Issuu on Google+

special pull out section

National Nursing Week May 6–12, 2013

commitment | dedication | excellence | compassion

CLE


N2

National Nursing Week 2013 — S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S

Heather Steiner, Mackenzie Heath medications and undergo numerous am a 34 year old with kidtreatments to remove the antibodies ney failure who does hemothat would try to fight the transplanted dialysis at home, four nights kidney at a hospital in Toronto. One a week. Heather Steiner is a of the treatments didn’t go so well and nurse who runs the Home Hemodialysis I got overloaded with fluids and mediprogram at Mackenzie Health (formerly cines that caused a serious reaction. I York Central Hospital). Since my kidgot violently ill and needed dialysis to neys stopped working in 2009, Heather remove the toxins in my system, but the has been looking after me the entire hospital I was at would not accommotime. Heather administered my first didate me in the dialysis centre. Needless alysis treatments in the home dialysis to say, I was very discouraged and sad training unit when I was too weak to because of what the hospital had done move and trained me how to do dialysis to me and the fact they wouldn’t even by myself. accommodate me to try and get me feelDuring the first six months, I had ing better. trouble finding a suitable place to live Heather was contacted at around 4 that could accommodate the dialysis p.m. and she asked if I could make it up and water machines along with all of to Richmond Hill so she could see me. the dialysis supplies. Heather looked afAfter leaving downtown Toronto in the ter me in the training unit until I could rain and in rush hour traffic, we finally find a home, which she was integral in made it to the dialysis centre in Richhelping me with. When I finally found mond Hill by about 6 o’clock. Heather a place to live, the dialysis supply comwas still there and had a dialysis mapany was being reluctant because my chine ready for me along with a doctor front door was far from the road and to assess my condition. Right away there were too many stairs to gget up to my bedroom where thee she saw that I looked terrible and got me to sit down so I could go supplies would be located. sstart dialysis. She took extra Heather stood up for me HONOURABLE special care of me and requestand got the supply coms MENTION eed some medicine from the pany to change their mind. doctor to quell my symptoms. d I finally had a home and a Heather stayed with me until 11 place to do my treatments H o’clock at night after already workm o’clo without having to drive from full day. Heather missed making tre in ing a ful Toronto to the dialysis centre dinner at home and her son’s hockey Richmond Hill after a long day at work, game in order to take care of me. I was, three times a week. and still am, truly grateful for her carThroughout the last four years, I have ing and personal sacrifice. It would have gone through many ups and downs both been simple for Heather to pass me off physically and emotionally. Heather has to another nurse, but she decided to stay always been there for me and spends a with me. This is the theme of Heather’s great deal of her time helping me feel dedication – she’s always there! better. Whether it’s getting a hold of I cannot say enough good things the doctor right away to get an answer, about Heather, both as a professional bringing me in for a quick assessment, or nurse and as a genuinely good human just being there to support me when I’m being. She is brilliant having built the feeling discouraged, Heather knows exRichmond Hill Home Hemodialysis actly what to do and I am back on track program from scratch and is a wellvery quickly. respected leader amongst the staff and Heather seems to never sleep as she is patients of the hospital. Heather has always either in the office and responds continued to stay current with her eduto phone calls and emails at all hours of cation having just upgraded her skills by the day, on weekends, and even when graduating from Ryerson University. All she is on vacation. Having someone like this while taking care of dozens of home Heather who is so caring, empathetic, hemodialysis patients and while looking responsive and action-oriented is… well after a family with two very active kids. it’s like I won the lottery. Just knowing She is truly an inspiration to professionthat I have someone like Heather only a al nurses everywhere and to me as her phone call or email away is its own medsmile, patience and dedication is always ical benefit. Having a nurse like Heathpresent. er who is so smart and such an effective Heather would be the first to dismiss communicator really makes me feel like any public recognition of her abilities I’m being listened to and part of a team and commitment to her profession and whose goal is give me the best quality of patients. Her intelligence, compassion life possible. She has clearly delivered. and commitment exist in Heather as There are so many examples of times part of her natural makeup, however, where Heather has gone well beyond she deserves to be recognized for the the call of duty to take care of me. results of her actions. Heather is the Whether it’s something small like havsingle greatest influence in keeping me ing problems getting my needles in or as healthy as possible. Without Heather, something more serious like concerns I feel I would be lost and forgotten and about my heart, Heather is always ready certainly be much less healthy. I want to to jump into action to take care of me. express my extreme gratitude and thank I would like to share once example of Heather for all that she has done and where Heather’s actions really stood out continues to do for me. She really is the as truly remarkable. best in so many ways! A few months ago, I began a lengthy H Thank you so much Heather! ■ process to get a kidney transplant from a donor who is not the same blood type as me. This required that I go on new Nominated by Scott Cameron www.hospitalnews.com

I

Creating a culture of collaboration between Nursing and Support Services

HOSPITAL NEWS MAY 2013


S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S — National Nursing Week 2013

N3

Congratulations to our Nurses! very year we look forward to our Nursing Week issue and the wonderful stories that come our way. This year’s Nursing Hero contest was the best yet with over 60 submissions of such high quality that it was extremely difficult to choose a winner. Nurses work in such a variety of different settings and different areas of expertise. They work with mothers and

E

babies at the beginning of life and they work with seniors and palliative care patients at the end of life. They work in busy urban hospitals and remote northern clinics. They are often the first on the scene when a patient is in distress and they are often the last to go home at the end of a long day. They know how to make patients feel calmer when they are distressed or fearful and they often have to

confront their own fears on a daily basis. They are a loud voice when they need to be heard and they are a very quiet calm voice when soothing and reassurance are needed. Over and over we have heard how nurses have gone the extra mile, put in additional effort, followed up on hunches, stayed late, came in early, persevered, led the way, encouraged others and paid attention to so many little details that

make their job so rewarding and so challenging at the same time. When you’re a nurse you know that every day you will touch a life or a life will touch yours. We are very touched by your stories and privileged to be able to share them with others. Congratulations to all of our H Nursing Heroes! ■ Julie Abelsohn Acting Editor, Hospital News

“Save one life, you’re a hero. Save 100 lives you’re a nurse.” Anonymous

Congratulations To the winners of our

2013 Nursing Hero Awards Sheryl Paul

Trillium Health Partners

1

st

prize

$1000

Cash Prize

Cynthia Rheault North Bay Regional Health Centre

$500

Cash Prize

2

nd

Corinne Nesbitt Royal Victoria Hospital

prize

3

rd

prize

$300

Cash Prize

SPONSORED BY

ALL NURSES ARE HEROES

www.hospitalnews.com

THANK YOU

MAY 2013 HOSPITAL NEWS


N4

National Nursing Week 2013 — S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S

Karen Fisher,

Hospice Wellington aren Fisher is the inaugural Director of Residential services at Hospice Wellington. Karen’s ability to connect with families and clients is extraordinary. Every day she is calling and communicating before the resident comes to Hospice helping ready people for what can be a terrifying and emotionally traumatic time. Maintaining a professional therapeutic relationship is always paramount for her, but here is where she has the genius to know when sometimes it is vital to show that human, vulnerable side to connect with someone who is teetering on the brink of being lost. When Nadine Armstrong accompanied her husband Richard to Hospice in August 2010 she had already lived many months of terrifying changes in their young married life. High school sweethearts, they married and seemed to have a perfect life but Richard had developed a brain tumour in his twenties, which was initially treated effectively and so they had chosen to start a family. Just as she discovered she was pregnant with her second child Richards’s tumour returned with a vengeance and 10 days after the birth of her child he died in her arms at Hospice Wellington. “I never knew nurses could be like the nurses at Hospice Wellington,” admits Nadine. “They weren’t just kind and competent, they really accompanied me on this journey. They looked at our

K

family photos and they really listened just paying it forward on one level it beto our family stories; they tucked Richcame a domino effect for many people. ard and I in bed together so we could Karen’s restless pursuit of excelspend the last few nights of our lives lence leaves her to constantly seek new cuddling like a normal married couple. ways of supporting what we do. It was Despite all this support I just could not her idea to “recruit” Lucy the Hospice imagine how life was going to be as a comfort dog in the case of a man whose young widow. I knew I was financially teenage daughter was terrified to leave looked after thanks to effective finanthe room. cial planning and insurance but I could Lucy was still a young puppy at the not discern how life was even going to time and Karen had championed the be possible. Just when I thought it idea of a family dog being present at Ho was impossible Karen came too Hospice to act as an icebreaker or distraction to families. Lucy talk with me, she shared her n own story of the loss of her needed walking frequently HONOURABLE aand she loved to play. first husband to cancer when MENTION she was young and suddenly Our young friend was pers I knew there is hope and it’s suaded to take Lucy longer an longer walks until she not just the children that need and rcoul you, you need to believe in yourcould be seen happily spending ho self and your own strength. Shee gave a few hours away from her dying fame that belief and I cannot thank her ther’s bed side and being more sociable enough.” with staff and other family members. Nadine shared her personal story so By the time her Dad died she had eloquently a mere 10 days later at the grown so fond of Lucy that her father’s Hospice’s main fundraising event with parting gift was the purchase of Lucy’s Karen’s help and support as well as that half sister from the same breeder and of her Mom. they both now come to Hike for HosThe impact of her speech as you can pice each year to raise money for the imagine was phenomenal and donations ongoing support of the Hospice. hit an all time high but also a member Karen’s genius at not only dreaming of the audience a local psychologist up the idea but persisting on encouragstepped forward and offered her time ing this young woman to engage with as a volunteer to establish a family grief the dog opened up a whole healthy approgram and a teen grief support event. proach to a family’s legacy. Karen’s compassion became more than My final story also involves a young

family in tragic circumstances. Lesley Prior’s beautiful and talented 19 year old daughter attempted to take her own life but only partially succeed. The family were left with the agonising decision to remove her from life support and she was transferred to Hospice to die. Karen knew both to find a way to support the transfer of care but also engage the family in preparing for the death through providing personal care like washing her hair, choosing the clothes she would wear for her departure and comforting them by cuddling with Lucy. Karen repeatedly spent time quietly sitting and supporting the family and they never felt overwhelmed by the situation. “It would have been so easy to have been totally bereft,” admits Lesley, “but Karen always seemed to know what to say and how to keep us focused on celebrating Julia’s life.” Karen Fisher is a phenomenal force in nursing; she is talented, intelligent, dedicated and driven to achieve excellence but she never loses sight of the real person behind the patient, or the family. For her to achieve the recognition of nursing hero would be a true reflection of the stature of her contribution and would be a nod to the debt our wonderful organization and sector owe H to her care and commitment. ■ Nominated by Rosslyn Bentley

OUR NURSES – Knowledge professionals providing inspired care. We believe that our nurses are a true expression of our mission and values who place compassion, respect, social responsibility and excellence at the forefront of patient care. We recognize our nurses’ professional knowledge, experience and tireless efforts in fulfilling our legacy of quality care and discovery. We value the contribution our nurses make – working around the clock, changing lives everyday. We celebrate our nurses’ many accomplishments and their dedication to nursing excellence in patient care, education and research. Today, and every day, we thank our 1,800 nurses for their unwavering commitment to our culture of caring and innovation.

HOSPITAL NEWS MAY 2013

www.hospitalnews.com


S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S — National Nursing Week 2013

Sheryl Paul Trillium Health Partners rom being the Stroke unit’s nurse educator into Clinical Quality Care Leader (CQCL) of our 26 inpatient bed at Trillium Health Partners (Mississauga Hospital), Sheryl Paul is the personification of leadership. Sheryl started as an RPN over 20 years ago and since then she worked her way up to get her RN degree and is currently pursuing her Masters. She has more than 20 years of nursing experience as she worked in Continuing Care, Med/Surg, Rehab and Stroke Unit. She is compassionate, dedicated, easily approachable and driven to provide excellent care to our patients. She is like www.hospitalnews.com

F

our adopted mother at work who always ensures that nurses are equipped with the tools needed to deliver safe care. Sheryl took over the responsibility of being a CQCL of our expanding unit over a year ago. She is the only CQCL responsible for more than 16 patients throughout the Mississauga Hospital who implemented Collaborative Care by Design (CCBD). Sheryl is a visionary. She pays meticulous attention to the needs of our enhanced unit while adhering to the highest standards. She worked in collaboration with the team as we all embarked on new changes and challenges opening new beds, intro-

N5

1

st

prize

ducing the Stroke Unit’s Nurse Practitioner, integrating our two new Stroke Internists, and participating in CCBD last year. She always comes early and leaves late ensuring all 26 patients’ needs are addressed and taken care of. She is never too busy to lend a hand to provide bedside care and assists nurses to reposition patients in bed, transfer in stretchers and even change incontinent briefs. She takes new staff under her wing to ensure they have a smooth transition as they become a part of our team. She has been and continues to be a highly valued clinician whose interest and ability to hear patients, families and

staffs needs coupled with her disciplined and professional approach to problem solving has led her to be an asset to this organization. As I sit here with my colleagues writing this nomination, it is with tears in our eyes to fathom that this will be Sheryl’s last year with us as she will be closing the curtains on her nursing career; she will be retiring at the end of 2013. Her personal warmth and collegiality will be truly missed by her beloved staff H on the Stroke Unit.■ Nominated by all of the staff of the Comprehensive Stroke Unit MAY 2013 HOSPITAL NEWS


N6

National Nursing Week 2013 — S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S

Shona Percival,

London Health Sciences Centre hona Percival is a Palliative care nurse at London Health Science Centre. As a coworker, I was given this essay to read. It was written as a project to discuss something she was proud of professionally. I was completely inspired by her compassion and ability to put family first. I work with tremendous people and this story really embraces the compassion that each and every one of our nurses displays on a daily basis. As much as the story was written by Shona it could have come from any one of my coworkers. It is with Shona’s permission and expectation, that all of the nurses on C6-200 be honoured if this submission is awarded a prize. Thank you for your consideration. All of the names have been changed to protect patient confidentiality.

