Page 1

Media Kit 2017 – 2018 School Year

Our mission is that our students will be high-achieving. Our vision is that our system will be world class.


Beliefs

Safety is our number one priority.  Failure is not an option. We do expect that all children can learn.  We will not be satisfied until all of our schools meet or exceed the highest academic standards.

 We are committed to determining what each child needs to fulfill his potential.  We take responsibility for learning, for both our students and ourselves.  We are not afraid of change and will embrace change that is research-based and proven to be effective.

The Houston County Way  Strive for excellence in all that we do.  Have a professional attitude.  Go the extra mile.  Base decisions on what’s best for the child.  Provide quality customer service.  Hard work, dedication and love for children.  Approach work every day with a positive attitude, hope, enthusiasm and compassion.  Do things right; do the right thing. This Media Kit is provided by the Houston County Board of Education Community & School Relations Department. The HCBOE Community & School Relations Department supports the district’s mission and vision. Our goals are to: develop positive relationships with our employees, students, parents, businesses, Robins AFB leaders, elected officials and media representatives; provide our customers with accurate, timely and transparent information through a variety of communication tools; increase community awareness; promote our students and employees’ successes; and to build support and trust for public education.

For more information, please contact: Mrs. Beth Conley McLaughlin Director, Community & School Relations  478.988.6390  Beth.McLaughlin@hcbe.net 1100 Main Street, Perry, GA 31069  www.hcbe.net


Table of Contents Page Number Working Together: Schools & the Media ........................................ 5 System Quick Reference ..................................................................... 7 Houston County Board of Education Members .............................. 8 Board of Education Meeting Schedule............................................ 10 Central Office Staff ............................................................................ 11 Schools, Addresses, Phone Numbers, Principals & E-mails ....... 12 School System Calendar .................................................................... 13 Test Schedule ...................................................................................... 14 Report Card Dates .............................................................................. 15 Special Dates........................................................................................ 16 Graduation ........................................................................................... 17 Accreditation ....................................................................................... 18 School Start and End Times.............................................................. 19 School Zones........................................................................................ 19 Enrollment History ............................................................................. 20 Budget ................................................................................................... 21 Millage Rate ......................................................................................... 22 Georgia Milestones Assessment System ....................................... 23 College & Career Readiness Performance Index ......................... 26 Advance Placement ............................................................................ 27 ESOL Program ...................................................................................... 28 Student Services ................................................................................. 29


Table of Contents, Continued Page Number Facilities................................................................................................ 31 Transportation .................................................................................... 32 Map of School Locations ................................................................... 33 School Mascots and Colors ............................................................... 34 Georgia Schools of Excellence ......................................................... 35 School Bell Awards............................................................................. 36 Teachers of the Year .......................................................................... 37 Employees of the Year ...................................................................... 39 Exemplary Awards ............................................................................. 40 Educational Web Sites........................................................................ 45 Georgia Department of Education .................................................. 46 Georgia Board of Education.............................................................. 47 Education Acronyms ......................................................................... 49 Education Definitions ........................................................................ 55


Working Together: Schools & the Media Relationship with the Media The Houston County Board of Education invites and welcomes the active participation of newspapers, magazines, radio, television and other mass media of communication in promoting the cause of good education. Our school system appreciates the local media and their interest in our schools. Our system views reporters as representatives of the public at large. We understand that reporters have an important job, and we do our best to be responsive and respectful of deadlines. Our goal is to provide accurate information in a timely manner. Board of Education policies and procedures and federal and state laws govern the system’s public information program. Key HCBOE Policies and Procedures  Board policy requires that requests for interviews with pupils, teachers and school system employees be approved by the Community Relations Department.  In the event of approval for an interview with a student, the parent must be present for the interview or provide written consent.  All visitors, including media representatives, are to report immediately to the principal’s office upon arrival and to report again to the principal’s office as he/she leaves the building. References: KB, Community Relations, Public Information Program and KM-R, Community Relations, Visits To The School Federal Law: FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act) School systems have a legal and ethical responsibility to protect the privacy of students and their education records. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) is a federal law that protects the privacy of student education records and limits information a school system may release about a student without parental or legal guardian consent. For example, school personnel may not disclose students’ grades, disciplinary record or academic program (such as if the student receives special education services). Georgia Law Regarding Employees Likewise, the Houston County School System has a responsibility to protect the rights of its employees, especially those who may be in the public spotlight. For example, employee home telephone numbers and addresses are exempt from release and would be redacted from files before made available for the public. Media often request a personnel file or ask for comments about an employee who is facing a disciplinary hearing. The school system follows the Open Records Act, Official Code of Georgia Annotated (O.C.G.A.) § 51-18-70 et seq., and discloses information that is legally releasable. At the same time, the system is bound by law to not disclose certain information. For example, per O.C.G.A. § 20-2-210, performance evaluations are confidential and not considered open records. Also, documents used as part of an employee investigation also are not releasable until 10 days after the investigation has concluded or, if necessary, after the Board has taken action.

5


Working Together: Schools & the Media, cont.

Georgia Law Regarding Visitors to Schools Maintaining a safe, orderly educational environment on campus and in the classroom is the most important consideration for a principal, including when working with the news media. The principal’s judgment will be the primary factor in determining the extent to which the news media will be allowed access to Houston County schools. O.C.G.A. § 20-2-1180 requires school visitors to check in at the designated location and give the reason for their visit. As reporters are visitors to the campus, they are required to sign in at the school’s main office. Media representatives will be escorted by the principal or designee while they are in the building. Schools may refuse access to media representatives on school property if their presence or behavior would be disruptive to the school environment. The Georgia Legislature strengthened the law regarding visitors on school property: O.C.G.A. § 20-2-1181 prohibits disruption of a public school. Crisis or Emergency Situations During a crisis or an emergency, media access to schools and other facilities may be limited to ensure student and staff safety or to maintain order. Administrators, however, may designate an area on school property to conduct news briefings on the crisis or emergency. In these situations, normal access procedures for media and other visitors may be suspended in the interest of student and staff safety and an orderly emergency response. Media Requests for Public Records The Houston County Board of Education fully complies with the Open Records Act (O.C.G.A. § 51-1870 et seq.), which exists to foster confidence in government through transparency. Open records requests should be submitted in writing to the Director of Community and School Affairs, the media’s official point of contact for requesting the release of public records. She will share requests with the appropriate department, help arrange inspection of records and assess staff time and copying costs, when necessary, in document retrieval and reproduction. During her absence, forward any requests to the Superintendent of Schools. As required by law, a response will be provided within three business days. Interviews, Photography and Videography Interviews, photographing or videotaping on school system property must be approved by the Community Relations Department. Requests for interviews are generally granted if the individual from whom the interview is being sought agrees to participate. Students may not be photographed or interviewed without parental permission. General images of children in which no one student is identifiable (such as backs of heads or shots of legs and feet) do not require parental permission. Media Liaison The media liaison for the Houston County School System is the Director of Community & School Affairs, Beth C. McLaughlin. Mrs. McLaughlin may be contacted by e-mail at Beth.McLaughlin@hcbe.net, by telephone at the office at 478-988-6390, ext. 0, or by cell phone at 478-256-8550. E-mail is best. When calling, please try the office number first.

Suggestions to improve the flow of information are always welcome.

6


System Quick Reference

Enrollment as of October 2017: 29,490

39 Campuses:  23 elementary schools (grade ranges Pre-K through 5)  8 middle schools (grades 6-8)  5 high schools (grades 9-12)  1 each - alternative school, Career Academy (charter school); Elberta Center

Economically disadvantaged as of October 2016: 60.4%

Students with Disabilities: ~11.6%

Enrolled in Gifted Program: ~14%

Ethnicity as of October 2016:  Asian 2.83%  American Indian .17%  Hispanic 9.07%

  

Black 37.48% White 45.00% Multiracial 5.44%

Female / Male: 48.82% / 51.18%

 

English Language Learners: 2.8% 34 different languages are spoken as our students’ native language.

4-Year Cohort Graduation Rate, 2017: Houston County = 87.6%; Georgia = 80.6%

Pupil-Teacher Ratio: 14:1 (total number of teachers divided into enrollment)

 Our district employs a total of approximately 5,000 employees. Our 2,234 certified teachers have the following degrees:  3 hold a teaching permit;  597 have a bachelor’s degree;  872 a master’s degree;  649 a specialist degree; and  113 a doctorate degree.

100% of Houston County teachers and paraprofessionals are deemed Professionally Qualified by the Georgia Department of Education.

 

FY 2018 Total Budget: $342,622,477 Average Expenditure per Pupil FY16: ~$11,256.39

7


Board Members

Mr. Fred Wilson, Chairman, District 4

114 Palm Drive, Warner Robins, GA 31088 (478) 929-0605 (home) post4@hcbe.net Term expires December 31, 2018; Member since January 1995

Mrs. Helen Hughes, Vice Chairman, District 5 112 Country Lane, Kathleen, GA 31047 (478) 987-4829 (home) post5@hcbe.net Term expires December 31, 2020; Member since June 2009

Mr. Dave Crockett, District 3 2011 Northside Road, Perry, GA 31069-2224 (478) 987-4194 (home) post3@hcbe.net Term expires December 31, 2020; Member since September 2015

8


Board Members, continued Mrs. Lori Johnson, District 2 524 Childers Drive, Warner Robins, GA 31088 (478) 284-9547 (cell) post2@hcbe.net Term expires December 31, 2018; Member since September 2015

Mr. Hoke Morrow, At Large, District 6 225 Lake Joy Rd., Perry, GA 31069 (478) 988-4094 (home) post6@hcbe.net Term expires December 31, 2018; Member since January 2015

Dr. Rick Unruh, District 1 102 Durango Drive, Centerville, GA 31028 (478) 923-3829 (home) post1@hcbe.net Term expires December 31, 2020; Member since March 2013

Mr. Bryan Upshaw, At Large, District 7 201 Jadestone Ct., Centerville, GA 31028

(478) 256-3284 (cell) post7@hcbe.net Term expires December 31, 2020; Member since August 2014

In Houston County, we are fortunate to have the best Board of Education that one could find anywhere in the U.S.!

9


Board of Education Meetings The Houston County Board of Education typically meets twice a month. The formal session is held the second Tuesday of the month at 1:00 p.m. at the Board of Education located at 1100 Main Street in Perry. The work session is held the Monday evening prior to the second Tuesday unless that Monday falls on a holiday. The work sessions are held at 6:00 p.m. either at the central office or a school. Special meetings are called as needed. The purpose of the meetings is to discuss any lawful business that should come before the Board. Meeting dates, locations and times are listed below and are approved through December.

