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Day at the Seaside Did you know that there is not a single location in Britain more than 70 miles from the sea? As such, a day – or longer - at the seaside has been a British summer tradition since Victorian times, when the health benefits of sea, sand and (hopefully) sun first became fashionable. Once the first railways were built, the coast came within affordable reach for families of all income levels. The Victorians invented wheeled bathing “machines” to preserve the modesty of bathers as they entered the sea. By the 1920’s these had given way to beach huts, which are still a favorite part of the British coastal landscape today. Other traditional ingredients of a seaside day out include building sandcastles, bingo and donkey rides along the sand. Chances are you live more than 70 miles from salt water, but consider including a round of bingo and traditional English fare to bring a bit of the British seaside to your next summer outing.

What to Eat: Fish & Chips!

What to Drink: Tea, from a Thermos Flask, While Huddling Out of the Wind

To Visit: Everyone in Britain has their own idea of the perfect beach, but for the full-on seaside experience consider Bournemouth in Dorset or Cromer in Norfolk. If you prefer unspoiled beauty, try Woolacombe in Devon or Wells-next-the-Sea in Norfolk. My own vote goes to Southwold in Suffolk, which is a charming town with postcard pretty views. A miniscule beach hut here can cost an eye-watering £60,000. That’s nearly $100,000!

A Row of Traditional British Beach Huts at Southwold

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Profile for Isabella & Max, LLC

House of Fifty July/August 2012  

House of Fifty magazine July/August 2012 issue

House of Fifty July/August 2012  

House of Fifty magazine July/August 2012 issue

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