S

It happened on a night shift about six years ago that I went into work. My assignment of patients included a gentleman that was very poor, and actively dying, who had been admitted from home just a day or two before. Upon entering the room, I met a very pale, cachectic, elderly man named Peter lying in bed while four people sat in chairs around him. I introduced myself to these four women and learned that they were his wife, Mary, his daughter, Brenda, and his two granddaughters. After performing a quick assessment of Peter, I questioned his family as to their understanding of his condition, and was relieved to learn that they had already been fully informed about his deteriorating status and the potential that he would die very soon. Later in the evening, as I suspected would happen, Peter died peacefully in his sleep. After a death, our mutidisciplinary team allows

HOSPITAL NEWS MAY 2013

and encourages the family to spend time with time during the World War II. He had been their loved ones, make phone calls, and alstationed in Germany and England, among low other family members to visit before we others, and was very reminiscent of the time transfer patients to the morgue, so I assured that he spent as a fighter pilot. Mary that they could take all the time they During this intimate time with the family, wanted. Usually, last rights are performed I was hoping that the chaplain or priest had before someone dies, but often a family asks called back to the unit. One of my colleagues for a priest after a death for further prayers was waiting by the phone while I was in the or blessings. Our unit has an on-call priest room with Peter’s family, but she regretfully that is available by pager, so I immediinformed me that there had been no calls. he M and her family were strong, ately paged him to notify him of the Mary cle family’s request. clearly Peter had instilled some of h strength in them, and decided Several minutes went by with his HONOURABLE that t no response from the priest. I they would go ahead and MENTION p paged again, and again. After pack up his things to leave. As th did, I noticed Mary pick up almost 45 minutes of waiting and they no response from the priest, I had a photograph of Peter with one of at to give the family the bad news that his fighter planes. In the photo, Peter pro I could not reach him. Fortunatelyy I did stood proudly with another man and the have another suggestion, which was to call the two of them held a Canadian flag. interfaith chaplain. The family were agreeable On our Palliative Care unit, when veterto having the chaplain, so I called the afterans of the war die, we respect their memory hours chaplain’s pager for assistance. and duty by placing a Canadian flag over top During the time I was waiting for calls back of them while we take them to the morgue. from the priest and chaplain, I spent time with This is something that is normally done after the family in the hospital room. I encouraged the body is on the stretcher to be taken to the them to talk about Peter’s life and what kind morgue, but something inside of me asked of person he was. They talked about Peter’s “Why not now?”. I took Mary aside and told sense of humour and strength. They laughed, her about our tradition of respect, and asked recalling stories about his stubbornness, how her if she would like us to put the flag on him he always hated reality television, and how before they left. She immediately said yes. cheap and frugal he was. Then they became I went to get the flag, and on the way, told very teary as they told me about his love for two of my colleagues what was going to haphis family, and how his “girls” were his life. pen. They followed me back to the room, and They told me that Peter had always said that instead of placing the flag on Peter’s body, I he had lived a very full life, was fiercely patripresented Mary with the flag and suggested otic, and had always mentioned how grateful that she might like to do it with the rest of her he was for the opportunities that Canada had family. provided him. Mary told me that they had The room was completely silent as Mary done a lot of traveling over the years because took the flag from me, and gave Brenda and he wanted to show her the places that he spent each granddaughter a corner of the flag. With

all four of “his girls” holding a corner, Peter was draped with the Canadian flag. One of my colleagues said “thank you for your service”, and there were no dry eyes in the room as we all felt the impact of this special moment. Following our impromptu ceremony, we gave Mary and the girls a few more minutes alone with Peter. When they emerged from the room, Mary was extremely thankful and appreciative for what I had suggested. She informed me that she had requested the priest because she assumed it was the right thing to do, but she truly believed that the flag was far more representative of who Peter was as a person, and that it would have meant more to him because he was not a particularly religious person. After Mary left, I thought back on the evening’s events and realized that things happen for a reason. Under normal circumstances, we are able to reach both the Catholic and Interfaith clergy at any time of day or night. As it turned out, it was a series of very unusual events that had led to us being unable to reach both of them on the same night, including an illness and a malfunctioning pager. On this particular night, I believed it happened for another reason. I believe it happened so that we would be challenged, and forced to come up with something that was far more meaningful to this small family. In my opinion, we did just that. We made something meaningful for them, and at the same time, something very meaningful for us. There are so many rewards working in Palliative Care, and knowing that I made a difference to this family in how they will remember the death of their H loved one, is one of my best. ■ Nominated by Jayme Vermue

www.hospitalnews.com


S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S — National Nursing Week 2013

N7

From left to right: Leigh-Anne Craig, Cynthia Rheault, LeeAnne Nesbitt and Kim Morrow.

Cynthia Rheault Emergency Department RN, North Bay Regional Health Centre feel that Cynthia Rheault is deserving of the Nursing Hero Award for numerous reasons, however, mostly because ‘going above and beyond the call of duty’ is truly ‘the norm’ for Cynthia all the time in caring for patients and family members and interacting with co-workers.

I

What defines Cynthia Rheault? Commitment – from the very start to the very end of each and every shift, with an ever-positive attitude, an everpresent smile, and an abundance of energy. Dedication – to her patients and their outcomes; to her team and their wellbeing. Compassion – toward the patient – their pain and their challenges. She understands the stress they are under – no matter how big or how small their problem is. Leadership – a strong Unit Leader,

a strong cheerleader, rallies the troops, celebrates successes, laughs with those around her, cries with those around her, quick to offer a hug, grateful to receive a hug, quick to offer praise, grateful to receive praise, not afraid to be honest, leads by example, the ultimate professional, brings solutions to the table along with the problems, happy and excited to share knowledge. Kindness – so kind to everyone. Kind in the way of sensitive, e.g. realizing when a patient is more comfortable speaking in French and adapts easily, e.g. singing to a small child receiving sutures. Kind in giving praise for a job well done and for “holding it together” in times of crisis. Kind in welcoming new staff aboard. Respectful – toward all. Given the nature of Emergency Medicine, respectful of all needs of patients, family members and co-workers of all disciplines. Respected – by all, as evidenced in the compliments received, written and H verbal. ■

Testimonials

2

nd

prize

“Very compassionate and caring…always puts the patient’s needs first.” “An excellent educator…i.e. a young new mother came to the ED with a 7-month-old child. She was crying because she wanted to console her baby. Cynthia assured her he would be okay and to just wait. Soon enough, he settled.” “Extremely positive attitude, hard worker, team player.” “Unit Leader role…shows leadership and organization in the flow of the department.” “Very honest.” “Always smiling and greets everyone with a warm smile.” Clerical Team Lead, North Bay Regional Health Centre “Cynthia is a professional nurse that you can always rely on in a difficult situation. She will not hesitate to act when she is needed. Her excellent technical nursing skills as well as her compassionate and sunny disposition make her a wonderful nurse to attend at that bedside. She strives for excellence and always has the patients needs as her first priority. She is a great leader for the less experienced nurses in our department and supports her nursing colleagues in times of difficulty. I think Cynthia Rheault is one of my Nursing Heroes. When I am working with Cynthia, I know that my day will be better for it.” Emergency Physician, Chief of Emergency Medicine, North Bay Regional Health Centre “So many nurses who work in the North Bay Regional Hospital’s Emergency Department are worthy of the Nursing Hero Award; however one particular nurse stands out. Cynthia is loved by all – patients, family members, other nurses, clerks, porters, doctors. As a manager, we hear about Cynthia through patient compliments and NEVER through complaints. In fact, Cynthia has come to me saying “I need to give you a heads-up…Mr. X’s family is probably going to be complaining about me.” When asking Cynthia what she did, she would explain that she had to say something to them that they did not want to hear. Lone and behold, I did hear from the family – they phoned to say how great Cynthia was as their father’s nurse – caring and so considerate of their father and the family – and thanking her for her candidness and compassion. Cynthia defines compassion. Amidst an often chaotic environment and competing priorities, Cynthia always manages to remind everyone that the patient is at the centre of everything we do. All this, while maintaining the highest standards of nursing practice.” Cynthia Rheault – a more deserving recipient of the “Nursing Hero Award”, you will not find. Director of Medicine, North Bay Regional Health Centre Nominated by Ellen Andrews, Program Assistant to Emergency Department and the Department of Medicine, North Bay Regional Health Centre

www.hospitalnews.com

MAY 2013 HOSPITAL NEWS


N8

National Nursing Week 2013 — S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S

Tracey Kitchen Clark,

Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre would like to nominate help us. Evening shift is very busy and Tracey Kitchen-Clark. Her this extra help is very much needed knowledge and dedication and appreciated. Tracey provided asas a clinical nurse inspired sistance and helped to calm the patient me to become like her. She encourdown even after her work day was aged me all the time to have a finished. nis This was helpful to the pa caring attitude, compassion patient and the nurses. and to be a more clinically efHONOURABLE fective member of the health Promotes and emphasizes MENTION care team. p patient focused care and paThe single most important t tient safety. factor in my job is not a fabuC4 has mostly elderly palous boss, not stupendous monntien tients with a large population etary reward, not challenging work of dem dementia and symptoms of conwhich is always the key – but it is the fusion when they get admitted. Tracey colleague who makes the difference and promotes the standards of falls protocols that is Tracey. and recommends that the staff place a falls sticker on the patient’s chart and one on their white board located in Some of the reasons their room. Tracey ensures that all staff why Tracey deserves reviews the strategies for falls preventhis award: tion and educates their caregivers/famiMakes special efforts beyond the lies. Tracey ensures that the bed alarms usual requirements of her role. are on in order to alert everybody when Tracey is scheduled to work from 8-4 a patient is attempting to get out of bed. but frequently comes in early and stays late. We recently had a patient that was Approaches patients and colleagues very confused, physically aggressive and with dignity and respect. creating a safety risk on the unit. Tracey does a walk about with the The patient was fearful, striking out C4 Manager at 0800 to say hello to at staff and attempting to leave the hosevery patient. She noticed that one of pital. Tracey offered an extra hand to the patients was manifesting respiratory

I

distress due to congestion and she was unable to clear her secretions. Tracey alerted the RN and together they suctioned the patient and put in an oral airway. Tracey showed respect with colleagues by offering her help and dignity with the patient by providing comfort and life-saving measures.

On C4 we have to use observers sometimes to keep patients safe. Tracey provided a process including a red binder to keep all the documents at the bedside until the patient is discharged. Tracey provides teaching not only to nurses but to students, observers and families too.

Demonstrates the values of excellence, collaboration, accountability respect and engagement in the workplace. Tracey is very involved in promoting excellence in care with our stroke population. She collaborates and supports the assignment-making but also support the efforts in team work. This effort enhances the satisfaction of all the nurses and the patients because she helps to ensure continuity of care. On C4, ACNRT nurses float to our unit. These nurse have not had the education for stroke care that Tracey provides so she developed an assignment making guideline so that if we are working short the ACNRT nurse can be assigned safely to a stroke patient with the least risk.

Contributes to a learning environment. C4 can be a stressful environment due to the workload and sometimes staff conflict. Tracey plans team building workshops which decrease our stress and enhances team building and helps us get to know each other better and then be more understanding of each other.

Demonstrates exceptional commitment to clinical teaching, supervision and mentoring.

Demonstrates leadership and acts as a role model for others Tracey is a good leader and role model. She plans and organizes workshops for us to attend and facilitates inservices on the unit. She role models with her soft voice and her behaviour serves as an example H for other staff to follow. ■ Nominated by Florinda Gliddon

Bridgepoint Nurses Lead Change bridgepointlivebetter.ca

A new era for care delivery at Bridgepoint Active Healthcare has begun with the move to our new, state-of-the-art hospital. Thanks to the work of so many staff and the hands of so many nurses, we successfully and safely moved our patients to the new facility. During this period of change, we saw many examples of the excellent care and attention that makes our nursing team unique and special. Bridgepoint is fundamentally changing the way people living with complex health conditions and those in need of rehabilitation receive care. Our unique approach offers nurses an opportunity to apply leading practices and play a leadership role within a diverse, interprofessional team. Nurses at Bridgepoint: ™

have access to state-of-the-art technologies and equipment;

™

lead transformative practices in the care of complex chronic health conditions;

™

have opportunities for mentorship and health coaching, and to participate in research to optimize patient health;

™

practice under an all-professional nursing care delivery model and strategy that enables them to work to their full scope of practice.

Our goal is to help our patients see what’s possible and live better, and nursing is a critical component of achieving that success. Join us and take an active role in transforming the way patients with complex health conditions receive their healthcare. Jane Merkley

You’ve helped us transform Bridgepoint. Thank you for your dedication, your support and your patience. Bridgepoint nurses restore life, so our patients can live better. We are grateful.

