation 86 A Caring Safe Place Inc. 71 Accepting Challenges to Improve Our Nation Community Development Corp 87 ACCION Texas Inc. 96 Adult Reading Center, Inc. 95 AIDS Foundation Houston Inc. 71 AIDS Research Consortium of Houston 71 Air Alliance Houston 52, 53, 57 Albert Schweitzer Fellowship Inc. 72 Aldine Independent School District 38 Aldine Youth Organization United to Help 94 Alley Theatre 19 Alvin Community College 39 American Festival for the Arts 17 American Heart Association Inc. - South Central Affiliate 71 American Leadership Forum 99 American Red Cross, Greater Houston Area Chapter 88 The Arc of Greater Houston 88 Ars Lyrica Houston 12, 13, 19 Art Council Inc. 20 Art League of Houston 20 Art Lies 17 ArtBridge 92 Arts Alliance Center at Clear Lake 20 Asian American Health Coalition of the Greater Houston Area 64, 65, 72 Assistance League of Houston 85 Association for Community Broadcasting 17 Association of Fundraising Professionals-Greater Houston Chapter 99 Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges 37 Audubon Texas 58 Aurora Picture Show 20 Avance Inc. 93 Avenue Community Development Corporation 97 Bach Society at Christ the King Evangelical Lutheran Church 20 Battleship Texas Foundation Inc. 25 Bay Area Rehabilitation Center 88 Baylor College of Medicine 61 Bayou Preservation Association, Inc. 58 Be The Match Foundation 74 Bering Omega Community Services 89 Better Business Bureau of Metropolitan Houston Educational Foundation 90 Big Brothers Big Sisters of North Texas 93 Bo’s Place 72 Brazoria County Alliance for Children Inc. 91 Brazosport College 39 Bread of Life Inc. 85 Breath of Life Children’s Center Inc. 72 Bridge Over Troubled Waters Inc. 91 Bridges to Life 87

Buffalo Bayou Partnership 57 Camp For All Foundation 76, 89 Capital Investing in Development and Employment of Adults Inc. 96 Career and Recovery Resources Inc. 96 Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos Incorporated 91 Catastrophic Theatre Inc. 20 Cathedral Health Ministries 85 Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston 87 Cenikor Foundation Inc. 71 Center for African American Military History Inc. 25 Center for Faith and Health Initiatives Inc. 85 Center for Hearing and Speech 89 Center for Houston’s Future Inc. 60 Center for Reform of School Systems Inc. 37 Center for the Healing of Racism 98 Center for Transportation & Commerce 25 Charles W. Moore Foundation Inc. 17 Child Advocates Incorporated 92 ChildBuilders 91 Childhood Cancer Family Alliance Inc. 74 Children’s Defense Fund 72 The Children’s Museum, Inc. 17 Chinese Community Center Inc. 88 Citizens’ Environmental Coalition Educational Fund 61 Citizens for Animal Protection Inc. 60 City Hall Fellows Inc. 98 City of Houston 57, 98 Close Up Foundation 98 Coalition for the Homeless of Houston/Harris County 88 Collaborative for Children 30, 31, 38 College for All Texans Foundation: Closing the Gaps 34, 35, 39 College of the Mainland 39 Communities Foundation of Texas Inc. 37, 39 Communities in Schools Bay Area, Inc. 93, 94 Communities in Schools Houston, Inc. 93 Community of the Streets Outreach Corporation 85 The Conservation Fund A Nonprofit Corporation 58 Contemporary Arts Museum Houston 17 Country Playhouse 20 Covenant House Texas 85, 94 Creative Alternatives Inc. 17 Crime Stoppers of Houston, Inc. 97 Crisis Intervention of Houston Incorporated 72 Cypress-Fairbanks Independent School District 38 Da Camera Society of Texas 20 Dance of Asian America 20 Daya Inc. 91 DePelchin Children’s Center 91, 92 Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance DBSA Greater Houston 72 Dionysus Theatre 17


