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Hospital for Special Surgery 535 East 70th Street New York, NY 10021 www.hss.edu

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 2012-2013 Annual Report

212.606.1000

A Return to Form and Function: The Essential Work of Hospital for Special Surgery Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 2012-2013 Annual Report


Department of Orthopaedic Surgery The 2012-2013 Annual Report of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery is produced by Education & Academic Affairs of Hospital for Special Surgery. Laura Robbins, DSW Senior Vice President Education & Academic Affairs Designated Institutional Officer, GME Marcia Ennis Director Education Publications & Communications Linda Errante Robert Pryzgoda Managing Editors Judy Pommett Associate Editor Ali Wilcox Art Director Robert Essel Major Photography Brad Hess Contributing Photography

About Hospital for Special Surgery Founded in 1863, Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) is a world leader in orthopaedics, rheumatology and rehabilitation. HSS is nationally ranked No. 1 in orthopaedics, No. 4 in rheumatology, and No. 5 in geriatrics by U.S.News & World Report (2013-14), and is the first hospital in New York State to receive Magnet Recognition for Excellence in Nursing Service from the American Nurses Credentialing Center three consecutive times. Located in New York City, HSS also serves patients in the regional area with physician offices in Greenwich, Long Island, and Queens, and serves Florida patients with an outpatient rehabilitation office in South Florida. Patients choose to come to Hospital for Special Surgery from across the United States and from around the world. HSS has one of the lowest infection rates in the country. From 2008 to 2013, HSS has been a recipient of the HealthGrades Joint Replacement Excellence Award. HSS is a member of the NewYork-Presbyterian Healthcare System and an affiliate of Weill Cornell Medical College and as such all Hospital for Special Surgery medical staff are faculty of Weill Cornell. The Hospital’s Research Division is internationally recognized as a leader in the investigation of musculoskeletal and autoimmune diseases. Hospital for Special Surgery is located in New York City and online at www.hss.edu.

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2013 Hospital for Special Surgery. All rights reserved.


Contents 2

A Message from the Surgeon-in-Chief

7 Orthopaedic Research at HSS A Return to Form and Function: The Essential Work of Hospital for Special Surgery

The essential work of Hospital for Special

13 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Service Reports Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement Division Hip Service Knee Service Surgical Arthritis Service

Surgery – patient care, research, and education – thrives on the communication,

Foot and Ankle Service

Hand and Upper Extremity Service

within the Department of Orthopaedic

Limb Lengthening and Complex Reconstruction Service

Surgery and across disciplines and other

collaboration, and collegiality that are found

specialties,” says Thomas P. Sculco, MD,

Metabolic Bone Disease/ Musculoskeletal Oncology Service

Orthopaedic Trauma Service

Surgeon-in-Chief. “With a common goal of

Pediatric Orthopaedic Service

Scoliosis Service

improving the lives of patients restricted

Spine Service

Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service

Department of Biomechanics

or immobilized by musculoskeletal injuries or disorders, the Hospital continues to extend the boundaries of what is possible in musculoskeletal care.

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Departmental Information 2012 Patient Care Volume Quality Care Indicators

Professional Staff

Affiliations

Endowed Chairs, Professorships, and Fellowships

2012-2013 Notable Achievements

2012-2013 Selected Publications

2012-2013 Graduating Residents and Fellows

Contact Information

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

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A Message from the Surgeon-in-Chief Thomas P. Sculco, MD As we celebrate the 150th Anniversary of the founding of Hospital for Special Surgery, I write this message with a touch of nostalgia and great affection for the institution where for more than 40 years I have had the privilege to develop my career and work side by side with some of the greatest minds in musculoskeletal medicine.

From its start in a small brownstone on Second Avenue in New York City to its current campus of clinical, research, and education facilities overlooking the East River, the Hospital has followed a trajectory of growth and innovation that continues to transform the fields of orthopaedic surgery and rheumatology to this day.

an infection rate significantly lower than the New York State average for hip replacement or revision surgeries. According to the most recent report on hospital infection rates released by the New York State Department of Health, the Hospital had a statistically lower surgical site infection rate of 0.4 percent compared with the state average of 1.12 percent.

During the past year, HSS saw a number of significant endeavors come to fruition. We embarked on several new initiatives that will play a role now and in the future, securing improvements in the clinical arena, driving new avenues of research, and ensuring that the orthopaedic surgeons of tomorrow are equipped with the knowledge and training to provide the highest quality of care to their own patients.

Numerous best practices – many pioneered here – help to keep our infection rates low. Several of these focus on minimizing surgical time for joint replacement, which, in general, lowers the risk for infection. They include the use of regional anesthesia, in turn reducing bleeding and the length of the surgery.

The Clinical Imperative Demand for the Hospital’s services has nearly doubled in the past six years. In 2012 alone, more than 215,000 256,000 patient visits were made to HSS orthopaedic surgeons, and over 27,000 surgeries were performed. Of these procedures, some 4,200 4,300 were total hip replacements – nearly four times that of any other institution in New York State and the highest number in the country. For the fourth consecutive year, HSS demonstrated

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In 2012, The Joint Commission acknowledged the Hospital as one of its Top Performers on Key Quality Measures.™ HSS was the only Manhattan-based hospital among the 620 hospitals singled out for achieving an exemplary level of accountability measure performance. The Joint Commission’s annual report presents scientific evidence of how hospital performance relates to common medical conditions and procedures. The Hospital also was recognized as a Top Performer for surgical care.

Thomas P. Sculco, MD Expanding Our Facilities To accommodate a patient population that continues to grow and to ensure that our facilities for diagnosis and treatment remain state of the art, HSS has an ongoing capital plan to modernize and expand facilities at its main campus and beyond. In 2012, the completion of two new operating rooms brought our OR complement to 35. We also celebrated the opening of several highly anticipated facilities: Alfred and Norma Lerner Children’s Pavilion and Ellen Wright Children’s Care Center – a comprehensive state-of-the-art “hospital within a hospital” for pediatric patients and their families Steve Tisch Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement Center and the Joan H. Tisch Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement Reception Area – new accommodations for the Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement Division equipped with contemporary exam rooms and physician offices, and a welcoming and comfortable space to greet patients and families when they arrive for appointments


James M. Benson Sports Rehabilitation Center and Tisch Sports Performance Center – beautiful, modern facilities in which professional and recreational athletes can recover from sports-related injuries, enhance their performance goals, and minimize the risk of re-injury East 75th Street Campus – a 30,000-square-foot, six-floor outpatient facility for the Hospital’s physiatry and pain management programs complete with spacious physician offices, procedure rooms, and radiology services HSS Long Island in Uniondale – expansion of patient care services for the Long Island community, including a physician staff of 18 and renovations that more than double the office space, housing 18 exam rooms, a new MRI suite, and a Special Procedures Unit for pain management treatments Expediting Research Translations The ultimate goal of the scientists in the Hospital’s Division of Research is to improve the lives of patients with musculoskeletal disorders. In the past several years, under the leadership of Steven R. Goldring, MD, Chief Scientific Officer, our research programs have evolved to incorporate new ways of thinking about benchto-bedside science and advances in technology that are accelerating the pace of discoveries in the laboratory to therapeutic applications. Musculoskeletal research efforts also are being strengthened through the creation of a formal Clinician

Scientist Program, funded by a generous gift from the Kellen Foundation, which provides mentoring and support to young faculty who are committed to careers as clinician-scientists. Among the Division’s priorities has been the establishment of multidisciplinary teams comprising basic scientists, biomedical engineers, and clinical investigators who collaborate to define mechanisms involved in osteoarthritis, cartilage repair, and bone injury and regeneration, for example.

Recently, Hollis G. Potter, MD, the Coleman Chair in MRI Research and
Chief of the Division of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Matthew F. Koff, PhD, received NIH funding for a multidisciplinary approach to identify total hip arthroplasty patients at risk for early revision surgery due to adverse effects of wear debris released from prosthetic implants. Teams of scientists, physicians, and engineers – led by Scott A. Rodeo, MD, Co-Chief of the Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, and Mary B. Goldring, PhD – are working together

Hospital for Special Surgery’s research programs have evolved to incorporate new ways of expediting bench-to-bedside science.

Five years ago, HSS launched its Osteoarthritis (OA) Initiative with major funding from the Li Ka Shing Foundation. Since that time, the OA Initiative has made great strides, developing multidisciplinary research activities and clinical trials that help address the broad-ranging challenges of OA. The establishment of a peer-review grants program and a faculty member support program has made possible, to date, pilot projects and ongoing research in areas that include mechanisms of post-traumatic arthritis, cellular mechanisms that result in the destruction and abnormal repair of cartilage, gene involvement in ACL repair, and early detection of osteolysis and identification of therapeutic targets.

in the Tissue Engineering, Regeneration and Repair Program to develop new strategies to prevent, repair, regenerate, or replace injured tissues. In addition, HSS is an associate founding member of the New York Genome Center, a collaboration of New York academic medical centers, private companies, foundations, and New York City, and one of the largest sequencing and bioinformatics centers in the country. Through the New York Genome Center, our scientists and clinical investigators have access to the newest genomics technologies furthering their ability to research the causes and regulation of musculoskeletal conditions and expedite the development of new therapies.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

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Honoring the Past, Envisioning the Future Celebrating 150 Years The 150th Anniversary of the founding of Hospital for Special Surgery on May 1, 1863, was commemorated with gala celebrations; scholarly and scientific symposia; a 530-page historical volume and documentary film; and numerous exhibits and publications.

1 I n Anatomy of a Hospital: Hospital for Special Surgery 1863-2013, David B. Levine, MD, emeritus attending orthopaedic surgeon at HSS, eloquently details the history of the Hospital.

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2 T he Metropolitan Museum of Art served as host to the Hospital’s 150th Anniversary reception, illuminating the grand stairway with candles displaying the HSS logo. 3 J oining in the festivities at the 150th Anniversary reception are (from left) Russell F. Warren, MD, 10th Surgeon-inChief; Philip D. Wilson, Jr., MD, eighth Surgeon-in-Chief; Sam Delgado, CST, Senior Technical Manager, OR; and Thomas P. Sculco, MD, current HSS Surgeon-in-Chief.

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4 L eading historians, scholars, scientists, physicians, and health policy experts from around the country gathered at HSS for a two-day symposium entitled “Honoring the Past, Envisioning the Future.” 5 T he Hospital’s 30th Annual Tribute Dinner celebrated the 150th Anniversary, honoring the City of New York with special guest Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who accepted the award on the City’s behalf. The event also paid 4 tribute to renowned spine surgeon Oheneba Boachie-Adjei, MD, Chief of the Scoliosis Service, who was honored with the HSS Lifetime Achievement Award.

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The HSS Healthcare Research Institute (HRI), directed by Stephen Lyman, PhD, is stepping up the Hospital’s patient-oriented research. The HRI consolidates clinical research programs under a single administrative structure with the

Residency Training In 1888, Virgil P. Gibney, MD, the Hospital’s second Surgeon-inChief, established the nation’s first orthopaedic residency program. Dr. Gibney set the gold standard for training in orthopaedic surgery

Our high patient volumes provide us with exceptional opportunities to compile and analyze data on patient outcomes through more than 45 registries with nearly 84,000 enrollees.

goal of enhancing the productivity and impact of clinical research. An established health services researcher, Dr. Lyman has focused his studies on the patterns of orthopaedic healthcare delivery and their impact on patient outcomes. Our high patient volumes provide us with exceptional opportunities to compile and analyze data on patient outcomes and, to this end, we now have more than 45 active patient registries with nearly 84,000 enrollees. This includes our joint replacement registry, which contains data on over 20,000 patients. The information afforded by these registries benefits not only our ability to provide better care to our own patients, but also raises the standards of care in the national and international medical arenas through the sharing of information in peer-reviewed publications and presentations at society meetings.

and and its its subspecialties subspecialties that that has has endured for more than endured for more than 125 125 years. years. The The program program has has grown grown from from one one year to five, including a first year year to five, including a first year spent spent in in general general surgery surgery at at NewYorkNewYorkPresbyterian Hospital, and Presbyterian Hospital, and from from two two residents 452013, as ofthe 2013. Also, residents to 48.toIn program greater than 70 here in was granted an fellows increasetrain in residents all musculoskeletal areas with in to nine per year, up from eight. 39 Also, orthopaedic surgery. greater than 70 fellows train here in all musculoskeletal areas with 39 in The Orthopaedic Residency Program orthopaedic surgery. of today is not so very different in its mission to provide residents the The Orthopaedic Residency Program opportunity to gain a well-rounded of today is not so very different in surgical education andresidents master the its mission to provide the fundamentals of orthopaedic surgery. opportunity to gain a well-rounded surgical education In 2012, more than and 600 master medicalthe fundamentals of orthopaedic surgery. school graduates applied to our orthopaedic In 2012, moreresidency than 600program; medical 55 candidates were interviewed school graduates applied to our for the 10 PGY-1 positions available. orthopaedic residency program; We were extremelywere successful in thefor 55 candidates interviewed orthopaedic match for ouravailable. residency the eight PGY-1 positions class. Competing with every We were extremely successfulother program in the country, rose in the orthopaedic matchHSS for our to number 11 on the match list for residency class. Competing with our topother 10 –program surpassing all previous every in the country, years. Our new residents received

their rose HSS MD to degrees number from 11 on University the match of list for ourSchool Maryland top 10 –ofsurpassing Medicine, Geisel all previous School of years. Medicine Ouratnew Dartmouth, residents received their Harvard Medical MDSchool, degreesHoward from Cleveland Clinic University College Lerner of Medicine, College Rush of Medicine; Medical College Columbia of RushUniversity University College ofCenter, Medical Physicians The Raymond and Surgeons; and Perelman Ruth Perelman SchoolSchool of Medicine of Medicine at the University at the University of Pennsylvania; of Pennsylvania, University of California,Autonoma Universidad Irvine Medical de School; University of California, Guadalajara, UniversitySan of Francisco; California and Weill San Francisco Cornell School Medical of Medicine, College. and Weill Cornell Medical College. I am also pleased to report that two of I amresidents our also pleased havetobeen report honored that two with of major our residents awards:have Michael been B. honored Cross,with MD, received major awards: an ORS/OREF Michael B. Travel Cross, Award MD, in Orthopaedic received an ORS/OREF ResearchTravel Translation, Award and in Orthopaedic Peter D. Fabricant, ResearchMD, Translation, MPH, received and Peterthe D. 2013 Fabricant, American MD, MPH, Orthopaedic received the 2013 Society American for Sports Medicine Excellence Orthopaedic Society in forResearch Sports Award forExcellence Medicine best clinicalinresearch Research paper. Award for best clinical research paper. With Pride in Our Faculty With2013 Pride in Our Faculty Annual Meeting of the The The 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons held in Chicago was a Surgeons heldfor in Chicago was a 160 great success HSS, with over great success for HSS, with over and 160 presentations, courses, exhibits, presentations, posters by our courses, faculty. exhibits, and posters by our faculty. The year also brought important The year also brought important honors and recognition for many honors recognition for many faculty and members. faculty members.MD, PhD, has been Jo A. Hannafin, Jo A. Hannafin, MD, PhD, has been named the first female president of the American named the firstOrthopaedic female president Society of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine and was elected for Sports of Medicine and wasSociety, elected Secretary The Herodicus where she of Secretary will The serve Herodicus as President Society, in 2015. Dr. where sheHannafin will servealso as President was named in 2015. Hannafin also honored was named one ofDr. three physicians by one of three physicians honored by Castle Connolly as Physician of the Castle as Physician Year forConnolly Clinical Excellence. Sheofisthe the Year for Clinical Excellence. She is the first orthopaedic surgeon to receive this award first orthopaedic in its eight-year surgeon tohistory. receive this award in its eight-year history.

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At the 2013 AAOS Annual Meeting, HSS orthopaedic surgeons had over 160 presentations, courses, exhibits, and posters.

Mary B. Goldring, PhD, was named First Vice President of the Orthopaedic Research Society (ORS) at its 2013 annual meeting and will assume the presidency in 2014. Mathias P. Bostrom, MD, was named Second Vice President of the Society. Timothy M. Wright, PhD, Director of Biomechanics and the F.M. Kirby Chair in Orthopaedic Biomechanics, received the ORS 2013 Alfred R. Shands, Jr. Award in recognition of his “contributions to orthopaedics and the devotion of a significant portion of his professional lifetime to furthering knowledge in the field of musculoskeletal disease.” Oheneba Boachie-Adjei, MD, Chief of the Scoliosis Service and founder of the FOCOS project in Ghana, received Hospital for Special Surgery’s Lifetime Achievement Award, and Edward V. Craig, MD, MPH, a pioneer in shoulder replacement, received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the New York Chapter of the Arthritis Foundation. I received the Austrian Cross of Honour for Science and Art First Class for my work in teaching in Austria and was elected President of The Knee Society for the year 2016. For the past 15 years, Helene H. Pavlov, MD, FACR, has led the Hospital’s Department of Radiology and Imaging, developing an

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outstanding program and greatly expanding orthopaedic imaging and MRI capabilities. Dr. Pavlov has announced that she will be stepping down as Radiologist-in-Chief, but we are pleased that she will remain active on staff both clinically and as a mentor and educator. All of our orthopaedic surgeons are credentialed faculty members of Weill Cornell Medical College. Our relationship with the Medical College dates back to 1951 thanks to the foresight of Philip D. Wilson, Sr., MD, HSS’s fifth Surgeon-in-Chief. Dr. Wilson believed that the Hospital should have a close affiliation with a medical school to enable it to be a leading orthopaedic institution. The past 60 years have borne this out, producing important and influential collaborations with Weill Cornell in clinical care, education, and research.

A Future Informed by Our Past In July, we learned that U.S.News & World Report again named Hospital for Special Surgery the top hospital in the country for orthopaedics in its 2013 “Best Hospitals” survey. For six of the past seven years, the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery has been ranked number 1. This is a tremendous honor for all who work at HSS and who constantly endeavor to advance the research and education that translate into unsurpassed patient care.

As we reflect on the extraordinary achievements of HSS throughout its history, we appreciate that when James A. Knight, MD, established the Hospital in 1863, he wanted for his young patients that which we desire for our patients and for those who will come to us in the future: to help children and adults of all ages who suffer from musculoskeletal disorders to live their lives to the fullest. In the feature article that follows we discuss the fundamental factors that make it possible for HSS to excel in its orthopaedic specialties today and provide a look at some of the pioneering research of our faculty that is expected to redefine the field. On a personal note, the opportunity to practice medicine at HSS, serve as an educator to physicians on the threshold of their careers as orthopaedic surgeons, and conduct research that can influence the outcome of patient care fills me with immense satisfaction. For the past decade, I have had the added pleasure of serving as Surgeon-inChief at this remarkable Hospital and to lead an extraordinary staff. Many of you may know that in the year to come I will be passing the baton to the Hospital’s 12th Surgeon-in-Chief. I want to thank all of you for your support over the years, and I look forward to continuing my tenure with HSS surrounded by colleagues who are committed to helping our patients achieve mobility and the highest quality of life possible.

Thomas P. Sculco, MD Surgeon-in-Chief and Medical Director


Orthopaedic Research at HSS

A Return to Form and Function: The Essential Work of Hospital for Special Surgery

When orthopaedic surgeon Mathias P. Bostrom, MD, looks out his office window, he can see his basic science lab some 25 yards across the street. “That doesn’t happen in many places,” says Dr. Bostrom, referring to the environment at Hospital for Special Surgery that is ideally structured to integrate clinical practice with scientific research and provide orthopaedic residents and fellows training in the best of both worlds. “At HSS, we have an interplay among engineers, biologists, and clinicians. This may happen in limited ways in some institutions, but not with the breadth offered here,” says Dr. Bostrom. “Individually, there are great clinical places. There are also great research laboratories and educational venues around the country. But to have them all in the same place is very unusual. Additionally, our clinicians and researchers represent all the orthopaedic subspecialties. We have cartilage people, tendon people, and bone people just in the basic science arena. We have an exceptional clinical research infrastructure with Steve Lyman, and we also have the engineering expertise of Tim Wright and his group. Most importantly, we all talk to each other. When I’m down in conference, there will be a handful of engineers and biologists, and two dozen clinicians and trainees all in the same room. And that’s just the arthroplasty group. All of the orthopaedic services have this kind of interaction.” “The essential work of our hospital – patient care, research, and education – thrives on the communication, collaboration, and collegiality that are found within the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and across disciplines and other specialties,” says Thomas P. Sculco, MD, Surgeon-in-Chief. “With a common goal of improving the lives of patients restricted or immobilized by musculoskeletal injuries or disorders, the Hospital continues to extend the boundaries of what is possible in musculoskeletal care.” Following is a look at some of the promising work taking place at the bench, within the ORs, and in the clinical arena of HSS.

“Being able to integrate patient care, research, and education in the way that we do here at HSS is very unique.” – Mathias P. Bostrom, MD

HSS Patient Registries: Taking Data Driven Research to a New Level Hospital for Special Surgery now has more than 45 institutional registries, with data on over 84,000 patients. These registries are a must in the world of evidence-based care, providing information that can form the basis for evaluating patient outcomes, refining current treatments, and developing new techniques and therapies. “Our registries have some unique capabilities, including a very large patient population, and are a little different than most others in that we concentrate heavily on getting information directly from the patients on their outcomes,” says Timothy M. Wright, PhD, Director, Department of Biomechanics, and the F.M. Kirby Chair in Orthopaedic Biomechanics. According to Dr. Wright, the information collected in some of the registries is beginning to bear fruit. “The amount of data that is being generated is

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care,” notes Dr. Lyman. “We currently have a number of pilot studies on the table to determine whether a new registry platform can be implemented on a broader scale with much more flexible data collection. This would be quite an innovative approach.”