HOSPITAL NEWS MAY 2013

Vice President, Programs, Services and Professional Affairs & Chief Nursing Executive

Learn more at bridgepointlivebetter.ca

www.hospitalnews.com


S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S — National Nursing Week 2013

Corrine Nesbitt RN, Royal Victoria Regional Health Centre hey (the staff at RVH) know her as Corinne we know her as our Guardian Angel. We will be forever grateful to her for saving our son’s life that frightful day. Words cannot express how grateful we are for Corrine and our son who is with us today because of her courageous act. Through this we will always have a bond and a wonderful friendship and always be connected. It is our honor to nominate Corinne Nesbitt as our hero.

T

RN Angel in the audience (Story told by Donna Danyluk) Austin Grawbarger rushed the puck up the ice with his sights firmly set on a goal. It was the second day of rookie camp and the 16-year-old defensemen was determined to play well. That’s when a simple hockey try-out turned into an icy brush with death. Austin collided with an opposing player, his skate caught an edge in the ice and he slid awkwardly into the corner. It was then, as he tried to prevent himself from hitting the boards too hard, that his own skate came up and sliced his wrist. In seconds the ice was covered in blood. “Austin frantically skated off the ice. He threw his gloves off and started holding his wrist, yelling ‘My wrist is broken,’” recalls Austin’s father, Norm Grawbarger. “I panicked not knowing what to do.” But Corinne Nesbitt, Royal Victoria Regional Health Centre’s Director of Clinical Operations Transition, knew exactly what to do. While she may be temporarily in clinical operations – once a registered nurse, always a registered nurse. Corinne had heard the loud thug of Austin hitting the boards, it was a sound she heard often at these try-outs, but it was the blood that caught her attention. “I thought maybe he’d broken his wrist and then I saw the blood and just ran to him. I could tell by the way the blood was just spurting out of him that he’d hit an artery,” said Corinne. “I grabbed his arm and pinched the artery with my fingers. It was hard because everything was so slippery with the amount of blood he was losing.” Austin’s father watched in amazement. “I was told after the incident that Austin was bleeding so fast that he had less than minute to live if Corinne hadn’t helped. She saved his life,” said Norm. And probably no one is more grateful for her quick action than Austin.

www.hospitalnews.com

3

N9

rd

prize

“She’s my little angel,” says Austin. “She saved my life. I’m so thankful she was there for me.” Austin vividly remembers the accident and how calm Corinne was. “She told me she was a nurse and that she could help me. I actually thought I hadn’t really hurt myself too bad because of how calm she was acting so I just trusted her,” says Austin. Corinne was able to stabilize the young player until she could hand him over to paramedics. And then, like all angels, she simply disappeared. “I was pretty freaked out by the whole accident. You never expect to see your big brother in such a life or death situation. I was so happy he had an angel named Corinne watching over him that day, thanks to her he is still around,” says Austin sister, Andrea 14. Once Austin was out of the woods Sherry and Norm Grawbarger, went on a hunt to find the mysterious woman who had saved their son’s life. As fate would have it, Corinne once again found herself sitting in the stands of yet another chilly hockey rink, watching her son play, when a conversation taking place behind her caught her attention. “Yes I was eavesdropping, but the man was telling a story so similar to Austin’s that I just had to listen. I thought there’s no way the same accident happened to two different players so I turned around and sure enough there was Austin’s father talking to another parent,” says Corinne. It was then that Norm got to personally thank Corinne, but the real emotional meeting was yet to come. That’s when Corinne met Sherry – Austin’s mother. “A simple ‘Thank you’ didn’t seem like nearly enough for the person who had saved my son’s life,” says Sherry. “It was two moms looking at each other, eye to eye knowing the one had saved the other’s son. We just said nothing and cried.” Indeed, this story has a great ending. “I’m happy to say Austin is going to play for the Bobcaygeon Bucks Jr. A team this year, so we are very excited for him,” says Norm. “I’m living my dream thanks to Corrine – the ‘Angel’ in my life,” says H Austin. ■ Nominated by Norm and Sherry Grawbarger and Donna Danyluk.

MAY 2013 HOSPITAL NEWS


N10 National Nursing Week 2013 — S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S

Jodi Chubbs,

RN, Soldiers' Memorial odi is an ICU nurse at concern – she had noted a rash on the OSMH and I have worked patient’s ankle that had spread rapidly with her since I began my over two hours. I had seen no such rash career in Orillia. Throughearlier. I was worried about necrotizing out that time, she has worked as a leader fasciitis, so I asked her to get a stat gram in the ICU, and thoroughly deserves stain done – this came back negative. recognition for her exceptional work. When Jodi called me to report this, she Jodi is an excellent nurse. She knows insisted that I come in to see this rash, as her patients very well and is usually she did not believe the gram stain. advancing her knowledge by readI did come in that evening and was ing about her patients’ ailments nts not completely convinced that th in order to take better care of this was necrotizing fasciitis. them. This commitment to W We got another gram stain, learning serves as an example w which was positive. At this NOTABLES to senior and junior staff. In ppoint, if it were necrotizing 2012, Jodi spent a lot of time ffasciitis, surgery was urgently as a mentor to a new graduin indicated. The patient would ate nurse (now one of our ICU U like likely not survive if we waited nurses). The role of a mentor has until tthe morning. Jodi advocated proven very important in the ICU at l on behalf of the patient and I strongly OSMH, as new graduates often have called the surgeon to come in – by now little exposure to critical care. Providit was after midnight. The surgeon was ing good training to future nursing staff not fully convinced either, but agreed to is a tremendously important role. take the patient for exploratory surgery Jodi’s outstanding nursing skills were given the risks of waiting. not just evident to me. In fact, her In the end, Jodi was right. It was necname was suggested to me be several of rotizing fasciitis. The patient survived her colleagues in the ICU, who felt that several surgeries before being discharged Jodi’s willingness to help, motivation home. I am convinced that without Jodi and teamwork ethic, not to mention her speaking for her patient and dragging prominent role as a mentor, made her two reluctant doctors along with her, an exceptional colleague who deserved that the patient would have died. recognition. I truly hope you will grant this award One particular case stands out. In to Jodi. Her commitment to learning, late December 2012, a patient was adleadership, advocacy skills and work H mitted to ICU with septic shock. We ethic make her a fantastic nurse. ■ had not identified a source. Jodi was Nominated by Dr. Mark Bailey on the night shift and called me out of

J

Happy Nursing Week from RPNAO The team at RPNAO would like to extend our most sincere thanks and warmest wishes to all of our nursing and health care colleagues across the country. Nursing Week is an opportunity for all of us to celebrate nurses and the incredibly important work they do. There are more than 32,000 RPNs working in Ontario today. And more than ever, these nurses are being asked to play key roles in diverse health care teams alongside their Registered Nurse colleagues and a wide range of allied health professionals. $QGHDFK\HDUDQLQFUHDVLQJQXPEHURI531VDUHĂ€QGLQJDFFHVVWRPRUH challenging career opportunities as well as the chance to utilize their full scopes of practice in their roles. RPNAO’s theme for Nursing Week this year is: “Professional care. Inspired by you and the ones you love. Ontario’s RPNs.â€? We believe this theme celebrates the skill, expertise and dedication of RPNs, who, in collaboration with their peers in health care, are able to make such positive differences in the lives of their patients, residents, clients and their family members every day. During this special week, it’s our honour to recognize and thank all nurses and other health care practitioners for the important work they do. We invite all of you to connect with us on our Facebook page at www. facebook.com/RPNAO or on Twitter at @RPNAO. Sincerely, The staff and board of directors of the Registered Practical Nurses Association of Ontario (RPNAO)

HOSPITAL NEWS MAY 2013

NOTABLES

Cindy Doucette,

Trillium Health Partners indy is a nurse practitioner and is a hero to patients, families and colleagues. Cindy has worked at Trillium Health Partners, Mississauga Hospital for over 20 years in a variety of clinical and leadership roles. For the last six years, Cindy has worked in Seniors’ Health as an advanced practice nurse in the Seniors Health Clinic and the Regional Geriatric Outreach Team (home visiting) serving frail older adults and their families. In this role, Cindy has demonstrated exemplary care for patients, families and colleagues. She has given of herself, far beyond what is expected and she has changed many patients’ lives. Cindy is our hero. Cindy is a hero to her patients. Cindy is empathetic and cares deeply for each and every patient. She is thorough in her assessment and care of patients leaving no stone unturned and no clinical issue left untouched. Cindy is also dedicated to see the clinical issues addressed as far as she has the ability to influence. There are countless patients that have received this care. Here is a brief story about one: Mr. G is an 89 year old widower living alone who was referred to the geriatric medical outreach program for functional and cognitive decline. Mr. G has multiple medical issues including cognitive impairment that resulted in distorted thinking/suspicion related to care providers assisting him at home. He was resistant to care and consistently refused care being provided to him and was at risk of losing supports in place. He also had suspicions toward his children and resulted in them being estranged from one another. Cindy completed a comprehensive geriatric assessment with Mr. G in his home. Through her innate ability to actively listen she gathered the pa-

C

tient’s history and was able to distill the source and trigger points of the suspicions. With this information she liaised with the geriatrician, the family physician and community partners to develop a care plan with Mr. G’s goal at the centre. Changes were made to medication and increased community seniors program involvement was implemented. Mr. G continues to live at home with daily care provided through community partners. One of Cindy’s greatest qualities is her ability to listen. Through active listening Cindy has been able to build rapport with patients to enable patient to accomplish their goal of continuing to live at home/ age in place. Cindy is a hero to families. She is approachable in her manner and time. She checks messages on her own time and has completed many follow up calls after hours. She is patient with families, making multiple visits to listen to them and educate them on their loved one’s needs. Cindy carefully explains the issues to families and gives them strategies on how they can assist. Finally, Cindy is a hero to her colleagues. She is caring towards each team member. She is interested in what our lives involve. However, more significantly, she is hilarious and keeps the lunch room laughing with stories of her encounters. Cindy recalls details that bring lift to every story and she engages us in her journeys. Cindy is a delightful team member whom every team would benefit from having. Cindy is an exemplary nurse. At team meetings, we are continually amazed at the details that she uncovers and the care she offers her patients. The world is a better place for H having nurse Cindy in it! ■ Nominated by the Seniors Health team

www.hospitalnews.com


S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S — National Nursing Week 2013 N11

3URIHVVLRQDOFDUH ,QVSLUHGE\\RXDQGWKHRQHV\RXORYH

2QWDULR·V531V

www.hospitalnews.com

MAY 2013 HOSPITAL NEWS


N12 National Nursing Week 2013 — S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S

Candace Riehl Ngungu, Canadian organization called Same World, Same Chance, and the Solwezi Hospital in Solwezi, Zambia ver the years I heard many heroic stories from Candace from her role as a nurse in Northern Ontario, downtown Toronto, small town Ontario, rural Zambia and in a Zambian small city: Solwezi. Below is an excerpt from her blog that showcases that she is truly a Canadian nursing hero. “After spending a month working on the high cost ward at the hospital I now have spent more than three months on the pediatric ward I was told this is where real nursing happens and I now don’t doubt that statement for a second. I was thrown into the mix quickly, was forced to tune up on speaking bemba quickly and all of a sudden found myself where I never imagined I could be. The charge nurse went away to school after one month and I assumed that role (not without some argumentation and stating multiple times I had only been on the unit 1 month, to which everyone replied but you have a lot of experience from Canada). I am not sure that any situation in Canada could prepare me for the months ahead. The previous charge nurse gave 6 nurses leaves from work for the month of December leaving me with minimal staff even for an African hospital. I worked most days with one other nurse and too frequently alone. Our nurse to patient ratio in

O

Canada is four patients to one nurse, I worked with 70 or more patients every day. I have witnessed too many children die due to a lack of resources and staff but I have also witnessed true heart and faith where you can sometimes feel like there is none. Malaria is rampant in the children’s

ward; almost 90 per cent of the patients come in with cerebral malaria, where the parasite has progressed to the brain causing seizures, unconsciousness, and other side effects. On this particular morning a young boy with severe malaria had stopped breathing, luckily we had the doctor on

the ward and started to resuscitate the child. First we bagged him (manually provided him with oxygen), as the child started to have a seizure we quickly administered phenobarbital, a bolus of dextrose, followed by adrenaline and continued to work on this child for the next hour. We inserted a nasogastric tube and removed oxygen from another child in order to provide this one with a chance at life. He was breathing on his own fairly well after a while and the doctor said, ‘Well all we can do now is pray.’ I choked back tears thinking that it was true; it was all we could do. We had used our limited resources and with all our heart we tried to save his life but our science can only go so far and then we have to let faith take over. I have unfortunately had many situations like this, particular on my last stretch of seven night shifts where there was no doctor on staff in the night. Maybe it is the innocence of children that makes it hard to accept their deaths, or the fact that I know children from Canada would never die due to lack of an oxygen machine or not enough staff. They keep telling me that I will get used to the way the pediatric ward is, but I H hope I don’t ever accept it.� ■ Nominated by Gillian Strudwick

NOTABLES

Jenette Schoon,

Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital or almost 30 years, Jenette Schoon has been a registered nurse, committing most of her career to providing excellent nursing care to children who have an acquired brain injury and their families at Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital. At this most traumatic time in their child’s life, Jenette’s is able to provide compassionate care to children and their families. She has become a clinical expert and invaluable member to the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Team. In this past year Jenette has broadened her frontline nursing focus and taken a leadership role in a project to streamline and revolutionize our admission process. This is an entirely new experience for Jenette as she partnered with all of the members of the interprofessional team, management and Collaborative Practice bringing all of her excellence in family and nursing to these groups and this large project. As a direct result of her efforts a new collaborative admission process that is caring, collaborative, clientcentred, accountable, evidence-based and safe has been implemented for all inpatients. In order to reflect the client and family’s voice in this work, Jenette con-