Harris County Domestic Violence Coordinating Council 91 Harris County Healthcare Alliance 74 Harris County Hospital District Foundation 73 HawkWatch International Inc. 58 Healthcare for the Homeless-Houston 73, 87 Heritage Society 25 Hermann Park Conservancy 57 HITS Theatre 17 Holocaust Museum Houston 24 HomeAid America Inc. 85 Hope Stone Inc. 17 House of Amos Inc. 85 Houston Achievement Place 94 Houston Arboretum & Nature Center 59 Houston Area Parkinson Society 89 Houston Area Women’s Center 91 Houston Arts Alliance 24, 26 Houston Arts and Media 25 Houston Ballet Foundation 8, 17, 21 Houston Baptist University 41 Houston Center for Contemporary Craft 21 Houston Center for Photography 17 Houston Chamber Choir 21 Houston Children’s Chorus Inc. 17 Houston Clean City Commission Inc. 61 Houston Community College System 39 Houston Community Health Centers Inc. 73 Houston Compass Inc. 87 Houston Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Inc. 71 Houston Early Music 21 Houston Festival Foundation Inc. 24 Houston Food Bank 85 Houston Friends of Chamber Music Inc. 21 Houston Grand Opera Association, Inc. 18 Houston Hispanic Forum 39 Houston Humane Society 60 Houston Independent School District 39 Houston Independent School District Foundation 38 Houston Interfaith Sponsoring Committee, Incorporated 98 Houston International Dance Coalition 21 Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo Inc. 94 Houston Metropolitan Dance Center Inc. 21 Houston Museum District Association 27 Houston Museum of African American Culture 24 Houston Museum of Natural Science 24 Houston Music Hall Foundation 21 Houston Parks Board 57 Houston Public Library Foundation 27 Houston READ Commission 95 Houston Repertoire Ballet 22

index

Diverse Works Inc. 20 Dress for Success Houston 96 Earthen Vessels Inc. dba Sandra Organ Dance Company 20 The Education Foundation of Harris County 93 Education Pioneers Inc. 32, 33, 37 Educational Programs Inspiring Communities Inc. 89 El Centro de Corazon 73 Elves & More 93 Ensemble Theatre 20 Environment Texas Research and Policy Center Inc. 58 Environmental Defense Fund Incorporated 57 Environmental Integrity Project 57 Environmental Support Center Inc. 61 Escape Family Resource Center of the Exchange Clubs of Houston 92 Executive Service Corps of Houston Inc. 99 Express Theatre 20 Eye Care for Kids Foundation 72 Family Promise of Montgomery County Inc. 85 Family Service Center at Houston and Harris County 72 Family to Family Network 90 The Forge for Families Inc. 94 Fort Bend Community Revitalization Projects 97 Fort Bend County Women’s Center, Inc. 92 Fort Bend Family Health Center, Inc. 73 FotoFest Inc. 20 Foundation for Modern Music Inc. 21 Foundation for the Retarded 89 Fourth Ward Clinic dba Good Neighbor Healthcare Center 73 Fredericksburg Education Initiative Inc. 41 Freneticore 21 Fresh Arts Coalition 26 Friends of Libraries and Archives of Texas Inc. 25 Friends of the Texas Historical Commission Inc. 14, 15, 25 Fundacion Latino Americana Contra El Sida Inc. 71 Galveston Arts Center Inc. 21 Galveston Bay Foundation 58 Galveston Community College 39 Galveston County Economic Alliance Foundation Inc. 96 Galveston Historical Foundation Inc. 25 Gathering Place Inc. 74 Genesys Works 96 Gilbert & Sullivan Society of Houston 21 Girls Incorporated of Greater Houston 94 Glasstire 17 Goose Creek Consolidated Independent School District 38 Greater Houston Community Foundation 21, 27, 85 Greater Houston Preservation Alliance, Inc. 25 Greens Bayou Corridor Coalition 48, 57 Gulf Coast – A Journal of Literature and Fine Arts 21 Gulf Coast Bird Observatory Inc. 58