2017 - 18 Houston County Board of Education Meetings

July 17 July 18

Work Session – BOE, Perry – 6:00 p.m. Meeting – BOE, Perry – 1:00 p.m.

August 7 August 8

Work Session – BOE, Perry – 6:00 p.m. Meeting – BOE, Perry – 1:00 p.m.

September 11 September 12

Work Session – Matt Arthur Elementary – 6:00 p.m. Meeting – BOE, Perry – 1:00 p.m.

October 2 October 3

Board Retreat – Herman Ragin Center, Perry – 8:30 a.m. Meeting – BOE, Perry – 1:00 p.m.

November 13 November 14

Work Session – Miller Elementary – 6:00 p.m. Meeting – BOE, Perry – 1:00 p.m.

December 11 December 12

Work Session – Morningside Elementary – 6:00 p.m. Meeting – BOE, Perry – 1:00 p.m.

January 8 January 9

Work Session – Huntington Middle – 6:00 PM Meeting – BOE, Perry – 1:00 PM

February 12 February 13

Work Session – Mossy Creek Middle – 6:00 PM Meeting – BOE, Perry – 1:00 PM

March 12 March 13

Work Session – Northside Elementary – 6:00 PM Meeting – BOE, Perry – 1:00 PM

April 9 April 10

Work Session – Northside High – 6:00 PM Meeting – BOE, Perry – 1:00 PM

May 7 May 8

Board Retreat – Ragin Center – 8:30 AM Meeting – BOE, Perry – 1:00 PM

June 11 June 12

Work Session – BOE, Perry – 6:00 PM Meeting – BOE, Perry – 1:00 PM

Note: The Board approves the meeting calendar in January for the calendar year. All meetings are subject to change.

10


Central Office Staff, 2017 - 2018 Superintendent of Schools: Dr. Mark Scott Deputy Superintendent for Administrative Services: Cindy Flesher Assistant Superintendent for Finance & Business Operations: Stephen Thublin Assistant Superintendent for School Operations: Dr. Richard Rogers Assistant Superintendent for Student Services: Dr. Zabrina Cannady Assistant Superintendent for Teaching & Learning: Dr. Eric Payne Executive Director for Elementary Operations: Lazunia Frierson Executive Director for Secondary Operations: Dr. Lionel Brown Director of Accounting: Michelle Morris Director of Career, Technical & Agricultural Education: David McDermott Director of Community & School Relations: Beth McLaughlin Director of Employee Benefits: Kristen Smith Director of Facilities: Scott Hill Director of Federal Programs: Dana Morris Director of Gifted Education: Jan Jacobsen Director of Maintenance: Cecil Parker Director of Personnel: Tonya Maddox Director of Professional Learning: Sharon Moore Director of Purchasing: Becky Daniel Director of School Nutrition: Meredith Potter Director of Student Services: Dr. Jenny McClintic Director of Technology: Brian Trent Director of Transportation: Tom Walmer Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator

of Assessment & Accountability: Chuck Dumas of Certification: Michelle Casey of Certification: Valerie Thomas of Health Related Services: Dana Rollins of Language Arts, K-5: Dr. Amanda Yoh of Language Arts, 6-12 & World Languages: Dr. Amy Fouse of Mathematics K-5 & School Improvement Specialist: Nikki Cooper of Mathematics, 6-12: Dr. Cassie Rape of School Nutrition: Shana Wood of Science, K-5: Tonya Woolfolk of Science, 6-12: Dr. Ann Williams-Brown of Social Studies, K-5: Gretna Soltis of Social Studies, 6-12: Dr. Melanie Watson of Special Education for Instruction: Dr. Shirley Randall of Special Programs: Blanche Lamb of Student Services: Robin Boutwell of Student Services: Jody Dean of Student Services: Monica Smith of Student Services Technology: Alissa Green of Cyber Security: Jarett (JC) Hill Any of these staff members may be contacted at (478) 988-6200.

11


School List

12


School Calendar

2017 July 26 – August 1

Pre-Planning (Opening Session July 26)

August 2

First Day of School

September 4

Labor Day Holiday

October 6

System/Site Collaboration, Parent Conferences, Student Holiday

October 9 - 13

Columbus Day Holiday and Fall Break

November 10

Veterans Day Holiday

November 20 - 24

Thanksgiving Holiday

December 20

Last Day of 1st Semester

December 21 – 29

Christmas Holiday

2018 January 1-2

New Year’s Day Holiday

January 3

Site Collaboration, Student Holiday

January 4

2nd Semester Begins

January 15

Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday

February 19

Presidents’ Day Holiday

February 20

System/Site Collaboration, Student Holiday

March 26 - 30

Spring Break

May 23

2nd Semester Ends, Last Day of School

May 24 – 25

Post-Planning / Site Collaboration

May 25 - 26

High School Graduation

May 28

Memorial Day Holiday

13


Test Schedule Elementary School Assessments August 1 – May 12 September 6 – March 24 October 24 – 26 January 13 January 17 – March 3 April 10 – 28 May 16 – 19

GKIDS, Grade K GAA Main Administration ITBS, Grades 2 and 4 GKIDS DOE Checkpoint ACCESS for ELLs Georgia Milestones Main Administration, Grades 3 - 5 EOG Retest Grades 3 and 5

Middle School Assessments September 6 – March 24 October 24 – 26 January 17 – March 3 April 10 – 28 May 16 – 19

GAA Main Administration ITBS, Grade 6 ACCESS for ELLs Georgia Milestones EOG Main Administration, Gr. 6-8 EOG Retest Grade 8

High School Assessments August 22 -26 September 6 – March 24 September 19 - 23 October 17 – 21 October 19 November 14 – 18 December 5 – 9 January 17– 23 January 17 – March 3 February 13 – 17 March 13 – 17 April 3 - May 12 April 24 – May 12 May 1 – 12

Georgia Milestones EOC Mid-month GAA Main Administration Georgia Milestones EOC Mid-month Georgia Milestones Mid-month PSAT Georgia Milestones EOC Mid-month Georgia Milestones EOC Winter Administration Georgia Milestones EOC Mid-month ACCESS for ELLs Georgia Milestones EOC Mid-month Georgia Milestones EOC Mid-month End of Pathway Assessments Georgia Milestones EOC Main Administration AP Exams

For more information, please visit our Testing webpage.

14


Report Card Dates, 2017 - 2018

2017 – 2018 Report cards are issued as follows, based on 180 days of school:  Elementary School: every nine weeks (about 45 days)  Middle school: every 18 weeks at the end of the semester (about 90 days), with progress reports issued at six and 12 weeks of each semester.  High School: every 18 weeks at the end of the semester (about 90 days), with progress reports issued close to six and 12 weeks of each semester.

Elementary School Nine Weeks Period Progress Report, Day 21 Report Card (9 weeks), Day 44 Progress report, Day 68 Report Card (9 weeks), Day 88 Progress report, Day 110 Report Card (9 weeks), Day 133 Progress Report, Day 158 Report Card (9 weeks), Day 180

End Date August 30 October 3 November 13 December 20 February 5 March 12 April 23 May 23

Date Report Issued 1 September October 16 November 15 January 9 February 7 March 14 April 25 May 23

Middle School Semeste rs Day 32 Progress Report, Progress Report, Day 61 End 1st Semester, Day 88 Progress Report, Day 118 Progress Report, Day 148 End 2nd Semester, Day 180

End Date September 15 November 3 December 20 February 15 April 9 May 23

Date Reports Issued 20 September November 8 January 9 February 21 April 11 May 25

High School Semeste rs Day 32 Progress Report, Progress Report, Day 61 End 1st Semester, Day 88 Progress Report, Day 118 Progress Report, Day 148 End 2nd Semester, Day 180

End Date September 15 November 3 December 20 February 15 April 9 May 23

Date Reports Issued 20 September November 8 January 9 February 21 April 11 May 25

15


Special Dates SEPTEMBER 2017

FEBRUARY 2018, CONT.

10 11 17 22

MARCH 2018

National School Attendance Awareness Month Grandparent’s Day Patriot Day Constitution Day First Day of Autumn

2 5-9 13-17 17-24

OCTOBER 2017

Down Syndrome Awareness Month National Physical Therapy Month National Principals Month 2-6 Georgia Pre-K Week 3 FTE Count 8-14 Fire Prevention Week 9-13 National School Lunch Week 16 National Boss’ Day 16 Georgia School Bus Driver Appreciation Day 16-20 National School Bus Safety Week 18 Health Tech Appreciation Day 23-31 Red Ribbon Week

NOVEMBER 2017

Georgia Apply to College Month Parent Engagement Month 5 Daylight Saving Time Ends (fall back) 6 Custodian Appreciation Day 7 Election Day 11 Veterans Day 13-17 School Psychology Awareness Week 16 Thanksgiving lunch in schools

DECEMBER 2017 14 15 21

Christmas lunch in schools Bill of Rights Day First Day of Winter

JANUARY 2018 22

Gifted Education Month 100th Day of School

FEBRUARY 2018

Black History Month Career, Technical & Agricultural Education Month American Heart Month Children’s Dental Health Month

1 2 5-9 5-9 10 11 13 20 20 TBA

Groundhog Day School Counseling Week National FCCLA Week National FFA Week

Exceptional Children’s Month Music in Our Schools Month Social Work Month Youth Art Month FTE Count NEA’s Read Across America National School Breakfast Week National Social Workers Week Teacher Recruiting Fair, VHS Daylight Saving Time Begins (spring forward) Paraprofessional Appreciation Day First Day of Spring National Agriculture Day School Board Member Appreciation Week

APRIL 2018

Autism Awareness Month Month of the Military Child Occupational Therapy Awareness Month Month of the Young Child 8-14 National Library Week 22 Earth Day 21 Prom 15-21 National Volunteer Week 25 Administrative Professionals Day 27 National Arbor Day

MAY 2018

Better Hearing and Speech Month Teacher Appreciation Week School Nutrition Employee Appreciation Day 7-11 National Music Week 7-13 Children’s Book Week 8 National Teacher Day 8 Retirement Banquet 9 School Nurse Appreciation Day 13-19 National Police (SRO) Week 19 Armed Forces Day 25-26 Graduation 7-11 7-11


Graduation Graduation 2018

Georgia National Fairgrounds Miller-Murphy-Howard Building Perry, Georgia Friday, May 25, 2018 Houston County High, 4:30 p.m. Northside High, 8:00 p.m. Saturday, May 26 , 2018 Warner Robins High, 8:30 a.m. Veterans High School, 12:00 p.m. Perry High, 3:30 p.m.