F

HOSPITAL NEWS MAY 2013

ducted many interviews with clients and families about their experiences. The information that she collected through interviews and extensive international research on admission pathways, literature reviews and by working exhaustively with members of the interprofessional team has helped to conceptualize and implement the collaborative admission process. The culmination of the admission process is a strengths-based, appreciative enquiry focus to the Family Team Goal Plan to support the ethos of the admission that makes families authentic partners in developing the plan of care for their child. While Jenette’s work has long been inspirational to clients, families and colleagues at Holland Bloorview, she is now receiving recognition globally. As a result of her taking on new challenges, this admission process is now active and has been presented to an international audience in Japan and Vancouver. It is her bravery that has lead Jenette to take on completely new challenges and develop new skills in an already established career. She has done H truly transformational work. ■

TEGH recognizes exceptional nurses with Daisy Awards Toronto East General Hospital (TEGH) recognizes a special nurse each month with a DAISY Award, a recognition program endorsed by over 1,000 organizations in seven countries. Through DAISY, TEGH is able to formally acknowledge nurses for the extraordinary work they do HYHU\GD\1XUVHVDUHSUHVHQWHGZLWKDFHUWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWHSLQDQG+HDOHU¡V Touch sculpture (hand carved by a tribe from Zimbabwe who revere their traditional healers). Making the awards even more special, nurses can be nominated by either patients or co-workers. Nomination stories share similar themes of care, compassion and an XQGHUVWDQGLQJRIWKHKRVSLWDOH[SHULHQFHIURPWKHSDWLHQW¡VSHUVSHFWLYH One recent story about care in the Emergency Department clearly demonstrates the spirit of DAISY and the exceptional work that TEGH nurses doâ&#x20AC;Śalways. Stacey Murray and Linda Philips were nominated together based on FRPPHQWVIURPRQHJUDWHIXOIDPLO\7KHSDWLHQW¡VGDXJKWHUUHTXHVWHG that the nurses who cared for her father in the Emergency Department EHUHFRJQL]HGIRUWKHH[WUDRUGLQDU\DQGGLJQLĂ&#x20AC;HGFDUHKHUHFHLYHG These two nurses saw a very proud man through an episode of incontinence with compassion and kindness, in addition to being professional DQGGHWDLOHG$OWKRXJKPRUWLĂ&#x20AC;HGE\WKHLQFLGHQWWKHJHQWOHPDQUHSRUWHG feeling extremely cared for and treated with dignity and respect. This is just one of example of the patient-centred care that TEGH nurses GHOLYHUHYHU\VLQJOHGD\DQGKRZ'$,6<UHFRJQLWLRQDIĂ&#x20AC;UPVWKH exceptional work that they do!

Nominated by Kim Bradley, Kim Krog and Shawna Wade www.hospitalnews.com


S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S — National Nursing Week 2013 N13

Valerie Johnston-Warren

Grand River Hospital alerie has been actively involved in the implementation of evidence-based practices for several years, initially as an Education Practice Lead (EPL) and then as CNS in the last 3 years. Prior to this Valerie was demonstrating significant interest in “best practices” as she worked through her Masters program at the University of Toronto. Valerie became a consistent member of the Mental Health and Addictions Program (MHAP) Best Practice working group, and was a driving force as GRH moved to, and achieved, the Best Practice Spotlight Organization designation. As a clinical nurse specialist, in Specialized Mental Health (SMH), Valerie now coordinates the implementation of several best practice guidelines across the wider Mental Health and Addictions program. In her CNS role, Valerie participates in several service based committees to bring her best practice knowledge and skill to patient care program development and evaluation, as well as contributing to discussion around quality and safety. On a more individual level, she consults to clinical teams where there are particularly complex nursing care and practice issues. At the SMH and Mental Health & Addictions Program (MHAP) leadership table, Valerie constantly advocates for her front line nurs-

V

ing colleagues, and looks for opportunithe implementation of best practice ties to advance the practice of nursing guidelines relating to least restrain. At to reflect evidence-based care. the same time, she has worked collabA significant part of Valerie’s role is oratively with nursing, occupational to contribute to the education and detherapy and medical colleagues to safely velopment of nurses who are new to the move elderly, frail patients away from ho restra program, and also students who restraints, while at the same time min are relatively new to the prominimizing the risk of falls. T fession. Valerie contributed This initiative has seen valua quality of life gains for a significantly to the develable NOTABLES n opment of the overall orinumber of patients. entation program for SMH In addition to the above, V and subsequently delivered Valerie brings her knowledge an expertise to the intake a number of specific sessions. and ar r From the outset, new nurses hear and referral group at SMH. This ex e that evidence-based practice iss an exhelps to ensure that the team is fully pectation within our program. That aware of the complex nursing care issues program has now been adapted and is that might be present. offered to all new staff members coming In this role Valerie is able to support into the wider MHAP. the team, and nurses in particular, as As a faculty member at Conestoga they collaborate with patients in develCollege, Valerie regularly offers experioping a realistic and meaningful shared ence to 4th year nursing students. This recovery plan. not only gives the students valuable In summary, Valerie practices to the knowledge and experience about menfull extent of her scope as an advance tal health and addictions nursing ispractice nurse. She not only advosues, it also bring current and additional cates for and participates in evidencebest-practice information to the wider based care; she also shows consisstaff group. As part of this role, Valerie tent collaboration with her colleagues supports inquiry and research, always on the wider clinical team, at SMH, bringing valuable information back to in the MHAP and across Grand River the front line staff and leadership within Hospital. SMH. Valerie is a wonderful asset to the H Valerie has been a prominent memhospital and the nursing profession. ■ ber of the least restraints group at GRH, Nominated by Sarah Robertson and has been a passionate advocate for

Toronto East General Hospital Nurses Helping us achieve a new standard in community-based hospital care

Valuing the patient experience in order to provide patient-centred care Collaborating to provide excellence in team-based performance Contributing to achieving evidence-informed quality outcomes Excelling in innovation, idea generation, and process improvement Demonstrating kindness, excellence and respect always

follow us on social media www.hospitalnews.com

www.tegh.on.ca MAY 2013 HOSPITAL NEWS


N14 National Nursing Week 2013 — S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S

Abeba Andemichael, Mount Sinai Aida Sulejmanovski, Trillium Health Partners Alison Rancourt, Markham Stouffville Hospital AnneMarie Longthorne, Trillium Health Partners Bhavna Meta, Sunnybrook Hospital Bibi Jaigobin, Trillium Health Candace Riehl Ngungu, Canadian organization called Same World, Same Chance, and the Solwezi Hospital in Solwezi, Zambia Candy Spencer-Walt, Soldiers’ Memorial Hospital Carnett Howell-Belle, Mount Sinai Hospital Carol Morgan, lberta Health Services Central Zone Carol Rivers, Credit Valley Hospital Cheryl Mattson, Hotel Dieu Hospital Cheryl McAdam, Misercordia Health Centre Cheryl Walker,RN, Soldiers’ Memorial Hospital, Orillia Cindy Doucette, Trillium Health Partners Cindy Robinson, Credit Valley Hospital Clarita Urbano, Runnymede Healthcare Centre Corinne Nesbitt, Royal Victoria Regional Health Centre Cory Parker, Credit Valley Hospital Cynthia Rheault, North Bay Regional Health Centre Deb Bisnaire, London Health Sciences Centre Elena Hossu, Credit Valley Hospital Flo Abbott, Peterborough Regional Health Centre Heather Marshall, Trillium Health Partners Heather Nesbeth, Trillium Health Partners Heather Steiner, Mackenzie Heath Jackie Sherrard, Embassy Hall Jacquie Fowler, Kelowna General Hospital Janice Herstwood, Soldier’s Memorial Hospital Jeff Nash, PeterboroughRegional Health Centre HOSPITAL NEWS MAY 2013

Hospital News salutes all nominees of the 2013 Nursing Hero Awards with excerpts from nomination letters Flo Abbott, Peterborough Regional Health Centre I arrived at my present room where another nurse Flo Abbott was waiting. I told her my eyes were blurring; I felt weak and faint and asked for oxygen. Flo saw my face turn white. She knew I was dying… She immediately put the oxygen tube in my nose and told the other nurses to put me on my back. She constantly checked my blood pressure (very low) on my left arm and right arm until it returned to almost normal. This was on a Thursday. On Saturday she asked me to sit in the wheelchair for 45 minutes but I lasted 15 minutes. Flo saved my life! All this happened weeks ago. Nominated by William Thompson Metzger

Kiran Dhillon, Trillium Health Partners Kiran goes above and beyond what is expected; as our hospital’s motto is patient centered care I truly believe Kiran shows this through her nursing practice. Kiran has had the opportunity to be on both sides of the table, first as a very sick patient and now as a very caring nurse. It is through her personal experience that her understanding of health and healing has moved beyond

the preconceived notions she has had about life. She has learned to appreciate what life has to offer and to not take things for granted. Without a doubt, her personal experience shaped her decision to pursue a career in nursing. Her nursing practices focus on the patient’s experiences of health, illness and quality of life, and how she can provide ways of caring that are meaningful to them in their process to recover. She was in excellent care when hospitalized and the moments she shared with her nurses and healthcare professionals were unforgettable. As such, she wanted to do something in life that would allow her to connect with people in their time of need, she wanted to care for people when they were in trouble...she wanted to be a nurse, making a difference one patient at a time! Nominated by Vicky Sharma

Janice Herstwood, Soldiers’ Memorial Hospital My husband Larry was admitted with an infection as a result of a chronic, terminal lung disease. Janice was compassionate and patient. She took the time to talk with us and to listen as Larry shared parts of his life story. She was extremely competent and thorough in her care of Larry. It is our strong belief that if not for her efforts, Larry would

not have lived as long as he did. While admitted, Larry’s condition deteriorated quite rapidly. It seemed like he was fading away. When Janice began her shift that night, she took Larry’s vitals and expressed her concern to me. I then called our children and they came to see him. In the meantime, Janice contacted our family doctor and this led to a new course of treatment through the night that helped him to ‘turn a corner’. It brought back the man we knew back to us. This nomination comes on behalf of our family. In our experience, Janice not only exemplifies what it means to be a nurse, we also consider her our hero. As we prepare to submit this nomination, my husband has recently died. However, we feel that Janice’s efforts were instrumental in allowing us to have this past year with him. Nominated by Donna Johnston

Alison Rancourt, Markham Stouffville Hospital Alison Rancourt provided incomparable care to my mother when she was in the hospital recovering from hip replacement surgery. In caring for my mother, Alison went above and beyond her regular nursing duties, provided a happy and caring presence and worked tirelessly to ensure my mother was comwww.hospitalnews.com


S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S — National Nursing Week 2013 N15

fortable in her recovery. Through her art, like brush strokes on a canvas, Alison left a permanent mark on our lives. She was the ray of sunshine my mother needed during her worst period of recovery. When my mother really needed it, Alison shared her feelings of comfort, patience and safety. She continually assured my mother that all would be well, which helped a great deal in her recovery, as it provided her with peace of mind. I truly believe that Alison’s caring demeanour and genuine concern for my mother played a significant role in her recovery. Nominated by Irene Ashfield

Carol Morgan, Alberta Health Services Central Zone Carol has volunteered as the MoreOB coreteam lead (Managing Obstetrical Risks Efficiently) at Wainwright Health Center. Achieving nurse and physician engagement in such a challenging program is no easy task especially during these turbulent times filled with staff shortages and tight budgets. That is where Carol has gone above and beyond the call of duty and has built a culture of teamwork on her unit. She has spent countless hours facilitating many activities including obstetrical emergency drills such as postpartum hemorrhage and audits, which ultimately results in safer patient care. Wainwright Obstetrical Unit led the way across the zone in completion of the MoreOb online exam with an eighty percent participation, thanks to Carol. They were one of the few sites to enter a video in the MoreOB Video Competition, which scored 2,425 hits, thanks to Carol. Even though it wasn’t the winning video, Carol was “proud to say we were successful in our efforts and we enjoyed a few good belly laughs in the making of the video.” Inspiring people like Carol make my job more than just a job and an enjoyable part of my life. Nominated by Karen

Millicent Walters, Runnymede Healthcare Centre Kind, caring and compassionate, Millicent sees potential in every person and makes a positive impact in the lives of everyone she meets—from patients and their families, to co-workers and students. Millicent’s extraordinary patience, resilience and open-mindedness allow her to build solid relationships with all clients, fostering an environment of understanding and acceptance, even in the toughest of situations. Millicent is a true nursing hero who is wholly committed to her many roles and responsibilities. Please accept this nomination to honour an outstanding member of Runnymede’s clinical team. Nominated by Deborah MacPherson

Kathrine Armenta and Kresside Moraleja, Runnymede Healthcare Centre This nomination is not based on one particular event—both Kathrine and Kressida go above and beyond the call of duty every day, not only making my job as a patient care manager easier, but also alleviating some of the strain from their co-workers. In addition to being exceptional nurses, Kathrine and Kressida are clinical team leads on their units. This is a new, permanent position at Runnymede that allows them to be the point persons for all third floor staff, patients and their families, ensuring greater consistency of care. Further, it provides the opportunity for them to conduct educational sessions for nursing staff and complete regular audits on patient falls and wounds. Both Kathrine and Kressida have risen to the challenge and demonstrated leadership, accountability and flexibility in this new role. I am so proud and grateful to have these two wonderful nurses on my team. Nominated by Charmaine Thompson