131


index 132

Houston Rescue and Restore Coalition 82, 83, 90 Houston Symphony Society 22 Houston Tomorrow 60 Houston Volunteer Lawyers Program, Inc. 87 Houston Wilderness Inc. 59 Houston Young Artist’s Concert 18 Houston Youth Symphony & Ballet 18 Houston-Harris County Immunization Registry Inc. 67, 68, 71 Humble Area Assistance Ministries 88 Ibn Sina Foundation Inc. 73 Independent Arts Collaborative 27 Indiana University 27 Inprint Inc. 22 Institute of Hispanic Culture of Houston, Texas 24 Interfaith Carepartners, Inc. 89 Interfaith Ministries for Greater Houston 85 Jazz Education Inc. 18 Jesse H. and Mary Gibbs Jones Scholars Program 41, 42-46 Jewish Family Service 89 John P. McGovern Museum of Health & Medical Science 24 Julia Ideson Library Preservation Partners Inc. 25 Katy Artreach 18 Katy Christian Ministries 85 Katy Prairie Conservancy 59 Katy Visual & Performing Arts Center 18 Kick Drugs Out of America Foundation 94 Kids Hope USA Inc. 93 Krist Samaritan Center for Counseling and Education 74 La Rosa-The Rose 91 Land Trust Alliance Incorporated 59 Latino Learning Center, Inc. 89 Lawndale Art and Performance Center 22 Leadership Houston Inc. 99 League City Historical Society Inc. 26 League of Women Voters of Houston Education Fund 98 Lee College 40 Legacy Community Health Services Inc. 73 Legacy Land Trust Inc. 58, 59 Linda Lorelle Scholarship Fund Inc. 39 Literacy Advance of Houston, Inc. 80, 81, 95 Literacy Texas 95 Literacy Volunteers of Fort Bend County Inc. 95 Local Infant Formula for Emergencies Inc. 86 Lone Star College System 40 Main Street Theater at Autry House 22 Manhattan Theatre Club, Inc. 18 Manned Space Flight Education Foundation Inc. 18 Masquerade Theatre 22 Memorial Assistance Ministries Inc. 96 Memorial Park Conservancy Inc. 57

Menil Foundation Inc. 18 Mental Health America of Greater Houston Inc. 71 The Mercury Baroque Ensemble 22 Miller Theatre Advisory Board Inc. 22 MIND Research Institute 41 Mission of Yahweh Inc. 86 Montgomery County Emergency Assistance 87 Montgomery County United Way Inc. 74 Montgomery County Youth Services Inc. 94 Montrose Counseling Center, Inc. 74 Mosaica Inc. 61 Multicultural Education and Counseling through the Arts 24 The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 18 Museum of Printing History 26 Music in Context 22 Musiqa 18 My Brother’s Keeper Outreach Center 86 Nameless Sound 18 NAMI Gulf Coast 73 National Academy of Sciences 60 National Assembly of State Arts Agencies 27 National Association of Elementary School Principals Foundation 37 National College Access Network Inc. 39 National Fish and Wildlife Foundation 59 National Trust for Historic Preservation in the United States 26 The Nature Conservancy of Texas 50, 51, 59 The Nature Discovery Center Inc. 6, 59 Neighborhood Centers Inc. 96, 97, 99 Network of Behavioral Health Providers Inc. 74 New Caney New Horizons Inc. 75 New Hope Housing Inc. 78, 79, 97 The New Teacher Project, Inc. 38 Northwest Assistance Ministries 86 OASIS Institute Houston Older Adult Enrichment Program 89 Open Door Mission Foundation 86 Opera in the Heights 22 Orange Show Foundation 22 Our Promise for West Baytown Inc. 94 Pacifica Foundation 24 Palacios Area Historical Association 26 Palmer Drug Abuse Program-Houston Inc. 73 Palmer Memorial Episcopal Church 86 Partners for Harris County Children Inc. 92 Partners for Livable Communities Inc. 27 Planned Parenthood of Houston and Southeast Texas, Inc. 73 Prairie View A&M University 4, 40 Prison Entrepreneurship Program 96 Progressive Forum 98 Project Row Houses 18 Pro-Vision Ministries Inc. 95