“Our patient registries are providing an incredible information base for answering clinical questions.” – Timothy M. Wright, PhD

amazing,” says Dr. Wright. “We’re deriving incredible benefits now that we have begun to analyze the data, including answering some questions in arthroplasty that literally no one has been able to answer. This is largely because we have so many patients in our Total Joint Replacement Registry – over 20,000. We know so much about them.” “Data generated from the registries and ongoing studies are enabling our clinicians and investigators to compete for grants, publish high impact manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals, and, most importantly, generate knowledge that can be applied to improving patient care,” says Steven R. Goldring, MD, Richard L. Menschel Research Chair and Chief Scientific Officer. Stephen Lyman, PhD, Program Director of the recently created Healthcare Research Institute, is charged with consolidating the Hospital’s clinical research programs, with the goal of enhancing productivity and impact. “To create efficiencies with the registry program, we are exploring the use of a common electronic platform. We can then link any patient in any registry. If a patient in those registries had hip preservation surgery or ACL surgery, and then 10 or 15 years from now has a total hip or total knee replacement, we’ll know.” Dr. Lyman and his colleagues have also proposed the development of a data warehouse for HSS to link electronic records with external data sources. “In this way when our patients leave HSS, we can follow their

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Dr. Lyman’s hope is that through the registries, HSS will become an arbiter of best practices. “If we could establish algorithms or predictive models that provide warnings to the surgeons, nursing staff, anesthesiologists, pharmacists, and other caregivers when certain combinations of issues are appearing in a patient’s record, it would be a truly efficient way to improve outcomes after surgery.” Total Joint Replacement: Coming Together to Meet the Challenges So many questions still to answer. That is the consensus of arthroplasty surgeons the world over. From the microscopic level to the animal model to human trials, HSS clinicians, engineers, and scientists are assessing, monitoring, and addressing problems with implants and techniques from every perspective. The influence of their body of work to date is impressive – spanning more than four decades since the development of the earliest implant designs and joint replacement procedures. So when problems with metalon-metal hip replacements were revealed, the team didn’t waste a minute trying to find out the reasons behind the implants’ early and high failure rates. “We are collecting data on patients at HSS who might be affected,” says Dr. Wright. “What’s unique about our approach is how many integrated disciplines we can involve to study this problem. We’ve got Dr. Ed Purdue and Dr. Goldring in the Osteolysis Lab looking at biomarkers in the blood and serum that might provide a screening tool to indicate if there’s a problem, as well as differentiate the signature of the biological response that a particular patient has had to that implant. Hollis Potter, Chief of our MRI Division, and her group are evaluating the MRIs of these patients. They found imaging markers that suggest if a patient may be on the road to a failure. So, now the patient and surgeon can do some planning and watchful waiting. Our department collects the retrieved implants from those patients who, unfortunately, went on to fail. By


what mechanisms are involved in these failures and why the vast majority of patients do very well while others do not,” says Dr. Purdue. “Total joint replacement is “In those patients phenomenally successful, undergoing revision with a very high success surgery, the surgeons rate in restoration of are making real-time function and removal of “Our goal is to enable patients and physicians observations of the failed pain. But it’s not perfect. to make decisions about treatment based on implants in the OR. That’s high quality evidence.” A small proportion of what I mean by integration. – Stephen Lyman, PhD patients do not do well You begin to understand and will need revision the problems much faster surgeries. It’s a hugely than if you were at an complex issue requiring a multifaceted approach. We institution that only looked at retrieved implants or keep the clinical perspective in view at all times.” only did osteolysis research. By having all of these According to Dr. Purdue, understanding the biological disciplines focused on a singular problem, you have mechanisms by which these joints are failing can help multiple opportunities to facilitate a positive outcome.” with diagnosis or early detection of disease. “This is Research in the laboratory of Dr. Mathias Bostrom something that’s critically missing at this point,” he has made some important inroads in understanding says. “We don’t see what we’re doing as academic; we how the body reacts to implants – whether metal or think it is part of the whole approach to coming up plastic – at the molecular biologic level. “We have with strategies to improve the lives of the patients.” very interesting animal models where we focus in Dr. Purdue’s lab begins its work when the failed on mechanisms of action,” says Dr. Bostrom. “At devices are retrieved from patients, collecting tissue the same time, we are doing a clinical study using from around the joint, as well as synovial fluid, serum, agents to see if we can improve bone quality around a and blood. “We’re looking at how the tissue looks patient’s hip before their hip replacement in order with histopathological approaches, devising ways to help sustain the implant over time.” to grade their pathology,” says Dr. Purdue. “This Notes Dr. Bostrom, “Our researchers are close, allows patients to be subdivided into different types but not quite there in terms of how to regenerate a of local tissue reaction. Our next step is to ask what biologic joint. In the future bioengineered products products are being made in these tissues that might be are going to have some sort of reaction that we’ll need contributing to tissue destruction and inflammation.” to understand better. If you understand how metal The other observation made by Dr. Purdue and his implants integrate into bone, we’ll then know how colleagues is that in many of the tissues that are new, tissue-engineered implants will integrate into reacting very poorly, such as with the metal-on-metal bone. Instead of using metal and plastic implants 20 implants, there appears to be a problem with corrosion years from now, we’ll be performing tissue-engineered of some of the metals. “In all of these failures joint replacements. HSS is the place that can really there’s a view that some sort of wear is occurring help to develop that. We have all the pieces.” in the implant, which is initiating the inflammatory Ed Purdue, PhD, Director of the Hospital’s Osteolysis reaction,” says Dr. Purdue. “By digging through the Research Laboratory, is also focused on what happens molecules that are being produced in the different to patients with a total joint replacement and why groups of patients through gene expression analysis of some of the joint implants fail. “We’re interested in examining these implants, we learn what it is about the implant – its shape, its composition – that controls the amount of wear and corrosion we are seeing.

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the tissues, we’ve identified specific products that are associated with each type of pathological reaction.” Dr. Purdue notes that in his research on osteolysis, traditionally the leading cause of failure with the polyethylene cup, there is often a lot of polyethylene debris present. “There were certain markers of the tissues being expressed at very high levels. However, these aren’t present in the tissues of patients who have the types of devices where the corrosion appears. There is a different set of inflammatory markers being produced. If we can identify a biomarker, it can act as an early indication of a tissue reaction without having to actually use invasive techniques. “It’s a rapidly changing field,” adds Dr. Purdue. “The range of different types of blood markers available is growing by the day for various disorders. It is an important goal of ours to develop these markers for early detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of the patient.” In the Hospital’s Tissue Engineering, Repair, and Regeneration Program, Suzanne A. Maher, PhD, Associate Director of the Department of Biomechanics, along with Peter A. Torzilli, PhD, and Russell F. Warren, MD, have reached a crucial turning point in their research on hydrogel materials to treat defects

in cartilage with a goal toward preserving joints. “Focal cartilage defects reduce the ability of articular cartilage to resist mechanical loading and provide lubrication during joint motion,” says Dr. Maher, who has been researching hydrogel materials for several years. “The limitations in current surgical treatments have motivated the use of biocompatible materials to fill the defect site as a future treatment option.” Dr. Maher and her colleagues have now described a new generation synthetic material that provides a unique and promising approach for the functional replacement of cartilage defects and are testing the newer hydrogel implant in the large animal model, bringing them closer to testing the product in humans. “In the 50 years that orthopaedic surgeons have been performing hip and knee replacements, the surgeries have been done with mechanical guides,” says David J. Mayman, MD, Clinical Co-Director, Computer Assisted Surgery Center. “We know that with those mechanical guides, knee implants are placed in the optimal position about 70 percent of the time and hips about 50 percent of the time. This doesn’t mean that 30 percent of knees fail or that 50 percent of hips fail. It means that they’re not in that optimal zone.” For the past several years, Dr. Mayman has been involved in research and development of smarter tools for joint replacement, refining computerized guides to be easily usable in the OR. “It’s not changing the operation or changing the implants that we use for the operation, it’s making the tools better. The computerized guides give us more consistent alignment, with no bigger incision.” Using the device, over 95 percent of knee implants are within that target zone. With hip implants, tested on cadavers and on saw bones, more than 90 percent are within the target zone when guided by the computerized tool. The hip tool is now under review by the FDA.

“Why joint implants are successful in the majority of patients but fail in others is a hugely complex issue.” – Ed Purdue, PhD

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Patient-Specific Surgery or No Surgery at All No two people are alike. Their ligaments are not quite the same. They don’t join the bones at exactly the same place. And the bones are slightly different shapes. “So it shouldn’t be surprising that when our surgeons


“Limitations in surgical treatments have motivated the study of synthetic materials to address cartilage defects.” – Suzanne A. Maher, PhD

reconstruct an ACL placing the standard graft in roughly the same spot, the outcome can vary from patient to patient,” says Dr. Timothy Wright. “We are integrating our studies of knee mechanics, pre and post surgery, with computational knee models to determine how those structures that are damaged in athletes – ACLs, menisci, and medial collateral ligaments – contribute to stabilizing the knee. What is emerging are tools that will allow surgeons to use objective stability measurements to customize the graft position that best restores the joint to its pre-injury status.” A recent study led by Dr. Suzanne Maher provided the first evidence that the shape of a person’s knee could be a factor in the decision of whether a patient should undergo ACL reconstruction after a tear. “After your ACL is ruptured, the changes in the mechanics of the knee can be affected by the shape of the knee,” says Dr. Maher. “Previously, researchers had only conducted studies looking at whether a particular knee shape makes a person more likely to have an ACL injury, specifically in the athletic population.” Dr. Maher and colleagues conducted experiments using nine cadaveric knees to examine how knee shape impacts knee mechanics during walking after a person has torn their ACL. Outfitting the knees with a sensor that measured the contact stresses of the tibial plateau, the researchers then mounted the knees on a machine that flexed and extended the specimens while applying forces in many directions to mimic the act of walking – with and without an ACL rupture.

“We found that the changes in contact stresses were highly variable, and the knees that showed changes in the front of the knee had specific shape features, including a less concave tibial plateau,” explains Dr. Maher. “If the tibial plateau has a very deep valley and then you have a femur sitting in a deep well that is going to give you a very stable knee. So, when you tear your ACL, it is not going to have a huge effect.” The study suggests that clinicians may be able to identify individuals who will have a more diffuse change in contact mechanics after their ACL is torn and be able to determine which patients are more likely to benefit from reconstruction surgery. Clinician scientist Matthew E. Cunningham, MD, PhD, has been investigating alternate methods to achieve spine fusion without surgery. “We are studying ways to deliver an injection of a specific gene to the disc that causes the disc tissue to turn into bone in the same space that would otherwise be the target for the surgery,” says Dr. Cunningham. “In other words, you still achieve the spine fusion, but you don’t have to subject the patient to surgery and its risks.” Dr. Cunningham’s work has been taking place in animal models using the ex vivo gene delivery technique. “We take cells from the bone marrow of one donor animal and expand them into a tissue culture in petri dishes. We then inject them with an adenovirus that contains our gene of interest,” explains Dr. Cunningham. “You then take those cells and put them into the animal spine and see if new bone was made, if the bones fused, and if the results are valid or applicable to the clinical endpoint.” Dr. Cunningham and his colleagues have conducted two large scale studies to further develop this line of research, looking at a bone morphogenic protein created with half of a BMP2 and half of a BMP7. According to Dr. Cunningham, the resulting heterodimer is very different biologically than the homodimers and about 30 times more powerful as a bone-producing signal. “When we delivered these heterodimers into the disc space of our animal models, they were a lot more effective. Not only did it make significantly more bone than the BMPs in the homodimer form, they were also capable of driving fusion events.”

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

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The ramifications of Dr. Cunningham’s research are astounding. “If you’re able to take patients who need a single-level anterior fusion, for example, for degenerative disc disease, you could potentially bring them in for an injection, send them home the same day, and enable them to go back to work the following day versus the three to four months of recovery needed with surgery.” Dr. Cunningham notes that a drawback of the current approach is that bone forms on the outside of the disc space, so he is now focusing his efforts on forcing bone to form within the disc space. “One thing that’s going to be required for this to work is to make the disc space vascular,” says Dr. Cunningham. “In our next series of experiments, we discovered that the enzyme chondroitin-sulfate-ABC exolyase dissolves the tissue. But when the disc is treated with this enzyme it makes the disc permissive to vascular in-growth. This is a step forward in trying to make bone grow in that space because not only does bone want to be held still while it is growing, it also wants to have an excellent blood supply.”

“We are looking at smarter tools, such as computerized guides, to enhance the accuracy of implant placement.” – David J. Mayman, MD

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Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

“By studying the molecular aspects of bone formation, I hope to develop better methods for spinal fusion.” – Matthew E. Cunningham, MD, PhD

Developing Clinician Scientists: Sustaining the Link between Research and Results “Essential to ensuring the effective transfer of new scientific knowledge is a cohort of investigators knowledgeable in the basic science of medicine and actively involved in care of patients,” says Dr. Steven Goldring. “Throughout the years, HSS has made it possible for several of its orthopaedic surgeons to have active clinical practices, while still pursuing research. In 2012, we created a formal Clinician Scientist Program to mentor and support early career clinical faculty who are committed to careers that combine ‘both sides of the coin.’” “The fact that we continue to support clinician scientists within our young faculty is really important,” says Dr. Mathias Bostrom, a longtime clinician scientist. “They can provide the link from what we are doing in the culture dish, in vivo, and in the clinic. Being able to integrate patient care, research, and education in the way that we do at HSS is very unique. Some may argue that the education and research parts are not critical to patients. I would argue the contrary. I think they’re incredibly important because it makes us question what we do and enables us to push the field forward in terms of innovation. This is an environment where we are always striving to make it better, and patients will continue to reap the benefits.”


D

uring the past year, the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery’s 12 surgical services, in concert with the Department of Biomechanics, continued to advance patient care,

research, and education programs in their respective specialties – developing alternative surgical techniques, pursuing research breakthroughs based in cross-discipline collaborations, and applying novel approaches to guide new physicians in their orthopaedic training.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Service Reports 14 Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement Division Hip Service Knee Service Surgical Arthritis Service 16

Foot and Ankle Service

17 Hand and Upper Extremity Service 18 Limb Lengthening and Complex Reconstruction Service 19

Metabolic Bone Disease/ Musculoskeletal Oncology Service

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Orthopaedic Trauma Service

21 Pediatric Orthopaedic Service 22 Scoliosis Service 23

Spine Service

24 Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service 26 Department of Biomechanics

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

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Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement Division Douglas E. Padgett, MD Chief, Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement Division Chief, Hip Service Steven B. Haas, MD Chief, Knee Service Mark P. Figgie, MD Chief, Surgical Arthritis Service Michael M. Alexiades, MD Friedrich Boettner, MD Mathias P. Bostrom, MD Robert L. Buly, MD Charles N. Cornell, MD Alejandro González Della Valle, MD Allan E. Inglis, Jr., MD Seth A. Jerabek, MD David J. Mayman, MD Bryan J. Nestor, MD

In 2012, the Division launched the Post-Discharge Nurse Call Pilot Program in which a nurse practitioner contacts all patients discharged by our orthopaedic surgeons one to two weeks postdischarge. The nurse addresses any routine questions as well as a set of clinical issues based on specific criteria defined by the surgeon’s office. Any non-routine issues are forwarded to the surgeon’s office to be managed. According to the physicians involved, in its first few months the pilot program has had

The Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement Division is composed of the Hip Service, the Knee Service, and the Surgical Arthritis Service. Led by 21 full-time surgeons, the Division performed approximately 8,700 surgeries in 2012.

rooms are being equipped with a new software system to help ensure – given the multiple and various

The Division continues to intensify its efforts in quality and and patient patient safety. safety. We are Wepleased are pleased to reporttothat report for the thatfourth for the fourth year HSS year – with HSS –nearly with nearly 4,200 4,200 procedures procedures in 2011– –had hadthe thehighest highest volume and lowest infection rate for total hip replacement in New York State according to the most recent report released by the New York State Department of Health. Among the 167 hospitals included in the report, Hospital for Special Surgery had a statistically lower surgical site infection rate of 0.4 percent compared with the state average of 1.12 percent for total hip replacement or revision hip procedures.

hip implant patients is more likely to be due

Under the direction of Steven B. Haas, MD, the Hospital’s operating

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Michael L. Parks, MD Paul M. Pellicci, MD Amar S. Ranawat, MD Chitranjan S. Ranawat, MD Eduardo A. Salvati, MD Thomas P. Sculco, MD Edwin P. Su, MD Geoffrey H. Westrich, MD Philip D. Wilson, Jr., MD (Emeritus) Russell E. Windsor, MD

computer system not only prevents errors in the OR, it results in a significant cost savings.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

Research at HSS has revealed that the cause of unexplained pain among metal-on-metal

to tissue damage than wear of the implant.

implant systems and parts that are now available – that joint replacement patients receive the correct implants. The product, OrthoSecure, developed by Dr. Haas and HSS colleagues, replaces manual reading of the implant packaging with computer scanning of a barcode on the implant that is validated before the prosthesis is used in the patient. Additionally, the label of the implant is projected on a large LCD screen for the entire OR team to view and confirm that it is the correct implant or system for that patient. A pilot study of the new system demonstrated that the

Douglas E. Padgett, MD

a great impact on patient care and satisfaction, including, for example, the early identification of potential patient readmissions. In collaboration with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, we have also developed the Intensive Home Rehab Program, which enables patients to receive front-loaded home therapy visits following their discharge home. This initiative is one oneseveral of of several aimed aimed at discharging at discharging


total joint replacement patients to their home instead of to inpatient rehabilitation, wherever appropriate. The ARJR Fellowship Program – with six accredited and two non-credited fellowship positions – continues to be strengthened under the leadership of Mathias P. Bostrom, MD. The program received 137 applicants for the 2014-2015 academic year. We continue to make great progress in several key areas of research. Since its launch in 2012, the prospective Total Joint Replacement Registry has enrolled over 20,000 hip and knee replacement patients and has participation by 20 HSS surgeons. This registry forms the foundation for many studies now complete or underway to evaluate patient outcomes, as well as the implants and the techniques that are used. With data compiled for the Registry, we have been able to report on outcomes of various subgroups of patients who have had joint replacements, including two studies in 2012 on patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the two new studies, investigators led by HSS rheumatologist Susan M. Goodman, MD, set out to examine whether outcomes remained worse for RA patients in a cohort with a high prevalence of potent diseasemodifying drugs and biologic agents. One study overturned the common belief that RA patients have worse outcomes after a total knee replacement than patients who undergo the operation for osteoarthritis (OA). The second study demonstrated that RA patients who undergo a total hip replacement were as likely to have

significant improvements in function and pain as patients with OA, even though they did not do as well. Our research priorities continue to focus on gaining a better underSteven B. Haas, MD Mark P. Figgie, MD standing of the biologic consequences of joint replacement, implant design and arthritis (JIA) last at least 10 years materials, and joint mechanics. These in 92 percent of cases; more than 75 efforts draw on crucial collaborations percent of the implants lasted 20 years with the Hospital’s Pathology or more. Because of the low volume of Department, the Magnetic Resonance procedures in this patient population, Imaging (MRI) Division, and the the research was worldwide in order Department of Biomechanics. to best determine the survivorship and functional outcome of total knee Research led by Douglas E. Padgett, replacement in this group of patients. MD, and Hollis G. Potter, MD, Chief of The next step for researchers will be MRI, has revealed that the cause of to look at the different types of knee unexplained pain among metal-onimplants to determine which fare the metal hip implant patients is more best for younger patients. Researchers likely to be due to tissue damage than will look at standard implants versus wear of the implant. Comparing 50 custom implants specifically designed patients who came to HSS for revision to meet the anatomical needs of JIA surgery because of unexplained pain patients. Dr. Figgie launched the study to a control group of 48 patients who to make sure surgeons have continued came because of loosening, malalignaccess to custom implants if they are ment, infection or fracture, the investineeded for a younger patient. gators found that some patients had a significant amount of tissue damage but not a lot of wear. The findings were based on clinical examinations, novel MRI protocols developed by Dr. Potter, wear analysis studies on the removed implants, and pathology studies of tissues removed at surgery. Information from the study is being used to develop guidelines for patients and surgeons. An international, multicenter study led by Mark P. Figgie, MD, found that total knee replacements in younger patients with juvenile idiopathic

We are also exploring the role of smart and enabling technologies in joint replacement as it pertains to both hip and knee. On the knee side, we are applying robotics and smart tools to perform both partial and total knee replacements and have demonstrated that these devices are practical and easy-to-use tools to improve alignment in total knee replacement. In hip replacement, enabling technology combines navigation and robotic systems, which are now being validated by both scientists and clinicians.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

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Foot and Ankle Service Jonathan T. Deland, MD Matthew M. Roberts, MD Co-Chiefs Walther H.O. Bohne, MD Constantine A. Demetracopoulos, MD Mark C. Drakos, MD Andrew J. Elliott, MD Scott J. Ellis, MD John G. Kennedy, MD David S. Levine, MD Martin J. O’Malley, MD Harvey Strauss, DPM, FACFAS

The Foot and Ankle Service – with 10 orthopaedic surgeons and one podiatrist – is the largest program of its kind in the country. In 2012, the Service saw more than 22,000

We are constructing a robotic gait simulator for the testing of new procedures in foot and ankle that is expected to be the most advanced technology of its kind in the world.

patient visits and performed over 2,000 surgeries. Our major emphasis continues to be on quality and safety. We consistently reevaluate our policies and procedures in order to improve patient outcomes. Our faculty remains committed not only to patient care, but also to education, research, and outreach. All members are involved in our national society (AOFAS) through numerous committees, leadership positions, and research endeavors. We are the site of the 2013 AOFAS Resident Review Course and also hosted the AOFAS Traveling Fellows again this past August.