Nomination for Carol Rivers, Credit Valley Hospital Carol embodies the values of a true Florence Nightingale – compassionate, caring, dedicated, selfless, holistic and professional. Twenty of her 35 years as an RN worked at CVH, from bedside to research to being a vascular access nurse, she has indeed, contributed to a successful initiative of the Hemodialysis Unit of CVH to have increased the use of fistulas thus earning 3rd of the 22 hemodialysis units in Ontario to have the most optimal use of fistulas/grafts in 2012. Stories and experiences from some of the patients on the early stages of the use of their fistulas were heard. They agreed and acknowledged that Carol, indeed, has patiently accessed these fragile fistulas with a tender touch. To her peers, she exemplifies a commitment to our patients for a caring and non-judgmental approach to their wellbeing. She worked beyond her hours to ensure that she catches the problems of www.hospitalnews.com

the vascular accesses of the patients for the whole 700-2300 shift. Her positive attitude encourages her peers and the patients to nourish their confidence in the health care system of the organization. Nominated by Liezl Begino, Stella Salamat, Sarah Bezeau and Daisy Binlayo

Cheryl Walker, Soldiers’ Memorial Hospital I met Cheryl in December, 2012, when I was referred to the Transfusion Clinic at OSMH. Apart from feeling unwell, I was also extremely nervous about the transfusion process. I had been poked and prodded by many healthcare professionals in the weeks leading up to this visit so I really wasn’t looking forward to more needles. I am happy to report that from the moment that Cheryl greeted me at the entrance to the clinic I felt comfortable and was confident that I was in good hands. Cheryl was compassionate and professional in her approach. She explained the transfusion process and answered all of my questions. She also had a knack for finding a good vein (not always an easy task with a cancer patient) during the three and a half months that I attended the clinic. Her soft spoken, gentle approach to everyone and her sense of humour was greatly appreciated by all of us. Nominated by Sharon Mascarin

Ria Rongo, Runnymede Healthcare Centre Although she is relatively new to the hospital, Ria has quickly proved herself to be a reliable and dedicated member of the clinical team. During one of her first night shifts at Runnymede, Ria was put to the test and had to assume increased responsibility. While the evening presented numerous challenges, including a patient emergency, Ria rose to the occasion and demonstrated the quickthinking and leadership skills of an outstanding nurse. Resilient, adaptable and most importantly, accountable, she managed a challenging situation with the poise of a seasoned expert. Words cannot express how impressed I am by her professionalism and courage to step up to the plate during a difficult time. Nominated by Simin Faridani

Timarie Kyle, Three Links Manner I would like to nominate Timarie Kyle, an LPN who works at Three Links Manor (TLM) in Kelowna, B.C.., as a nursing hero. I am relief staff for quite a few residential care homes and she has been so helpful to me during occupational therapy assessment and therapeutic intervention with residents at TLM. Timarie ensures she knows everything about every resident she works with and appreciates the contribution to care by each team member. She is compassionate toward residents and takes the time to understand their needs and point of view. She excels at consulting the resident, their family members, and other staff to help us make the best decisions about care. She is very informed about strategies addressing falls prevention, behavioral issues, and maintenance of skin integrity and functional mobility. Timarie is very approachable and considerate of staff, despite our often interrupting her while she is charting. Most of all, even though she is busy, she just makes a person, whether a resident, staff or family member, feel special. Nominated by Chris Dixon

Nisha Joy and Olive Smart, Runnymede Healthcare Centre Nisha and Olive are both charge nurses who demonstrate exceptional leadership, compassion and team spirit on a regular basis. Beloved by staff and patients alike, they make it a priority to thoroughly answer questions, patiently listen to concerns and quell any anxieties that may arise in a demanding and oftentimes challenging, healthcare environment. With an unwavering focus on quality and safety, both women consistently go the extra mile to ensure the most appropriate care is being provided to patients at all times. Conscientious, diligent and extremely dedicated to their professions, Nisha and Olive truly embody Runnymede’s values of integrity, compassion, accountability, respect and excellence (ICARE). Nominated by Deborah MacPherson Continued on page 16

Jenette Schoon, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabiliation Hospital Jodi Hazell, Peterborough Regional Hospital Jodi Chubbs, RN, Soldiers’ Memorial Julie James, Misericordia Health Centre Karen Brunetta, Sault Area Hospital Karen Fisher, Hospice Wellington Kathrine Armenta, Runnymede Healthcare Centre Kresside Moraleja, Runnymede Healthcare Centre Kelly Comer, Soldiers’ Memorial Hospital Kim Hebert, Windsor Regional Hospital Kiran Dhillon, Trillium Health Partners Leah Heinisch, Grand River Hospital Lee Ann Fox, Kingston General Hospital Madge Reece, Humber River Regional Hospital Marion Brisson, Almonte General Hospital Michelle Soares, Soldiers’ Memorial Hospital Millicent Walters, Runnymede Healthcare Centre Monica Dickson, Mount Sinai Hospital Nisha Joy, Runnymede Healthcare Centre Olive Smart, Runnymede Healthcare Centre Parmjit Kaur, Trillium Health Partners Ria Rongo, Runnymede Healthcare Centre Sheryl Paul, Trillium Health Partners Shona Percival, London Health Sciences Centre Theresa Ferrari, The Credit Valley Hospital Timarie Kyle, Three Links Manner Tracey Kitchen Clark, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre Valerie Johnston-Warren, Grand River Hospital Vicky Sharma, Trillium Health Centre Wendy Chivers, Misericordia Health Centre Zofia Zuchowicz, Rouge Valley Centenary Hospital

MAY 2013 HOSPITAL NEWS


N16 National Nursing Week 2013 — S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S

person who stood out from above the crowd! Every single day that she is here at work, she goes all above and beyond the call of duty! Patients who already know her will actually “request” to have Zofia as their nurse! Because she was blessed with a special gift of “x-ray eyes” and therefore is extremely talented with IV starts, the other nurses won’t stop bugging her to help them with the difficult veins. Zofia, of course will never say no! She will also never decline any shift that she is asked for. I think everyone, including, staff, management and patients, are quietly hoping that Zofia will never retire! If angels would actually have physical bodies and were visible, I am sure that Zofia is one! She probably just keeps her wings at home, so we won’t figure it out! Nominated by Dorota Sitnik

Bibi Jaigobin, Trillium Health Bibi Jaigobin is one among the dedicated nurses. She is soft spoken and truly cares about her patients. She has got the skills and knowledge to render patient centred care throughout her career for many years. Patient comfort and care is number one priority for her. On numerous occasions, I have seen her speaking pleasantly with family members answering their questions and reassuring them, in the middle of her busy schedule. There are very many occasions, where Bibi attends to patients and there is pleasant smile on their faces in spite of their pain and suffering. She has been a preceptor for many years. She has guided many students to become caring nurses like herself and quite willing to train many in future. There is no doubt that her students become committed nurses. She is quite willing to impart her skills and knowledge to the next generation. Her patience with patients and students with her busy schedule needs special recognition. Nominated By Bhavan Athanee

Cheryl McAdam, Misercordia Health Centre

Julie James, Misericordia Health Centre In my role with facility maintenance, I’ve had dealings with Julie on a number of occasions. Julie is always the personification of professionalism, caring, & dignity. She’s proven to be an extremely valuable co-worker whenever we’re dealing with issues involving upset or demanding residents or their family members. But in addition to her professional demeanour & competence, Julie has an almost magical effect when dealing with the residents. On a number of occasions, I have seen Julie approach a resident who has become agitated, is calling out or is perhaps sitting crying. She positions herself face to face with the aged person, very, very close. Julie gently puts her hands on the sides of the person’s face, and speaks in a very soft, gentle, reassuring voice. Invariably, the resident will calm down in response to this most warm & kind approach. It occurs to me that Julie James’s manner with our residents should serve as the model for long term care. Nominated by Louis P. Leroeye HOSPITAL NEWS MAY 2013

Abeba Andemichael, Mount Sinai Hospital I am nominating Abeba Andemichael for being one of the best nurses in labour and delivery in providing quality care for labouring patient and supports for family members. I worked with her for more than 20 years; her practice in providing care is always excellent. She always receives positive feedback from patients, family members, colleagues and doctors too. She is dedicated to her career and tried to attend several workshops and in-services to learn more about current issues in nursing which enhances her skills in providing quality care. She is considered as one of the best preceptor, she is well liked by newly hired nurses and students for guiding them to adjust to the new environment. Abeba is very patient, quiet and trustworthy. She is an excellent nurse to be recognized. Nominated by Edith Fanugao

instantly makes you take your focus from your illness. She explained my medications; never at any point did I feel like an inconvenience or a burden. When the line from my IV fell on the floor, she didn’t just swab, she changed the line without any attitude or negativity. I love her professionalism and that she is a wife and the mom of two little girls who comes in to work 12 hour night shifts with a smile. She says she enjoys her job and is happy to help as much as she can. What a hero! I had a sense of security knowing she was working on shift. She has the skill of balancing documentation while maintaining a high focus on quality care for her patients and offers help to co-workers. I don’t ever look forward to coming back to the hospital, but if I ever do I hope Aida will be my nurse. Nominated by Dawnia Wade

Aida Sulejmanovski, Trillium Health Partners

Zofia Zuchowicz, Rouge Valley Centenary Hospital

She is one of best nurse I have ever had since my numerous visits. She did her job with a pleasant demeanour that

I’ve been a staff nurse on 7W for almost 6 years now, and from day one, while still orientating, Zofia was one

Cheryl works in the Pre-operative assessment clinic for ophthalmology and Pediatric dental. She has been a nurse for 25 years and living with Multiple Sclerosis. Every day is a physical battle with bone weariness , sensory and motor affiliations . This is enough to make anyone give up, but not Cheryl. Cheryl is always upbeat , kind , diligent and knowledgeable in her job providing her best for patients and staff. Cheryl is our go to person for information and sometimes for a prayer. She is able to cope with whatever comes her way with grace and humbleness that we co-workers could only wish to aspire to when dealing with patients, families and co-workers. The nursing profession is blessed to have her and we the Misercordia family, feel the same way. Nominated by Sheree Hibbs

Cindy Robinson, Credit Valley Hospital Every shift I have worked with Cindy I have seen a level of dedication like no other. She is always very patient with whomever she is in contact with. Her patients and families are treated with respect and she spends the well needed time with them to explain and answer their questions. There is not one specific example of her work ethic, but it is shown all the time. She has been a wonderful example of a mental health nurse and many look up to her. She also has a wonderful sense of humour that makes working with her a terrific experience. Nominated by Lorraine Beselaere www.hospitalnews.com


S A L U T E

T O

Elena Hossu, Credit Valley Hospital Elena has truly made a difference on our unit, welcoming any new staff and patients. She works well as a team player and independently. She is also a patient advocate! The patients of unit 1E enjoy having Elena as their nurse, she makes them smile and laugh every time she is around. Elena has become a true mentor to many nurses and students, who appreciate her honesty and encouragement to be a better nurse and individual. Elena‘s patient care exceeds expectation, patients who have been discharged returned to visit Elena on the unit, with great feelings of gratefulness and appreciation. Working in collaboration with Elena has helped the continuity of high quality care of patients at Credit Valley Hospital, especially Unit 1E Complex Cont. Care. Nominated by Felesia Fowler

Heather Marshall, Trillium Health Partners It is our pleasure to nominate Heather as our hero. Heather has worked with us at the McCall Centre for 28 exceptional years. Her dedicated qualities have shown in many areas of nursing and she has worked in various positions as an RN on all floors. Heather is well respected by all family, doctors, colleagues and patients. Her understanding, knowledge, compassion and experience, as well as her ability to adapt, has always been admired and appreciated. When Heather is called upon you know you can count on her to be there with enthusiasm and support. Her professionalism, kindness and good sense of humour has shown throughout the years in several nursing positions. She has her own tool kit to add to all her abilities. Thank you Heather for what

www.hospitalnews.com

O U R

H E R O E S — National Nursing Week 2013 N17

you have taught us throughout the years. Nominated by Doreen Johnson and Mary White

Kelly Comer, Soldiers’ Memorial Hospital When I think of a nurse, I think of a compassionate, patient, personable, helpful person with such a passion for their career that it exudes to their patients and co-workers and I got this and much more from a nurse when my daughter River Similas was admitted to the paediatric unit for a large bowel obstruction. Kelly was our day nurse on Sunday and our night nurse on Monday and I can honestly say that I wouldn’t have made it through Rivers’ hospital stay without her. She was absolutely amazing; she was so helpful to River and me. She is not only a phenomenal nurse but also a phenomenal person. She is truly one of a kind and River and I are ever so grateful to have had her as a nurse and will forever be indebted to her. Nominated by Sarah-Lee Handy

Vicky Sharma, Trillium Health Centre Vicky goes above and beyond what is expected, as our hospital’s motto is patient centered care she truly believes in this. Vicky always says we are not just here to get through our twelve hour shift but to actually make a difference in the lives of our patients and families. In the first year of being employed, Vicky was nominated by the clinical educator, Marcella Honour on Orthopaedics for being the new graduate of the year by Health Care Interaction’s national magazine. Vicky was selected and an article, “An Angel Amongst Us” was published about her devotion to patient care and positive attitude that brought on a mini

revolution amongst the staff. As she is of South Asian descent and has had many patients on the unit from the same background, this has certainly worked towards the patient’s advantage as her ability to advocate for them by translating their needs and concerns to the healthcare team. I believe that Vicky’s values and beliefs are an extreme asset to Trillium Health Centre. Nominated by Kiran Dhillon