Texas Land Conservancy 59 Texas Medical Center Orchestra 23 Texas One Voice A Collaborative for Health & Human Services 98 Texas Rice Industry Coalition for the Environment 59 Texas Southern University 40, 98 Texas State Historical Association 26 Texas Woman’s University 92 Theater LaB Houston 23 Theatre Suburbia Inc. 23 Theatre Under The Stars Inc. 23 Thomas B. Fordham Institute 41 TOMAGWA Ministries Inc. 74 Travesty Dance Group 23 Turtle Island Restoration Network 59 United Nations Association of the USA Inc. 98 United States Veterans Initiative 86 United Way of Greater Houston 99 University of Houston 19, 23, 26, 38, 40, 41, 54, 55, 58 University of Houston Clear Lake 19 University of Houston-Downtown 40 University of North Texas 25 The University of Texas at Austin 37, 39, 40, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston 71 The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center 71 Urban Entrepreneur Partnership Inc. 97 Urban Harvest Inc. 60 U.S. Foundation for the Inspiration and Recognition of Science & Technology 94 Virtuosi of Houston 19 VN Teamwork 87 Voices Breaking Boundaries 24 Volunteer Houston 99 Volunteer Interfaith Caregivers Southwest 90 W. Leo Daniels Towers, Inc. 90 W. Oscar Neuhaus Memorial Foundation 93 Wesley Community Center, Inc. 88 Westside Homeless Partnership 88 Wharton County Junior College 40 The Women’s Fund for Health Education and Research 72 The Women’s Home 88 Women’s Resource of Greater Houston 87 Wonderworks 93 Workshop Houston 93 World Affairs Council of Houston 98 Writers in the Schools 19 Yellowstone Academy Inc. 87 Young Audiences Inc. of Houston 10, 11, 19 Young Life 95 Young Men’s Christian Association of Greater Houston Area 72, 93 Zina Garrison All Court Tennis Academy 95

index

Psophonia 22 Public Citizen Foundation, Inc. 57 Reach Unlimited, Inc. 89 Resolve It Inc. 94 Rice University 37, 41 River Oaks Chamber Orchestra 19 River Performing and Visual Arts Center 27 Rogosin Institute Inc. 71 The Rose 74 San Jacinto Battleground Association 26 San Jacinto College District 40 San Jacinto Museum of History Association 26 San Jose Clinic 73 Santa Maria Hostel Inc. 62, 75 Scenic Texas, Inc. 60 Search Institute 93 Service of the Emergency Aid Resource Center for the Homeless 86 The Shakespeare Globe Centre Southwest Inc. 19 SHAPE Community Center Inc. 97 Sheltering Arms 90 Society for Preservation & Encouragement of Barbershop Quartet Singing America 23 Society for the Performing Arts 23 Southeast Area Ministries 86, 88 Southwest Alternate Media Projects Inc. 23 Spacetaker 23 SPARK 57 Spaulding for Children 92 Spay-Neuter Assistance Program Inc. 60 Spring Branch Education Foundation 37 Spring Branch Independent School District 24, 39 Stages Inc. 23 Star of Hope Mission 86 Student Conservation Association, Inc. 59 Tahirih Justice Center 92 Talento Bilingue de Houston 24 Target Hunger 86 Teach for America Inc. 38 Texan-French Alliance for the Arts 19 Texans Together Education Fund 97 Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, Texas A&M University System 58 Texas A&M Foundation 38 Texas Accountants & Lawyers for the Arts 23 Texas Appleseed 90 Texas Children’s Hospital 75 Texas Council on Family Violence Incorporated 90 Texas Folklife Resources 23 Texas Heart Institute 68, 69, 74 Texas Institute for Education Reform 37

133


Hous t on E n d ow m e n t a phila nthropy en d owe d by j e s s e h . a n d m a ry gibbs j on e s 600 Travis, Suite 6400 Houston, Texas 77002-3000 Tel 713.238.8100 Fax 713.238.8101 w w w.houstonendowment.org

writer , photographer and producer

Steven Fenberg design

CORE Design Studio, Houston, Texas proofreader

Polly Koch Other photography

Page 8 Page 12 Page 15 Page 35 Page 48 Page 52 Page 55 Page 62 Page 69 Page 76 Page 79

Houston Ballet—courtesy of Nic Lehoux and Gensler Ars Lyrica Houston—courtesy of Anthony Rathbun Texas Historical Commission College for All Texans Foundation—courtesy of www.gentx.org Greens Bayou Corridor Coalition—courtesy of Houston Canoe Club Air Alliance Houston University of Houston—courtesy of Metalab Santa Maria Hostel—courtesy of the Houston Chronicle Texas Heart Institute Camp For All—courtesy of Rocky Kneten New Hope Housing Inc.—courtesy of Bruce Glass Photography

Houston Endowment’s 2010 annual report was printed entirely on Forest Stewardship Council certified paper using soy-based inks. FSC certification ensures that the paper used in this report contains fiber from well-managed and responsibly harvested forests that meet strict environmental and socioeconomic standards.

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Houston Endowment 2010 Annual Report  

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