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Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

We continue to provide our three fellows and two rotating residents with training in all aspects of foot and ankle care. Through our large and diverse faculty, fellows and residents are exposed to reconstructive techniques for congenital and acquired deformities, trauma, and sports injuries. Fellows participate in procedures such as total ankle replacement, flatfoot correction, forefoot reconstruction, fracture

with nine presentations at the recent AOFAS meeting. Service members are expanding the use of total ankle replacements with increasing success, with the latest implant requiring less bone to be removed on the front and back of the ankle. It also uses curved cuts on the bone so that the load on the bone is along a curved surface, much like that of an ankle joint in its natural state. Clinical studies are evaluating the treatment of osteochondral lesions using cartilage stem cells, bone marrow aspirates, and platelet-rich plasma injections. We are actively researching how best to use the biological adjuncts. In addition, the implantation of juvenile cartilage cells and transplanting cartilage from one joint to repair the defect in the ankle joint are both demonstrating improved results.

The foundation for progress in laboratory research has been established with the support of Herbert Black. Dr. Josh Baxter, the first PhD in biomechanics devoted to foot and ankle, has Matthew M. Roberts, MD, and Jonathan T. Deland, MD been added to HSS’s research team. Dr. Baxter’s research focuses on how surgical adjustments repair, and novel cartilage and tendon of foot and ankle structure affect reparative techniques. function, with the long-term goal of Our Service-wide registry, supported translating experimental findings to by the Susan and Elihu Rose clinically relevant tools. Currently, Foundation, is a key focal point of we are working with the Department our research. As of the end of 2012, of Biomechanics to develop a robotic the web-based, customized database gait simulator that will help answer enrolled 40,968 patients and is one questions about which surgical proceof the largest registries at HSS. dures are most effective at correcting This data has helped to generate deformities. Once completed, it will be numerous peer-reviewed publications a versatile research tool.


Hand and upper extremity service Edward A. Athanasian, MD Chief

The Hand and Upper Extremity Service is a nationally and internationally respected authority in the treatment of common and complex conditions of the hand, wrist, forearm, and elbow. Our surgeons, each skilled in a particular specialty, are committed to enhancing the quality of life of patients, while advancing the science of orthopaedic surgery and the training of residents and fellows. Members of the Service performed over 2,400 cases in 2012, with more 6,000 than new and 21,000 14,000 newfollow-up and patient visits. follow-up patient visits. In December 2013, former HSS orthopaedic resident, Duretti T. Fufa, MD, will join the Service after completing a fellowship in hand and upper extremity at Washington University in St. Louis and a second fellowship in microsurgery at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital in Taiwan. Dr. Fufa, who specializes in traumatic injuries to the hand and upper extremity, will guide the microsurgical training of our fellows. Our faculty also direct surgical hand programs at NewYorkPresbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, Memorial SloanKettering Cancer Center, and the Bronx VA Hospital. The Service has coordinatorsupported registries in seven key areas: the basal joint, distal radius, carpal tunnel, neoplasia, pediatrics, brachial plexus, and the elbow. In 2012, the Service achieved national attention with a study led by Michelle G. Carlson, MD, on the treatment of hand and wrist injuries

Michelle G. Carlson, MD Aaron Daluiski, MD Duretti T. Fufa, MD (December 2013) Robert N. Hotchkiss, MD Lana Kang, MD Steve K. Lee, MD Andrew J. Weiland, MD Scott W. Wolfe, MD (Chief Emeritus)

in the high level athlete. The risks and rewards of each potential treatment protocol can make a significant difference in the career

and Traumatic Nerve Injury, researchers challenged a widely held belief that long nerve grafts do poorly in adults with an axillary nerve injury. Investigators found

The Hand and Upper Extremity Service achieved national recognition for establishing a study group of hand surgeons serving as consultants to professional teams to collaborate on outcomes research of the treatment of hand and wrist injuries in the high-level athlete.

path of professional, collegiate, and high school athletes, as well as affect the timing of when to clear an athlete to return to play. Noting the lack of literature on return to play after treatment, Dr. Carlson founded a study group of consultant hand surgeons to professional teams to collaborate on studies of outcomes of treatment in this population. As Co-Chair of this group, she served as guest editor for an issue of Hand Clinics focusing on hand and wrist injuries in the elite athlete. In a major study in 2012, led by Scott W. Wolfe, MD, Director of the Center for Brachial Plexus

that the outcomes of long nerve grafts were comparable to those of modern nerve transfers in restoring function, concluding that this type of graft should not be overlooked as an effective treatment for an axillary nerve injury. Results were measured by the patients’ recovery and by electromyography. In May 2012, the Service hosted the Lee Ramsay Straub, MD, Honorary Lecture in Hand Surgery with Scott Kozin, MD, Associate Professor, Department of Orthopaedics at Temple University School of Medicine, Shriners Hospital for Children in Philadelphia, presenting on the pediatric hand.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

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Limb Lengthening and Complex Reconstruction Service S. Robert Rozbruch, MD Chief Austin T. Fragomen, MD

The Limb Lengthening and Complex Reconstruction Service is nationally and internationally recognized for its ongoing contributions to the care of children and adults with complex problems of limb length equalization and deformity correction. S. Robert Rozbruch, MD, and Austin T. Fragomen, MD, play major roles in the subspecialty at the national level, serving this past year as president and treasurer, respectively, of the Limb Lengthening and Reconstruction Society of the

malunion fractures, upper extremity deformities, and limb lengthening for children, the Service continually tackles more infrequent situations, including limb lengthening in patients with Russell-Silver syndrome and treating infected ankles in patients with neuropathy.

We continue to evaluate the results of this new device as compared to traditional methods and are finding the new device may be even more precise and accurate than the external fixator. We are currently engaged in the development of a similar noninvasive lengthening device.

In the last year, we introduced an exciting new clinical practice – the intramedullary remote-controlled limb lengthening system, PRECICE. Our Service is one of the first in the country to use the fully implantable limb lengthening motorized nail, recently approved by the FDA, for lengthening procedures of the tibia

We continue to work closely with other services – foot and ankle, arthroplasty, metabolic bone, radiology, and rehabilitation, to name a few – throughout HSS, developing techniques to address challenging situations. In collaboration with the Department of Radiology and Imaging, we will be evaluating different techniques for using fluoroscopy in the OR to minimize radiation exposure to the surgeons.

The Limb Lengthening and Complex Reconstruction Service is one of the first in the country to use the fully implantable limb lengthening motorized nail, recently approved by the FDA, for lengthening procedures of the tibia and femur.

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). In addition, Dr. Rozbruch has been invited to author a chapter on rehabilitation following limb lengthening surgery for an AAOS publication, Rehabilitation after Orthopaedic Surgery. Drs. Rozbruch and Fragomen will be editing an upcoming Springer major reference work, Limb Lengthening and Reconstruction Surgery – A Case Atlas. In addition to addressing deformities related to knock-knee and bowleg, foot and ankle, as well as nonunion and

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Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

and femur and is participating in a multicenter trial on this device. This new technology, which can be applied in many cases, but not all, accomplishes bone elongation without external fixation. A telescopic titanium rod is placed inside the patient’s bone and a remote control magnetic generator is placed over the skin where the rod is implanted. By turning the magnetic driver, the rod gradually lengthens the bone by an average of a millimeter a day or a little more than an inch a month with little pain.

With physical therapists, we are developing a postoperative rehabilitation protocol for limb lengthening. The educational information provided, available in print, video, and online, helps to facilitate a patient’s recovery process. We are also working with the physical therapists to develop the first postoperative rehabilitation course in limb lengthening and reconstruction surgery geared to therapists and physician assistants. Our Third Annual Dr. Bonnie Reichman Distinguished Lectureship featured Sanjeev Sabharwal, MD, Chief of Pediatric Orthopaedics at University Hospital, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, who presented on lessons learned in the management of lower limb deformity in children.


Metabolic Bone Disease/Musculoskeletal Oncology Service Joseph M. Lane, MD Chief

The Metabolic Bone Disease/ Musculoskeletal Oncology Service is a consortium of basic scientists, clinical diagnosticians, and medical disciplines focused on the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, Paget’s disease, and related bone disorders. The Service brings together practitioners across clinical fields, including orthopaedics, rheumatology, physiatry, endocrinology, nephrology, and pediatrics, and involves interactions between basic, clinical, and translational research efforts. The Service has close relationships with endocrinologists at NewYorkPresbyterian/Weill Cornell and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. In 2012, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons selected Joseph M. Lane, MD, along with Adele L. Boskey, PhD, and Eve Donnelly, PhD, from the Hospital’s Musculoskeletal Integrity Program, to develop a national fact-finding conference to determine the elements of bone quality and how to establish it in patients beyond the use of DEXA. Supported by the National Institutes of Health, the conference established a general consensus for identifying key elements for invasive and noninvasive methods of determining bone strength and fragility and ways to restore bone quality. We are also providing leadership in the creation of a fracture liaison service at HSS, with a particular focus on hip fracture, utilizing nurse practitioners to establish algorithms for orthopaedic and fracture care in the setting of osteoporosis. The

Richard S. Bockman, MD, PhD Adele L. Boskey, PhD Shevaun M. Doyle, MD Azeez M. Farooki, MD Steven R. Goldring, MD Martin Nydick, MD Linda A. Russell, MD Alana C. Serota, MD Robert Schneider, MD

program has drawn clinicians from around the country who come to HSS for individual preceptorships to learn how to create a similar program at their own institution.

significantly better results than those receiving just one. Though an important step, we will continue to evaluate whether the combination therapy will sustain bone density at two years, and whether the quality of that bone has improved.

In 2012, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons selected faculty from HSS to develop and host a national fact-finding conference to establish a consensus on identifying the elements of bone quality and methods for promoting bone health in patients.

We have also become more proactive treating osteoporosis where bone healing is required, including spine surgery patients in whom osteoporotic agents can enhance fusion and pediatric patients who present with low levels of vitamin D. In a recent clinical trial, researchers found that postmenopausal women experienced significant amounts of bone growth by taking teriparatide with denosumab, a targeted therapy drug used to stop bone loss. The 12-month study, published online May 15 in The Lancet, involved 94 postmenopausal women being treated for osteoporosis. Those treated with both drugs enjoyed

Some of the current research being being performed performed by theby Metabolic the Metabolic Bone Bone Disease Disease Service Service includes includes the the characterization of the favorable responders to teriparatide (PTH 1-34); 1-34); determining determining the effect the effect of frailty of frailty and and support support systems systems in influencing in influencing outcome from hip fractures; testing if high vitamin D levels improve patient balance and prevent falls; and studying how delayed fragility fracture care beyond 48 hours affects short-term and long-term recovery. The Seymour Cohn Metabolic Bone Registry, which analyzes patient data to identify methods to prevent and repair fragility fractures, has recruited 540 participants since its launch in July 2007.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

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orthopaedic trauma service David L. Helfet, MD Chief David E. Asprinio, MD Gregory S. DiFelice, MD Andrew Grose, MD Joseph M. Lane, MD Dean G. Lorich, MD John P. Lyden, MD David S. Wellman, MD

The Orthopaedic Trauma Service (OTS) has grown dramatically over the last 15 years and is renowned nationally and internationally for the capability to care for all types of

clinical research initiatives. We have developed groundbreaking methods for studying arterial contributions associated with bone perfusion. This research represents significant collaboration of orthopaedic and radiology specialties and modalities, including orthopaedic trauma, hip preservation, arthroplasty, sports medicine, hand and upper extremity,

In collaboration with other specialties, the Orthopaedic Trauma Service has developed groundbreaking methods for studying the arterial contributions associated with bone perfusion.

orthopaedic trauma, from isolated injuries to the most complex. Cases include upper and lower extremity fractures; pelvic, acetabulum, and articular fractures; polytrauma and complicated cases involving nonunions and malunions with or without presence of deformity; and limb length discrepancies. The Medical-Orthopaedic Trauma Service (MOTS) continues as a model program, ensuring geriatric patients, particularly those with hip fractures, receive quality care through collaboration of the General Medicine Service at NewYork-Presbyterian/ Weill Cornell and the OTS. The specialty of orthopaedic trauma continues evolving – not just in techniques – but also in scientific aspects. Our research, directed by Dean G. Lorich, MD, includes a large database of cases that forms the basis of important basic science and

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Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography. Our vascularity research aims to precisely assess bone perfusion using contrast-enhanced MRI with custom analytical software. In the past year, this research has focused on (i) femoral head vascular disruption associated with surgical approaches to the hip joint, including the standard posterior approach, modified posterior approach, and anterolateral trochanteric flip approach; (ii) a novel vessel-sparing posterolateral surgical approach for surgical hip dislocation; (iii) soft tissue damage and femoral head dysvascularity in antegrade femoral nailing: comparison of the piriformis and greater trochanteric starting points; and (iv) assessment

of the contributions from the volar and dorsal radial artery branches to scaphoid vascularity. In 2012, OTS members gave 29 research presentations at national and international conferences, including six at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) Annual Meeting and 11 at the Orthopaedic Trauma Association Annual Meeting. One 2012 AAOS presentation focused on arterial supply to the patella. Findings demonstrated that the dominant arterial contribution entered inferomedially in 75 percent of study specimens. A dorsal arterial anastamotic network contributed secondarily. This has significant surgical implications. In 2012, OTS members published 28 articles, including 20 peer-reviewed publications. A key component of the OTS is education, providing HSS residents with remarkable experience in management of acute trauma, fractures in the elderly, tumors, and pediatric orthopaedic trauma. Currently, four residents during their training have chosen to specialize in orthopaedic trauma. The Orthopaedic Trauma Fellowship accepts three fellows annually and is enhanced through the significant referral nature of the program. Through HSS’s affiliation with NewYork-Presbyterian, a Level 1 Trauma Center, and Westchester Medical Center, the busiest New York State Level 1 Trauma Center, fellows gain extensive experience in the management of a variety of complicated polytrauma.


Pediatric Orthopaedic Service Roger F. Widmann, MD Chief

In 2012, the Pediatric Orthopaedic Service marked the opening of the Alfred and Norma Lerner Children’s Pavilion dedicated to the care of children with musculoskeletal conditions. The new 31,000-squarefoot pavilion includes a 10-bed pediatric inpatient unit, an expanded outpatient facility with 17 exam rooms, and a family-friendly waiting room. The pavilion also houses a radiology suite that includes two conventional digital radiology rooms and an EOS® low-dose imaging

John S. Blanco, MD The Pediatric Orthopaedic Emily R. Dodwell, MD, MPH Service has expanded its Shevaun M. Doyle, MD expertise in pediatric hip Daniel W. Green, MD, FACS reconstruction, with a focus Cathleen L. Raggio, MD Leon Root, MD on reconstructive pelvic David M. Scher, MD osteotomies for patients with Ernest L. Sink, MD hip dysplasia by preserving their native hip joint. Prior to the advent of this procedure patients had to consider total hip replacement. following spinal surgery. We are

The Service is actively using magnetically controlled lengthening rods in the setting of limb length discrepancy, and we are hopeful that similar technology will be approved

also moving forward in the growth and development of registries in osteochondritis dissecans, pediatric fractures, and patella subluxation.

Under the direction of our research chief, Daniel W. Green, MD, our faculty are currently working The Pediatric Orthopaedic Service is at the on more than 35 forefront of extremely low dose imaging active IRB-approved modalities for spinal deformity and limb studies. Dr. Green is deformity, which provide 3-D visualization also spearheading the Pediatric Sports capabilities with much less radiation. Medicine Program, including a research component, working closely in for use in the growing spine. conjunction with the Hospital’s adult This technology can conceivably radiology suite. This complements sports medicine colleagues. take what is a surgical operative the Hospital’s CA Technologies intervention every six months to The Leon Root, MD Motion Analysis Rehabilitation Center for children, lengthen growing rods in the spine Laboratory, under the co-direction of which opened last fall. and make it an outpatient procedure David M. Scher, MD, has flourished In the OR, we have begun utilizing monthly or even weekly. with an increase of referrals of young intraoperative CT scanning, which patients for gait analysis. Dr. Scher, With the recruitment of clinician allows for three-dimensional along with a clinical physical scientist Emily R. Dodwell, MD, real-time imaging. This advanced therapist and a dedicated researcher, MPH, in 2012, the Service is pursuing technology assists in both the is expanding the Service’s research prospective multicenter studies on assessment of placement of implants efforts in cerebral palsy. surgical outcomes and disparities in in spinal deformity surgery, as well healthcare for pediatric orthopaedic The Pediatric Orthopaedic Service as for the imaging of growth plates patients. Along with Service was honored to be selected as one of – more specifically, determining colleagues, Dr. Dodwell is developing four U.S. host facilities for the 2013 completeness of resection of premaa Pediatric Spinal Deformity Surgical POSNA-EPOS Traveling Fellows. ture closure of the growth plate. Site Infection Prospective Database to investigate these infections

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

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Scoliosis Service Oheneba Boachie-Adjei, MD Chief John S. Blanco, MD Matthew E. Cunningham, MD, PhD Daniel W. Green, MD, FACS Han Jo Kim, MD Cathleen L. Raggio, MD Bernard A. Rawlins, MD Roger F. Widmann, MD

The Scoliosis Service has earned a worldwide reputation for managing the care of both children and adults with spine deformity using advanced techniques of spinal instrumentation

The Service’s eight orthopaedic surgeons are also members of the Hospital’s Spine Care Institute, a comprehensive program that brings together all of the dimensions and facets of operative and nonoperative treatment resources for the care of scoliosis and spine patients. Our faculty further developed the use of minimally invasive surgery for adult spinal deformities. While our surgeons use both maximally

Our surgeons are applying the use of preoperative halo traction with a tension-based halo designed at HSS that provides gradual traction and lengthening of the spine prior to surgery.

to achieve safe, maximum, and optimum surgical results. The surgical staff is complemented by a team of pediatricians, geneticists, pulmonologists, and neurologists who contribute to the overall academic and clinical activities of the surgeons, fellows, and residents. In 2013, we welcomed Han Jo Kim, MD, a former HSS resident, who recently completed a spine fellowship in adult and pediatric spinal deformity and scoliosis surgery, followed by a subspecialty fellowship in cervical spine surgery at Washington University in St. Louis, Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Dr. Kim has a particular interest in motion-preserving surgeries of the cervical spine.

22

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

invasive and minimally invasive surgical procedures, they have achieved similar, if not improved, outcomes with the posterior approach, which is better tolerated by patients. Combined anterior and posterior spinal fusion requires a thoracotomy and a thoracoscopy, performed two weeks apart, placing greater demand on a patient’s pulmonary function. Particularly with complex reconstructive techniques, such as an osteotomy, our surgeons can perform the resection and reconstruct the spine from the back – essentially performing one operation instead of two. Patients recover in 24 hours

rather than 48 hours and ambulate within two days. Offered at few medical centers due to its complexity, the posterior approach helps to avoid pulmonary embolisms, blood clots, breathing difficulties, and abdominal wall asymmetry. Surgeons can also perform the minimally invasive anterior approach through a small incision on the side. The surgeon is able to access the front of the spine for a segmental correction to aid in the improvement of the curve, thus stabilizing it from the back. Surgeons are applying the use of preoperative halo traction for patients with complicated spinal deformities. The weightless, tension-based halo, which was designed at HSS, is worn by the patient at home for two months prior to surgery. The gradual traction and lengthening of the spine enables the surgeon to perform the posterior only resection procedure more safely and effectively. Our surgeons, along with residents and fellows, continue to treat underserved adults and children with spinal deformity at the FOCOS (Foundation of Orthopedics and Complex Spine) Orthopaedic Hospital in Accra, Ghana. Members of the Service are also part of the International Spine Study Group and the Complex Spine Study Group and are principal or co-investigators in a number of multicenter clinical registries and research protocols.


spine service Frank P. Cammisa, Jr., MD Chief

The Spine Service continues to develop the multidisciplinary Spine Care Institute and Integrated Spine Research Program. The Spine Care Institute is a collaboration of some 50 physicians, surgeons, and health professionals across multiple specialties with expertise in diagnosing and treating all levels of spine disease, making comprehensive and coordinated care more accessible to patients. The Integrated Spine Research Program continues to pursue basic and clinical research that will lead to evidence-based care and promote

their improvement over time in comparison to those who had nonoperative care. The results of the study were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association and The New England Journal of Medicine. The Spine Service continues to be at the forefront of refining minimally invasive fusion through a transpsoas approach and publishing outcome data. The approach reduces blood loss during surgery and enables the surgery to be accomplished avoiding the major muscles of the back or abdomen.