Jackie Sherrard, Embassy Hall We all have a saying when we see Nurse Jackie coming in on our shift in the morning...”It’s going to be a good day” and that it is. She runs a tight ship and keeps her crew working. She is dedicated to working with the elderly and is just simply an amazing person. Not a moment do I see her sitting; she is always involved in something – either taking blood, giving meds, walking or shopping with patients, feeding them, hugging them and doing care for them. This woman is never without a smile and is constantly positive and always interested in anything you have to say. She sets our mood in the morning and keeps our mood cheerful all day. Working with Nurse Jackie makes me value my job and makes me a better person at it. Nominated by Cynthia Chiasson

Heather Nesbeth, Trillium Health Partners Heather Nesbeth has been a diabetes educator for over 20 years. In that time she has helped countless people to understand their condition, prevent or delay serious complications and to live well with diabetes. Diabetes is a condition which is managed and not cured, and patients must engage with their health care team to self-manage in a

meaningful way. Patients feel heard, understand and NEVER judged when working with Heather. Whether dealing with health problems, issues around food and cultural preference, finances or social problems, they feel secure that Heather will listen, never judge, and develop a collaborative care plan with them to meet their needs. This care is consistent day in and day out, through missed lunches and late appointments. It is a privilege to work with Heather and learn from her. Nominated by Pam Osborn

Michelle Soares, Soldiers’ Memorial Hospital Michelle was an angel to us on the day my husband entered the hospital and does continue to enquire how things are going, always in a professional, caring manner. In the curtained area, while my husband had been seen by many medical staff, all of whom I am very appreciative of, Michelle quietly came and talked to us, letting us know exactly what was happening and her genuine support was overwhelming. She hugged me and let me know that everything was going to be okay. “You are in the right place and people are trained to help you in this situation – whatever you need”. Her words left me feeling reassured despite this being a very difficult time. Michelle gave me the comfort to cry, to express emotions, to be completely lost, without any hesitation to help us. She talked to my husband in a very knowledgeable, concerned manner and explained what would be happening to him. She helped us through a very scary, traumatic time all the while listening and offering information to relieve our worries. She is definitely in the area of work where her gifts shine. Nominated by Betty Whitwell Continued on page 18

MAY 2013 HOSPITAL NEWS


N18 National Nursing Week 2013 — S A L U T E

Cory Parker, Credit Valley Hospital My late father had been in the hospital for over a month for his final journey. During his stay, over ten nurses had been assigned to taking care of him. My mother, with the trait of a dedicated wife, spent twelve hours a day in the hospital to be with my father. She carefully observed how each nurse was helping my father. Through weeks of selftraining, she became an expert on how things are supposed to be done from a patient perspective. Every time when Cory is on duty for my father, my mother would happily tell me that he had been taken good care of by the nurse. I could see my mother’s emotional burden was less on those days. In his final day, he was one of the lucky patients to receive the highest quality of care from a nurse. My mother was pleased to have Cory HOSPITAL NEWS MAY 2013

when he passed away peacefully. Cory’s professionalism and dedication for her patients is impressive. It is our honour to nominate Cory Parker as the nursing hero, who helped to lessen my mother’s burden and provided the highest quality of care for my late father. Thanks Cory! Nominated by Wilkin Chau

AnneMarie Longthorne, Trillium Health Partners The Charge Nurse on the 4th floor where our mother is, is just fantastic-excellent. She truly stands for the word CARE-Compassionate/ Caring; Approachable; Responsible; Excellence. She along with the physician and other staff members have met with us a few times to discuss my mother’s status, our options, care process, respectfully and subsequently has always been there to answer any questions or

T O

O U R

concerns we may have. She is very polite and humble given her load of responsibility at the facilities. AnneMarie is a true example of one who would make the family feel at peace while leaving their loved one in the care of your facilities. My siblings and I wish to nominate her for Nursing Hero at Trillium Health Partners. We wish her the best in life for her compassionate and caring way to patients, residents and family members. Thank you so much. Nominated by Naznin Grattan

Jeff Nash, Peterborough Regional Health Centre During my recovery following a major surgery at PRHC, Jeff Nash was one of the nurses assigned to me. He was very professional and went beyond the call of duty in LISTENING (key word) and

H E R O E S

tending to my needs and discomforts and took the time to provide a number of tips and items to make things easier and more comfortable for me. He also suggested a number of handy tips for at home care, all of which was very useful and aided in my speedy recovery. Jeff, thanks for a job well done – it was much appreciated. Nominated by Lorraine Kelly

Candy Spencer-Walt, Soldiers’ Memorial Hospital It is my pleasure to nominate Candy Spencer-Walt for the Hospital News Nursing Heroes award. Candy has been an RN in the Emergency department since 2000. When I first considered nominating her I was reminded of the ONA 2012 nursing week motto “Value the Invaluable”. Candy certainly is a valwww.hospitalnews.com


S A L U T E

T O

ued member of the healthcare team at OSMH. It is easy to recognize her hard work, knowledge, professionalism, compassion and caring. Candy demonstrates a strong work ethic during every rotation she works. She is thorough, detail oriented and complete with every task. She is always eager to support other staff and assist all patients. It truly is an honour working with such an outstanding nurse. Nominated by Michelle Soares

www.hospitalnews.com

O U R

H E R O E S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; National Nursing Week 2013 N19

Clarita Urbano, Runnymede Healthcare Centre Clarita is a charge nurse on Runnymedeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fourth floor who demonstrates an immense dedication not only to her profession, but to her patients, co-workers and the hospital as well. She is always the first to arrive at work in the morning and the last to

leave, regularly lending a helping hand to tie up any loose ends. Exuding compassion, patience and grace, Clarita has the ability to make anyone feel calm, comfortable and at ease in her presence. She is incredibly respectful and kind to others, always finding the time to truly listen and take other peoplesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opinions and feelings into consideration. She is a mother figure who acts as

a mentor to the other nurses, answering questions and providing assistance that is consistently free from frustration and criticism. Clarita is exactly what a nurse should be: caring, compassionate and committed to providing the right care at the right time, making her a true nursing hero. Nominated by Simin Faridani Continued on page 20

MAY 2013 HOSPITAL NEWS


N20 National Nursing Week 2013 — S A L U T E

T O

O U R

Bhavna Meta, Sunnybrook Hospital

The Nurse By Roopdai Mohotoo and Nita Marcus

Florence Nightingale, the lady with the lamp, Mother Theresa in the refugee camp, Caring, compassionate, gentle and kind, A more noble profession, one could not find. The nurse is the doctor's eyes and ears, Records any changes, allays patient fears, Monitors rhythms, takes vital signs Administers drugs, sets up IV lines. The nurse is highly trained in her skills, To assist in the healing of wounds and ills, In the OR, wards or critical care, Her presence unnoticed because she is always there. With devotion and pride, she nobly serves, Though pressures, demands, may fray her nerves The nurse lowly paid, in gold is her worth, For she's truly god's angel sent down to earth by.

My father, Alan Kean, is a veteran from World War II and has lived at the Veteran’s Wing at Sunnybrook Hospital since the fall of 2011. Upon his arrival we met Bhavna Mehta, his primary nurse. Bhavna always goes the extra mile to make sure that my father is well cared for. She combs his hair just right. She realized that he likes to dress up and put on a tie for my mother so she helps him get ready for visits and on my mother’s 90th birthday, she helped Dad put on a suit and even put a little flower in his lapel. My parents have been married over 65 years and their change in living arrangements has been difficult for them. Bhavna is very supportive on an emotional level to Dad and the whole family. Also, she provides a high standard of care with respect to my father’s physical needs. She patiently explains any medication that is required and notes any day to day changes in his mood or habits to our Mother. She was a wonderful help during a long period of depression that occurred with my Dad. We are very thankful for her and all the nurses in L Wing at Sunnybrook Hospital. Nominated by Theresa Kean

Candace Riehl Ngungu, (Same World, Same Chance) The Solwezi Hospital in Solwezi, Zambia Over the years I heard many heroic stories from Candace from her role as a nurse in Northern Ontario, downtown Toronto, small town Ontario, rural Zambia and in a Zambian small city: Solwezi. Below is an excerpt from her blog that showcases that she is truly a Canadian nursing hero.

H E R O E S

“After spending a month working on the high cost ward at the hospital I now have spent more than three months on the pediatric ward I was told this is where real nursing happens and I now don’t doubt that statement for a second…Malaria is rampant in the children’s ward; almost 90 per cent of the patients come in with cerebral malaria, where the parasite has progressed to the brain causing seizures, unconsciousness, and other side effects. On this particular morning a young boy with severe malaria had stopped breathing, luckily we had the doctor on the ward and started to resuscitate the child. First we bagged him (manually provided him with oxygen), as the child started to have a seizure we quickly administered phenobarbital, a bolus of dextrose, followed by adrenaline and continued to work on this child for the next hour. We inserted a nasogastric tube and removed oxygen from another child in order to provide this one with a chance at life. He was breathing on his own fairly well after a while and the doctor said, ‘Well all we can do now is pray.’ I choked back tears thinking that it was true; it was all we could do. We had used our limited resources and with all our heart we tried to save his life but our science can only go so far and then we have to let faith take over. Nominated by Gillian Strudwick

Carnett Howell-Belle, Mount Sinai Hospital On a Friday evening at Carnett decided to complete one final wound care consult. It was time to go home but she wanted at least to leave some information for the nurses to follow over the weekend and complete the consult on Monday. This patient had bilateral leg cellulites and pitted edema with lymph-

SOAR IN YOUR HEALTH CARE CAREER

R

yerson University’s Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing and The G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education would like to commend all nurses who have chosen to continue their education.

The Chang School has a long history of, and a strong reputation for, providing practical and applied programs. A variety of our certificate programs can be completed in a short time. Learners from the health care sector can choose from several Chang School programs to add a career-focused specialization to their resumés.

NURSING COURSES AND CERTIFICATES • Post-Diploma BScN Degree for Registered Nurses – Offered through a flexible, part-time, online format. • NEW – The Certificate in Advanced Nursing Leadership and Management is a certificate for post-baccalaureate nurses and is available through a combination of on-line and in-class courses. • NEW – Paediatric Health Assessment course is available online.

FOR MORE INFORMATION about nursing courses and programs, visit www.ryerson.ca/ce/nursing. Email: cenurse@ryerson.ca Phone: 416.979.5000, ext. 4775 Visit www.ryerson.ca/ce for other Health Care Related Certificates at The Chang School. HOSPITAL NEWS MAY 2013

www.hospitalnews.com


S A L U T E

T O

edema like presentation. He was not able to walk or move his ankles because of the edema. In order to provide the appropriate treatment, a detailed assessment needed to be completed. Carnett explained to the patient the type of treatment that would benefit him and the type of assessment that would be required. She regrouped with her colleagues outside of the patient’s room and discussed how much the patient would benefit if the treatment was started early on that day. All of the nurses immediately decide to stay and to complete the assessment and treatment for the patient. The assessment included completion of the bedside ABI, measurement (circumference of each leg) application of a two layer wrap to each leg and documentation. The patient was very grateful and the next Monday, happily reported that the treatment worked wonderfully over the weekend. He was now able to ambulate up and down the halls and his planned discharge was scheduled for the following day. Nominated by Crystal Li

Cheryl Mattson, Hotel Dieu Hospital Cheryl is a leader within her department, fellow staff members look to her for knowledge and guidance; she is always readily available to answer questions without a moment’s notice. She is a teacher with a wealth of experience, appreciated by surgeons, nurses, and patients. During a crisis involving patient care, Cheryl remains calm and diligently assesses the situation and reacts appropriately. She is one person who we appreciate having on our team during an emergency. We have had several situations in EPACU where Cheryl has always placed patient care a priority. For example, last week a patient required

O U R

H E R O E S — National Nursing Week 2013 N21

immediate assistance, the patient had low blood pressure and was going into shock, Cheryl contacted the appropriate staff and continued to monitor and treat the patient accordingly. This was during a time period where her only assistance was one other staff member; she always utilizes what resources are available to her. Thanks to her, the patient recovered and is doing well. Nominated by Jennifer Hamilton-Browne and Liisa Ware

Cindy Doucette, Trillium Health Partners Cindy is a nurse practitioner and is a hero to patients, families and colleagues. Cindy has worked at Trillium Health Partners, Mississauga Hospital for over 20 years in a variety of clinical and leadership roles. For the last six years, Cindy has worked in Seniors’ Health as an advanced practice nurse in the Seniors

Health Clinic and the Regional Geriatric Outreach Team (home visiting) serving frail older adults and their families. In this role, Cindy has demonstrated exemplary care for patients, families and colleagues. She has given of herself, far beyond what is expected and she has changed many patients’ lives. Cindy is our hero. Cindy is a hero to her patients. Cindy is empathetic and cares deeply for each and every patient. She is thorough in her assessment and care of patients leaving no stone unturned and no clinical issue left untouched. Cindy is also dedicated to see the clinical issues addressed as far as she has the ability to influence. There are countless patients that have received this care. Finally, Cindy is a hero to her colleagues. She is caring towards each team member. She is interested in what our lives involve. However, more sig-

nificantly, she is hilarious and keeps the lunch room laughing with stories of her encounters. Nominated by the Seniors Health team

Jacquie Fowler, Kelowna General Hospital The nurse with the largest of hearts, from where compassion is truly seeded. The nurse who manages the over capacity bulletins by responding respectfully, assertively, and again from her compassionate Nurse-Professional heart to those who must hear that she has no more room at the” Inn”. The nurse who chooses to distract from stressors by doing a sudden little dance around her chair, or hum a favourite little tune that brings her joy. The nurse I will remember my entire life. Nominated by Wendy Glazier Continued on page 16

OUR NURSES

STAND OUT! Thank you for putting g patients p first. At North York General, our teams are making a world of difference. Caring, skilled and dedicated, our nurses play an amazing role in achieving a new standard of excellence in integrated patient-centred care. On behalf of the people we serve in one of Canada’s most diverse communities, we recognize and appreciate everything you do each day to exceed the expectations of patients and their families.