17


Accreditation In 2014 and 2009, the Houston County School System was granted District Accreditation by the AdvancED Accreditation Commission, the national commission that confers the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Council on Accreditation and School Improvement (SACS CASI) accreditation seal. This means that the system and all 38 schools are accredited, recognizing Houston County across the nation as a quality school system. The accreditation process involves three ongoing components: 1) meeting high quality standards; 2) implementing a continuous process of improvement; and 3) engaging in quality assurance through internal and external review. Accreditation is good for five years; regular monitoring of progress and reporting occurs during the five-year term. District Accreditation provides Houston County a nationally-recognized mark of quality for our system overall, as well as all schools within our district. It demonstrates our commitment to excellence, our openness to external review and feedback, and our desire to be the best we can be on behalf of the students we serve. District Accreditation is a rigorous process that focuses the entire school system on the primary goal of creating lifelong learners.

18


School Times Primary and Elementary Schools All Primary and Elementary Schools: 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Doors Open at 7:45 a.m. Middle Schools All Middle Schools: 7:30 a.m. to 2:45 p. m. High Schools All High Schools: 7:45 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. Houston County Career Academy: 7:45 a.m. to 2:25 p.m. Houston County Crossroads Center: 8:00 a.m. to 2:40 p.m. Edge Academy: 8:05 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

School Zones School zones are posted online. An interactive tool is available where one may enter an address to see the schools zoned for that specific address, as well as the distance to the school, two closest bus stops, bus number, school times and a printable map. This information is accessible from the HCBOE website Zoning and Transportation pages.

19


20

Houston County School System Enrollment History


Budget Fiscal Year July 1, 2017, through June 30, 2018

21


Millage Rate The millage rate is the tax rate at which property is assessed in the county for the purpose of public education. The 2017 millage rate for the Houston County Board of Education (HCBOE) is in the lowest 10 percent in the state, ranked at 165 out of 180 school systems. Based on the 2017 Tax, the Board approved a rate of 13.32 mills for Calendar Year 2017 Property Taxes. A “mill� is one-thousandth of a dollar. In Houston County, the taxable value is 40 percent of the assessed value, so a $100,000 home assessment would be taxed on $40,000. The millage has only been raised one time in more than 10 years. The current rate is lower than the 2004 millage rate.

22


Academic Performance, GMAS Georgia Milestones Assessment System Scores from the 2017 Georgia Milestones Assessment System (GMAS) were released on July 20, 2017, by the Georgia Department of Education. Houston County students outperformed the state average in all but one subject. Houston’s students improved over their 2016 scores in 18 of 24 areas. Superintendent of Schools Dr. Mark Scott said, “We are proud of our students’ performance on the Georgia Milestones and commend our teachers, administrators and parents on these scores. Our students continue to outperform the state average and we made notable gains in several areas. Most impressive are high school geometry, which is 16 points above the state, and American Literature, which increased five points over last year. As we continue to focus on literacy, strong standards-based instruction and Multi-Tiered System of Supports, we are confident that our students will continue to improve.” Students began taking Georgia Milestones in 2014-2015. Students in grades 3-8 take Georgia Milestones End of Grade (EOG) Assessments, while students in grades 9-12 take Georgia Milestones End of Course (EOC) Assessments. GMAS measures student learning on four levels of achievement: Beginning, Developing, Proficient and Distinguished. The achievement levels help teachers pinpoint where students are in relation to their peers across the state so that teachers may develop individualized strategies to help students continue to improve and be more successful. On the EOG, Houston County’s students scored above the state average for Developing Learner and Above in all content areas at all grade levels. On the EOC tests, high schoolers scored above the state average in seven of eight content areas. Most impressive is that in Geometry, Houston’s students earned 16 points above the state average for Developing Learner and Above. The testing system is a comprehensive program across grades 3-12 and includes open-ended questions to gauge students’ content mastery. In 2016-17, students in grades 3-8 were tested in English/language arts and math. Students in grades 5 and 8 also tested in science and social studies. In grades 9-12, students enrolled in 9th Grade Literature & Composition, American Literature & Composition, Algebra I, Geometry, Biology, Physical Science, U.S. History, and/or Economics took a Georgia Milestones EOC assessment. The Milestones tests are rigorous and aim to better prepare students for college and career and to provide a more realistic picture of academic progress.

System and state scores follow.

23


2017 EOG System and State

Grade

Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8

Social ELA Math Science Studies % % % % System/State Developing Developing Developing Developing Learner Learner Learner Learner and Above and Above and Above and Above System 75% 86% State 70% 80% System 78% 87% State 73% 82% System 80% 78% 74% 78% State 74% 75% 69% 74% System 72% 80% State 70% 76% System 74% 84% State 71% 78% System 82% 88% * 76% 79% State 79% 79% * 57% 75% th *Includes students who took Algebra I in 8 grade

2017 GA Milestones Spring EOC Assessments System and State Economics/ 9th American Business/ Physical Literature & Literature & US History Biology Geometry Algebra I Free Science Composition Composition Enterprise System/State % % % % % % % % Developing Developing Developing Developing Developing Developing Developing Developing Learner & Learner & Learner & Learner & Learner & Learner & Learner & Learner & Above Above Above Above Above Above Above Above System 87% 85% 74% 82% 72% 66% 90% 83% State 84% 81% 72% 75% 70% 67% 74% 71%

Parents received their child’s scores in May. This fall they will receive a report showing how their child’s score compares to the system and state.

24


Academic Performance, GMAS, cont. A description of the performance levels follows. 

 

Beginning Learners do not yet demonstrate proficiency in the knowledge and skills necessary at this grade level/course of learning, as specified in Georgia’s content standards. The students need substantial academic support to be prepared for the next grade level or course and to be on track for college and career readiness. Developing Learners demonstrate partial proficiency in the knowledge and skills necessary at this grade level/course of learning, as specified by Georgia’s content standards. The students need additional academic support to ensure success in the next grade level or course and to be on track for college and career readiness. Proficient Learners demonstrate proficiency in the knowledge and skills necessary at this grade level/course of learning, as specified in Georgia’s content standards. The students are prepared for the next grade level or course and are on track for college and career readiness. Distinguished Learners demonstrate advanced proficiency in the knowledge and skills necessary at this grade level/course of learning, as specified in Georgia’s content standards. The students are well prepared for the next grade level or course and are well prepared for college and career readiness.

Georgia law requires a comprehensive summative assessment program in grades 3 - 12, to include End of Grade assessments in English/language arts, math, science and social studies for grades 3-8 and End of Course assessments in designated core subjects for grades 9 - 12. During the 2015-16 school year, science and social studies assessments were required in grades 3 – 8; those assessments were only required in grades five and eight as a result of Senate Bill 364 passed by the 2016 General Assembly and signed into law in May 2016. Georgia Milestones results are used to calculate the College and Career Ready Performance Index (CCRPI), Georgia’s accountability system. Milestones replaced the Criterion-Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) which was last given in 2013-2014. For more information, please visit the Georgia Milestones Assessment System website.

25


Academic Performance, CCRPI College and Career Ready Performance Index Houston Outperforms State in CCRPI Scores The Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE) released the 2016 College and Career Ready Performance Index (CCRPI) today, Dec. 8, 2016, based on 2015-16 school year data. The CCRPI is Georgia’s accountability tool to measure how well public schools and school districts are preparing students to achieve college and career readiness goals. Houston County’s overall single score was 79.5, which is 5.9 points above the state’s overall single score of 73.6. “We congratulate our students, teachers, parents and administrators on another outstanding year,” said Superintendent of Schools Dr. Mark Scott. “Their hard work, dedication and collaboration continue to be reflected in the system CCRPI scores. We are proud of our continuous commitment to meet the needs of all of our students. Houston County will continue to utilize this important tool to guide our school improvement plans to ensure that all students are prepared as they work toward and achieve graduation.” The CCRPI measures schools and school districts on an index that assesses college and career readiness for all students. This index uses a 100-point scale with the opportunity to earn up to 10 challenge points. The score is based on various indicators such as test scores and graduation rates to determine student progress and achievement. The CCRPI also shares other information, such as the performance of student subgroups, school climate and financial efficiency. The 2016 state and district scores follow. 2016 State and District CCRPI Scores Houston State County Elementary Schools 71.7 79.9 Middle Schools 71.5 76.3 High Schools 75.7 79.7 Total Score 73.6 79.5 Substantial changes to the CCRPI accountability system are projected for the future. This accountability method has been revised annually by state officials since first implemented in 2012. This year’s CCRPI score included only minimal changes from the previous year. Much more emphasis continues to be placed on student progress rather than student achievement in 2016. The progress measurement describes a student’s growth relative to academically-similar students from across the state. The student’s starting point is used to measure growth which allows all students, regardless of their individual achievement level, to have the opportunity to demonstrate growth. View the GaDOE news release, “Georgia releases 2016 CCRPI scores, Student Growth Model.”

26


Academic Performance, AP Advanced Placement Advanced Placement (AP) is an international program of college level courses and exams for secondary students. Participating students who earn a qualifying exam score may receive college credit at the same time they are earning high school credit. Each May students have the option to take an AP exam after completing college-level courses at their high school. Houston County students are encouraged to enroll in AP classes for the rigor and challenge, have the opportunity to take college courses early with highly-trained Houston County teachers, and may take AP exams with the possibility of earning college credit. As our partnership with the National Math and Science Initiative (NMSI) comes to an end of the three-year grant, our students who earned qualifying scores for math, science and English will receive financial incentives in September 2016. The College Board currently offers 38 AP courses. Houston County issued 2,350 AP exams in May 2016, nearly double that of May 2013 with 1,250 exams issued. Exams with a qualifying score of 3, 4, or 5 totaled 1,275, the highest ever in Houston County and saving families tuition money of an estimated $3.3 million. Houston County students scored a mean score of 2.74, alongside of Georgia at 2.84 and close to the U.S. mean or 2.85 and global average of 2.87.


English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Program Assistant Superintendent for Teaching & Learning: Dr. Eric Payne Director of Federal Programs: Ms. Dana Morris ESOL Program Goals

The English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) program goals are to help students obtain English language proficiency and to meet age and grade appropriate academic achievement standards for grade promotion and graduation. This program assists students to succeed socially and academically in all four language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing). The ESOL Program is federally mandated and was established to ensure equal access to the school system’s instructional program for those students who have limited English proficiency.