James C. Farmer, MD Federico P. Girardi, MD Charles B. Goodwin, MD Russel C. Huang, MD Alexander P. Hughes, MD Joseph M. Lane, MD Darren R. Lebl, MD Patrick F. O’Leary, MD Andrew A. Sama, MD Harvinder S. Sandhu, MD

The Spine Service’s review of surgical site infections recently published in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery details our experiences with postoperative wound infections.

optimal outcomes for patients. This includes the establishment of the Spine Clinical Outcomes Unit (SCOUT), which is fostering the development of approaches to correlate surgical outcomes to patient expectations. Our spine surgeons have been involved in numerous multicenter clinical trials, including the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) funded by the National Institutes of Health, which found that patients who had surgery showed greater improvement and maintained

To ensure an outstanding level of care for our patients, quality management and process improvement remain a top priority. With a patient’s bone health critical to the success of a spine fusion, the Spine Care Institute has initiated a clinical protocol for patients to evaluate their bone health prior to surgery using bone density and laboratory tests. Based on the results, a treatment plan is developed with the goal of maximizing bone quality to ensure the best surgical outcomes. Our review of surgical site infections recently published in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery details our experiences with postoperative

wound infections. We are also working on a Process Modeling of Infections in Spinal Surgery (ProMISS) study that will examine a number of variables to determine the impact each has on patient outcomes, helping to identify high-risk factors. The Spine Service has continued with basic science research in orthobiologics, specifically, bone healing in animal fusion models. In recent years the Service has studied the efficacy in established animal spine models of demineralized bone matrices and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) ceramics. Utilizing our animal models, we are seeking to characterize the mechanisms associated with the fusion profile using platelet-rich fibrin matrix. Clinically, we are currently reviewing our first 50 patients with greater than two-year follow-up. The Spine Service and the Biomechanics Department continue to coordinate a global registry of retrieved total disc replacements to understand wear and performance mechanisms of all the early designs of total disc replacement. During the past year, the cervical series was published in The Spine Journal and the lumbar series in Spine.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

23


sports medicine and shoulder service

David W. Altchek, MD Scott A. Rodeo, MD Co-Chiefs Answorth A. Allen, MD Struan H. Coleman, MD, PhD Frank A. Cordasco, MD, MS Edward V. Craig, MD, MPH David M. Dines, MD Joshua S. Dines, MD Stephen Fealy, MD Lawrence V. Gulotta, MD Jo A. Hannafin, MD, PhD Anne M. Kelly, MD Bryan T. Kelly, MD John D. MacGillivray, MD Robert G. Marx, MD, MSc, FRCSC Michael J. Maynard, MD Stephen J. O’Brien, MD, MBA Andrew D. Pearle, MD Hollis G. Potter, MD Anil S. Ranawat, MD Howard A. Rose, MD Beth E. Shubin Stein, MD Sabrina M. Strickland, MD Russell F. Warren, MD Thomas L. Wickiewicz, MD Riley J. Williams, III, MD Primary Care Sports Medicine Brian C. Halpern, MD Chief William J. Briner, Jr., MD Lisa R. Callahan, MD Marci Anne Goolsby, MD James J. Kinderknecht, MD Osric S. King, MD Jordan D. Metzl, MD

24

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

The Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service is one of the largest in the country with more than 105,000 patient visits and nearly over 9,300 9,300 surgical procedures surgical procedures performed performed in 2012. Our in physicians 2012. Our physicians and physical andtherapists physical have the distinction therapists have the distinction of being the of team physicians being the team physicians and athletic and trainers for numerous athletic trainers professional for numerous and college teams,and professional including college the teams, New York Knicks, New including theYork NewMets, York New Knicks, York Giants, New York New Mets, YorkNew Liberty, YorkNew Giants, York Red Bulls, New York Liberty, USRowing, NewUSA York Red Swimming, Bulls, USRowing, St. John’s USAUniversity Swimming, Athletics, St. John’s University CUNY Athletic Athletics, Conference, CUNY Athletic St. Peter’s Conference, College, St. and theCollege, Peter’s Association and the of Tennis Association Professionals. of Tennis Professionals. Most recently, HSS has been designated the first National Medical Center of the United States Olympic Committee’s National Medical Network. In this capacity, the Hospital is an official hospital for elite U.S. athletes who will be sent to HSS for all aspects of their care – evaluation, operative, nonoperative, and rehabilitative management. We are thrilled that Hospital for Special Surgery will now have an even closer relationship with elite athletes and the opportunity to put its full expertise behind all of Team USA. In September 2012, the Hospital opened the James M. Benson Sports Rehabilitation Center and Tisch Sports Performance Center, providing athletes with multidisciplinary and comprehensive activities for those who want to improve performance, whether they are recovering from an orthopaedic or sports related injury or seeking to take their fitness to the next level. The new Centers feature custom designed massage rooms,

an aquatics program, an antigravity treadmill, and state-of-the-art video analysis and core performance training systems. The Service’s education program has seven accredited Sports Medicine Fellowship positions and an additional non-accredited international fellow. A two-year fellowship position permits a dedicated research year. In 2012, we welcomed our first primary care fellow. We continue to develop a research infrastructure to enable our faculty to expand and sustain clinical and basic science research programs that parallel the clinical problems we see. This structure includes four well-developed clinical registries containing intraoperative data and follow-up data on outcomes for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery, cartilage repair procedures, shoulder replacement, and hip surgery. With one of the largest caseloads in the country for ACL repair and a long history of investigating ACL injuries and instability, the Service has established a major research program over the years specifically focused on ACL injuries. This research program encompasses basic and clinical researchers working in a multidisciplinary environment side-by-side clinician scientists, bioengineers, physical therapists, and imaging specialists, among others. Together, they are addressing questions related to the biology of soft tissue, knee biomechanics and the role that ligaments play, how instability from an ACL injury affects the knee, and gait analysis in in patients patients who who have have undergone undergone ACL ACL surgery. surgery. Faculty Faculty have have just just


reported on the first in-depth study of a knee cartilage repair technique, showing improvement in patient outcomes and regeneration of knee cartilage. The study demonstrated that a natural tissue graft can spur regeneration of cartilage and improve symptoms in patients who have cartilage damage in their knee.

factors. The researchers noted that athletes with coexisting elbow conditions or injuries should be counseled that they might experience inferior clinical outcomes from UCL surgery. Additionally, gymnasts and javelin throwers may be at increased risk for postoperative complications due to their sport’s increased stress on the elbow.

The Department of Biomechanics, the Leon Root, MD Motion Analysis Basic science research remains Laboratory, and the Department of an integral part of our program, Radiology and Imaging continue complementing our clinical to be our partners in ongoing longterm studies of knee mechanics. These Hospital for Special Surgery has been initiatives include studies evaluating the relationships between knee stability and knee kinematics in cadaveric models utilizing robotics and a gait simulator.

ACL reconstruction. Another new area of investigation focuses on the therapeutic effects of human derived placental adherent stromal cells for treatment of tendon degeneration using a rat collagenase-induced tendinosis model. Research involving a vitamin D-deficient rat model we created last year continues to progress toward our goal of determining if rotator cuff healing is impaired in vitamin D-deficient animals.

designated the first National Medical Center of the United States Olympic Committee’s National Medical Network. In this capacity, HSS is an official hospital for elite U.S. athletes.

We also have significant ongoing investigations on athletic conditions affecting the shoulder and elbow, shoulder stability, shoulder arthroplasty, rotator cuff tendon healing, and articular cartilage repair. With the incidence of ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) tears dramatically increasing over the past decade in the adolescent population due to widespread participation in overhead sports, our faculty led a study on the docking technique to repair a torn elbow ligament in teenage athletes. The outcomes were better than those in previously published reports on reconstruction of the ulnar collateral ligament in this age group and may be attributed to technique-specific

research initiatives. In the past several years, research has been ongoing looking at augmenting the biology of healing for ligaments, tendons, and menisci using stem cells and growth factors. This work is starting to be applied clinically, with a study now underway using stem cells in rotator cuff repair in patients. Under the umbrella of the Hospital’s Laboratory for Soft Tissue Research, the Service has many novel and exciting projects taking place within the Tissue Engineering, Repair, and Regeneration Program – primarily in animal models. Current projects include studies that are evaluating the effect of mechanical load on tendon-to-bone tunnel healing in

Scott A. Rodeo, MD, and David W. Altchek, MD

In conjunction with colleagues at Weill Cornell Medical College, we are exploring a novel imaging technique – multiphoton microscopy – to longitudinally quantify tendon healing and reorganization in live animals. In collaboration with colleagues at Columbia University, we are investigating the use of engineered nanofiber-spun scaffolds to augment soft tissue graft tendonbone healing within ACL tunnels, as well as investigating the use of synthetic-braided ACL graft seeded with bone marrow stem cells as a candidate for ACL graft substitute.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

25


Department of Biomechanics Timothy M. Wright, PhD Director Yingxin Gao, PhD Christopher J. Hernandez, PhD Carl W. Imhauser, PhD Joseph D. Lipman, MS Suzanne A. Maher, PhD Marjolein van der Meulen, PhD

During the past year, engineers in the Department of Biomechanics collaborated on research projects with nearly every orthopaedic service at HSS. Two projects highlight HSS as a unique environment for integrative approaches to research that can rapidly be applied to patient care.

predict how these subtle differences can explain the alterations in knee stability seen in the experiments. The power of this approach is the ability to compare the computer predictions with the actual functional results measured in the robot. These predictive capabilities are the first step in improving the outcomes of ACL surgery by customizing surgery for each individual patient. The second effort is a joint initiative among researchers from HSS and Cornell University’s main campus in Ithaca. Marjolein van der Meulen, PhD, a professor in Ithaca

The first effort, led by Carl W. Imhauser, PhD, focuses on the

Researchers at HSS have developed a model of OA in which in vivo mechanical loading of intact knees in mice recapitulates key features of the human disease.

anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), a complex structure deep within the knee joint that unfortunately is injured in more than 200,000 Americans each year. Using a sophisticated robotic system, Dr. Imhauser and colleagues from the sports and arthroplasty services have been unraveling how the ACL helps control knee motion and how that motion is altered when the ACL is injured. Interestingly, the experimental results varied greatly with small anatomical variations among the knees that were tested in the robot. This has led Dr. Imhauser to develop a computer model to

26

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

and a senior scientist at HSS, has been exploring the pivotal role that mechanical loading plays in osteoarthritis (OA). The excessive repetitive loads that joints like the knee sustain during daily activities can damage the articular cartilage that lines the surfaces of joints. Dr. van der Meulen and her colleagues, Steven R. Goldring, MD, Mary B. Goldring, PhD, and Timothy M. Wright, PhD, have developed a model of OA in which in vivo mechanical loading of intact

knees in mice recapitulates key features of the human disease. During the past year they sought to understand whether the changes created by the model were due to direct physical damage to the tissues or were caused by a cell-mediated biological response. Differentiating between these two scenarios is important, because if the former were true (the loading was directly damaging the tissues), the model would have little application beyond studying the type of traumatic OA that occurs with an acute injury. They conducted an experiment in which a single bout of loading was applied to the knees of adult mice. The single dose of applied load was identical to the daily loading of the initial experiments that had used repetitively applied loads, yet was sufficient to induce the same changes, proving that the response was indeed through cellmediated mechanisms. During the coming year, Dr. van der Meulen and her colleagues will apply the model to examine the effects of loading in the context of a joint that has been genetically manipulated to have abnormal cartilage matrix or bone properties. Ultimately, this model provides a unique opportunity to investigate the pathogenesis of OA with the long-term goal of developing both mechanical and pharmacologic treatments.


Departmental Information 28

2012 Patient Care Volume

30

Quality Care Indicators

32

Professional Staff

33 Affiliations 34 Endowed Chairs, Professorships, and Fellowships

E

35

2012-2013 Notable Achievements

42

2012-2013 Selected Publications

64 2012-2013 Orthopaedic Surgery Graduating Residents and Fellows

xcellence in the Hospital’s Department

66 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Contact Information

of Orthopaedic Surgery is measured in

many ways. These include the increasing number of patients who seek our care; patient outcomes; caliber of our physicians, residents, fellows, and researchers; awards and honors by peers and others; leadership of professional societies; and publications in scientific journals.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

27


2012 patient care volume Hospital for Special Surgery Department Orthopaedic 2012 Patient of Care Volume * Surgery 2012 Patient Care Volume

l 13,830 Total Inpatient Surgeries l 1 13,895 Total Ambulatory Inpatient Surgeries l 3,727 Total Surgeries l 13,733 Total Ambulatory Surgeries Total Surgical Volume: 27,557 (1) Total Patient SurgicalVisits: Volume: 27,628 Total 316,826 Total Patient Visits: 256,714

* Volume and visit figures are inclusive of all Hospital departments.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 2012 Patient Care Volume Adult Reconstruction and Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement Division Joint Replacement Division

28

Total Hip Replacements (1) Total Hip Replacements

Total Knee Replacements (( 22 )) Total Knee Replacements

l l 8,054 7,976 Inpatient Inpatient Surgeries Surgeries l 651 l 651 Ambulatory Ambulatory Surgeries Surgeries Total Surgical Volume: Total Surgical Volume: 8,705 8,627 Total Total Patient Patient Visits: Visits: 43,856 43,856

l 3,547 l 3,547 P Primary rimary Total Total Hip Hip Replacements, Replacements, bilateral bilateral and unilateral and unilateral l l 494 494 R Revision evision Total Total Hip Hip Replacements Replacements l l 342 342 H Hip ip Resurfacing Resurfacing Procedures Procedures

l 4,334 l 4,334 P Primary rimary Total Total Knee Knee Replacements, Replacements, bilateral bilateral and unilateral and unilateral l l 360 360 R Revision evision Total Total Knee Knee Replacements Replacements

Foot and Ankle Service

Hand and Upper Extremity Service

Limb Lengthening and Complex Reconstruction Service

l 397 391 Inpatient Surgeries l 1,682 Ambulatory Surgeries 1,681 Total Surgical Volume: 2,078 2,073 Total Patient Visits: 22,664

l 131 116 Inpatient Surgeries l 2,334 2,335 Ambulatory Surgeries Total Surgical Volume: 2,465 2,451 Total Patient Visits: 21,529

l 390 Inpatient Surgeries 373 l 333 Ambulatory Surgeries Total Surgical Volume: 706 723 Total Patient Visits: 3,613

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery


Metabolic Metabolic Bone Bone Disease/ Disease/ Musculoskeletal Musculoskeletal Oncology Oncology Service Service

Orthopaedic Orthopaedic Trauma Trauma Service Service

l 30 l 47 I Inpatient npatient Surgeries Surgeries -- HSS HSS l 168 I npatient Surgeries l 168 Inpatient Surgeries -- NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Cornell l 33 l 14 A Ambulatory mbulatory Surgeries Surgeries -- HSS HSS l 17 l 17 A Ambulatory mbulatory Surgeries Surgeries -- NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Cornell Total Surgical Total Surgical Volume: Volume: 248 246 Total Total Patient Patient Visits: Visits: 9,870 9,870 DEXA DEXA Scans: Scans: 2,352 2,352

l l 365 407 Inpatient Inpatient Surgeries Surgeries -- HSS HSS l 1,269 I npatient l 1,269 Inpatient Surgeries Surgeries - - NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Cornell l 196 l 215 A Ambulatory mbulatory Surgeries Surgeries -- HSS HSS l l 316 316 A Ambulatory mbulatory Surgeries Surgeries -- NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Cornell (3) Total Surgical Total Surgical Volume: Volume: 2,146 2,207 ( 3 ) Total Total Patient Patient Visits: Visits: 5,691 5,691

Pediatric Pediatric Orthopaedic Orthopaedic Service Service

(5) Scoliosis Scoliosis Service Service ( 5 )

(1) Surgical

l l 634 634 I Inpatient npatient Surgeries Surgeries -- HSS HSS l 147 I npatient Surgeries l 147 Inpatient Surgeries -- NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Cornell and and New New York York Hospital Hospital Queens Queens l 2,534 l 2,534 A Ambulatory mbulatory Surgeries Surgeries -- HSS HSS (4) Total Surgical Volume: 3,168 ( 4 ) Total Surgical Volume: 3,168 Total Total Patient Patient Visits: Visits: 19,791 19,791

l 283 l 283 Inpatient Inpatient Surgeries Surgeries Total Surgical Volume: 283 Total Patient Visits: 10,643

Spine Service

Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service

l 2,164 2,175 Inpatient Surgeries l 323 Ambulatory Surgeries Total Surgical Volume: 2,498 2,487 Total Patient Visits: 13,418

l 1,722 1,614 Inpatient Surgeries l 7,683 7,623 Ambulatory Surgeries Total Surgical Volume: 9,297 9,345 Total Patient Visits: 105,639

volume does not include surgeries performed (1) B byilateral HSS orthopaedic procedures surgeons are at NewYork-Presbyterian/ counted as two surgeries. Weill Cornell and New York (2) IHospital ncludes Queens knee replacement surgeries performed by the (2) Includes knee replacement Sports Medicine and Shoulder surgeriesBilateral performed by the are Service. procedures Sports and Shoulder countedMedicine as two surgeries. Service (3) Trauma surgeries are performed (3) Trauma surgeries are performed by Hospital for Special Surgery’s by Hospital for Special at Surgery’s orthopaedic surgeons both orthopaedic surgeons at both HSS and NewYork-Presbyterian/ HSS NewYork-Presbyterian/ Weill and Cornell. Volume does not Weill Cornell. Volume does not include surgeries performed by include surgeries performed the Metabolic Bone Disease by the Metabolic Bone Disease Service or surgeries performed Service or surgeries performed at Westchester Medical Center. at Westchester Medical Center. (4) Total includes 240 inpatient (4) Total includes pediatric surgeries and 2,121 ambulatory orthopaedic surgical casesHSS surgeries across all other across all HSS orthopaedic orthopaedic services. services (5) Includes patient visits and (5) Includes patient visits and scoliosis surgeries performed scoliosis surgeries performed by surgeons who are joint by surgeons whoPediatric are joint and members of the members Services. of the Pediatric andis Scoliosis One case Scoliosis Services an ambulatory surgery.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

29


QUALITY CARE INDICATORS

In today’s demanding healthcare environment, it is incumbent upon healthcare institutions to continually evaluate and improve the quality of care delivered to patients while at the same time operate efficiently and cost effectively. At HSS, this value is supported by tangible results such as increasing patient volume, low complication rates, and improved quality of life. In fact, patient satisfaction with Hospital for Special Surgery is consistently ranked in the 99th percentile by Press Ganey.

Sixteen-year-old with complex acetabular fracture at 19 months post surgery is pain free and has resumed all activities.

Surgical Volume Lower Extremity Major Joint Replacement and Reattachment U.S. Medicare 2011*

0

1,000

2,000

3,000

Non-Cervical Spine Fusion New York State Medicare 2011*

4,000

0

Number of Patients

50

100

150

200

250

Number of Spine Fusion Procedures (Non-Cervical)

* S ource: Hospital Compare, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services These figures reflect the Medicare segment of the population only. Total joint replacement volume at Hospital for Special Surgery is more than twice the number shown here.

Preventing Infections Infections After Hip Surgery

Preventing Urinary Catheter Infections

0.4%

1.1% 0.0%

0.3%

0.6% Rate of Infection

Source: 2011 New York State Acquired Infections Report

0.9%

1.2%

70%

75%

80%

■ Hospital for Special Surgery***

85%

90%

■ State Average**

95%

100%

■ National Average**

*HSS 2012 Data is for Q1-Q3 2012; National and State 2012 Average Data is for Q2 2011-Q1 2012. ** Source for National and State Average data collected is Hospital Compare. *** Source for HSS 2010 and 2011 data is Hospital Compare. Source for HSS 2012 data is HSS internal monitoring.

30

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery


QUALITY OF LIFE Pain Reduction*

Activity Levels*

Worst Pain 10 Possible

Least 10 Difficulty

9

9

8

8

7

8.6

7

6.25

5.9

6

6

5

5

4

4

3

3

2 1

5.2

4.9

2

1.25

1

0.5

No Pain 0

9.1

Hip Replacement

Most Difficulty 0

Knee Replacement

Hip Replacement

■ Before Surgery ■ 2 Years After Surgery

Knee Replacement

■ Before Surgery ■ 2 Years After Surgery

*Source: HSS CERT Registry

Before Before

After

Before

After

Before

After

After

■ Before Surgery ■ 2 Years After Surgery

PATIENT SATISFACTION 100%

99%

99%

99%

99%

99%

99%

Magnet Percentile Rank

95%

90%

■ Overall Rating of Care Provided by HSS – Inpatient Surgery* ■ How Likely Patients Are to Recommend HSS – Inpatient Surgery**

85%

* HSS has ranked in the 99th percentile for the past 12 consecutive quarters. ** HSS has been in the 99th percentile for 20 consecutive quarters.