TAKE A BOW. YOU’RE AMAZING. To find out more about our outstanding nursing team, visit us online.

www.nygh.on.ca www.hospitalnews.com

MAY 2013 HOSPITAL NEWS


N22 National Nursing Week 2013 — S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S

Jenette Schoon, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabiliation Hospital For almost 30 years, Jenette Schoon has been a registered nurse, committing most of her career to providing excellent nursing care to children who have an acquired brain injury and their families at Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital. At this most traumatic time in their child’s life, Jenette’s is able to provide compassionate care to children and their families. She has become a clinical expert and invaluable member to the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Team. In this past year Jenette has broadened her frontline nursing focus and taken a leadership role in a project to streamline and revolutionize our admission process. This is an entirely new experience for Jenette as she partnered with all of the members of the interprofessional team, management and Collaborative Practice bringing all of her excellence in family and nursing to these groups and this large project. As a direct result of her efforts a new collaborative admission process that is caring, collaborative, client-centred, accountable, evidencebased and safe has been implemented for all inpatients. While Jenette’s work has long been inspirational to clients, families and colleagues at Holland Bloorview, she is now receiving recognition globally. As a result of her taking on new challenges, this admission process is now active and has been presented to an international audience in Japan and Vancouver. Nominated by Kim Bradley, Kim Krog and Shawna Wade

Jodi Chubbs, Soldiers’ Memorial Jodi is an ICU nurse at OSMH and I have worked with her since I began my career in Orillia. Throughout that time, she has worked as a leader in the ICU, and thoroughly deserves recognition for her exceptional work. One particular case stands out. In late December 2012, a patient was admitted to ICU with septic shock. We had not identified a source. Jodi was on the night shift and called me out of concern – she had noted a rash on the patient’s ankle that had spread rapidly over two hours. I had seen no such rash earlier. I was worried about necrotizing fasciitis, so I asked her to get a stat gram stain done – this came back negative. When Jodi called me to report this, she insisted that I come in to see this rash, as she did not believe the gram stain. I did come in that evening and was not completely convinced that this was necrotizing fasciitis. We got another gram stain, which was positive. At this point, if it were necrotizing fasciitis, surgery was urgently indicated. The patient would likely not survive if we waited until the morning. Jodi advocated strongly on behalf of the patient and I called the surgeon to come in – by now it was after midnight. The surgeon was not fully convinced either, but agreed to take the patient for exploratory surgery given the risks of waiting. In the end, Jodi was right. It was necrotizing fasciitis. The patient survived several surgeries before being discharged home. I am convinced that without Jodi speaking for her patient and dragging two reluctant doctors along with her, that the patient would have died. Nominated by Dr. Mark Bailey

Jodi Hazell, Peterborough Regional Hospital Jodi is the NP for the POP clinic here at PRHC. I have had the opportunity to use this clinic a couple of times in the last few months. My daughter who was HOSPITAL NEWS MAY 2013

five months old at the time was very ill with what I thought was a common virus cold. I took her to the physician who sent us to the pediatrician who ordered puffers for my daughter to use. She (the pediatrician) told us to go directly to the hospital for puffer training with Jodi at the POP clinic. As a nurse I thought I needed no assistance with this but in light of my daughter’s condition I thought I best do what they said. At this time is when I met Jodi. She welcomed us in the clinic with open arms and at the very end of her day. Did a VERY thorough examination of my daughter’s condition, gave us the training on the puffer, but wouldn’t let us leave just then.. After a few minutes she returned and said that my daughter would need to be admitted to hospital overnight, which I found very devastating. Jodi was very calm cool and collected as I ranted and raved about why I could take care of her just the same at home but, she did convince me that she should stay for 1 night. Since then, I have called on the POP clinic another couple of times. Instead of oh come in at such and such time, it was come now, immediately... no questions asked. Nominated by Tara Archer and Erin Howcroft

Karen Brunetta, Sault Area Hospital The Nursing Award being presented for caring, dedication, professionalism, mentorship and advocacy is just in its description of an RPN I work with within our Renal Unit here at Sault Area Hospital. Her integrity and compassion are evident each and every day. Karen, although only in the renal area three years, is a Project Lead Assistant for the Home Peritoneal Dialysis Program. Together, both of us oversee a home dialysis program consisting of 25 Peritoneal Dialysis patients. Without the collaboration and partnership of Karen, it would not be possible. Karen’s work experience and skill level are paramount for the caring of our home PD patients. Her professionalism is apparent and warranted in dealing with the complexities of any nurse client relationship. The patients she taught and formed a con-

nection with often conveyed gratefulness for the continued respect for their feelings. She has mentored new staff and has served as a preceptor for Sault College Practical Nursing Students. Karen is the 1st RPN to work in Hemodialysis at the Sault Area Hospital and is a founding staff member of the Sault Area Hospital Rehab Unit, and Acute Care

of the Elderly Unit. Advocacy for the patient is Karen’s middle name and if a staff member was under her care, rest assured that the nursing component would be upheld and done because of a true love of the nursing profession. Nominated by Marsha DeFrancesco Continued on page 24

define your course W W W. M I C H E N E R . C A / C E

Michener - helping nurses define your course through continuing education and part-time studies “I enjoyed the flexibility and independence of doing courses online on my own time – that helps a lot for those who work full-time and have families.” We realize that nurses have busy schedules and busy lives. Our key priority for the coming year is to expand your options so that you can learn on your own time…at your own pace… and in the comfort of a setting convenient for you. With recent changes, you can now enroll in our refresher courses any time in the year and have a full year to complete them. You can also take most of our courses online. We have introduced new hybrid courses combining online and hands-on workshops. And the majority of our Primary & Critical Care courses are offered in your workplace. If you want to simply take a course to enhance your skills or build important new competencies in your profession – we have hundreds to choose from. Or you may consider taking a full certificate program for new possible directions to enhance your career opportunities. Most of our certificates can be completed in as a little as sixteen months and offer specialties in Health Care Leadership, Clinical Research, Quality Management, Diabetes Education and more. Whatever your need or interest, we are here for you. Let us help you define your course. # & 4 5  & 9 1 & 3 * & / $ &  t  # & 4 5  & % 6 $ " 5 * 0 /

www.hospitalnews.com


S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; National Nursing Week 2013 N23

deďŹ ne your course

W W W. M I C H E N E R . C A / C E

Proudly Serving the Nursing Profession

enhance your skills

t Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) t Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) t Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers (CPR) t Neonatal Resuscitation (NRP) t Pediatric Emergency Assessment, Recognition and Stabilization (PEARS)

Scan to stay informed on CE courses

expand your job opportunities t Performing ECG t Cardiac rhythm interpretation t IV Insertion and Maintenance t Venipuncture Techniques t Pulmonary Function Testing

enrich your future t Diabetes Educator t Diabetes Specialty Courses t Clinical Research Associate t Leadership in Health Care

and a chance to win an iPad3! For more information or to register visit:

www.michener.ca/ce

4U1BUSJDL4USFFU5PSPOUP 0/.57tt

# & 4 5  & 9 1 & 3 * & / $ &  t  # & 4 5  & % 6 $ " 5 * 0 / www.hospitalnews.com

MAY 2013 HOSPITAL NEWS


N24 National Nursing Week 2013 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; S A L U T E

T O

O U R

ing her apheresis skills so that she could cover in the event that the worst scenario came to pass. Her colleagues on the unit love and respect her as much as anyone. It has been said that she is, â&#x20AC;&#x153;very knowledgeable with Hem/ Onc care and treatmentsâ&#x20AC;?. She is flexible and well rounded. She advocates for her patients. Her patients sing her praises as well. She is very focused on patient and family centered care. She leads by example and helps keep us on the cutting edge of best practice and clinical standards. She strives for excellent care with every patient she touches. Lee Ann is the nurse we all strive to be. She is our nurse hero. Nominated by Rose Marie Doucette

Kim Hebert, Windsor Regional Hospital I am very grateful to all the staff in helping me recover from a serious illness...sepsis due to a perforated bowel. All the staff on 8North was great and I wish I knew all their names to recognize them, but I saw how hard they worked to give excellent care with compassion. There was one nurse that cared for me who I really hope you could honour in a special way during Nurseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s week. Kim Hebert is a mother of two who worked midnight shift all through the Easter weekend. She did her work in a very humble, dedicated, compassionate way with a lot of love. She really touched me how she took great care in making sure the 94-year-old bedridden woman across from me had sips of water and warm blankets to comfort her despite all the other things that needed to be done like vital signs, assessments, turning, intakes and outputs, incision care etc. She took great care in tending to the man facing surgery next to me. She was there with pain medication right away for me and I really appreciated that because it was really severe pain. She explained things to me about the plan of care so I could know what to expect. I really hope she could be honoured because you could tell that she really was called to be a nurse by her interactions with people. I have not been that ill before in a hospital and she really helped me through a crisis. Nominated by Deborah Kloos

Leah Heinisch, Grand River Hospital Leah is a Registered Practical Nurse who works on our Adult Unit with individuals experiencing severe and persistent mental health challenges. Leah came to our unit with a solid medical/

H E R O E S

Madge Reece, Humber River Regional Hospital

surgical background but very little mental health knowledge. Since her recruitment to SMH Leah has embraced the vision we have for our program and she emulates it in every aspect of her nursing care. Leah is a strong advocate of the recovery philosophy which is one of the hallmarks of the program. Leah has taken every opportunity to learn as much as she can about mental health nursing. In addition, she has taken a unique interest in a sub-set of our patient population who live with not only a mental illness but also a developmental delay. Leah has been an advocate for all our patients but particularly those who fall in this subset. For one patient in particular, Leah has been instrumental in advocating for and helping to create and sustain a collaborative working group comprised of a true interdisciplin-

ary team who work together as a team on developing a holistic â&#x20AC;&#x153;plan of careâ&#x20AC;? for this client. Aspects of this care plan have been referred to as â&#x20AC;&#x153;ground breakingâ&#x20AC;?. The care plan is a highly individualized plan that has this patient functioning at the highest potential possible. Nominated by Sarah Robertson

Lee Ann Fox, Kingston General Hospital For Rosie and Nancy in the Stem Cell Transplant Unit Lee Ann is an amazing resource and support. Last year we both had a family member that was terminally ill and we were worried that we would both have to be off at the same time. This would have been detrimental to the program. Lee Ann came and spent time with us in the unit, refresh-

I was a patient at the Humber River Regional Hospital and would like to nominate Made Reece for the Nursing Hero Award for all the care and support that she provided to me at the time of my stay. Her tough love approach was exactly what I needed at the time, especially since my mental state was at the breaking point and I felt so overwhelmed that I just wanted to give up and die. At the time I only wanted Madge to go away and leave me alone. But she persevered and eventually made me realise that my behaviour was not only detrimental to myself but was affecting those closest to me. She forced me to realize that my family not only loved me but needed me, particularly my elderly parent. Today I am well and am at peace with myself and never want to go back to that dark place again. Nominated by Anna DeRose Continued on page 26

CLE

Legal Risk Management in

Documentation and Charting for Nurses Wednesday, June 12, 2013 Osgoode Professional Development; Downtown Toronto Conference Centre

Get practical advice on managing the key legal risks and dilemmas facing nurses around documentation and charting in 2013, including: v v v v v v v v

7KHVWDQGDUGVRISUDFWLFHDURXQGFKDUWLQJ 'RFXPHQWDWLRQDQGFKDUWLQJDVFULWLFDOFRPPXQLFDWLRQWRROV (OHFWURQLFFKDUWLQJqZKDWDUHWKHJHQHUDOUHTXLUHPHQWV" 7KH&12VWDQGDUGVqZKDW\RXPXVWXQGHUVWDQG +RZWRGRFXPHQWODWHHQWULHV 5HFRUGLQJLQIRUPDWLRQDFFXUDWHO\DQGHIIHFWLYHO\ %HVWSUDFWLFHVWRHQVXUH\RXDUHPHHWLQJ\RXUREOLJDWLRQV 5LVNPDQDJHPHQWqH[DPSOHVDQGFDVHVWXGLHVRIFRPPRQVFHQDULRV

Plus! Reinforce your learning in the intensive workshop included in

the course: Exploring Strengths and Weaknesses in Documentation and the Legal Implications

Chairs: Wendy Whelan, %RUGHQ/DGQHU*HUYDLV//3 Kate Crawford, %RUGHQ/DGQHU*HUYDLV//3 Registration Fee: $525 plus HST ,QTXLUHDERXWJURXSGLVFRXQWVDQGoQDQFLDODLG

Osgoode Professional Development values the contributions of the nursing profession and would like to give thanks to all of our nurses! Osgoode Professional Development (OPD), a division of Osgoode Hall Law School at York University, provides lifelong learning programs for lawyers and other professionals, including those working in the health care sector. Whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking to learn or refresh skills or simply get an update on recent developments, consider OPDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rich and diverse programs. We provide a number of non-degree seminars, certificate programs and workshops for health care professionals, including the areas of law relevant for nurses, hospital liability, long-term care, clinical risk management and mental health law.