Program Description Elementary students participate in mainstream classes and receive ESOL instruction based on each student’s proficiency level and grade level. Small group instruction is designed to develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in English. Middle and high school students are scheduled into classes where they are provided extra language support. Some high school students also spend a portion of their school day in self-contained intensive English classes or content-based ESOL. All students participate in mainstream electives. The scheduling of classes is based on the grade level and English language proficiency of the ESOL student.

Enrollment Procedures for English Language Learners All students enrolling in Houston County schools are surveyed to determine language background other than English. ESOL instructional support will be provided after the student qualifies according to the WIDA-ACCESS Placement Test (W-APT). Eligible students are then assigned to a cluster site. English Learners are assessed annually on the state-adopted English proficiency measure (ACCESS) to determine continued eligibility. ACCESS=Assessing Comprehension and Communication in English Stateto-State).

27

Languages Represented

Spanish Gujarati Vietnamese Chinese Korean Filipino, Tagalog German Arabic Russian Hindi Japanese Other Asian Other African Turkish Housa Amharic Hebrew Thai Other Indian Mayan Languages Swahili Englishes other than Standard American English Haitian Creole Portuguese Swedish Hmong Romanian Ukrainian Urdu (as of 7/16)

If any question on the Home Language Survey is answered with a language other than English, students must be screened for ESOL services. ESOL instructional support will be provided after the student qualifies based on an English language proficiency test. Parents have the right to select ESOL program services, remove their child from the ESOL program upon request, or decline ESOL services.

Acronyms BICS: Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills CALP: Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency ELL: English Language Learners LAC: Language Assessment Conference LEP: Limited English Proficient PHLOTE: Primary Home Language Other Than English

28


Student Services Assistant Superintendent for Student Services: Dr. Zabrina Cannady Director of Student Services: Dr. Jenny McClintic The mission of Student Services is to eliminate barriers to student achievement. We believe that student failure is not an option. The Houston County School System provides a wealth of services for our students. The departmental goal is to assist school-based personnel with implementing instruction that will maximize student achievement for all students. The Student Services department partners with parents, students, community members and school personnel to meet the Georgia Department of Education criteria for exemplary school status in the areas of academics, attendance, dropout rate and graduation rate. This department encompasses several programs, which are listed below. Special Education Department: The special education department includes 324 special education teachers, 36 speech language pathologists, and 290 special education paraprofessionals who support the efforts of approximately 3,558 students with disabilities as they strive for academic success. The department includes personnel that serve system-wide: program specialists, behavior and academic intervention teachers, transition specialist, special education technology, an audiologist, assistive technology, physical therapist, physical therapy assistants, occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants and a child find team. Itinerant services are offered in the areas of hearing impairment, visual impairment, autism and orthopedic impairment. Psychology Department: The psychology department consists of 12 school psychologists who work to help children and youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally and emotionally. They collaborate with educators, parents, and other professionals to create safe, healthy, and supportive learning environments that strengthen connections between home, school and the community for all students. School psychologists are highly trained in both psychology and education, completing a minimum of a specialist-level degree program that includes a year-long supervised internship. This training emphasizes preparation in mental health and educational interventions, child development, curriculum/instruction, and assessment. School psychologists must be certified and/or licensed by the state in which they work. The National Association of School Psychologists sets ethical and training standards for practice and service delivery. For more information, contact Mrs. Monica Smith. Health Related Services: Our System employs 8 nurses, 38 health technicians, 2 Occupational Therapist (OT) with 5 Certified OT Assistants, 1 Physical Therapist(PT) with 2 Certified PT Assistants and an Audiologist. We involve parents, students, and teachers in the development of appropriate health related accommodations and procedures. Specific individual health and safety plans are developed and implemented for students with medical conditions that impact attendance and learning. We partner with community agencies to bring programs and opportunities to our schools. For more information, contact our Coordinator for Health Related Services, Mrs. Dana Rollins, RN, MSN.

Social Services: The social services department consists of 8 school social workers. School social workers serve as a liaison between school, home, and the community in order to minimize and/or remove psychological, social and economic barriers to educational achievement. Ensuring that every child is present for school is the main focus of the social services department. Through

29


Student Services, continued innovative programs and initiatives, school social workers in collaboration with school staff are able to reduce truancy and provide students and parents with resources necessary to ensure a successful school year. For more information, contact Dr. Shirley Randall. Counseling Department: The counseling department employs 59 school-based counselors. The school counseling program’s mission is to promote the academic, personal/social and career development of students to eliminate barriers to student achievement through the implementation of a school guidance curriculum that is organized, planned, sequential and flexible for all students. In addition to the counseling department, our school system employs achievement specialists at each of the Title I high schools. Through the use of disaggregated data, our achievement specialists plan for program and activity development to design interventions and to close the achievement gap between specific groups of students and their peers. School Nutrition Program: The Houston County School Nutrition Program consists of more than 400 employees, including food assistants, managers, area managers, dietitians and even a Chef. This program offers breakfast, lunch, after school snack and a summer feeding program. All schools offer a variety of nutritious menus each day. Meal prices are shown below. Meal Prices Breakfast, Elementary Lunch, Elementary Breakfast, Middle and High Lunch, Middle and High

Reduced $.30 $.40 $.30 $.40

Paid $1.75 $2.50 $1.75 $2.75

Adult $2.00 $3.75 $2.00 $3.75

Guests $2.00 $3.75 $2.00 $3.75

All school nutrition employees are required to complete a 30-hour employee orientation course within their first year of employment. Employees must attend a six-hour, in-service training each year. Several other training opportunities are offered throughout the year for professional enrichment. Managers must complete 150 hours of coursework and be ServSafe certified. In accordance with state law and local board of education policy, all kitchens are inspected by the Houston County Health Department. Our schools have an excellent record, with an average system wide score of above 99 percent. As shown in the chart that follows, millions of meals are served to the students of Houston County each year. For more information, please contact the Director of School Nutrition, Meredith Potter, MBA, RD, LD.

30


Student Services, continued

Annual Lunches Served Average Daily Student Lunches Served Annual Breakfasts Served Average Daily Student Breakfasts Served Annual Afterschool Snacks Served Average Daily Afterschool Snack Served Summer Meals Served June and July School Nutrition Workers

2016-2017 3,578,205 19,990 2,037,173 11,381 152,556 852 278,050 374

Facilities Assistant Superintendent for Finance & Business Operations: Stephen Thublin Director of Facilities: Scott Hill Our 39 campuses have a total of 2,044 instructional units. The schools are located on 953 acres county wide. Auxiliary buildings such as the maintenance shop, stadium, warehouse and central office are located on another 76.5 acres. The average building age is 31 years, and the oldest facility is the central office which was built in 1925. The Facilities Department oversees building, renovations and modifications, to include projects approved by voters through an education Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax (E-SPLOST). As part of managing the facilities, this department handles all security alarms, video surveillance cameras and fire alarms covering more than four million square feet of buildings. E-SPLOST The citizens of Houston County approved a continuation of this E-SPLOST on March 1, 2016, and the 2017-2022 E-SPOST began April 2017. The 2012-2017 E-SPLOST project improvements included: additional cameras; secured vestibules; updating older HVAC systems; improved lighting; replacing carpet with vinyl composition tile or, in gyms, with sports flooring; renovation of mechanical systems and fixtures; kitchens; and site upgrades such as additional parking and storm water allowance. The renovation of Linwood Elementary, renamed Pearl Stephens Elementary, was completed in 2014. In addition, a replacement school for Perry Primary was built on Langston Road in Perry. Langston Road Elementary opened July 2014. The renovation of Houston County High was completed as of April 2016. A new stadium, Freedom Field, opened August 2016. A central Bus Facility, located on Bear Country Blvd. In Warner Robins, opened in 2017. For more information, please visit the Facilities Department webpage.

31


Transportation Assistant Superintendent for Finance & Business Operations: Stephen Thublin Director of Transportation: Tom Walmer Children transported Bus routes Total # Buses Route Buses / Used for spares & activities Daily School Bus Stops Bus Drivers Monitors Miles Driven Daily Area Covered Extracurricular trips

2017 - 2018 13,836 students transported twice daily 178 251 178 /73 7,096 198 69 11,727 Houston County, 379.8 square miles 4,349 trips (2016-17)

On average, each bus driver completes two routes twice a day, with most driving a middle school and high school route and then an elementary school route. Safety Record / Driver Training Our system has an outstanding safety record. All firsttime school bus drivers in Houston County successfully complete a minimum of 44 hours of training, to include 12 hours in a classroom, 8 hours of bus inspection and 24 hours of behind-the-wheel training. The behind-thewheel training consists of 12 hours of driving without students and 12 hours of driving with students. In addition all drivers must pass the Commercial Driver’s License test and receive current, nationally recognized instruction in student management. Bus Inspections In accordance with state law and the local Board of Education policy, all school buses are inspected annually by the Department of Motor Vehicle Safety prior to the beginning of each school year. Additionally, all school buses must be inspected every 30 days by the transportation department. Fuel Buses are fueled offsite using local fuel suppliers.

32


District Map

33


School mascots and Colors Elementary Schools Bonaire Elementary C. B. Watson Primary Centerville Elementary David Perdue Elementary David Perdue Primary Eagle Springs Elementary Kings Chapel Elementary Hilltop Elementary Lake Joy Elementary Lake Joy Primary Langston Road Elementary Lindsey Elementary Matt Arthur Elementary Miller Elementary Morningside Elementary Northside Elementary Parkwood Elementary Pearl Stephens Elementary Quail Run Elementary Russell Elementary Shirley Hills Elementary Tucker Elementary Westside Elementary Middle Schools Bonaire Middle Feagin Mill Middle Huntington Middle Mossy Creek Northside Middle Perry Middle Thomson Middle Warner Robins Middle High Schools Houston County High Northside High Perry High Veterans High Warner Robins High Alternative School HC Crossroads Center

Wildcat Warrior Mustang Bulldog Panda Eagles Cougar Hawk Lion Lion Stallion Jet Knight Rockets Panther Falcon Blue Eagle Warrior Cub Patriot Mustang Tiger Wildcat

Red Red & Blue Royal Blue Red, Black & White Navy, Blue & White Royal Blue & Silver Green & Yellow Red and Black Black, Silver, Royal Blue Black, Silver, Royal Blue Red & Blue Blue & Gold Purple, Silver & Black Royal Blue & Orange Burgundy & Gold Silver & Teal Royal Blue & White Red & Blue Burgundy & Blue Red, White & Blue Green & Blue Blue & White Blue & Orange

Jaguar Wolf Hawk Gator Jets Panther Tiger Warrior

Purple, Black & White Black & Silver Red, Black, Gray & White Gold and Black Green, White & Gold Maroon & Gold Blue, White & Orange Orange, Black & White

Bear Eagle Panther Warhawks Demon

Black, Silver & White Blue, White & Orange Maroon & Gold Red, White & Blue Cardinal & White

Cougar

Black & Gold

34


Georgia Schools of Excellence Of our 37 schools, 23 have been named Georgia Schools of Excellence for a total of 39 times. 