80%

75%

70%

Q1-Q4 2011

Q1-Q4 2012

Q1-Q2 2013

Source: Press Ganey Survey for Magnet-designated hospitals Magnet Hospitals refer to all Magnet-designated hospitals in the Press Ganey database.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

31


Professional Staff Surgeon-in-Chief and Medical Director Thomas P. Sculco, MD Clinical Director Charles N. Cornell, MD Academic Director Mathias P. Bostrom, MD Orthopaedic Research Director Jo A. Hannafin, MD, PhD Faculty Development Director Scott W. Wolfe, MD Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement Division

Jonathan T. Deland, MD Matthew M. Roberts, MD Co-Chiefs Walther H. O. Bohne, MD Constantine A. Demetracopoulos, MD Mark C. Drakos, MD Andrew J. Elliott, MD Scott J. Ellis, MD John G. Kennedy, MD David S. Levine, MD Martin J. O’Malley, MD Harvey Strauss, DPM, FACFAS

Douglas E. Padgett, MD Chief, Hip Service

2012-2013 Fellows MaCalus V. Hogan, MD Eric Lloyd, MD Christine M. Seaworth, MD

Steven B. Haas, MD Chief, Knee Service

Hand and Upper Extremity Service

Mark P. Figgie, MD Chief, Surgical Arthritis Service

Edward A. Athanasian, MD Chief

Michael M. Alexiades, MD Friedrich Boettner, MD Mathias P. Bostrom, MD Robert L. Buly, MD Charles N. Cornell, MD Alejandro González Della Valle, MD Allan E. Inglis, Jr., MD Seth A. Jerabek, MD David J. Mayman, MD Bryan J. Nestor, MD Michael L. Parks, MD Paul M. Pellicci, MD Amar S. Ranawat, MD Chitranjan S. Ranawat, MD Eduardo A. Salvati, MD Thomas P. Sculco, MD Edwin P. Su, MD Geoffrey H. Westrich, MD Philip D. Wilson, Jr., MD (Emeritus) Russell E. Windsor, MD

Michelle G. Carlson, MD Aaron Daluiski, MD Duretti T. Fufa, MD (December 2013) Robert N. Hotchkiss, MD Lana Kang, MD Steve K. Lee, MD Andrew J. Weiland, MD Scott W. Wolfe, MD (Chief Emeritus)

2012-2013 Fellows Matthew P. Abdel, MD Michael P. Ast, MD Trevor R. Banka, MD Thomas John, MD Denis Nam, MD Joseph Ogyaadu, MB, BCh Lucas Pugh, MD, MBA, MPH Jeffrey D. Stimac, MD Jonathan M. Vigdorchik, MD

32

Foot and Ankle Service

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

2012-2013 Fellows Eugene Ek, MBBS, PhD Thomas Owen, MD Nina Suh, MD Limb Lengthening and Complex Reconstruction Service

S. Robert Rozbruch, MD Chief Austin T. Fragomen, MD 2012-2013 Fellows Yatin Kirane, MBBS, D.Ortho, MS, PhD Saravanaraja Muthusamy, MBBS, MS Metabolic Bone Disease/ Musculoskeletal Oncology Service

Joseph M. Lane, MD Chief Richard S. Bockman, MD, PhD Adele L. Boskey, PhD Shevaun M. Doyle, MD Azeez M. Farooki, MD

Steven R. Goldring, MD Martin Nydick, MD Linda A. Russell, MD Alana C. Serota, MD Robert Schneider, MD Metabolic Bone Affiliated Staff Jessica G. Davis, MD Edward F. DiCarlo, MD Elizabeth M. Manejias, MD Cathleen L. Raggio, MD 2012-2013 Fellows Pingal Desai, MD Parth Vyas, MD Orthopaedic Trauma Service

David L. Helfet, MD Chief David E. Asprinio, MD Gregory S. DiFelice, MD Andrew Grose, MD Joseph M. Lane, MD Dean G. Lorich, MD John P. Lyden, MD David S. Wellman, MD 2012-2013 Fellows Jason Halvorson, MD Jeremy LaMothe, MD C. Ryan Martin, MD Pediatric Orthopaedic Service

Roger F. Widmann, MD Chief John S. Blanco, MD Emily R. Dodwell, MD, MPH Shevaun M. Doyle, MD Daniel W. Green, MD, FACS Cathleen L. Raggio, MD Leon Root, MD David M. Scher, MD Ernest L. Sink, MD 2012-2013 Fellow O. Folorunsho Edobor-Osula, MD, MPH Scoliosis Service

Oheneba Boachie-Adjei, MD Chief John S. Blanco, MD Matthew E. Cunningham, MD, PhD Daniel W. Green, MD, FACS Han Jo Kim, MD Cathleen L. Raggio, MD Bernard A. Rawlins, MD Roger F. Widmann, MD


Scoliosis Service (continued)

2012-2013 Fellows Motasem Al Maaieh, MD Woojin Cho, MD, PhD Mazda Farshad Tabrizi, MD Marios-Nikolaos Lykissas, MD Ali Maziad, MD (John R. Cobb Spine/Scoliosis Fellow) Joshua Schroeder, MD Haruki Ueda, MD Spine Service

Frank P. Cammisa, Jr., MD Chief James C. Farmer, MD Federico P. Girardi, MD Charles B. Goodwin, MD Russel C. Huang, MD Alexander P. Hughes, MD Joseph M. Lane, MD Darren R. Lebl, MD Patrick F. O’Leary, MD Andrew A. Sama, MD Harvinder S. Sandhu, MD 2012-2013 Fellows Motasem Al Maaieh, MD Woojin Cho, MD, PhD Mazda Farshad Tabrizi, MD Marios-Nikolaos Lykissas, MD Joshua Schroeder, MD Haruki Ueda, MD

Howard A. Rose, MD Beth E. Shubin Stein, MD Sabrina M. Strickland, MD Russell F. Warren, MD Thomas L. Wickiewicz, MD Riley J. Williams, III, MD Primary Care Sports Medicine Brian C. Halpern, MD Chief

William J. Briner, Jr., MD Lisa R. Callahan, MD Marci Anne Goolsby, MD James J. Kinderknecht, MD Osric S. King, MD Jordan D. Metzl, MD 2012-2013 Fellows Olusanjo Adeoye, MD, MBA (Hip Preservation) Tiffany M. Bohan, MD (Primary Care) K. Lauchlan Chambers, MD, MPH Demetris Delos, MD Kristofer Jones, MD Richard Kang, MD Richard Ma, MD (Research Fellow) Andrew Merritt, MD Cathal Moran, MD (International Fellow) Danyal Nawabi, MD Adult Ambulatory Care Center

Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service

Alejandro Leali, MD Medical Director

David W. Altchek, MD Scott A. Rodeo, MD Co-Chiefs

Department of Biomechanics

Answorth A. Allen, MD Struan H. Coleman, MD, PhD Frank A. Cordasco, MD, MS Edward V. Craig, MD, MPH David M. Dines, MD Joshua S. Dines, MD Stephen Fealy, MD Lawrence V. Gulotta, MD Jo A. Hannafin, MD, PhD Anne M. Kelly, MD Bryan T. Kelly, MD John D. MacGillivray, MD Robert G. Marx, MD, MSc, FRCSC Michael J. Maynard, MD Stephen J. O’Brien, MD, MBA Andrew D. Pearle, MD Hollis G. Potter, MD Anil S. Ranawat, MD

Timothy M. Wright, PhD Director Yingxin Gao, PhD Christopher J. Hernandez, PhD Carl W. Imhauser, PhD Joseph D. Lipman, MS Suzanne A. Maher, PhD Marjolein van der Meulen, PhD Research Division

Steven R. Goldring, MD Chief Scientific Officer

AFFILIATIONS

The affiliations of Hospital for Special Surgery enable orthopaedic surgery residents and fellows to benefit from a broad range of research and training opportunities. Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Orthopaedic Service John H. Healey, MD Chief New York Hospital Queens

Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Jeffrey E. Rosen, MD Chair NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/ Weill Cornell Medical Center

Combined Orthopaedic Trauma Service David L. Helfet, MD Director Dean G. Lorich, MD Director, Orthopaedic Trauma Service, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/ Weill Cornell Medical Center St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center

Orthopaedic Surgery William G. Hamilton, MD Senior Attending Orthopaedic Surgeon James J. Peters Veterans Administration Medical Center Bronx, NY

Orthopaedic Surgery Allan E. Inglis, Jr., MD Chief Westchester Medical Center

Orthopaedic Surgery David E. Asprinio, MD Chair and Program Director

Lionel B. Ivashkiv, MD Associate Chief Scientific Officer and Director of Basic Research Robert N. Hotchkiss, MD Director of Clinical Research

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

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Endowed chairs, professorships, and Fellowships Endowed chairs, professorships, and fellowships recognize the generosity of our donors and sustain excellence in musculoskeletal care, research, and medical education. Named Chairs and Professorships

Franchellie M. Cadwell Chair Sergio Schwartzman, MD Coleman Chair in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research Hollis G. Potter, MD Joel and Anne Bick Ehrenkranz Research Chair Allan E. Inglis, MD, Chair in Surgical Arthritis supporting research under the direction of the Chief, Surgical Arthritis Service – a position currently held by Mark P. Figgie, MD John N. Insall Chair in Knee Surgery Steven B. Haas, MD Collette Kean Research Chair Jane E. Salmon, MD F.M. Kirby Chair in Orthopaedic Biomechanics Timothy M. Wright, PhD David H. Koch Chair for Arthritis and Tissue Degeneration Research Lionel B. Ivashkiv, MD Korein-Wilson Professorship in Orthopaedic Surgery Thomas P. Sculco, MD Richard S. Laskin, MD, Chair in Musculoskeletal Education Charles N. Cornell, MD David B. Levine, MD, Chair in Scoliosis Oheneba Boachie-Adjei, MD C. Ronald MacKenzie, MD, Chair in Ethics and Medicine C. Ronald MacKenzie, MD Richard L. Menschel Research Chair Steven R. Goldring, MD Stephen A. Paget, MD, Chair in Rheumatology Stephen A. Paget, MD Chitranjan S. Ranawat, MD, Chair in Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement Douglas E. Padgett, MD

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Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

Leon Root, MD, Chair in Pediatric Orthopaedics Leon Root, MD

Leo Farbman Fellowship for Pediatric Musculoskeletal Research Lorene C. Janowski, OTR/L, MS

Benjamin M. Rosen Chair in Immunology and Inflammation Research Mary K. Crow, MD

Helen Frankenthaler Fellowship in Restorative Mobility Andrew D. Pearle, MD

Joseph P. Roth Professor of Rheumatic Diseases in Medicine Mary K. Crow, MD Virginia F. and William R. Salomon Chair in Musculoskeletal Research Carl Blobel, MD, PhD Eduardo A. Salvati, MD, Chair in Hip Arthroplasty The Peter Jay Sharp Chair in Lupus Research Alessandra B. Pernis, MD St. Giles Research Chair supporting Theresa T. Lu, MD, PhD Starr Chair in Mineralized Tissue Research Adele L. Boskey, PhD Starr Chair in Tissue Engineering Research supporting Chitra Dahia, PhD Russell F. Warren, MD, Research Chair supporting Suzanne A. Maher, PhD Named Fellowships

Robert and Helen Appel Fellowship in Biomedical Engineering Frank Ko, MS Finn and Barbara Caspersen Fellowship for Spine Research Paul D. Kiely, MD Charles L. Christian, MD, Research Fellowship Lisa Mandl, MD, MPH Ira W. DeCamp Fellowship in Musculoskeletal Genetics Mary Goldring, PhD

Mary Rodgers and Henry Guettel Fellowship in Biomedical Mechanics Ken and Jill Iscol Fellowship in Orthopaedic Research Andrew D. Pearle, MD Irving Lipstock and Sally Lipstock Fellowship in Orthopaedic Surgery Lazaros Poultsides, MD, PhD Ludwig Fellowship for Women’s Sports Medicine Research Stavros Niarchos Foundation– Thomas P. Sculco, MD, International Orthopaedic Fellowship Vasileios Sakellariou, MD, PhD Robert and Gillian Steel Fellowship in Musculoskeletal Research Inez Rogatsky, PhD Nancy Dickerson Whitehead Research Fellowship supporting, in part, Adele L. Boskey, PhD, and collaborators in the Musculoskeletal Integrity Program Fellowship in Arthroplasty Edward Purdue, PhD Immunology and Inflammation Fellowship Sergei Rudchenko, PhD


2012-2013 NOTABLE ACHIEVEMENTS The orthopaedic surgeons at Hospital for Special Surgery are regularly cited for their professional achievements and outstanding contributions to musculoskeletal medicine, research, and education. They manage the care of numerous major professional sports teams and organizations, hold leadership positions and serve on committees for national and international organizations and professional societies, serve on editorial boards and as reviewers for numerous peer-reviewed journals, and as authors and co-authors of book chapters and textbooks. Awards and Special Recognition

Answorth A. Allen, MD Head Team Orthopaedist, New York Knicks Head Team Physician, St. John’s University Orthopaedic Consultant, West Indies Cricket Board of Control Consultant, Major League Baseball David W. Altchek, MD Medical Director, New York Mets Medical Director, New Jersey Nets William J. Briner, Jr., MD Head Team Physician, USA Volleyball Medical Delegate for Beach Volleyball at the Horse Guards Parade, London 2012 Olympic Games, Federation Internationale de Volleyball Frank P. Cammisa, Jr., MD Spinal Consultant, New York Giants Spinal Consultant, National Hockey League Players’ Association Founders Award for Best Paper, Eastern Orthopaedic Association Best Podium Presentation, Cervical Spine Research Society

Stephen Fealy, MD Team Physician, Chaminade High School Orthopaedic Consultant, Major League Baseball Players Association Joseph H. Feinberg, MD Team Physician, St. Peter’s College Austin T. Fragomen, MD Alpha Omega Alpha Society Alumni Membership Award, Downstate Medical College Patients’ Choice Award Marci Anne Goolsby, MD Team Physician, New York Liberty Daniel W. Green, MD 2013 Excellence in Research Award, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Brian C. Halpern, MD Consultant, New York Mets Jo A. Hannafin, MD, PhD Team Physician, USRowing Head Team Physician, New York Liberty

Struan H. Coleman, MD, PhD Head Team Physician, New York Mets

Anne M. Kelly, MD Team Physician, St. John’s University

Frank A. Cordasco, MD, MS Scientific Exhibit 2012 Top 20 Award, American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons

Bryan T. Kelly, MD Associate Team Physician, New York Giants Assistant Team Physician, New York Red Bulls Consulting Team Physician, New Jersey Nets

Edward V. Craig, MD, MPH Lifetime Achievement Award, New York Chapter, Arthritis Foundation David M. Dines, MD Medical Director, Association of Tennis Professionals – ATP World Tour Team Physician, U.S. Davis Cup Tennis Team Team Physician and Medical Director, Long Island Ducks Minor League Baseball Head Orthopaedic Consultant, U.S. Open Tennis 2012 Best Scientific Exhibit, American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons Joshua S. Dines, MD Team Physician, U.S. Davis Cup Tennis Team Team Physician, Long Island Ducks, Minor League Baseball Team Orthopaedic Consultant, Los Angeles Dodgers 2012 Award of Excellence for Scientific Exhibit, American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons

Osric S. King, MD Sports Medicine Coordinator, City University of New York Athletic Conference Associate Medical Director, St. John’s University Medical Director, Metro Chapter, USA Boxing James J. Kinderknecht, MD Assistant Team Physician, St. John’s University Assistant Team Physician, New York Mets Consulting Team Physician, New York Giants Darren R. Lebl, MD 2013 Best Podium Presentation, Cervical Spine Research Society Patients Choice Award Robert G. Marx, MD, MSc, FRCSC 2013 Excellence in Research Award, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Michael J. Maynard, MD Medical Director, Department of Athletics, Marist College

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

35


2012-2013 NOTABLE ACHIEVEMENTS Stephen J. O’Brien, MD Chief Orthopaedic Consultant, Athletic Department, St. John’s University Martin J. O’Malley, MD Medical Staff, New Jersey Nets Foot and Ankle Consultant, New York Knicks Foot and Ankle Consultant, New York City Ballet Foot and Ankle Consultant, Iona College Athletics Douglas E. Padgett, MD Commencement Speaker and Guest of Honor, Naval Medical Center, San Diego Andrew D. Pearle, MD Associate Team Physician, New York Mets Anil S. Ranawat, MD Assistant Team Physician, New York Mets Richard S. Laskin, MD, Resident Teaching Award, Hospital for Special Surgery Bernard A. Rawlins, MD Spine Consultant, New York Knicks Spine Consultant, New York Mets Scott A. Rodeo, MD Associate Team Physician, New York Giants Cabaud Memorial Award, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine S. Robert Rozbruch, MD Mimics Innovation Award, Development and Verification of a Computational Model of the Knee Joint for the Evaluation of Surgical Treatment of Osteoarthritis, Materialise Andrew A. Sama, MD Orthopaedic Research and Education Fellowship Grant in Spine Care Thomas P. Sculco, MD Austrian Cross of Honour for Science and Art First Class Nancy Kane Bischoff Mentor Award Beth E. Shubin Stein, MD Team Physician, U.S. Federation Cup Tennis Team Ernest L. Sink, MD 2012 Achievement Award, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Sabrina L. Strickland, MD Leadership Fellows Program, American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons Russell F. Warren, MD Team Physician, New York Giants Thomas L. Wickiewicz, MD Team Physician, Department of Athletics, St. Peter’s College Roger F. Widmann, MD 2013 Excellence in Research Award, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

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Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

Riley J. Williams, III, MD Head Team Physician, New Jersey Nets Medical Director, New York Red Bulls Head Team Physician, Department of Athletics, Iona College New York Orthopaedic Consultant, National Football League Timothy M. Wright, PhD Alfred R. Shands, Jr., MD Award, Orthopaedic Research Society Leadership Positions and Appointments

Michael M. Alexiades, MD President, Weill Cornell Medical College Alumni Association Board of Overseers, Weill Cornell Medical College Oral Examiner, American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery Edward A. Athanasian, MD Long Island Committee, Harvard Medical School Oheneba Boachie-Adjei, MD Fellowship Criteria Task Force; 50th Anniversary Task Force; Globalization Committee, Scoliosis Research Society Richard S. Bockman, MD, PhD Chair, Calcium Subcommittee of the Professional Practice Committee, American Society for Bone and Mineral Research Steering Committee, 64th Clinical Endocrinology Update Meeting, The Endocrine Society Mathias P. Bostrom, MD Board of Trustees, Hospital for Special Surgery Board Member, International Society for Fracture Repair Board of Directors and Fellowship Committee, The Hip Society Board of Directors; Presidential Line (2015); Member-at-Large, Orthopaedic Research Society Study Section, Musculoskeletal Tissue Engineering, National Institutes of Health Course Director, American Austrian Foundation William J. Briner, Jr., MD Chair, USA Volleyball Sports Medicine and Performance Commission Robert L. Buly, MD Board Member, Maurice E. Muller Foundation of North America Secretary, International Society for Hip Arthroplasty Lisa R. Callahan, MD Chief Medical Officer and Vice President of Player Care, New York Knicks and New York Liberty Medical Advisory Board, American Ballet Theatre Advisory Board, Center for Women’s Healthcare, Weill Cornell Medical College Frank P. Cammisa, Jr., MD Medical Advisory Board, The Alan T. Brown Foundation to Cure Paralysis


Michelle G. Carlson, MD Council and Annual Program Committee, American Society for Surgery of the Hand Founder and Co-Chair, Elite Athlete Hand and Wrist Study Group, and Founder and Co-Chair, Women in Hand Surgery Group, American Society for Surgery of the Hand Leadership Development Committee, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Nominating Committee, Ruth Jackson Orthopaedic Society Study Group, Shriner’s Pediatric Hand Surgery

Emily R. Dodwell, MD, MPH Clinical Trials Committee, Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America

Struan H. Coleman, MD, PhD Board of Trustees, Cunningham Dance Foundation Treasurer, MLB Team Physicians Association Chairman, Fundraising Committee; Education Committee, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Board of Directors and Member-at-Large; Co-Chairman, Closed Meeting Program Committee; Chairman, Membership Committee; Evidence Analysis Task Force, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Research Committee, Arthroscopy Association of North America Research Committee, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Representative on the Health Policy Committee, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

Scott J. Ellis, MD Chair, Young Physicians Committee; Awards Committee; Program Committee; Safety Summit, Hand, Foot, and Ankle Workgroup, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

Frank A. Cordasco, MD, MS Board of Directors, Baryshnikov Arts Center Executive Committee, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Medical Advisory Board, Children of China Pediatric Foundation Charles N. Cornell, MD Board of Trustees, Hospital Board of for Special Surgery Edward V. Craig, MD, MPH Medical Advisory Board, AmeriCares Board of Directors and Chair, ABC Travelling Fellowship Committee; Judiciary Committee, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Chair, ABC Traveling Fellowship, The American Orthopaedic Association Planning and Development Committee, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Jonathan T. Deland, MD Board of Directors, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society David M. Dines, MD Industry Relations Committee and 2016 ICSES Committee, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Education Committee, American Orthopaedic Association Shoulder and Elbow ICL Committee, American Academy of Orthopaedc Surgeons

Mark C. Drakos, MD Young Physicians Committee, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Andrew J. Elliott, MD Honors and Awards Committee and Psycho Lab Advisory Committee, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

Stephen Fealy, MD Technology Committee, Arthroscopy Association of North America American Orthopaedic Association Reviewer, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Research Committee, Major League Baseball Association Joseph H. Feinberg, MD Clinical Practice Guideline Committee, American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Austin T. Fragomen, MD Treasurer, Limb Lengthening and Reconstruction Society Federico P. Girardi, MD International Medical Graduate Committee, Medical Society of the State of New York Publications Committee, Spine Arthroplasty Society Patient-Based Outcomes Committee and Global Outreach Committee, Scoliosis Research Society Steven R. Goldring, MD Board of Trustees, Hospital for Special Surgery Co-Chair, Annual Meeting Basic Research Conference, American College of Rheumatology Advisory and Organizing Committee and Session Chair, Sun Valley Workshop on Musculoskeletal Biology, International Bone & Mineral Society Review Panel, Research Education Fund Investigator-Initiated Grants, American College of Rheumatology Marci Anne Goolsby, MD Annual Meeting Program Planning Committee; Practice and Policy Committee; Research Committee, American Medical Society for Sports Medicine Representative, Female Athlete Triad Coalition, American Medical Society for Sports Medicine