This is what past delegates have said about our health law programs: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every administrator, director of care, Board member should participate in this timely and worthwhile conference. Please offer this again!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the best professional courses I have attended in 32 years of nursingâ&#x20AC;? Ă&#x2C6;<oZ\cc\eki\m`\nf][fZld\ekXk`feXe[[\Ă&#x201D;Z`\eZ`\jkfY\XnXi\f]%8ccelij\j should have the opportunity to attend this workshop to improve practice.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Very informative â&#x20AC;&#x201C; I wish all of my staff could attend. Use of actual scenarios extremely helpful.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Excellent, informative, current, empowering and interesting â&#x20AC;&#x201C; every nurse needs to know and hear again and again.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Extremely applicable to the nursing professional. Very useful and informative conference.â&#x20AC;?

To Register: ZZZRVJRRGHSGFD Or Call: RU Or E-mail: RSGUHJLVWUDWLRQ#RVJRRGH\RUNXFD

For a complete list of upcoming events or to register for any of our programs: Visit: www.osgoodepd.ca Call: 416.597.9724 or 1.888.923.3394 E-mail: opd-registration@osgoode.yorku.ca

Osgoode Professional Development, 1 Dundas Street West, Suite 2600, Toronto

Osgoode Professional Development, 1 Dundas Street West, Suite 2600, Toronto

3ULRULW\6HUYLFH&RGH+1

HOSPITAL NEWS MAY 2013

www.hospitalnews.com


S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; National Nursing Week 2013 N25

Celebrating Nursing at Mackenzie Health Thank you to the more than 800 Mackenzie Health nurses for your ongoing commitment to maintaining the highest standards of professionalism. Your hard work and dedication has earned the designation of Best Practice Spotlight Organization from the Registered Nurses Association of Ontario and recently helped Mackenzie Health to achieve Accreditation with Exemplary Standing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the highest possible award from Accreditation Canada. Working collaboratively with professionals from a wide variety of disciplines, you provide the best possible quality of care to our patients and their families. Through consistent use of evidence-based best practices and your relentless pursuit to continuously improve quality of care, you are helping to create a world-class health experience for the people of our community.

Mackenzie Health is a major regional healthcare provider serving Southwest York Region, one of Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fastest growing communities. Mackenzie Health includes two full service hospitals and a network of community-based services, helping create a world-class health experience to meet the growing needs of our community. The two hospitals include: the future Mackenzie Vaughan Hospital and the existing Mackenzie Richmond Hill Hospital (formerly York Central Hospital). Both hospitals will offer core healthcare services. Mackenzie Health and its network of health services unite our community under one comprehensive healthcare provider, making navigating the system easier and improving access to care. Our community highlighted the need for improved healthcare and expanded hospital services close to home. We listened and are proud to announce a new and innovative approach to healthcare in our community â&#x20AC;Ś Mackenzie Health.

www.mackenziehealth.ca

weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re delivering on our Promise of a Healthy Niagara (YHU\GD\RXU1XUVHVDUHDQLQWHJUDOSDUWRIDQLQWHUGLVFLSOLQDU\ WHDPFRPPLWWHGWRSURYLGLQJTXDOLW\SDWLHQWFHQWUHGFDUHWRD SRSXODWLRQRIPRUHWKDQDFURVVWKH1LDJDUDUHJLRQ :HFHOHEUDWHWKHLUHIIRUWVLQSOD\LQJDSLYRWDOIURQWOLQHUROH:H FRPPHQGWKHLULPSRUWDQWFRQWULEXWLRQVWRRXUODUJHFROODERUDWLYH WHDP:HUHVSHFWWKHLUH[SHUWLVHLQPHQWRULQJQHZWHDPPHPEHUV $QGZHUHFRJQL]HWKHVLJQLILFDQFHRIWKHLUSUHVHQFHHYHU\GD\LQ WKHOLYHVRIRXUSDWLHQWV

www.hospitalnews.com

7KDQN\RXIRUH[HPSOLI\LQJRXUFRUHYDOXHVRIFRPSDVVLRQ SURIHVVLRQDOLVPDQGUHVSHFW7KDQN\RXIRUKHOSLQJXVUHDOL]HRXU YLVLRQRIH[FHOOHQFHDVWKHPDMRUSURYLGHURIDFXWHFDUHLQ1LDJDUD UHJLRQ7KDQN\RXIRU\RXULQYROYHPHQWLQRXUPDMRUQHZKHDOWK FDUHFRPSOH[DQGQHZUHJLRQDOSURJUDPV<RXFRQWLQXHWRPDNHXV SURXG7KDQN\RX 7RILQGRXWPRUHDERXW1XUVLQJDW1LDJDUD+HDOWKYLVLWRXUZHEVLWH

MAY 2013 HOSPITAL NEWS


N26 National Nursing Week 2013 — S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S

expert. There were many days I felt so helpless. Then God sent me an angel to make my working life more comfortable and easier. This angel was Theresa Ferrari. How can I describe Theresa? I can use all nursing values and human values to describe Theresa without any doubts in my mind. She is one of the most humble, pleasant, open-minded, flexible and friendly people I have ever met in this world. Compared to Theresa’s knowledge, I am still in the beginning of the learning process. But she respects our point of view when we discuss things. She provides feedback either positive or negative without making us uncomfortable. She uses her sense of humor to smooth any difficult situation. She does not use power to control the team. She moves the team toward its goals by providing support and guidance. She motivates and inspires us by becoming an example. Theresa’s self-confidence and her compassion remarkably show her pride as a nurse. Nominated by Kumudu Gunasekera

Valerie Johnston-Warren, Grand River Hospital

Parmjit Kaur, Trillium Health Partners I suffer from Crohn’s Disease and during my stay at Trillium Health Partners, I had the pleasure of meeting Paramjit Kaur. She is the best nurse I have ever had since my numerous visits. She did her job with pleasure and never hesitated to help when other nurses were overloaded. She came quickly when I

HOSPITAL NEWS MAY 2013

buzzed for her, explained my medications, never at any point did I feel like an inconvenience or a burden. I had a sense of security knowing she was working on shift. She has the skill of balancing documentation while maintaining a high focus on quality care for her patients; and still offers help to coworkers. Nominated by Dawnia Wade

Theresa Ferrari, The Credit Valley Hospital I recently graduated from a nursing program. As a novice nurse I experienced overwhelm due to lack of nursing experience and skills. Senior nurses provided a wonderful support, however, they were busy with their own workload. I was so afraid to make my nursing judgements without consulting an

Valerie became a consistent member of the Mental Health and Addictions Program (MHAP) Best Practice working group, and was a driving force as GRH moved to, and achieved, the Best Practice Spotlight Organization designation. As a clinical nurse specialist, in Specialized Mental Health (SMH), Valerie now coordinates the implementation of several best practice guidelines across the wider Mental Health and Addictions program. In her CNS role, Valerie participates in several service based committees to bring her best practice knowledge and skill to patient care program development and evaluation, as well as contributing to discussion

www.hospitalnews.com


S A L U T E

T O

O U R

H E R O E S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; National Nursing Week 2013 N27 sense of calm, her warm motherly spirit and her hilarious easy going sense of humor. Working in Health Care is challenging enough but it is truly a pleasure to come to work and be inspired by her strength and her passion for job. They say you will meet people in your lifetime that change you forever. We met Wendy and she changed us. Nominated by Patty Darvill, Cathy McGregor &Janice Peters

Marion Brisson, Almonte General Hospital

around quality and safety. In summary, Valerie practices to the full extent of her scope as an advance practice nurse. She not only advocates for and participates in evidence-based care; she also shows consistent collaboration with her colleagues on the wider clinical team, at SMH, in the MHAP and across Grand River Hospital. Valerie is a wonderful asset to the hospital and the nursing profession. Nominated by Sarah Robertson

Wendy Chivers , Misericordia Health Centre Wendy came to Misericordia Eye Clinic of Excellence from our Cornish 3 Ward this year, 2012. Wendy had many challenges in our department. She jumped at the chance to learn new things. Wendy is always asking questions, eager to learn and to help in any way or form, even volunteering to file

the paper work! Wendy had a short time to learn how to assist hands on in our minor surgery area and she learned the names of all the new instruments, assisting with the physicians during surgery. She is able to perform an excellent eye consult and does all the pretesting required for the consult. It is amazing how one person can bring their passion for life to everything they do and pass it onto others. Our patients in the Eye Clinic love her great

Marion Brisson has been an RPN at Almonte General Hospital since 1974. She goes over and beyond the call of duty. Not only is her compassion for the patient outstanding, she simply brings a breath of fresh air to the unit. She is a natural nurse in that her very presence soothes the patient. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a knowledgeable, intuitive, non-complaining, gentle nurse. She is always willing to give a hand and share her compassion and knowledge with younger nurses and student nurses. Marion is everything a nurse should be. One of the nurses she mentored commented that Marion showed her how to connect with the patient; whereas before the nurse found it difficult to understand how to connect with a patient from simply reading about a patient. She added by saying Marion is so knowledgeable and admires how Marion makes a point of knowing her patient. Marion stressed to her mentee the importance of being patient and taking the time to get to know your patient; to develop a strong rapport and to complete a thorough assessment. This world is simply a better place because Marion is in it. This hospital is so proud and grateful to have the caliber of a nurse such as Marion. Nominated by Shelly Branje

Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Youville offers choice for Canadian students seeking nursing degree Buffalo, N.Y. - Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Youville College, a small private four-year institution near the Peace Bridge in Buffalo, has become the school of choice for thousands of Canadian students seeking an education in health care and education. 5HSODFLQJWHDFKHUHGXFDWLRQDVWKH´KRWÂľĂ&#x20AC;HOGLVQXUVLQJDSURIHVVLRQZKRVHJUDGXDWHV are in high demand throughout Canada. '¡<RXYLOOHFUHDWHGZHVWHUQ1HZ<RUN6WDWH¡VĂ&#x20AC;UVWIRXU\HDUQXUVLQJSURJUDPLQWKH VDQGWRGD\RIIHUVDFRPSOHWHDUUD\RIQXUVLQJSURJUDPVDVZHOODVRWKHUKHDOWKFDUH RIIHULQJV)URP%DFKHORURI6FLHQFHLQ1XUVLQJ %61 5HJLVWHUHG1XUVHWRD%DFKHORU RI6FLHQFHGHJUHHLQQXUVLQJ 51WR%61 0DVWHURI6FLHQFHLQ1XUVLQJ)DPLO\1XUVH Practitioner and a Doctor of Nursing Practice program, the college offers it all. '¡<RXYLOOHQDPHGDIWHUDZHOONQRZQ&DQDGLDQ6DLQWPDNHVLWHDV\IRU&DQDGLDQ¡VWR DWWHQG6WXGHQWVHQUROOHGLQWKH51WR%61SURJUDPUHFHLYHSHUFHQWRIIWXLWLRQDOO other Nursing programs receive a 20 percent discount for Canadians and undergraduate scholarships go up to $69,000. ,QDGGLWLRQWKHUHDUH)ULGD\RQO\FODVVHVWRPHHWWKHQHHGVRIVWXGHQWVZKRDUHZRUNLQJ and clustered nursing courses on Thursdays and Fridays for graduate nursing programs. 2YHUWKHSDVWĂ&#x20AC;YH\HDUV'¡<RXYLOOHKDVLQYHVWHGDSSUR[LPDWHO\PLOOLRQLQQHZ DQGXSJUDGHGFDPSXVIDFLOLWLHVLQFOXGLQJQHZVWDWHRIWKHDUWQXUVLQJVLPXODWLRQODEV that opened last year featuring the full body high tech patient simulator mannequins that bring amazing realism to the nursing students today. These are the most advanced patient simulators available today. -XVWXQYHLOHGWKLV\HDUZDVDQRWKHUVWDWHRIWKHDUW6LPXODWLRQ/DEWRKHOSWHDFKVWXGHQWV FROODERUDWLRQZLWKDYDULHW\RIKHDOWKFDUHGLVFLSOLQHV7KHVHLQFOXGHSKDUPDF\ physician assistant, physical and occupational therapy, dietetics, chiropractic and nursing, all taught at Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Youville. 7KHVWXGHQWVZRUNWRJHWKHUWRWUHDWD´SDWLHQWÂľZLWKVSHFLĂ&#x20AC;FV\PSWRPV 7KHQHZODEIHDWXUHVDVLPXODWHGKRVSLWDOURRPDQGDQRWKHUUHSUHVHQWLQJDQRXWSDWLHQW clinic. '¡<RXYLOOHKDVEHHQDQH[FHOOHQWDOWHUQDWLYHIRU&DQDGLDQVWXGHQWVIRURYHU\HDUV ,W¡VZLWKLQHDV\WUDYHOGLVWDQFHDIIRUGDEOHZLWKDQDFFRPPRGDWLQJDWPRVSKHUHZLWK FODVVHVWDXJKWE\SURIHVVRUVZLWKFOLQLFDOH[SHULHQFH

Visit us on the web at ww.dyc.edu www.hospitalnews.com

MAY 2013 HOSPITAL NEWS


N28 National Nursing Week 2013 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; S A L U T E

HOSPITAL NEWS MAY 2013

T O

O U R

H E R O E S

www.hospitalnews.com


Hospital News Nursing Week Supplement 2013