Russell Elementary School

1986

Warner Robins High School

1986, 1990, 1997

Warner Robins Jr. High School

1987, 2001

Tabor Jr. High School

1988

Northside High School

1988, 1993

Tucker Elementary School

1989

Perry Middle School

1989, 1997

Perry High School

1989, 1996

Miller Elementary School

1990

Bonaire Elementary School

1991, 2009

Northside Middle School

1991

Kings Chapel Elementary School

1992, 2005

Shirley Hills Elementary School

1993

Bert Rumble/Huntington Middle School

1993, 1999, 2007

Houston County High School

1995

Perry Elementary School

1996

Centerville Elementary School

1998, 2008, 2013

Quail Run Elementary School

2002, 2007, 2008, 2013

Bonaire Middle School

2002

Northside Elementary School

2003

Feagin Mill Middle School

2003, 2007

Pearl Stephens Elementary School

2004

Lake Joy Elementary

2010

35


School Bell Award Winners 15 schools have won a School Bell Award a total of 21 times

 Bonaire Elementary, 2014  Centerville Elementary, 1998 and 2014  Lake Joy Primary, 2013  Morningside Elementary, 2002, 2013 and 2016  Miller Elementary, 2011  Eagle Springs Elementary, 2007 and 2010  Lake Joy Elementary, 2010  David Perdue Primary, 2009  Tucker Elementary, 2009  Matt Arthur Elementary, 2008  Shirley Hills Elementary, 2001 and 2006  David Perdue Elementary, 2005  Linwood Elementary, 2005  Northside Elementary, 2003 and 2016  Quail Run Elementary, 2000 School Bell Award Background Information The Georgia Association of Elementary School Principals (GAESP) selects 10 elementary schools a year to receive the School Bell Award. This award gives recognition to exemplary programs in the areas of curriculum and organizational leadership. The program was developed to help inform fellow educators and the general public of outstanding educational programs in Georgia. This award is presented to schools that demonstrate excellence in elementary programming. Nominated schools must have a principal that has served at least two full years in the school and who will be serving as principal upon receipt of the award. The principal must also be an active member in the state organization.

36


2017 – 2018 Teachers of the Year 2017-2018 Houston County Teacher of the Year Mr. Ike Thompson, Veterans High School 2017-2018 Systemwide Finalists  Summer Collins, Centerville Elementary  Kaitlyn Bryant, Parkwood Elementary  Travis Phelps, Thomson Middle  Henry Jones, Jr., Westside Elementary 2017 - 2018 Houston County Teachers of the Year Bonaire Elementary……………………………………………………………………………..Kim Wheeler Bonaire Middle…..…………………………………………………………………Thomas “Chris” Arnold C.B. Watson Primary………………………………………………………………………………Sarah Gray *Centerville Elementary……………………………………………………………………Summer Collins *David Perdue Elementary…..……………………………………………………………..Suzanne Ganas David Perdue Primary…..………………………………………………………………………..Katie Davis Eagle Springs Elementary…..…………………………………………………………………Tiffany Gann Edge Academy…..…………………………………………………………………………...…Teresa McCoy Feagin Mill Middle…..………………………………………………………………………………Lisa Duke Hilltop Elementary…..…………………………………………………………………….…Kim Stallworth *Houston County Career Academy…..………………………………………………….…Will Smith, Jr. Houston County Crossroads Center………………………………………………Anthony Blasingame Houston County High…..………………………………………………………………………Nicole Stone Huntington Middle…..…………………………………………………………….………Roselaine Nelson *Kings Chapel Elementary…...……………………………………………………………Kathy Robinson Lake Joy Elementary…..………………………………………………………………….……Tina Goodroe Lake Joy Primary…..………………………………………………………………………Stephanie Reeves Langston Road Elementary.………………………………………………………………Christie Lehman Lindsey Elementary…..……………………………………………………………….………Barbara Smith Matt Arthur Elementary…..…………………………………………………………………….……Joni Lee Miller Elementary…..……………………………………………………………………...Jennifer Carbajal Morningside Elementary……………………………………………………………………Yolanda Felder *Mossy Creek Middle…..………………………………………………………………………Alicia Rogers Northside Elementary…..………………………………………………………………….……Tina Everett *Northside High…..…………………………………………………………………….………Elaine Tignor Northside Middle…..………………………………………………………………..…………Yakima Smith *Parkwood Elementary…..……………………………………………………………..……Kaitlyn Bryant Pearl Stephens Elementary....…………………………………………………………………Emilia Sadler Perry High…..…………………………………………………………………………….…………Joe Sendek Perry Middle…..…………………………………………………………………………..…Stephanie Boone Quail Run Elementary....…………………………………………………………………Melissa Camarota Russell Elementary…..………………………………………………………………………Niesha Mitchell Shirley Hills Elementary…….………………………………………………………………Jasmine Sayles *Thomson Middle…..…………………………………………………………………….….…Travis Phelps Tucker Elementary…..……………………………………………………………………..…Jessica LeBrun *Veterans High…..…………………………………………………………….………………Ike Thompson Warner Robins High…..……………………………………………………………...………Rebecca White Warner Robins Middle…..………………………………………………………………….Brenda Jackson *Westside Elementary…..…………………………………………………………….……Henry Jones, Jr. * Top 10 semi-finalist for Houston County Teacher of the Year

37


2017 – 2018 System Teacher of the Year

Mr. Ike Thompson Veterans High School

38


Employees of the Year, 2017 - 2018

Maintenance Employee of the Year Travanti Harrell

Custodian of the Year Betty Jean Mathis, Quail Ran Elementary School

School Nutrition Manager of the Year Vicki Purvis, Tucker Elementary School

Central Distribution Employee of the Year William Middleton Bus Driver of the Year Erica Peck Bus Monitor of the Year Ruth Clowers

39


Exemplary Awards

National Awards, 2016 – 2017  Perry High won first place at the National FFA Nursery/Landscape event and 11th place at the National FFA Meat Evaluation event.  Several schools won awards at the national Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) conference in Students Taking Action for Recognition (STAR) competitions:  Houston County High won four gold and two silver medals.  Perry High won two gold and two silver medals.  Houston County Career Academy won a silver  Feagin Mill Middle won a silver medal  Mossy Creek Middle gold and placed in the top 10.  Northside Middle won two gold and one silver medal.  Thomson Middle won two gold medals.  The Warner Robins Middle FCCLA Chapter won the 2017 National 1st Place Middle School Financial Fitness Award.  Houston County High and Veterans High were ranked as two of the nation’s best high schools by U.S. News & World Reports,  The Houston County Alliance Robotics Team qualified for and competed in the FIRST Robotics World Competition.  A Houston County High student won first place in the International Environmental Youth Symposium essay contest.  A Northside High student was named a National Hispanic Scholar by the College Board for Excellence in Academic Achievement.  Houston County High students won first place in the nation at the FBLA Leadership Conference in Emerging Business Issues.  Two Perry High students earned national Latin Exam Awards – a Gold Summa Cum Laude and a Cum Laude.  A Houston County High student was elected as the FCCLA National Vice-President of Programs. Houston County High teacher Shonda McFadden was also named a FCCLA National Executive Council Adviser and Master Adviser.  A Houston County High student was one of 150 national Coca-Cola scholars and one of 161 U.S. Presidential Scholars. 

A Veterans High student was named a National Beta Scholar. 40


 A Perry High School student won Honorable Mention for her art entered into the 2017 Scholastic Art & Writing competition.  Huntington Middle Principal Dr. Gwendolyn Taylor was appointed to the National Association of Secondary School Principals as the Middle-School At Large Officer. She is the first person from Georgia to ever be appointed to this board.  Northside Elementary teacher Marla Garnto won the National Excellence in Teaching About Agriculture Award by the USDA and Farm Credit and the National Agriculture in the Classroom Organization. She was one of only eight teachers in the U.S. honored with this award.  Thomson Middle teacher Terra McMillian was presented one of two national awards given middle school teachers for innovative use of date collection technology. The award was the Vernier Technology Award.  Our district won first place in the nation for large systems in the 2016-2017 Digital School Districts Survey award.  Our district was named an AP Honor District by the College Board. Only 433 districts across the U.S. and only 10 in Georgia were recognized.  School Nutrition Program Director Meredith Potter received the Rising Star Award at the National Foodservice Achievement Management Excellence awards ceremony.  Our School Nutrition Program (SNP) was awarded two national awards, winning U.S. Department of Agriculture Best Practice award for two categories, Increasing Student Meal Participation and Customer Service. The team competed against other districts with enrollments of more than 20,000 students in eight states.  Our Community Relations Department won three national school public relations awards, to include a 2017 Golden Achievement Award for the district’s E-SPLOST campaign.

Major State Awards, 2016 – 2017  Thomson Middle was named a 2016 Breakout Middle School by the Georgia Association of Secondary School Principals (GASSP). This is the highest honor presented to middle schools by the GASSP.  All five of our high schools - Houston County, Northside, Perry, Veterans and Warner Robins - were named 2017 Advanced Placement Honor Schools, AP STEM Schools and AP STEM Achievement Schools. In addition, AP Humanities Schools were Houston County and Perry High; and Houston County and Veterans High was also AP Merit Schools.  Seven elementary schools were named 2017 Title 1 Reward Schools by the Georgia Department of Education. Centerville and Quail Run were chosen for Highest Performance. Eagle Springs, Northside, Russell, Shirley Hills and Westside were chosen for Highest Progress.

41


 Westside Elementary Principal Dr. Cynthia Hammond was named Georgia’s National Distinguished Principal.  Six schools achieved 2017 National Beta School of Merit status. Congratulations to Bonaire Middle, Huntington Middle, Houston County High, Northside High, Veterans High and Warner Robins High.  Students from Veterans High and Warner Robins High won first place awards at the 2017 State Beta Club Convention.  Morningside Elementary and Northside Elementary were both named Georgia School Bell Award winners.  Bonaire Middle and Houston County High students won Georgia Social Studies Fair top “Best in Class” awards.  In FFA State competitions, Veterans High won two state champions for the Junior and Senior Meat Judging competitions. 