Joshua S. Dines, MD Chair, Technology Committee, American Shoulder and Elbow Society

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

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2012-2013 NOTABLE ACHIEVEMENTS Daniel W. Green, MD Board Member, New York State Society of Orthopaedic Surgeons Board Member and Treasurer, New York County Medical Society New York Board of Councilors Representative and Communication Cabinet Member, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Representative to the American College of Surgeons for the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America Education Committee, Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America Program Committee and Patient Education Committee, Scoliosis Research Society Clinic Chief, Association of Children’s Prosthetic-Orthotic Clinics Steven B. Haas, MD Program Chair and New York Coordinator, John N. Insall Travelling Fellowship, The Knee Society Jo A. Hannafin, MD, PhD President, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Vice President, Board of Trustees, National Rowing Foundation Secretary, The Herodicus Society Medical Commission, FISA (International Rowing Federation) David L. Helfet, MD Board of Trustees, Hospital for Special Surgery Trustee, AO Foundation Chair Emeritus, Clinical Investigation and Documentation, AO Foundation Technical Commission, AO North America Robert N. Hotchkiss, MD Board of Trustees, Hospital for Special Surgery Lana Kang, MD Diversity Committee; Government Affairs Committee; Nominating Committee, American Society for Surgery of the Hand Young Members Committee and Subspecialty Committee, Medical Society of the State of New York Leadership Fellows Program and Research Committee, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons John G. Kennedy, MD Co-Chair, International Cartilage Repair Counselor Group Board Member, European Society of Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery and Arthroscopy – Ankle and Foot Association James J. Kinderknecht, MD Physician Director, Board of Certification for the Athletic Trainer Medical Consultant, National Hockey Players’ Association Medical Advisory Board, New York State Athletic Commission Osric S. King, MD Board of Directors, Foundation of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine

Joseph M. Lane, MD Chair, MOAC Recertification Program, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Chair, Study Section, Special Grants Review Committee, National Institutes of Health and National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Skin Disorders Darren R. Lebl, MD Morbidity and Mortality Committee and Global Outreach Committee, Scoliosis Research Society Steve K. Lee, MD Leadership Circle, American Foundation for Surgery of the Hand Chairman, Public Education Committee; Courses/Meetings Advisory Committee; Engagement Task Force; Leader, Subgroup on Transparency and Equitability Member Engagement Task Force; SHUEHORN Task Force, American Society for Surgery of the Hand David S. Levine, MD Membership Committee, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Foot and Ankle Instructional Course Committee, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Dean’s Advisory Council, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University Dean G. Lorich, MD Technical Commission and Osteoporosis Task Force, AO Foundation Douglas E. Padgett, MD Board of Trustees, Hospital for Special Surgery Board Member-at-Large and Committee on Education, American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Secretary, The Hip Society Program Committee, 2010-2012 Annual Meeting, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Michael L. Parks, MD President, New York State Society of Orthopaedic Surgeons Member-at-Large, Board of Directors; Health Policy Committee; Communications Cabinet, American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Andrew D. Pearle, MD Arthroscopy Committee, International Society of Arthroscopy, Knee Surgery and Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Technology Committee, American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine ACL Study Group Rock G. Positano, DPM, MSc, MPH Deputy Chairman, Board of Trustees, Medicine Board, New York College of Podiatric Medicine Board of Trustees, Children’s Health Fund Hollis G. Potter, MD Research Committee, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Program Committee, International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

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Department of Orthopaedic Surgery


Cathleen L. Raggio, MD Chair, Data and Safety Monitoring Board, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Skin Diseases Medical Advisory Council, Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation Research Committee; Advocacy Committee; Annual Meeting Abstract Reviewer, Pediatric Orthopedic Society of North America Advocacy Committee, Orthopaedic Research Society Amar S. Ranawat, MD Chairman, Technical Exhibits Committee, Eastern Orthopaedic Association Anil S. Ranawat, MD Master Instructor, Hip and Knee Course, Arthroscopy Association of North America Chitranjan S. Ranawat, MD President, Eastern Orthopaedic Association President, Eastern Orthopaedic Education Foundation Chairman, Ranawat Orthopaedic Research Foundation Chairman, Annual “ROC Advances and Techniques in Joint Replacement Surgery” Bernard A. Rawlins, MD Examiner, American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery Program Committee, Cervical Spine Research Society Matthew M. Roberts, MD Postgraduate Education and Training Committee and Resident Candidate, American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society Board Member, New York State Society of Orthopaedic Surgeons Scott A. Rodeo, MD Chairman, Sports Medicine/Science Committee, USA Swimming Study Section on Skeletal Biology Structure and Regeneration, National Institutes of Health Leon Root, MD Chairman, Orthopaedic Section, New York Academy of Medicine S. Robert Rozbruch, MD President, Limb Lengthening and Reconstruction Society Thomas P. Sculco, MD Governing Board, Salzburg Medical Seminar International Executive Director and Founder, International Society of Orthopaedic Centers Board of Trustees, Vice Chairman, New York Chapter, Arthritis Foundation Board of Directors, President-Elect, The Knee Society Advisory Council on Biology and Medicine, Brown University Board of Trustees, Hospital for Special Surgery Board of Trustees, Carnegie Hall Board of Visitors, Columbia University Medical Center Steering Committee, World Orthopaedic Alliance

Beth E. Shubin Stein, MD Program Committee and 2014 Program Chair, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Ernest L. Sink, MD 2012 Annual Meeting Local Host; Program Committee; Chair, Specialty Day, Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America Jennifer L. Solomon, MD Women’s Sports Medicine Committee, Association of American College of Sports Medicine Harvey Strauss, DPM, FACFAS Board of Directors, New York Division, New York State Podiatric Medical Association Edwin P. Su, MD Hip Program Subcommittee, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons Russell F. Warren, MD Board of Trustees, Hospital for Special Surgery Andrew J. Weiland, MD Chairman, American Foundation for Surgery of the Hand Nominating Committee, American Society for Surgery of the Hand Geoffrey H. Westrich, MD Board Member; Treasurer; Chairman, Program Committee; Finance Committee, Eastern Orthopaedic Association Riley J. Williams, III, MD Research and Education Committees, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Technology Committee, American Shoulder and Elbow Society ACL Study Group Russell E. Windsor, MD Examiner, American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery Scott W. Wolfe, MD Vice President, New York Society for Surgery of the Hand Electronic Information Committee, American Society for Surgery of the Hand Timothy M. Wright, PhD National Institutes of Health Special Review Panel for Grant Applications, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases for Centers of Research Translation

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

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2012-2013 NOTABLE ACHIEVEMENTS Editorial Appointments

David W. Altchek, MD Co-Editor, Sports Medicine of Baseball Co-Editor, Foot and Ankle Sports Medicine Edward A. Athanasian, MD Reviewer: The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery; Journal of Hand Surgery John S. Blanco, MD Reviewer, Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics Oheneba Boachie-Adjei, MD Board of Associate Editors, Spine Journal Mathias P. Bostrom, MD Editorial Board, HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery Lisa R. Callahan, MD Editorial Advisor: Journal of Women’s Health; Women’s Health Advisor; Food and Fitness Advisor Michelle G. Carlson, MD Reviewer: Journal of Hand Surgery; Journal of Hand and Microsurgery; Sports Health Struan H. Coleman, MD, PhD Reviewer: Journal of Orthopaedic Research; Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research; The American Journal of Sports Medicine; Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery; Arthroscopy; The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery Charles N. Cornell, MD Editor-in-Chief, HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery Senior Associate Editor, Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research Edward V. Craig, MD, MPH Editor-in-Chief, Techniques in Shoulder & Elbow Surgery Matthew E. Cunningham, MD, PhD Reviewer, Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research Jonathan T. Deland, MD Editor-in-Chief, Foot and Ankle Section, Orthopaedia Associate Editor, Foot & Ankle International

Scott J. Ellis, MD Editorial Board, HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery Reviewer: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research; HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery; Journal of Orthopaedic Research; The Journal of Musculoskeletal Medicine; Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy Stephen Fealy, MD Reviewer, The American Journal of Sports Medicine; Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Joseph H. Feinberg, MD Editorial Board, HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery Steven R. Goldring, MD Associate Editor, Arthritis Research & Therapy Daniel W. Green, MD Editor, Orthopaedics Section, Current Opinion in Orthopaedics Consultant Reviewer: Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics; Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research Reviewer, Spine Lawrence V. Gulotta, MD Editorial Board, HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery Jo A. Hannafin, MD, PhD Reviewer: Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery; Journal of Orthopaedic Research; The American Journal of Sports Medicine; The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery; Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research Lana Kang, MD Reviewer: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research; Journal of Hand Surgery Anne M. Kelly, MD Reviewer, The American Journal of Sports Medicine

David M. Dines, MD Board of Trustees and Treasurer, Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

Han Jo Kim, MD Editorial Board, HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery

Joshua S. Dines, MD Chief Social Media Editor, Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Co-Editor, Sports Medicine of Baseball Co-Editor, Foot and Ankle Sports Medicine Editorial Board, The American Journal of Orthopedics

Joseph M. Lane, MD Editorial Board: Bone; Journal of Arthroplasty; Journal of Orthopaedic Research; Spine

Emily R. Dodwell, MD, MPH Consultant Reviewer: Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics; The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery

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Mark C. Drakos, MD Reviewer: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research; The American Journal of Sports Medicine; The Physician and Sports Medicine

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

Alejandro Leali, MD Senior Associate Editor, HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery Darren R. Lebl, MD Editorial Board, HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery


Steve K. Lee, MD Editorial Board, Associate Editor,HSS Journal Journal: of Hand The Surgery Musculoskeletal Journal of HospitalEditor, Associate for Special Yearbook Surgery of Hand and Upper Limb Surgery AssociateBoard, Editorial Editor,HSS Journal Journal: of Hand The Surgery Musculoskeletal Journal of Associate HospitalEditor, for Special Yearbook Surgery of Hand and Upper Limb Surgery Consultant Reviewer: The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery; Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research Robert G. Marx, MD, MSc, FRCSC Deputy Editor, Evidence-Based Orthopaedics, The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery Senior Associate Editor, HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery Michael J. Maynard, MD Section Editor for Sports Medicine, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons OKOJ – Orthopedic Knowledge Online Journal Martin J. O’Malley, MD Editorial Advisory Committee, PhysicianLink Douglas E. Padgett, MD Editorial Board, The Journal of Arthroplasty Consultant Reviewer: Journal of Orthopaedic Research; The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery; Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research Andrew D. Pearle, MD Editor-in-Chief, Techniques in Knee Surgery Associate Editor, Sports Medicine Newsletter, The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery Rock G. Positano, DPM, MSc, MPH Co-Editor, Foot and Ankle Sports Medicine Hollis G. Potter, MD Associate Editor: Imaging; Sports Health Amar S. Ranawat, MD Editorial Board, Journal of Arthroplasty Reviewer: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research; Current Orthopaedic Practice Chitranjan S. Ranawat, MD Founder and Editor, Orthopedics E-Journal Bernard A. Rawlins, MD Reviewer: Journal of Spine; Journal of Orthopaedic Research; Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics

David M. Scher, MD Editorial Board, HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery Consultant Reviewer: Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics; Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research Thomas P. Sculco, MD Deputy Editor, American Journal of Orthopedics Advisory Board and Editorial Board, HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery Editorial Board, Istituto Ortopedico, Rizzoli Reviewer, The Lancet Edwin P. Su, MD Editorial Board, The American Journal of Orthopedics Russell F. Warren, MD Editor-in-Chief, Techniques in Shoulder & Elbow Surgery Andrew J. Weiland, MD Board of Trustees, The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery Reviewer: The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery; Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research; Journal of American Society of Surgical Hand; Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma David S. Wellman, MD Editorial Board, HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery Thomas L. Wickiewicz, MD Treasurer, The American Journal of Sports Medicine Board of Trustees, Medical Publishing Group, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Roger F. Widmann, MD Editorial Board, Journal of Children’s Orthopaedics Consultant Reviewer: Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics; Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research; Journal of Children’s Orthopaedics Scott W. Wolfe, MD Editor-in-Chief, Green’s Operative Hand Surgery Reviewer: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research; The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery; Journal of Hand Surgery; Journal of Orthopaedic Research Timothy M. Wright, PhD Deputy Editor, HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery Co-Editor, Journal of Orthopaedic Research

Scott A. Rodeo, MD Invited Editor, Special Issue on Rotator Cuff Biology and Healing, Volume 21, February 2012, Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Havinder R. Sandhu, MD Co-Editor, Symposium Section, SAS Journal

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

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2012-2013 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement Division

Ast MP, Gorab AH, Banka TR, Lee L, Lyman S, Westrich GH. Clinical outcomes of patients with non-fatal VTE after total knee arthroplasty. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2013 May 15. [Epub ahead of print] Ast MP, Mayman DJ, Su EP, González Della Valle A, Parks ML, Haas SB. The reduction of implant-related errors and waste in total knee arthroplasty using a novel, computer based, e.label and compatibility system. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2013 Apr 22. [Epub ahead of print] Ast MP, Nam D, Haas SB. Patient-specific instrumentation for total knee arthroplasty: a review. Orthopedic Clinics of North America. 2012 Nov;43(5):e17-22. Burton L, Paget DE, Binder NB, Bohnert K, Nestor BJ, Sculco TP, Santambrogio L, Ross, PF, Goldring SR, Purdue EP. Orthopedic wear debris mediated inflammatory osteolysis is mediated in part by NALP3 inflammasome activation. Journal of Orthopaedic Research. 2013 Jan;31(1):73-80. Chevillotte C, Trousdale RT, An KN, Padgett DE, Wright TM. Retrieval analysis of squeaking ceramic implants: Are there related specific features? Orthopaedics & Traumatology: Surgery & Research. 2012 May;98(3):281-87. Colwell CW Jr, Froimson MI, Mont MA, Ritter MA, Trousdale RT, Spitzer AI, Donaldson TK, Padgett DE. Cost-effectiveness of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis with a new mobile device after total hip arthroplasty. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2012 Sep;27(8):1513-17. Cornell CN. Commentary and perspective: multimodal approach to pain management following bipolar hemiarthroplasty for femoral neck fractures: I’m a believer! The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. 2013;95:e21(1-2). Cornell CN. CORR Insights®: role of Interleukin-6 as an early marker of fat embolism syndrome: a clinical study. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 Apr 10. [Epub ahead of print] Cornell CN. Letter from the Editor. HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery. 2012 Feb;8(1):1. Cross MB, Dolan MM, Sidhu GS, Nguyen J, Mayman DJ, Su EP. The removal of acetabular bone in hip resurfacing and cementless total hip replacement: a comparison using the ratio of the size of the acetabular component to the diameter of the native femoral head. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Br). 2012 Oct;94(10):1339-43. Cross MB, Nam D, Plaskos C, Sherman SL, Lyman S, Pearle AD, Mayman DJ. Recutting the distal femur to increase maximal knee extension during TKA causes coronal plane laxity in mid-flexion. Knee. 2012 Dec;19(6):875-79. Cross MB, Nam D, van der Meulen MC, Bostrom MP. A rare case of a bisphosphonate-induced peri-prosthetic femoral fracture. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Br). 2012 Jul;94(7):994-97.

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Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

Dy CJ, Ma Y, Franco N, Mazumdar M, González Della Valle A. A meta-analysis of complications after patellofemoral and total knee replacement. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy. 2012;20(11):2174-90. Fahlgren A, Yang X, Ciani C, Ryan JA, Kelly N, Ko FC, van der Meulen MC, Bostrom MP. The effects of PTH, loading and surgical insult on cancellous bone at the bone-implant interface in the rabbit. Bone. 2013 Feb;52(2):718-24. Fox AJ, Bedi A, Wanivenhaus F, Sculco TP, Fox JS. Femoral neuropathy following total hip arthroplasty: review and management Guidelines. Acta Orthopaedica Belgica. 2012 78(2):145-51. Gadinsky NE, Manual J, Lyman S, Westrich GH. Increased operating room time in patients with obesity during primary total knee arthroplasty: conflicts for scheduling. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2012 Jun;27(6):1171-76. Gesell MW, González Della Valle A, Bartolomé García S, Memtsoudis SG, Ma Y, Haas SB, Salvati EA. Safety and efficacy of multimodal thromboprophylaxis following primary total knee arthroplasty: a comparative study of preferential aspirin vs. routine Coumadin chemoprophylaxis. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2013 Apr;28(4):575-79. Ghomrawi HM, Mancuso CA, Westrich GH, Marx RG, Mushlin AI; Expectations Discordance Study Group. Discordance in TKA expectations between patients and surgeons. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 Jan;471(1):175-80. González Della Valle A, Chiu YL, Ma Y, Mazumdar M, Memtsoudis S. The metabolic syndrome in patients undergoing TKA and THA. Trends and in-hospital outcomes in the United States. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2012 Dec;27(10): 1743-49. Greenbaum JN, Bornstein LJ, Lyman S, Alexiades MM, Westrich GH. The validity of self-report as a technique for measuring short-term complications after total hip arthroplasty in a joint replacement registry. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2012 Aug;27(7):1310-15. Hanifi A, Bi X, Yang X, Kavukcuoglu B, Lin PC, DiCarlo E, Spencer RG, Bostrom MP, Pleshko N. Infrared fiber optic probe evaluation of degenerative cartilage correlates to histological grading. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2012 Dec;40(12):2853-61. Heyse TJ, Chong LR, Davis J, Boettner F, Haas SB, Potter HG. MRI analysis of the component-bone interface after TKA. Knee. 2012 August; Vol 19(4)290-94. Heyse TJ, Chong LR, Davis J, Haas SB, Figgie MP, Potter HG. MRI diagnosis of patellar clunk syndrome following total knee arthroplasty. HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery. 2012 July;8(2):92-95. Heyse TJ, Haas SB, Drinkwater D, Lyman S, Kim HJ, Kahn BA, Figgie MP. Intraarticular fibrinogen does not reduce blood loss in TKA: a randomized clinical trial. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 May 9. [Epub ahead of print]


Heyse TJ, Haas SB, Efe T. The use of oxidized zirconium alloy in knee arthroplasty. Expert Review of Medical Devices. 2012 Jul;9(4):409-21. Johnson BK, Goodman SM, Alexiades MM, Figgie MP, Demmer RT, Mandl LA. Patterns and associated risk of perioperative use of anti-tumor necrosis factor in patients with rheumatoid arthritis undergoing total knee replacement. The Journal of Rheumatology. 2013 May;40(5):617-23. Jules-Elysee KM, Wilfred SE, Memtsoudis SG, Kim DH, YaDeau JT, Urban MK, Lichardi ML, McLawhorn AS, Sculco TP. Steroid modulation of cytokine release and desmosine levels in bilateral total knee replacement. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. 2012 December 94-A(23):2120-27. Kirksey M, Chiu YL, Ma Y, Gonzรกlez Della Valle A, Poultsides L, Gener P, Memtsoudis L. Trends in in-hospital major morbidity and mortality after total joint arthroplasty: USA 1998-2008. Anesthesia and Analgesia. 2012;115(2):321-27. Klingenstein GG, Yeager AM, Lipman JD, Westrich GH. Computerized range of motion analysis following dual mobility total hip arthroplasty, traditional total hip arthroplasty and hip resurfacing. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2013 Mar 8. [Epub ahead of print] Klingenstein GG, Yeager AM, Lipman JD, Westrich GH. Increased range of motion to impingement with large head total hip arthroplasty: point of dimishing returns. Hip International. 2012 May-Jun;22(3):261-65. Liu SS, Buvanendran A, Rathmell JP, Sawhney M, Bae JJ, Moric M, Perros S, Pope AJ, Poultsides L, Della Valle CJ, Shin NS, McCartney CJ, Ma Y, Shah M, Wood MJ, Manion SC, Sculco TP. A cross-sectional survey on prevalence and risk factors for persistent postsurgical pain 1 year after total hip and knee replacement. Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine. 2012 Jul-Aug;37(4):415-22. Liu SS, Buvanendran A, Rathmell JP, Sawhney M, Bae JJ, Moric M, Perros S, Pope AJ, Poultsides L, Della Valle CJ, Shin NS, McCartney CJ, Ma Y, Shah M, Wood MJ, Manion SC, Sculco TP. Predictors for moderate to severe acute post-operative pain after total hip and knee replacement. International Orthopaedics. 2012 Nov;36(11):2261-67.

