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Guest Editorial

UPCOMING DEADLINES FEBRUARY 2016 ISSUE EDITORIAL JAN 8 ADVERTISING: DISPLAY JAN 22 CAREER JAN 26 MONTHLY FOCUS: Facilities Management and Design/ Health Technology/Greening Healthcare/Infection Control:

Innovative and efficient health care design, the greening of healthcare and facilities management. An update on the impact of information technology on health care delivery. Advancements in infection control. + INFECTION CONTROL SUPPLEMENT

MARCH 2016 ISSUE EDITORIAL FEB 5 ADVERTISING: DISPLAY FEB 19 CAREER FEB 23 MONTHLY FOCUS: Gerontology/Alternate Level of Care/ Home Care/Rehab:

Geriatric medicine, aging-related health issues and senior friendly strategies. Best practices in care transitions that improve patient flow through the continuum of care. Programs and advancements designed to keep patients at home. Care in rural and remote settings: enablers, barriers and approaches. Rehabilitation techniques for a variety of injuries and diseases. + LONG TERM CARE SUPPLEMENT

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LEAVE A GIFT IN YOUR WILL TO MSF Help us provide medical assistance wherever the need is greatest by remembering Médecins Sans Frontières/ Doctors Without Borders with a gift in your will. For information, contact Emily Harris: 1-800-982-7903 or emily.harris@msf.org msf.ca/mylegacy

Don’t hurt me. Heal me.

Be nice to me By Dr. Peter Pisters hose nine words describe what every patient who enters a hospital expects from their care teams. And we all know that, try as we might, people do come to harm in ways that can be prevented. Hospital acquired infections, injuries from falls, bed sores, and medication errors are examples of preventable harm that occur every day in healthcare organizations. In a video we produced for our Annual General Meeting last June we described how dangerous all hospitals are and underlined the need to have frank discussions about our need to improve. We cannot change what we don’t measure and acknowledge. A significant component of this change is that we need to approach preventable harm as an opportunity to learn and fine tune the system. Frank and supportive discussions need to take place on how we must change so that no patient is hurt as a result of a hospitalization. I lead University Health Network – a health care system that includes acute care hospitals, rehabilitation facilities, and long-term care. In our health system, a community of nearly 20,000 care providers and volunteers work together to provide world class clinical care, innovative research and technology solutions to health problems, and education for 7,000 students a year in a variety of health disciplines. Our community is now committed to use our talent, expertise and resources to reduce and eventually eliminate preventable harm for the patients we serve. As a part of a structured transformation process, we have conducted a Speak Up for Safety survey that was carried out across the entire system. This safety survey tool has been used in healthcare organizations across North America and allows us to benchmark our safety cul-

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ADVISORY BOARD Cindy Woods,

Senior Communications Officer The Scarborough Hospital,

Barb Mildon,

RN, PHD, CHE , CCHN(C) VP Professional Practice & Research & CNE, Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences

610 Applewood Crescent, Suite 401 Vaughan Ontario L4K 0E3 TEL. 905.532.2600|FAX 1.888.546.6189

EDITOR

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ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

KRISTIE JONES

editor@hospitalnews.com

DENISE HODGSON denise@hospitalnews.com PUBLISHER

STEFAN DREESEN CREATIVE DIRECTOR

LAUREN REID-SACHS SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER

JOHANNAH LORENZO facebook.com/HospitalNews

HOSPITAL NEWS JANUARY 2016

ture against hundreds of other hospitals and health systems and to monitor safety culture over time as we undergo our safety transformation. The response rate to our survey was extraordinary. Two of our hospitals achieved a 100 per cent response rate, with an overall response of 74 per cent at UHN. This is unequivocal evidence of the engagement of our organization around the commitment that we have made to our patients and the community that we serve.

In high reliability industries safety is a core value and employees are supported and trained to spot problems before they happen and take immediate action For critical insights on improving safety, we are looking to other industries that have made extraordinary safety improvements over the past 30 years. These industries include aviation, nuclear power, and chemical manufacturing – industries that have a relative complexity of the work environment similar to healthcare and where reliability and resilience have been hard wired into the workforce. Collectively, these industries have adopted practices known as high reliability. In high reliability industries safety is a core value and employees are supported and trained to spot problems before they happen and take immediate action. The lessons learned from success in other industries are applicable to healthcare. Two of the most important critical success factors in safety transformation are the presence of a CEO, who sees themselves as the Chief Safety Officer,

Helen Reilly,

Publicist Health-Care Communications

Jane Adams,

President Brainstorm Communications & Creations

Bobbi Greenberg,

Health care communications

Sarah Quadri Magnotta, Health care communications

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

ANGEL EVANGELISTA CAROLINE PAPINEAU NICK MCGRAW RENATA VALZ JEFF CHARD ARUN PRASHAD ALICESA LAROCQUE KATHLEEN WALKER STEPHANIE GIAMMARCO BILLING AND RECEIVABLES

MATTHEW PICCOTTI PHIL GIAMMARCO

Dr. Peter Pisters is President & CEO, University Health Network. Follow him on twitter @ppisters

Dr. Cory Ross,

B.A., MS.C., DC, CSM (OXON), MBA, CHE Dean, Health Sciences and Community Services, George Brown College, Toronto, ON

Akilah Dressekie,

Ontario Hospital Association

David Brazeau

Director, Public Affairs, Community Relations and Telecommunications Rouge Valley Health System

and constant engagement of the Board. Indeed, we have commitment from myself and the UHN Board to aggressively pursue this safety transformation. Our journey to improve safety will not be easy, nor will it be quick. And so, we have collaborated on this with peer hospitals including the Hospital for Sick Children, Sinai Health System, and Women’s College Hospital. This collaboration will help accelerate progress by allowing us to share approaches, resources and tools designed to make our hospitals safer for our patients and staff. Patients and staff will be part of a common safety culture that extends across our organizations. Safety is an implicit expectation that Ontarians have of our hospitals. For those who would like to read more about High Reliability Organizations I recommend two books – Why Hospitals Should Fly by J.D. Nance and Managing the Unexpected by Karl Weick and Karen Sutcliffe of the University of Michigan. The first is written in novel form and imagines what it would be like to work in a hospital that has adopted the principles of high reliability organizations. The second book is a seminal work that outlines the principles in more detail. We work with caring, concerned and dedicated people who want the best outcomes for their patients. By working together, speaking up for safety, and supporting our workforce to change practice and behavior, we can transform our organizations become stronger and more resilient over time. We hope that our efforts may precipitate a safety transformation that extends across the entire H health care sector in Canada. ■

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Hospital News 2016 January Edition  

Professional Development, Continuing Medical Education (CME) and Human Resources. *Special Supplement: Professional Development

Hospital News 2016 January Edition  

Professional Development, Continuing Medical Education (CME) and Human Resources. *Special Supplement: Professional Development