Three schools won 1st place awards at State FCCLA:  Perry Middle (one)  Houston County High, six gold medals  Perry High won three gold medals

 In FBLA, a Perry Middle student won 1st place. Five other students also won awards in the top 10 rankings.  A Houston County Career Academy and Perry High student won the SkillsUSA 2017 State Championship in Career Profile Portfolio.  Northside High won the state one act play championship.  Perry High School AFJROTC earned an overall unit assessment of “Exceeds, Standards,” the highest rating attainable for a unit evaluation. Three students also received individual awards.  Thirty-one students were selected for All-State Chorus from Bonaire Middle, Feagin Mill Middle, Huntington Middle, Houston County High, Northside High, Veterans High and Warner Robins High. This is the highest honor a choral student may achieve.  Eleven students were selected for All-State Band from Feagin Mill Middle, Houston County High, Northside High, Perry High, Veterans High and Warner Robins High. Selection for All-State is the highest honor a band member may achieve  Houston County High Black and Silver Brigade Bank was awarded the Exemplary Performance Award by the Georgia Music Educators Association.  Five elementary schools were chosen to perform at the Georgia Music Educators Association’s 2017 Statewide Elementary Honor Chorus. Eighteen students from Hilltop, Langston Road, Matt Arthur, Pearl Stephens, and Quail Run performed. 42


Two Perry High students won All-State Art Symposium awards.

 Five schools and the district were awarded a Lifetime Giving Award by the American Heart Association.  A Bonaire Middle student was named one of Georgia’s top two youth volunteers in the Prudential Spirit of Community Awards.  A Veterans High School student was awarded the High School Student of the Year by State School Superintendent Richard Woods.  A team of students from Thomson Middle School were named Best in State for Georgia middle schools in the Verizon Innovative Learning app challenge.  Feagin Mill Middle Principal Dr. Jesse Davis also won two state awards – the Linda Hopping National Merit Award and Dr. Bob Puckett Effective Middle School Program Award.  Warner Robins Middle teacher Amanda Hayes was named the Georgia FCCLA Adviser Mentor  Northside Elementary teacher Stacy Brown was named the Museum of Aviation STEM Elementary Teacher of the Year.  Warner Robins High School Business and Computer Science Teacher Stephanie Dale was named the 2016 Georgia Association for Career & Technical Education Teacher of the Year.  Northside Elementary teacher Marla Garnto was named the 2016 Georgia Agriculture in the Classroom Teacher by the Georgia Farm Bureau.  Thomson Middle teacher Terra McMillian was named the Air Force Association Georgia State Teacher of the Year.  A team of Feagin Mill Middle School teachers were named Team of the Year by the Georgia Association of Middle School Principals in 2017.  A Northside High student won a State Championship in wrestling,  Our Houston County Sharks won three Varsity State Wheelchair Championships – Handball, Basketball and Football! Our Sharks team has now won 20 State Championships in 9 years!  Our Sharks also won a Triumph of the Human Spirit Award, named the “High School Team of the Year” for the third consecutive year.  All of our schools are active in Special Olympics. During the Georgia State Winter Games, students from Houston County High, Northside High, Veterans High and Warner Robins Middle won Gold medals. Perry High students won Silver and Bronze.

43


 Seven schools won 2016 Georgia SHAPE Honor Roll Awards: CB Watson Primary, Hilltop Elementary, Lake Joy Elementary, Matt Arthur Elementary, Pearl Stephens Elementary and Russell Elementary were Platinum winners. Mossy Creek Middle won Silver.  Our Community Relations Department won eight Georgia school public relations awards, to include five Gold and three Best in Category awards.  Our Business Department earned the “Award of Distinction for Excellent Financial Reporting” from the Georgia Department of Audits and Accounts. The district’s 2016 Audit Report had no qualifications or findings, garnering this award which is given to Boards that go beyond minimum requirements of generally accepted accounting principles. This is the fourth year the award has been given and Houston County’s fourth time receiving it.  Our Board was named an Exemplary School Board by the Georgia School Boards Association.  We are proud that many of our students and staff serve at the national and state level.  Feagin Mill Middle Principal Dr. Jesse Davis was selected as the President of the Georgia Association of Middle School Principals in 2016.  Northside High teacher Richard Frazier was elected to the Educational Theatre Asso0ciation Board of Directors.  Feagin Mill Middle and Veterans High students were chosen for the State School Superintendent’s Advisory Council. 

A Houston County High student was elected President of the Georgia Beta Club.

 A Houston County High student was elected as the FCCLA Georgia Vice-President of Membership.  Dr. Amy Fouse was elected the 2017 President of the Georgia Language Arts Supervisors.  Mr. Cecil Parker was elected as the Vice President of the Georgia Association of School Facility Administrators.

44


Educational Web Sites

Houston County Board of Education, http://www.hcbe.net/ Includes HCBOE goals, school calendar, job openings, Board policy, zone maps, bus routes, Board meetings, facilities plans, school lunch program and links to system schools. Georgia Department of Education, www.doe.k12.ga.us/ Includes the Georgia Public Education Report Card, education definitions, education acronyms, and information on the curriculum, Georgia public schools and the State Board of Education. View the AYP report. Governor’s Office of Student Achievement, www.gaosa.org/ The OSA was established to address two major goals that affect all students: student achievement and school completion. Georgia School Council Institute (GSCI), www.gsci.org/ The GSCI has several tools to include www.GeorgiaEducation.org, which provides student achievement data, school council training and resources, education news and links to education information resources. Georgia School Boards Association, www.gsba.com Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education, www.gpee.org Georgia Association of Educational Leaders, www.ciclt.net/gael/ Organization that provides unity of school leadership groups in Georgia American Association of School Administrators, www.aasa.org National Center for Education Statistics, nces.ed.gov/ National Association of Elementary Schools Principals, www.naesp.org/ National Association of Secondary School Principals, www.nassp.org/ National Education Association, www.nea.org/ U.S. Department of Education, www.ed.gov/ Education Writers Association, www.ewa.org/ Georgia Department of Human Resources View immunization requirements for children entering schools.

45


Georgia Department of Education

Mr. Richard Woods, State Superintendent 2066 Twin Towers East, Atlanta, Georgia 30334 800-311-3627; state.superintendent@doe.k12.ga.us Deputy Superintendent for External Affairs Garry McGiboney: 404-657-2965; gmcgiboney@doe.k12.ga.us Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum, Instruction & Assessment Dr. Caitlin McMunn Dooly: 404-656-2804; cdooley@doe.k12.ga.us Deputy Superintendent for School Improvement Stephanie S. Johnson: 404-651-7277; stjohnson@doe.k12.ga.us Deputy Superintendent for Finance and Business Operations Scott Austensen: 404-656-2492; saustens@doe.k12.ga.us Deputy Superintendent, Assessment and Accountability Dr. Melissa Fincher: 404-656-2668; mfincher@doe.k12.ga.us Chief Information Officer Bob Swiggum: 404-657-0810; rswiggum@doe.k12.ga.us AskDOE, State School Superintendent’s Helpdesk 800-311-3627; askdoe@gadoe.org

46


Georgia Board of Education Members First Congressional District Mike Long 404-657-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978, mlong@doe.k12.ga.us Second Congressional District Mike Cheokas 404-657-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978, mcheokas@doe.k12.ga.us Third Congressional District Helen Odom Rice 404-657-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978, hrice@doe.k12.ga.us Fourth Congressional District Lisa Kinnemore, Vice Chair 404-657-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978, lkinnemore@doe.k12.ga.us Fifth Congressional District Kenneth Mason 404-652-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978; kmason@doe.k12.ga.us Sixth Congressional District Barbara Hampton, CPA 404-657-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978; bahampton@doe.k12.ga.us Seventh Congressional District Mike Royal 404-657-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978, mroyal@doe.k12.ga.us ** Eighth Congressional District Vann K. Parrott 404-657-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978, vparrott@doe.k12.ga.us Ninth Congressional District Kevin Boyd 404-657-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978, kevin.boyd@doe.k12.ga.us Tenth Congressional District Lee Anne Cowart 404-657-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978 Eleventh Congressional District Scott Johnson 404-657-7410, FAX: 404-657-6978, scjohnson@doe.k12.ga.us

47


Georgia Board of Education Members (cont.)

Twelfth Congressional District Trey Allen 404-657-7410; FAX: 404-657-6978, James.Allen@doe.k12.ga.us Thirteenth Congressional District Vacant Fourteenth Congressional District Larry Winter 706-278-2834, FAX: 404-657-6978, lwinter@doe.k12.ga.us

48


Education Acronymns

A AASA ACA ACE ACT ADA ADD ADHD AERA AFT ALA AP AP APEG ASBO ASCA ASCD ASL ASP ASFSA

American Association of School Administrators American Counseling Association American Council on Education American College Testing Americans with Disabilities Act Attention Deficit Disorder Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder American Educational Research Association American Federation of Teachers American Library Association Accommodation Plan (Section 504 Students) Advanced Placement Adequate Program for Education in Georgia Association of School Business Officials American School Counselor Association Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development American Sign Language After-School Program American School Food Service Association

B BD BEOG BIP BOE

Behavior Disorder Basic Education Opportunity Grant Behavior Intervention Plan Board of Education

C CACREP CAP CAP CBA CCGPS CCRPI CDA CNA COTA CP CRCT CRCT-M

Council on Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs Central Auditory Processing Corrective Action Plan Curriculum Based Assessment Common Core Georgia Performance Standards College and Career Ready Performance Index Child Development Associate Child Nutrition Act Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant Cerebral Palsy Criterion-Referenced Competency Test Criterion Referenced Competency Test – Modified

D DFACS DOE DHR

Department of Family and Children Services Department of Education Department of Human Resources 49


DJJ DTAE

E

EBD ECE EIP ELL EOCT ERIC ES ESEA ESOL ESSA ESY ETS

Department of Juvenile Justice Department of Technical and Adult Education

Emotional/Behavioral Disorder Early Childhood Education Early Intervention Program English Language Learners End-of-Course Test Education Resources Information Center Elementary School, Grades K-5 Elementary and Secondary Education Act English to Speakers of Other Languages Every Student Succeeds Act Extended School Year Educational Testing Service

F FAPE FBA FBLA FCCLA FERPA FTE FRL FY

Free and Appropriate Public Education Functional Behavioral Analysis Future Business Leaders of America Family, Career and Community Leaders of America Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Full-time Equivalent Free and Reduced Lunch Fiscal Year