McArthur B, Dy CJ, Fabricant PD, Gonzรกlez Della Valle A. Long-term safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability of hyaluronic acid injection in patients with painful osteoarthritis of the knee. Patient Preferences and Adherence. 2012;6:905-10. McLawhorn AS, Nam D, McArthur BA, Cross MB, Su EP. Preoperative templating and its intraoperative applications for hip resurfacing arthroplasty. The American Journal of Orthopedics. 2012 Dec;41(12):E157-62. Meftah M, John M, Lendhey M, Khaimov A, Ranawat AS, Ranawat CS. Safety and efficacy of non-cemented femoral fixation in patients 75 years of age and older. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2013 Mar 22. [Epub ahead of print] Meftah M, Potter HG, Gold S, Ranawat AS, Ranawat AS, Ranawat CS. Assessment of reactive synovitis in rotatingplatform posterior-stabilized design: a 10-year prospective matched-pair MRI study. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2013 Mar 22. [Epub ahead of print] Meftah M, Ranawat AS, Sood AB, Rodriguez JA, Ranawat CS. All-polyethylene tibial implant in young, active patients a concise follow-up, 10 to 18 years. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2012 Jan;27(1):10-14. Meftah M, Yadav A, Wong AC, Ranawat AS, Ranawat CS. A novel method for accurate and reproducible functional cup positioning in total hip arthroplasty. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2013 Feb 22. [Epub ahead of print] Mella C, del Rio J, Lara J, Paroli D, Moya L, Schmidt-Hebbel A, Boettner F. Arthroscopy after hip joint injury. Cases studies and indication. Unfallchirurg. 2012; 115: 273-78. Memtsoudis SG, Dy CJ, Chiu YL, Ma Y, Gonzรกlez Della Valle A, Mazumdar M. In-hospital patient falls following total joint arthroplasty. Incidence, demographics and risk factors in the United States. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2012;27(6):823-28. Memtsoudis SG, Hargett M, Russell LA, Parvizi J, Cats-Baril WL, Stundner O, Sculco TP; for the Consensus Conference on Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty Group. Consensus statement from the Consensus Conference on Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty Group. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 Apr 6. [Epub ahead of print]

Lombardi AV Jr, Cameron HU, Della Valle CJ, Jones RE, Paprosky WG, Ranawat CS. What would you do? challenges in hip surgery. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Br). 2012 Nov;94 (11 Suppl A):70-74.

Memtsoudis SG, Pumberger M, Ma Y, Chiu YL, Fritsch G, Gerner P, Poultsides L, Gonzรกlez Della Valle A. Epidemiology and risk factors for perioperative mortality after total hip and knee arthroplasty. Journal of Orthopedic Research. 2012 Nov;30(11):1811-21.

Lu N, Yang Y, Gonzรกlez Della Valle A, Salvati EA. Effect of preoperative donation of autologous blood on venous thromboembolism disease after total hip replacement. Zhongguo Gu Shang. 2013 Jan;26(1):38-40.

Murakami AM, Hash TW, Hepinstall MS, Lyman S, Nestor BJ, Potter HG. MRI evaluation of rotational alignment and synovitis in patients with pain after total knee replacement. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. 2012 Sep;(94)9:1209-15.

McArthur B, Cross M, Geatrakas C, Mayman D, Ghelman B. Measuring acetabular component version after THA: CT or plain radiograph? Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2012 Oct;470(10):2810-18.

Nam D, Bostrom MP, Fahlgren A. Emerging ideas: instabilityinduced periprosthetic osteolysis is not dependent on the fibrous tissue interface. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 Jun;471(6):1758-62.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

43


2012-2013 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Nam D, Cross MB, Plaskos C, Sherman S, Mayman DJ, Pearle AD. The effect of medial condylar bone loss of the knee on coronal plane stability – a cadaveric study. Knee. 2012 Oct;19(5):640-43. Nam D, Dy CJ, Cross MB, Kang MN, Mayman DJ. Cadaveric results of an accelerometer based, extramedullary navigation system for the tibial resection in total knee arthroplasty. Knee. 2012 Oct;19(5):617-21.

Parks ML. Patient-centered care for total knee arthroplasty. Orthopedics. 2013 Mar;36(3):203-4.

Nam D, Jerabek SA, Cross MB, Mayman DJ. Cadaveric analysis of an accelerometer-based portable navigation device for distal femoral cutting block alignment in total knee arthroplasty. Computer Aided Surgery. 2012, 17(4):205-10.

Poultisides LA, Sioros V, Anderson JA, Bruni D, Beksac, Sculco TP. Ten- to 15-year clinical and radiographic results for a compression molded monoblock elliptical acetabular component. The Journal of Arthroplasty. December 2012, 27(10):1850-56.

Nam D, Maher PA, Rebolledo BJ, Su EP. A comparison of two resurfacing arthroplasty implants: medium-term clinical and radiographic results. Hip International. 2012 Sep-Oct;22(5):566-73.

Poultsides LA, Ma Y, González Della Valle A, Chiu YL, Sculco TP, Memtsoudis SG. In-hospital surgical site infections after primary hip and knee arthroplasty – incidence and risk factors. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2013 Mar;28(3):385-89.

Nam D, Maher PA, Robles A, McLawhorn AS, Mayman DJ. Variability in the relationship between the distal femoral mechanical and anatomical axes in patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2013 May;28(5):798-801. Nam D, McArthur BA, Cross MB, Pearle AD, Mayman DJ, Haas SB. Patient-specific instrumentation in total knee arthroplasty: a review. Journal of Knee Surgery. 2012 Jul;25(3):213-19. Nam D, Sculco PK, Abdel MP, Alexiades MM, Figgie MP, Mayman DJ. Leg-length inequalities following THA based on surgical technique. Orthopedics. 2013 Apr 1;36(4):e395-400. Nam D, Weeks KD, Reinhardt KR, Nawabi DH, Cross MB, Mayman DJ. Accelerometer-based, portable navigation vs imageless, large-console computer-assisted navigation in total knee arthroplasty: a comparison of radiographic results. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2013 Feb;28(2):255-61. Nawabi DH, Conditt MA, Ranawat AS, Dunbar NJ, Jones J, Banks S, Padgett DE. Haptically guided robotic technology in total hip arthroplasty: a cadaveric investigation. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H. 2013 Mar;227(3):302-9. Nawabi DH, Gold S, Lyman S, Fields K, Padgett DE, Potter HG. MRI predicts ALVAL and tissue damage in metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 Jan 26. [Epub ahead of print] Nawabi DH, Hayter CL, Su EP, Koff MF, Perino G, Gold SL, Koch KM, Potter HG. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in symptomatic versus asymptomatic subjects following metal-onmetal hip resurfacing arthroplasty. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2013 May 15;95(10):895-902. Osagie L, Figgie MP, Bostrom MP. Custom total hip arthroplasty in skeletal dysplasia. International Orthopaedics. 2012 Mar;36(3): 527-31. Padgett DE, Cottrell J, Kelly N, Gelber J, Farrell C, Wright TM. Retrieval analysis of nonmodular constrained tibial inserts after primary total knee replacement. Orthopedic Clinics of North America. 2012 Nov;43(5):e39-43.

44

Padgett DE, Wright TM. That’s why we call it BIOmechanics! Commentary on an article by H. John Cooper, MD, et al.: Adverse local tissue reaction arising from corrosion at the remoral neck-body junction in a dual-taper stem with a cobalt-chromium modular neck. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2013 May 15;95(10):e711-12.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

Purdue EP, Levin AS, Ren K, Sculco TP, Wang D, Goldring SR. Development of polymeric nanocarrier system for early detection and targeted therapeutic treatment of peri-implant osteolysis. HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery. 2013 Feb;9(1):79-85. Ranawat AS, Meftah M, Rodriguez S, Ranawat CS. The incidence of anterior knee pain and crepitation after total knee replacement: a matched pair analysis between rotating platform and fixed bearing posterior stabilized designs. Journal of ASTM International. 2012 Mar; STP 1531:46-54. Ranawat CS, Meftah M, Windsor EN, Ranawat AS. Cementless fixation in total knee arthroplasty: down the boulevard of broken dreams – affirms. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Br). 2012 Nov;94(11 Suppl A):82-84. Rebolledo BJ, Gladnick BP, Nguyen JT, Sculco TP, Cornell CN, Lane JM. Does vitamin D status affect the attainment of in-hospital functional milestones after total hip arthroplasty? The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2012 March 27(3): 482-89. Robinson M, Bornstein L, Mennear B, Bostrom MP, Nestor BJ, Padgett DE, Westrich GH. Effect of restoration of combined offset on stability of large head THR. Hip International. 2012 May-June;22(3):248-53. Schneppendahl J, Grassmann JP, Petrov V, Boettner F, Koerbl B, Hakimi M, Betsch M, Windolf J, Wild M. Decreasing mortality after femoral neck fracture treated with bipolar hemiarthroplasty during the last twenty years. International Orthopaedics. 2012; 36(10): 2021-26. Sculco TP. Local infiltration analgesia reduced postoperative morphine consumption and provided better pain relief than intrathecal morphine after total knee arthroplasty. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2012 Aug 15;94(16):1511-13. Sculco TP. Intraoperative periarticular infiltration of levobupivacaine reduced morphine consumption in the first twelve hours after total hip arthroplasty. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2012 Aug 15;94(16):1512-13.


Sculco TP, Sculco PK. Orthopaedic crossfire: contemporary technologies. Simultaneous-bilateral TKA. Double troubleopposes. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2012 November 94(11):93-94. Stoner K, Jerabek SA, Tow S, Wright TM, Padgett DE. Rotating platform has surface damage advantage over fixed-bearing TKA. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 Jan;471(1):76-85. Su EP. Fixed flexion deformity and total knee arthroplasty. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Br). 2012 Nov;94 (11 Suppl A):112-15. Su EP, Perna M, Boettner F, Mayman DJ, Gerlinger T, Barsoum W, Randolph J, Lee G. A prospective, multicenter, randomised trial to evaluate the efficacy of a cryopneumatic device on total knee arthroplasty recovery. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Br). 2012; 94 (11 Suppl):153-56. Su EP, Su SL. 5 points on hip resurfacing. American Journal of Orthopedics. 2012 Oct;41(10):446-49. Thakur RR, Ast MP, McGraw M, Bostrom MP, Rodriguez JA, Parks ML. Severe persistent synovitis after cobalt-chromium total knee arthroplasty requiring revision. Orthopedics. 2013 Apr 1;36(4):e520-24. Unnanuntana A, Saleh A, Nguyen JT, Sculco TP, Cornell CN, Mancuso CA, Lane JM. Low vitamin D status does not adversely affect short-term functional outcome after total hip arthroplasty. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2013 Feb;28(2):315-22. Vulcano E, Gesell M, Esposito A, Ma Y, Memtsoudis S, Gonzรกlez Della Valle A. Multimodal thromboprophylaxis with preferential use of aspirin for elective hip and knee arthroplasty. International Orthopaedics. 2012;36(10):1995-2002. Vaidya SV, Gadhiya RM, Bagaria V, Ranawat AS, Ranawat CS. Computed tomographic evaluation of femoral component rotation in total knee arthroplasty. Indian Journal of Orthopaedics. 2013 Jan;47(1):40-44. Vulcano E, Lee YY, Yamany T, Lyman S, Gonzรกlez Della Valle A. Obese patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty have distinct preoperative characteristics. An institutional study of 4,718 patients. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2013 Mar 21. [Epub ahead of print] Vulcano E, Memtsoudis S, Gonzรกlez Della Valle A. Bilateral total knee arthroplasty guidelines: are we there yet? Journal of Knee Surgery. 2013 [Epub ahead of print] Wang JL, Gadinsky NE, Yeager JM, Lyman S, Westrich GH. The increased utilization of operating room time in patients with increased BMI during primary total hip arthroplasty. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2013 Apr;28(4):680-83. Yadeau JT, Goytizolo EA, Padgett DE, Liu SS, Mayman DJ, Ranawat AS, Rade MC, Westrich GH. Analgesia after total knee replacement: local infiltration versus epidural combined with a femoral nerve blockade: a prospective, randomised pragmatic trial. The Bone & Joint Journal. 2013 May;95-B(5):629-35.

Yadeau JT, Tedore T, Goytizolo EA, Kim DH, Green DS, Westrick A, Fan R, Rade MC, Ranawat AS, Coleman SH, Kelly BT. Lumbar plexus blockade reduces pain after hip arthroscopy: a prospective randomised controlled trial. Anesthesia & Analgesia. 2012 Oct;115(4):968-72. Yang X, Willie BM, Beach JM, Wright TM, van der Meulen MC, Bostrom MP. Trabecular bone adaptation to loading in a rabbit model is not magnitude-dependent. Journal of Orthopaedic Research. 2013 Jun;31(6):930-34. Foot and Ankle Service

Baksh N, Hannon CP, Murawski CD, Smyth NA, Kennedy JG. Platelet-rich plasma in tendon models: a systematic review of basic science literature. Arthroscopy. 2013 Mar;29(3):596-607. Chan JY, Elliott AJ, Ellis SJ. Reconstruction of Achilles re-rupture with peroneus longus tendon transfer. Foot & Ankle International. 2013 Feb 4. [Epub ahead of print] Chan JY, Williams BR, Nair P, Young E, Sofka C, Deland JT, Ellis SJ. The contribution of medializing calcaneal osteotomy on hindfoot alignment in the reconstruction of the stage II adult acquired flatfoot deformity. Foot & Ankle International. 2013 Feb;34(2):159-66. Chen L, Lyman S, Do H, Karlsson J, Adam SP, Young E, Deland JT, Ellis SJ. Validation of foot and ankle outcome score for hallux valgus. Foot & Ankle International. 2012 Dec;33(12):1145-55. Deland JT. Spring ligament complex and flatfoot deformity: curse or blessing? Foot & Ankle International. 2012 Mar;33(3):239-43. Deland JT, Williams BR. Surgical management of hallux rigidus. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2012 Jun;20(6):347-58. Drakos MC, Taylor SA, Fabricant PD, Haleem AM. Synthetic playing surfaces and athlete health. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2013 May;21(5):293-302. Ellis SJ. Peritalar Symposium: determining the talus orientation and deformity of planovalgus feet using weight-bearing multiplanar axial imaging. Foot & Ankle International. 2012 May;33(5):444-49. Ellis SJ, Young E, Endo Y, Do H, Deland JT. Correction of multiplanar deformity of the second toe with metatarsophalangeal release and extensor brevis reconstruction. Foot & Ankle International. 2013 Feb 7. [Epub ahead of print] Fansa AM, Smyth NA, Murawski CD, Kennedy JG. The lateral dorsal cutaneous branch of the sural nerve: clinical importance of the surgical approach to proximal fifth metatarsal fracture fixation. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2012. 40(8):1895-98.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

45


2012-2013 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Hannon CP, Baksh N, Newman H, Murawski CD, Smyth NA, Kennedy JG. A systematic review on the reporting of outcome data in studies on autologous osteochondral transplantation for the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus. Foot & Ankle Specialist. 2013 Jun;6(3):226-31. Hannon CP, Murawski CD, Fansa AM, Smyth NA, Kennedy JG. Microfracture for osteochondral lesions of the talus: a systematic review of reporting of outcome data. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 Mar;41(3):689-95. Hannon CP, Murawski CD, Smyth NA, Kennedy JG. Critical defect size for osteochondral lesions of the talus: letter to the editor. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2012 Sep; 40(9):NP23-24. Hillstrom HJ, Song J, Kraszewski AP, Hafer JF, Mootanah R, Dufour AB, Chow BS, Deland JT. Foot Type Biomechanics Part 1: structure and function of the asymptomatic foot. Gait & Posture. 2013 Mar;37(3):445-51. Kennedy JG, Smyth NA, Fansa AM, Murawski CD. Anatomic lateral ligament reconstruction in the ankle: a hybrid technique in the athletic population. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2012 Oct;40(10):2309-17. Krych AJ, Richman D, Drakos MC, Barnes RP, Cammisa FP, Warren RF. Epidural steroid injection for lumbar disc herniation in NFL athletes. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. February 2012; 44(2):193-98. Lee HH, O’Malley MJ, Friel NA, Chu CR. Effects of doxycycline on mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis and cartilage repair. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage. 2013 Feb;21(2):385-93. Lee KT, Kim KC, Park YU, Park SM, Lee YK, Deland JT. Midterm outcome of modified Kidner procedure. Foot & Ankle International. 2012;33(2):122-27. Ling JS, Ross KA, Hannon CP, Egan C, Smyth NA, Hogan MV, Kennedy JG. A plantar closing wedge osteotomy of the medial cuneiform for residual forefoot supination in flatfoot reconstruction. Foot & Ankle International. 2013 Apr 26. [Epub ahead of print] Malzberg AB, Vulcano E, O’Malley MJ, Deland JT, Ellis SJ. Costs and benefits of routine histopathological examination of hammertoe specimens. Foot & Ankle International. 2013 Apr;34(4):530-33. Mani SB, Brown HC, Nair P, Chen L, Do HT, Lyman S, Deland JT, Ellis SJ. Validation of the foot and ankle outcome score in adult acquired flatfoot deformity. Foot & Ankle International. 2013 Mar 19. [Epub ahead of print] Michael RJ, Ellis SJ, Roberts MM. Tibial plateau fracture following proximal tibia autograft harvest: a case report. Foot & Ankle International. 2012; Nov;33(11):1001-5. Mootanah R, Song J, Lenhoff MW, Hafer JF, Backus SI, Gagnon D, Deland JT, Hillstrom HJ. Foot Type Biomechanics Part 2: are structure and anthropometrics related to function? Gait & Posture. 2013 Mar;37(3):452-56.

46

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

Nemani V, Frank RM, Reinhardt KR, Pascual-Garrido C, Yanke AB, Drakos MC, Warren RF. Popliteal venotomy during posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the setting of a popliteal artery bypass graft. Arthroscopy. February 2012; 28(2): 294-99. O’Brien SJ, Taylor SA, DiPietro JR, Newman AM, Drakos MC, Voos JE. The arthroscopic “subdeltoid approach” to the anterior shoulder. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 2013 Apr;22(4):e6-10. O’Malley MJ, Basran HS, Gu Y, Sayres S, Deland JT. Treatment of advanced stages of hallux rigidus with cheilectomy and phalangeal osteotomy. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2013 Apr 3;95(7):606-10. Parlamas G, Hannon CP, Murawski CD, Smyth NA, Ma Y, Kerkhoffs GM, van Dijk CN, Karlsson J, Kennedy JG. Treatment of chronic syndesmotic injury: a systematic review and metaanalysis. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy. 2013 Apr 26. [Epub ahead of print] Ross KA, Smyth NA, Murawski CD, Kennedy JG. The biology of Ewing’s sarcoma. ISRN Oncology. 2013; 759725. Savage-Elliott I, Murawski CD, Smyth NA, Golano P, Kennedy JG. The deltoid ligament: an in-depth review of anatomy, function, and treatment strategies. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy. 2013 Jun;21(6):1316-27. Smyth NA, Fansa AM, Murawski CD, Kennedy JG. Platelet-rich plasma as a biological adjunct to the surgical treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus. Techniques in Foot & Ankle Surgery. 2012 March. 11(1): 18-25. Smyth NA, Murawski CD, Fortier LA, Cole BJ, Kennedy JG. Platelet-rich plasma in the pathologic processes of cartilage: review of basic science evidence. Arthroscopy. 2013 May 10. [Epub ahead of print] Smyth NA, Murawski CD, Haleem AM, Hannon CP, Savage-Elliott I, Kennedy JG. Establishing proof of concept: platelet-rich plasma and bone marrow aspirate concentrate may improve cartilage repair following surgical treatment for osteochondral lesions of the talus. World Journal of Orthopaedics. 2012 Jul 18;3(7):101-8. Smyth NA, Murawski CD, Levine DS, Kennedy JG. Hindfoot arthroscopic surgery for posterior ankle impingement: a systematic surgical approach and case series. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 May 29. [Epub ahead of print] Suero EM, Meyers KN, Bohne WH. Stability of the metatarsophalangeal joint of the lesser toes: a cadaveric study. Journal of Orthopaedic Research. 2012 Dec;30(12):1995-58. Taylor SA, Fabricant PD, Khair MM, Haleem AM, Drakos MC. A review of synthetic playing surfaces, the shoe-surface interface, and lower extremity injuries in athletes. The Physician and Sports Medicine. November 2012;40(4):66-72. Vosseller JT, Ellis SJ, Levine DS, Kennedy JG, Elliott AJ, Deland JT, Roberts MM, O’Malley MJ. Achilles tendon rupture in women. Foot & Ankle International. 2013 Jan;34(1):49-53.