G GAA GACE GACES GACIS GACTE GaDOE GAE GAEA GAEL GAESP GAMEIS GAMSP GaPIE GAPT GAPSS GASBO GASCD GASP GASPA GASSP GCSTME

Georgia Alternative Assessment Georgia Assessments for the Certification of Educators Georgia Association for Counselor Education and Supervision Georgia Association of Curriculum and Instructional Supervisors Georgia Association of Colleges of Teacher Educators Georgia Department of Education Georgia Association of Educators Georgia Art Education Association Georgia Association of Educational Leaders Georgia Association of Elementary School Principals Georgia Association of Managers of Educational Information Systems Georgia Association of Middle School Principals Georgia Association of Partners in Education Georgia Association for Pupil Transportation Georgia Assessment of Performance on School Standards Georgia Association of School Business Officials Georgia Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Georgia Association of School Psychologists Georgia Association of School Personnel Administrators Georgia Association of Secondary School Principals Georgia Coalition for Science, Technology and Mathematics Education 50


GCTM GED GELI GERA GERSC GFIE GHEA GHP GHSA GHSGT GHSWT G-KAP-R GIMS GKAP GLISI GMAS GMEA GMSA GPA GPB GPEE GPPF GPS GPEE GREAT GSAMS GSBA GSCA GSCI GSDC GSEI GSFC GSFSA GSP GSPRA GSSA GTAPP GTE GTEP GYSTC

Georgia Council of Teachers of Mathematics General Education Development (Diploma) Georgia Early Learning Initiative Georgia Educational Research Association Governor’s Education Reform Student Commission Georgia Foundation for the Improvement of Education Georgia Home Education Association Governor’s Honors Program Georgia High School Association Georgia High School Graduation Test Georgia High School Writing Test Georgia Kindergarten Assessment Program – Revised Georgia Initiative in Math and Science Georgia Kindergarten Assessment Program Georgia’s Leadership Institute for School Improvement Georgia Milestones Assessment System Georgia Music Educators Association Georgia Middle School Association Grade Point Average Georgia Public Broadcasting Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education Georgia Public Policy Foundation Georgia Performance Standards Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education Gang Resistance Education and Training Georgia Statewide Academic and Medical System Georgia School Boards Association Georgia School Counselors Association Georgia School Council Institute Georgia Staff Development Council Georgia Superintendent Evaluation Instrument Georgia Student Finance Commission Georgia School Food Service Association Georgia Scholars Program Georgia School Public Relations Association Georgia School Superintendents Association Georgia Teacher Alternative Preparation Program Gifted and Talented Education Georgia Teachers Evaluation Program Georgia Youth Science and Technology Center

H H/H HEA HEIR HOA HOPE HOTS HS

Hospital/Homebound Higher Education Act Home Education Information Resource Hands On Atlanta Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally Higher Order Thinking Skills High School, Grades 9-12 51


I IB IDEA IEE IEP INTASC IQ ISS ITBS IU

L

LAPS LD LEA LEP LKES LRE

M

MDR MID MOD MS

International Baccalaureate Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Independent Educational Evaluation Individualized Education Plan Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium Intelligence Quotient In-school Suspension Iowa Test of Basic Skills Instructional Unit Leader Assessment on Performance Standards Learning Disability Local Education Agency Limited English Proficient Leader Keys Effectiveness System Least Restrictive Environment Manifestation Determination Review Mildly Intellectually Disabled Moderately Intellectually Disabled Middle School, Grades 6-8

N NAEP NAES NAESP NASBE NASDC NASSP NBC NBCC NBPTS NCATE NCES NCLB NCTQ NEA NEGP NGA NGSP NIH NRT NSBA NSF NSPRA NTE

National Assessment of Educational Progress (National Report Card) National Alliance for Effective Schools National Association of Elementary School Principals National Association of State Boards of Education New American Schools Development Corporation National Association of Secondary School Principals National Board Certification National Board for Certified Counselors National Board of Professional Teaching Standards National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education National Center for Education Statistics No Child Left Behind Act National Council on Teacher Quality National Education Association National Education Goals Panel National Governor’s Association Next Generation Schools Project National Institutes of Health Norm-Referenced Test National School Boards Association National Science Foundation National School Public Relations Association National Teachers’ Examination 52


O O.C.G.A. OCR OEA OERI OHI OI OSR OSS OT

P

PAGE PBIS PDD PDP PDK PFP PID PLOP POI PPC Pre-K PSAT PSC PSO PT PTA PTO PTSA PTSO

Q

QBE QCC

Official Code of Georgia Office of Civil Rights Office of Education Accountability Office of Educational Research and Improvement, U.S. Department of Education Other Health Impaired Orthopedically Impaired Office of School Readiness Out-Of-School Suspension Occupational Therapy Professional Association of Georgia Educators Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports Pervasive Developmental Disorder Professional Development Plan Phi Delta Kappa Pay for Performance Profoundly Intellectually Disabled Present Level of Performance Pyramid of Intervention Professional Practices Commission Pre-Kindergarten Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test Professional Standards Commission Postsecondary Options Program Physical Therapy Parent Teacher Association Parent Teacher Organization Parent Teacher Student Association Parent Teacher Student Organization

Quality Basic Education Quality Core Curriculum

R RBOC REP RESA RTI RYDC

Regional Educational Service Agency Board of Control Regional Education Program Regional Educational Service Agency Response to Intervention Regional Youth Detention Center

S SACS SAT SAYRE SBOE

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Scholastic Assessment Test Southeastern Association for Year-Round Education State Board of Education

53


SDD SDRC SDU SEA SEBD SI SID SIS SLD SLP SLEP SLO SLP SMCP SOE SOP SPAI SREB SRC SRO SSS SST SSW STEM STW SYDC SWSS

Significant Developmental Delay State Data and Research Center Staff Development Unit State Education Agency Severe Emotional/Behavioral Disorder Speech Impaired Severely Intellectually Disabled Student Information System Specific Learning Disability Speech Language Pathologist Secondary Level English Proficiency Test Student Learning Objectives School Lunch Program System Media Contact Person School of Excellence Summary of Performance Speech Pathologist Assessment Instrument Southern Regional Education Board Southern Regional Council School Resource Officer Student Support Service Student Support Team School Social Worker Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics School-to-Work State Youth Development Campus Strategic Waivers School System

T TANF TAP TBI TCT TESOL TFA TIMSS TKES TOEFL TOTY TRSGA TSS

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Test of Achievement and Proficiency Traumatic Brain Injury Teacher Certification Test Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages Teach for America Third International Math and Science Study Teacher Keys Effectiveness System Test of English as a Foreign Language Teachers of the Year Teachers Retirement System of Georgia Teacher Support Specialist

V VI

Visually Impaired

54


Education Definitions

A A Plus Education Reform Act of 2000 (H.B. 1187): Education legislation drafted by Governor Roy Barnes that took effect in April 2000. The law lowered class sizes, developed an accountability framework with state criterion-referenced tests as the measurement system, created school councils and implemented early intervention programs. Ability Grouping: A way to organize students of like abilities that allows them to remain together for a short period of time – part of the school day, a few days or a few weeks. Accreditation: The process by which an organization sanctions teacher-education programs. Advanced Placement (AP) Exams: Tests administered by the College Board in various subjects such as European history, calculus and foreign language. High school students take these exams to receive college credit. American College Testing (ACT) Assessment: National college admission examination that consists of tests in English, reading, mathematics and science reasoning. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA): Federal law passed in 1990 that prohibits the discrimination against any disabled individual. Applies to both employment and educational services. Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD): A medical term used to describe students with severe inattention and impulsiveness. The disorder can be treated through medication, psychotherapy, behavior modification and training. The most common medications used are Ritalin, Dexedrine and Aderall. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): A medical term used to describe students with inappropriate degrees of hyperactivity, inattention and impulsiveness. The disorder can be treated through medication, psychotherapy and behavior modification and training. The most common medications used are Ritalin, Dexedrine and Aderall.

B Behavior Disorder (BD): A term used in special education to describe students whose behavior interferes with their classroom performance. Such students have problems relating to other children and adults, exhibit inappropriate behaviors such as extreme anger, are severely depressed or have a tendency to develop physical symptoms or fears about personal and school problems. Behavioral Correction Plan: Plan developed for a student with chronic disciplinary problems upon return from an expulsion or suspension. Benchmarks: Examples of performances that serve as standards against which students’ achievement is scored. Blue Ribbon Schools Program: A national program established by the U.S. Department of Education in 1982 to honor outstanding public and private schools across the country and share information on the best practices among schools. Business/Education Partnerships: School-reform coalitions formed by private 55


businesses and schools or districts. Partnerships range from individual school partnerships to systemic school reform efforts.

C Carnegie Unit: One unit of credit awarded in grades 9 through 12 for a minimum of 150 hours of instruction during the regular school year or 120 hours of instruction during summer school. Certificate of Performance: Certificate for students who do not pass the Georgia High School Graduation Test, but meet all other graduation requirements. Students who leave school with a certificate of performance may take the graduation test again as many times as necessary to qualify for a high school diploma. College Board: Nonprofit organization that administers the SAT and AP programs. Communities in Schools (CIS): A community-based organization that helps children succeed in school and prepare for life. Through partnerships with schools, public officials, businesses, parents and the community, the organization provides numerous services to prevent children from dropping out of school. Community Partnerships: Connections between local organizations and schools to help address students’ needs and improve achievement. Criterion-Referenced Competency Tests (CRCT): Tests administered to Georgia students to evaluate students’ acquisition of skills and knowledge described in Georgia’s Quality Core Curriculum (QCC). In grades one through eight, tests are given in reading, math and language arts. In grades three through eight, tests are also given in science and social studies. Test scores will be used in considering the promotion of students in grades three, five and eight beginning with the 2003-2004 School Year. CRCT scores produce information on students, classrooms, schools, systems and state achievement in education.

E Early Intervention Programs (EIP): Programs provided from kindergarten through the fifth grade. These programs provide specialized instruction in smaller classes to students who are performing below grade level. Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA): Federal law passed in 1965 that focuses on children from high-poverty communities and students at risk of education failure. The Act authorizes Title I, Safe and Drug Free Schools and Title VII programs and was reauthorized in 2002 as No Child Left Behind (NCLB). Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (EBD): Disorders characterized by consistently aggressive, impulsive or withdrawn behavior (i.e. schizophrenia). EBDs impair personal, social, academic and vocational skills. End-of-Course Tests (EOCT): Assessments for high school students in core subjects to be determined by the Georgia Board of Education. The tests will measure students’ acquisition of skills and knowledge described in the Georgia Quality Core Curriculum. English as a Second Language (ESOL): Most commonly includes immersion as well as support to individuals in their native languages. Classes are typically composed of students who speak many different languages, but are not fluent in English. They may attend classes for only a portion of every day to work strictly on English skills or attend for a full day and learn both academics and English. Equalization Grants: State funding to provide additional assistance to the poorer school districts. Equalization funding aims to reduce the disparities as to how much can 56


be raised through local tax dollars between the wealthiest and poorest school districts in the state. Exceptional Learners: Students with an IQ in the bottom (mentally challenged) or top (gifted) three percent of the population or who have other physical or mental differences that affect learning. All exceptional learners receive special education.

G Georgia Assessments for the Certification of Educators (GACE): Georgia's state-approved educator certification assessment program. The purpose of the assessments is to ensure that the knowledge and skills acquired by prospective Georgia educators are aligned with state and national standards for educator preparation and with state standards for the P–12 student curriculum. Georgia High School Graduation Test (GHSGT): Passage required by high school students to receive a high school diploma. Covers content in mathematics, language arts, science and social studies. Performance levels are reported at the pass and pass plus levels. A score of 500 is needed to pass each section of the Graduation Test. The pass plus scale scores are 538 or greater for English language arts and 535 or greater for math. Georgia High School Writing Test (GHSWT): Administered to all 11th grade students. Students are asked to produce a response to a persuasive writing prompt. Georgia Kindergarten Assessment Program-Revised (GKAP-R): A test administered to kindergarten students in Georgia to determine whether they are ready for first grade. Students are evaluated in the areas of literacy, mathematics and social/emotional development through one-on-one, small group and large group instructional settings throughout the year. Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education (GPEE): Founded in 1990 by the Georgia Chamber of Commerce and the Georgia Economic Developers Association, the Partnership consists of business, education, community and government leaders who share a vision of improved education. Working to be Georgia's foremost change agent in education, the non-profit, non-partisan organization takes lead roles in efforts to shape policy and reform education. The mission of the Partnership is to improve the academic achievement of Georgia students through research, advocacy and communication. Georgia Schools of Excellence Program: Statewide program that works in conjunction with the Blue Ribbon Schools Program. The program recognizes outstanding Georgia public and private schools and nominates them for the national program. Georgia Teacher Alternative Preparation Program (GTAPP): College coursework and supervised hands-on experience for individuals who hold college degrees and wish to teach in grades K-12, but who have not completed a traditional teacher preparation program. Gifted: a student who demonstrates a high degree of intellectual and/or creative ability(ies), exhibits an exceptionally high degree of motivation, and/or excels in specific academic fields, and who needs special instruction and/or special ancillary services to achieve at levels commensurate with his or her ability(ies). Gifted and Talented: Houston County elects to include students in the Gifted and Talented Education (GTE) classes who are not identified as gifted, but who demonstrate exceptional ability and motivation.

57


H Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally (HOPE): Funded by the Georgia Lottery, the HOPE program provides qualified Georgia students with tuition assistance in diploma, certificate or degree programs at any public or private college, university or technical institution in the state. To qualify, students must earn a 3.0 GPA in high school, and they must maintain a 3.0 in college to keep the scholarship. Highly Qualified Teacher: A teacher is considered Highly Qualified when he or she meets the requirements of (1) obtaining an academic minimum of a bachelor’s degree, (2) obtaining a full state certification or licensure, and (3) formally demonstrates a high level of competency in the subject taught.

I In-School Suspension (ISS): An alternative to Out-Of-School Suspension for less severe rule infractions. The goal of ISS is to remove students from interactions with their peers. Students are given specific assignments aimed at improving their achievement levels. In-Service Workshop: Workshops attended by teachers on various topics pertaining to education. Inclusion: Term used when special education or ESOL students receive educational services in a general education classroom setting. The students are included in the regular education program rather than being served in individual education classes. Individualized Education Plan (IEP): A plan developed by a student’s parent and teachers that outlines the student’s program of study and the particular education services the child receives. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA): A law passed in 1990 that requires public schools to provide a free and appropriate public education to disabled school-aged children ages three through 21. Iowa Tests of Basic Skills (ITBS): Achievement tests given to students throughout the country. Scores usually are reported as percentiles, with scores in the 50th percentile being the national norm.

L Learning Disability (LD): A term used in special education to describe a disorder in one of the basic psychological processes. These students may have difficulty in listening, thinking, speaking, writing, spelling or doing mathematical calculations. Limited-English-Proficient (LEP) Students: Students whose first language is other than English and who have not yet mastered English.

M Magnet School: A school with strong emphasis in a particular subject area (i.e. music, science, drama, math). Students may be selected through an application process instead of being assigned based on residence. Mainstreaming: Moving a special education student from a special environment into the regular school environment.

N National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP): Often referred to as the National Report Card. National testing program administered by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). Reading and mathematics tests are given to fourth, eighth, 58


and twelfth grade students nationwide. NAEP reports student performance as average scale scores and by achievement level. Average scale scores reflect the performance of test takers both as a whole and in groups (i.e. by gender, race, etc.). NAEP has three achievement levels: basic (partial mastery), proficient (solid academic performance) and advanced (superior academic performance). National Board Certification (NBC): Rigorous program for classroom teachers administered by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards that includes performance-based assessments and peer review. The state and some local school systems reward National Board Certified teachers with additional pay. NBC takes approximately a year to complete and is the top national certification for educators. National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS): A nonprofit organization created in 1987 to advance education reform and establish high standards for teachers. NBPTS administers the National Board Certification program to assess and certify teachers in accordance with these standards. Next Generation School Project (NGSP): An initiative of the Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education. It is a grassroots effort that encourages local communities to organize themselves to dramatically improve their local schools. For 10 years, schools receive annual grants to give them necessary resources for innovations. In 2002, schools began to receive grants to change the school calendar from the traditional 180 days to a more balanced calendar that features strong intercessions for remediation and enrichment activities. No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act: Law passed in 2001 that emphasizes increased accountability for States, school systems and schools and creates greater choice for parents and students, particularly those attending low-performing schools. The law gives more flexibility for states and local education agencies in the use of federal education dollars, and a stronger emphasis on reading. The law requires all states to implement statewide accountability systems, and allows students attending persistently failing schools to use Title I funds for supplementary education services.

O Office of Student Achievement (OSA): Formerly known as the Office of Education Accountability (OEA), was established to improve student achievement and school completion in Georgia. The OSA will produce annual accountability report cards for K-12 public schools and post-secondary education institutions with the implementation of the reform.

P Per-pupil Expenditures: Money spent on each student in a given school district. Because public schools are financed in part by local property taxes, there is a disparity in per-pupil expenditures across the state. Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) program Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT): A practice test for students taking the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). The PSAT is designed to help students identify academic strengths and weaknesses. Since 1997, state funds have paid for PSAT administration to all tenth grade students in Georgia’s public schools. Professional Learning: A whole range of activities aimed at improving teaching by providing teachers with necessary skills training and information. Professional development activities range from formal courses and seminars to teacher mentoring and collaboration. 59


Professional Standards Commission: The agency responsible for certifying teachers, school personnel and administrators in the State of Georgia.

Q Quality Basic Education (QBE) Act: The legal foundation for education in Georgia passed into law in 1986 with the goal of improving education. It provides the framework for such things as funding, educational programs and student and teacher assessments. Quality Core Curriculum (QCC): The State of Georgia’s mandated minimum guidelines for the curriculum. Objectives are given at each grade level and must be taught. Local systems can add to QCC, but they cannot teach less than is mandated.

R Reconstitution: Process through which the state oversees a low performing school (school receiving Needs Improvement designation on a school report card for two or more consecutive years) and directs the duties of the school principal until school performance improves. Regional Education Service Agencies (RESAs): The primary provider of staff development in Georgia. Georgia’s 16 RESAs provide leadership development, strategic planning, school improvement planning and other services to teachers and local schools.

S Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT): Standardized test taken by college-bound students to gain admission to College. The SAT tests students’ verbal and mathematical reasoning ability. School Choice: Allows parents to enroll their children in the school of their choice. Section 504: Federal law that prohibits discrimination against disabled students. Social Promotion: Practice of allowing students who have failed to meet performance standards and academic requirements to pass on to the next grade with their peers instead of completing or satisfying the requirements. Social promotion ended in Georgia in the 2003-2004 school year for Grade 3, in 2004-2005 for Grade 5, and in 2005-2006 for Grade 8. Special Education: Special instruction for mentally challenged or gifted students. Special Instructional Assistance (SIA): A state funded program for kindergarten, first and second grade at-risk students. It provides additional funding to the regular instructional program to reduce class size, purchase additional teaching materials and involve parents in their children’s education. Special Needs: A student who has disabilities or is at the risk of developing disabilities that may require special education services.

T TANF: Georgia Temporary Assistance for Needy Families - the monthly cash assistance program for poor families with children under age 18. Title I: A federally funded program for K-12 at-risk students that provides additional help on the basic skills. Title I is the largest federal aid program for elementary and secondary schools. The program provides money to school systems based on the number of low-income families in each district. Title II: A federally funded program that provides assistance to state and local educational agencies and institutions of higher education with teacher education programs. Title II funds programs to improve teaching and learning, reform teacher


preparation and certification standards and to develop better performance-based assessment and professional development strategies. Title VI: Part of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color or national origin in programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance, including schools. Title VI prohibits the denial of equal access to education to students with limited proficiency in English. Title VII: A federal program designed to improve the English proficiency of bilingual students. Title IX: Law barring gender discrimination in education facilities that receive federal funds. Most Title IX cases filed against K-12 schools involve sex equity in athletic programs. Tracking: The practice of dividing students into class size groups, which exist for the major part of the school day or year, based on the student’s perceived ability or prior achievement and then designing and delivering instruction to each group. Transition Plan: Plan separate from the IEP that documents goals for a special education student to aid him or her in making the transition from school to work.

V Values Education: The process of providing opportunities for all students to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes about the following values specified by the Georgia Board of Education: citizenship, respect for others, and respect for self. Voucher: A state allocation of money given to parents to allow their children to attend a school of the parent’s choice, either public or private. Georgia does not allow vouchers.

Z Zero Tolerance: Policies that mandate predetermined consequences or punishments for a specific offense regardless of the circumstances surrounding it. Sources: Georgia Department of Education, Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education’s “Education-ary” and HCBOE Community & School Relations

61

Houston County Board of Education Media Kit | 2017-2018  
Houston County Board of Education Media Kit | 2017-2018  
Advertisement