Zwiers R, Wiegerinck JI, Murawski CD, Smyth NA, Kennedy JG, van Dijk CN. Surgical treatment for posterior ankle impingement. Arthroscopy. 2013 Mar 28. [Epub ahead of print] Hand and Upper Extremity Service

Carlson MG. Commentary on RCL/UCL injury in basketball. Hand Clinics. 2012 Aug; 28(3):373-75. Carlson MG. Commentary on scaphoid fractures in basketball. Hand Clinics. 2012 Aug; 28(3):281-72. Carlson MG. Elite athlete’s hand and wrist injury. Preface. Hand Clinics. 2012 Aug; 28(3):xv-xvi. Carlson MG, Hearns KA, Inkellis E, Leach ME. Early results of surgical intervention for elbow deformity in cerebral palsy based on degree of contracture. The Journal of Hand Surgery (Am). 2012 Aug;37(8):1665-71. Carlson MG, Warner KK, Meyers KN, Hearns KA, Kok PL. Anatomy of the thumb metacarpophalangeal ulnar and radial collateral ligaments. The Journal of Hand Surgery (Am). 2012 Oct; 37(10):2021-26. Carlson MG, Warner KK, Meyers KN, Hearns KA, Kok PL. Mechanics of an anatomical reconstruction for the thumb metacarpophalangeal collateral ligaments. The Journal of Hand Surgery (Am). 2013 Jan;38(1):117-23. Dy CJ, Daluiski A. Flexor pulley reconstruction. Hand Clinics. 2013 May;29(2):235-42. Dy CJ, Hernandez-Soria A, Ma Y, Roberts TR, Daluiski A. Complications after flexor tendon repair: a systematic review and meta-analysis. The Journal of Hand Surgery (Am). 2012 Mar; (3):543-551.e1. Dy CJ, Lange DJ, Jones KJ, Garg R, DiCarlo EF, Wolfe SW. Diagnostic biopsy of the pronator teres and a motor branch of the median nerve: indications and technique. The Journal of Hand Surgery (Am). 2012 Dec;37(12):2570-75. Dy CJ, Rosenblatt L, Lee SK. Current methods and biomechanics of extensor tendon repairs. Hand Clinics. 2013 May;29(2):261-68. Dy CJ, Schmicker T, Tran Q, Chadwick B, Daluiski A. The use of a tablet computer to complete the DASH questionnaire. The Journal of Hand Surgery (Am). 2012 Dec;37(12):2589-94. Dy CJ, Taylor SA, Patel RM, Kitay A, Roberts TR, Daluiski A. The effect of search term on the quality and accuracy of online information regarding distal radius fractures. The Journal of Hand Surgery (Am). 2012 Sep;37(9):1881-87. Dy CJ, Taylor SA, Patel RM, McCarthy MM, Roberts TR, Daluiski A. Does the quality, accuracy, and readability of information about lateral epicondylitis on the Internet vary with the search term used? HAND. 2012 Dec; 7(4):420-25. Dy CJ, Tucker SM, Kok PL, Hearns KA, Carlson MG. Anatomy of the radial collateral ligament of the index metacarpophalangeal joint. The Journal of Hand Surgery (Am). 2013 Jan;38(1):124-28.

Egidy CC, Fufa D, Kendoff D, Daluiski A. Hinged external fixator placement at the elbow: navigated versus conventional technique. Computer Aided Surgery. 2012;17(6):294-99. Farfalli GL, Aponte-Tinao LA, Ayerza MA, Muscolo DL, Boland PJ, Morris CD, Athanasian EA, Healey JH. Comparison between constrained and semiconstrained knee allograft-prosthesis composite reconstructions. Sarcoma. 2013;2013:489652. [Epub ahead of print] Gay DM, Lyman S, Do H, Hotchkiss RN, Marx RG, Daluiski A. Indications and reoperation rates for total elbow arthroplasty: an analysis of trends in New York State. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2012 Jan 18;94(2):110-17. Hadley SR, Lee SK. Perilunate injuries. Current Orthopaedic Practice. 2012;23(4):318-21. Healey JH, Morris CD, Athanasian EA, Boland PJ. Compress knee arthroplasty has 80% 10-year survivorship and novel forms of bone failure. Clincal Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 Mar;471(3):774-83. Henn K, Lee SK, Wolfe SW. Dynamic external fixation for proximal interphalangeal fracture-dislocations. Operative Techniques in Orthopedics. 2012;22(3):142-50. Kitay A, Swanstrom M, Schreiber JJ, Carlson MG, Nguyen JT, Weiland AJ, Daluiski A. Volar plate position and flexor tendon rupture following distal radius fracture fixation. The Journal of Hand Surgery (Am). 2013 Jun;38(6):1091-96. Kitay A, Wolfe SW. Scapholunate instability: current concepts in diagnosis and management. The Journal of Hand Surgery (Am). 2012 Oct;37(10):2175-96. Krych AJ, Kohen RB, Rodeo SA, Barnes RP, Warren RF, Hotchkiss RN. Acute brachialis muscle rupture caused by closed elbow dislocation in a professional American football player. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 2012 Jul;21(7):e1-5. Laino D, Petchprapa C, Lee SK. Ulnar variance: correlation of plain radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging with anatomic dissection. The Journal of Hand Surgery (Am). 2012;37A:90-97. Lee AT, Carlson MG. Thumb metacarpophalangeal joint collateral ligament injury management. Hand Clinics. 2012 Aug;28(3):361-70, ix-x. Lee AT, Schrumpf MA, Choi D, Meyers KN, Patel R, Wright TM, Hotchkiss RN, Daluiski A. The influence of gravity on the unstable elbow. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 2013 Jan;22(1):81-87. Lee SK. Modern tendon repairs in the hand. Hand Clinics. 2012;28:565-70. Lee SK. Tendon repair: flexor tendons zone I & II and extensor tendons. Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics. 2012;22:106-11. Lee SK, Kim KJ, Lee JW, Choy WS. Plate osteosynthesis versus intramedullary nailing for both forearm bones fractures. European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology. 2013 May 28. [Epub ahead of print]

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

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2012-2013 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Lee SK, Wolfe SW. Nerve transfers for the upper extremity: the new horizon in nerve reconstruction. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2012;20:506-17. Maak TG, Osei D, Delos D, Taylor S, Warren RF, Weiland AJ. Peripheral nerve injuries in sports-related surgery: presentation, evaluation, and management: AAOS exhibit selection. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2012 Aug 15;94(16): e1211-10. McCoy TH Jr, Kim HJ, Cross MB, Fragomen AT, Healey JH, Athanasian EA, Rozbruch SR. Bone tumor reconstruction with the Ilizarov method. Journal of Surgical Oncology. 2013 Mar;107(4):343-52. O’Shea K, Weiland AJ. Fractures of the hamate and pisiform bones. Hand Clinics. 2012 Aug;28(3):287-300. Schreiber JJ, Warren RF, Hotchkiss RN, Daluiski A. An online video investigation into the mechanism of elbow dislocation. The Journal of Hand Surgery (Am). 2013 Mar;38(3):488-94. Shifflett GD, Dy CJ, Daluiski A. Carpal tunnel surgery: patient preferences and predictors for satisfaction. Journal of Patient Preference and Adherence. 2012;6:685-89. Steensma M, Boland PJ, Morris CD, Athanasian EA, Healey JH. Endoprosthetic treatment is more durable for pathologic proximal femur fractures. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2012 Mar; 470 (3):920-26. Sapienza A, Yoon HK, Karia R, Lee SK. Flexor tendon excursion and load during passive and active simulated motion: a cadaver study. The Journal of Hand Surgery (Eur). 2012 Dec 6. [Epub ahead of print] Tang JB, Amadio PC, Boyer MI, Savage R, Zhao C, Sandow M, Lee SK, Wolfe SW. Current practice of primary flexor tendon repair: a global view. Hand Clinics. 2013 May;29(2):179-89. Tang JB, Lee SK. Intrinsic tendon healing and staged tendon reconstruction: reflection of legends. Hand Clinics. 2013 May;29(2):311. Tang JB, Lee SK. Preface. Hand Clinics. 2013 May;29(2):xiii-xiv. Taylor SA, Osei DA, Jain S, Weiland AJ. Digital artery pseudoaneurysm following percutaneous trigger thumb release: a case report. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2012 Jan 18;94(2):e6. Weiland AJ. Boutonnière and pulley rupture in elite baseball players. Hand Clinics. 2012 Aug;28(3):447. Weiland AJ. Peripheral nerve injuries in sports-related surgery: presentation, evaluation, and management: AAOS exhibit selection. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2012 Aug 15;94(16):e1211-10.

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Wolfe SW, Strauss HL, Garg R, Feinberg J. Use of bioabsorbable nerve conduits as an adjunct to brachial plexus neurorrhaphy. The Journal of Hand Surgery (Am). 2012 Oct;37(10):1980-85. Limb Lengthening and Complex Reconstruction Service

Ashfaq K, Fragomen AT, Nguyen JT, Rozbruch SR. Correction of proximal tibia varus with external fixation. The Journal of Knee Surgery. 2012, 25(5):375-84. Fabricant PD, Camara JM, Rozbruch SR. Femoral deformity planning: intentional placement of the apex of deformity. Orthopedics. 2013 May 1;36(5):e533-37. Fragomen AT, Borst E, Schachter L, Lyman S, Rozbruch SR. Complex ankle arthrodesis using the Ilizarov method yields high rate of fusion. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2012 Oct;470(10):2864-73. Lesiak AC, Voseller JT, Rozbruch SR. Osteotomy, athrodesis, and arthroplasty for complex multiapical deformity of the leg. HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery. 2012 Oct;8(3):304-8. Mahboubian S, Seah M, Schachter L, Fragomen AT, Rozbruch SR. Femoral lengthening with lengthening over a nail has fewer complications than intramedullary skeletal kinetic distraction. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2012, 470(4):1221-31. McCarthy JJ, Iobst CA, Rozbruch SR, Sabharwal S, Eisman E. Limb Lengthening and Reconstruction Society AIM index reliably assesses lower limb deformity. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 Feb;471(2):621-27. McCoy TH, Goldman V, Fragomen AT, Rozbruch SR. Circular external fixator-assisted ankle arthrodesis following failed total ankle arthroplasty. Foot & Ankle International. 2012, 33(11):947-55. McCoy TH, Kim HJ, Cross MB, Fragomen AT, Healey JH, Athanasian EA, Rozbruch SR. Bone tumor reconstruction with the Ilizarov method. Journal of Surgical Oncology. 2013 Mar;107(4):343-52. Pawar A, Dikmn G, Fragomen AT, Rozbruch SR. Use of an antibiotic coated nail for fusion of infected Charcot ankles. Foot & Ankle International. 2013;34(1):80-84. Pawar A, McCoy TH, Fragomen AT, Rozbruch SR. Does humeral lengthening with monolateral fixation improve function? Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 2013 Jan;471(1):277-83.

Weiland AJ. Treatment of fracture of hook of the hamate in baseball players. Hand Clinics. 2012 Aug;28(3):301.

Rozbruch SR, Fryman C, Schachter LF, Bigman D, Marx RG. Growth arrest of the tibia after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: lengthening and deformity correction with the Taylor Spatial Frame. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 Jul;41(7):1636-41.

Wolfe SW, Garcia-Elias M, Kitay A. Carpal instability nondissociative. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2012 Sep;20(9):575-85.

Smith N, Beaman D, Rozbruch SR, Glazebrook M. Evidencebased indications for distraction ankle arthroplasty. Foot & Ankle International. 2012, 33:632-36.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery


Metabolic Bone Disease/ Musculoskeletal Oncology Service

Bargman R, Posham R, Boskey AL, Carter E, DiCarlo E, Verdelis K, Raggio CL, Pleshko N. High- and low-dose OPG-Fc cause osteopetrosis-like changes in infant mice. Pediatric Research. 2012 Nov;72(5):495-501. Bargman R, Posham R, Boskey AL, DiCarlo E, Raggio CL, Pleshko N. Comparable outcomes in fracture reduction and bone properties with RANKL inhibition and alendronate treatment in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta. Osteoporosis International. 2012 Mar;23(3):1141-50. Borrelli J, Pape C, Hak D, Hsu J, Lin S, Giannoudis P, Lane JM. Physiological challenges of bone repair. Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. 2012;26:708-11. Boskey AL, Lukashova L, Spevak L, Ma Y, Khan SR. The kidney sodium-phosphate co-transporter alters bone quality in an age and gender specific manner. Bone. 2013 Apr;53(2):546-53. Burket JC, Brooks DJ, MacLeay JM, Baker SP, Boskey AL, van der Meulen MC. Variations in nanomechanical properties and tissue composition within trabeculae from an ovine model of osteoporosis and treatment. Bone. 2013 Jan;52(1):326-36. Burton L, Paget D, Binder NB, Bohnert K, Nestor BJ, Sculco TP, Santambrogio L, Ross FP, Goldring SR, Purdue PE. Orthopedic wear debris mediated inflammatory osteolysis is mediated in part by NALP3 inflammasome activation. Journal of Orthopaedic Research. 2013 Jan;31(1):73-80. Busaidy NL, Farooki A, Dowlati A, Perentesis JP, Dancey JE, Doyle LA, Brell JM, Siu LL. Management of metabolic effects associated with anticancer agents targeting the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway. Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2012 Aug 10;30(23): 2919-28. Coleman RM, Aguilera L, Quinones L, Lukashova L, Poirier C, Boskey AL. Comparison of bone tissue properties in mouse models with collagenous and non-collagenous genetic mutations using FTIRI. Bone. 2012 Nov;51(5):920-28. Donnelly E, Meredith DS, Nguyen JT, Boskey AL. Bone tissue composition varies across anatomic sites in the proximal femur and the iliac crest. Journal of Orthopaedic Research. 2012 May;30(5):700-6. Donnelly E, Meredith DS, Nguyen JT, Gladnick BP, Rebolledo BJ, Shaffer AD, Lorich DG, Lane JM, Boskey AL. Reduced cortical bone compositional heterogeneity with bisphosphonate treatment in postmenopausal women with intertrochanteric and subtorchanteric fractures. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2012: 672-78. Donnelly E, Saleh A, Unnanuntana A, Lane JM. Atypical femoral fractures: epidemiology, etiology, and patient management. Current Opinion: Supportive and Palliative Care. 2012; (6);3;348-54.

Dorvee JR, Boskey AL, Estroff LA. Rediscovering hydrogelbased double-diffusion systems for studying biomineralization. CrystEngComm. 2012 Jan 1;14(18):5681-700. Doyle JR, Lane JM, Beinborn M, Kopin AS. Naturally occurring HCA1 missense mutations result in loss of function: potential impact on lipid deposition. The Journal of Lipid Research. 2013 Mar;54(3):823-30. Dy CJ, Dossous PM, Ton QV, Hollenberg JP, Lorich DG, Lane JM. The medical orthopaedic trauma service: an innovative multidisciplinary team model that decreases in-hospital complications in patients with hip fractures. Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. 2012 Jun;26(6):379-83. Fabricant PD, Dy CJ, Patel RM, Blanco JS, Doyle SM. Internet search term affects the quality and accuracy of online information about developmental hip dysplasia. Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics. 2013 Jun;33(4):361-65. Goldring SR. Alterations in periarticular bone and cross talk between subchondral bone and articular cartilage in osteoarthritis. Therapeutic Advances in Musculoskeletal. 2012 Aug;4(4):249-58. Goldring SR, Purdue PE, Crotti TN, Shen Z, Flannery MR, Binder NB, Ross FP, McHugh KP. Bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases. 2013 Apr;72 Suppl 2:ii52-5. Gourion-Arsiquaud S, Lukashova L, Power J, Loveridge N, Reeve J, Boskey AL. Fourier transform infrared imaging of femoral neck bone: reduced heterogeneity of mineral-to-matrix and carbonate-to-phosphate and more variable crystallinity in treatment-naive fracture cases compared with fracturefree controls. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2013 Jan;28(1):150-61. Guang LG, Boskey AL, Zhu W. Regulatory role of stromal cell-derived factor-1 in bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced chondrogenic differentiation in vitro. The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology. 2012 Nov;44(11):1825-33. Hirsch BP, Unnanuntana A, Cunningham ME, Lane JM. The effect of therapies for osteoporosis on spine fusion: a systematic review. The Spine Journal. 2013 Feb;13(2):190-99. Kacena MA, Gundberg CM, Kacena WJ 3rd, Landis WJ, Boskey AL, Bouxsein ML, Horowitz MC. The effects of GATA-1 and NF-E2 deficiency on bone biomechanical, biochemical, and mineral properties. Journal of Cellular Physiology. 2013 Jan 28. [Epub ahead of print] Kim G, Boskey AL, Baker SP, van der Meulen MC. Improved prediction of rat cortical bone mechanical behavior using composite beam theory to integrate tissue level properties. Journal of Biomechanics. 2012 Nov;15;45(16):2784-90. Ko FC, Dragomir C, Plumb DA, Goldring SR, Wright TM, Goldring MB, van der Meulen MC. In vivo cyclic compression causes cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone changes in mouse tibiae. Arthritis & Rheumatism. 2013 Jun;65(6):1569-78.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

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2012-2013 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Lane JM. CORR Insights®: Does early functional outcome predict 1-year mortality in elderly patients with hip fracture? Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 Apr 19. [Epub ahead of print] Lane JM, McKiernan F, McKinney R, Ng A, Nieves J, O’Keefe R, Papapoulos S, Howe TS, van der Meulen MC, Weinstein RS, Whyte MP. Atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures: second report of a task force of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2013 May 28. [Epub ahead of print] Macdonald DE, Rapuano BE, Vyas P, Lane JM, Meyers K, Wright TM. Heat and radiofrequency plasma glow discharge pretreatment of a titanium alloy promote bone formation and osseointegration. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry. 2013 May 3. [Epub ahead of print] Mait J, Perino G, Lane JM. Multimodality treatment of a multifocal osteoblastoma-like tumor of the lower extremity: a case report. Skeletal Radiology. 2012:1345-46. Memtsoudis SG, Hargett M, Russell LA, Parvizi J, Cats-Baril WL, Stundner O, Sculco TP; for the Consensus Conference on Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty Group. Consensus statement from the Consensus Conference on Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty Group. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 Apr 6. [Epub ahead of print] Morris PG, Fazio M, Farooki A, Estilo C, Mallam D, Conlin A, Patil S, Fleisher M, Cremers S, Huryn J, Hudis CA, Fornier MN. Serum N-telopeptide and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase levels in patients with osteonecrosis of the jaw receiving bisphosphonates for bone metastases. Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. 2012 Dec;70(12):2768-75. Newton PT, Staines KA, Spevak L, Boskey AL, Teixeira CC, Macrae VE, Canfield AE, Farquharson C. Chondrogenic ATDC5 cells: an optimized model for rapid and physiological matrix mineralisation. International Journal of Mollecular Medicine. 2012 Nov;30(5):1187-93. Park-Min KH, Lee EY, Moskowitz NK, Lim E, Lee SK, Lorenzo JA, Huang C, Melnick AM, Purdue PE, Goldring SR, Ivashkiv LB. Negative regulation of osteoclast precursor differentiation by CD11b and β2 integrin-B-cell lymphoma 6 signaling. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2013 Jan;28(1):135-49. Paul O, Barker JU, Lane JM, Helfet DL, Lorich DG. Functional and radiographic outcomes of intertrochanteric hip fractures treated with calcar reduction, compression, and trochanteric entry nailing. Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. 2012 Mar;26(3):148-54. Poundarik AA, Diab T, Sroga GE, Ural A, Boskey AL, Gundberg CM, Vashishth D. Dilatational band formation in bone. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA. 2012 Nov 20;109(47):19178-83. Prasarn ML, Ahn J, Helfet DL, Lane JM, Lorich DG. Bisphosphonate-associated femur fractures have high complication rates with operative fixation. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2012;470:2295-301.

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Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

Rauck RC, LaMont LE, Doyle SM. Pediatric upper extremity stress injuries. Current Opinion in Pediatrics. 2013 Feb;25(1):40-45. Rapuano BE, Singh H, Boskey AL, Doty SB, Macdonald DE. Effects of heat and radiofrequency plasma glow discharge pretreatment of a titanium alloy on mineral formation in MC3T3 osteoprogenitor cell cultures: evidence for enhanced osteoinductive properties. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry. 2013 Mar 13. [Epub ahead of print] Rebolledo BJ, Gladnick BP, Unnanuntana A, Nguyen JT, Kepler CK, Lane JM. Comparison of unipedicular and bipedicular balloon kyphoplasty for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures: a prospective randomized study. The Bone and Joint Journal. 2013 Mar;95-B(3):401-6. Reinhart K, Lazaro LE, Cross M, Ben-Paul NU, Lane JM, Helfet DL, Lorich DG. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D and calcium in low-energy patella fractures. HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery. 2012 Feb;9(1):17-20. Ricciardi BF, Paul J, Kim A, Russell LA, Lane JM. Osteoporosis drug therapy strategies in the setting of disease-modifying agents for autoimmune disease. Osteoporosis International. 2013 Feb;24(2):423-32. Ritter SY, Subbaiah R, Bebek G, Crish J, Scanzello CR, Krastins B, Sarracino D, Lopez MF, Crow MK, Aigner T, Goldring MB, Goldring SR, Lee DM, Gobezie R, Aliprantis AO. Proteomic analysis of synovial fluid from the osteoarthritic knee: comparison with transcriptome analyses of joint tissues. Arthritis & Rheumatism. 2013 Apr;65(4):981-92. Saleh A, Hegde VV, Potty AG, Lane JM. Bisphosphonate therapy and atypical fractures. Orthopedic Clinics of North America. 2013 Apr;44(2):137-51. Saleh A, Hegde VV, Potty AG, Schneider R, Cornell CN, Lane JM. Management strategy for symptomatic bisphosphonateassociated incomplete atypical femoral fractures. HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery. 2012 July;8(2)103-10. Saleh A, Vyas PA, Lane JM. Commentary: hypovitaminosis D in patients undergoing kyphoplasty is associated with increased risk of subsequent vertebral fractures. The Spine Journal. 2012 Apr;12(4):313-14. Schneider R. Imaging of osteoporosis. Rheumatic Disease Clinics of North America. 2013 Aug;39(3):609-31. Shane E, Ebeling PR, Abrahamsen B, Adler RA, Brown TD, Cheung AM, Cosman F, Curtis JR, Dell R, Dempster DW, Einhorn TA, Genant HK, Geusens P, Klaushofer K, Shindle MK, Endo Y, Warren RF, Lane JM, Helfet DL, Schwartz EN, Ellis SJ. Stress fractures about the tibia, foot, and ankle. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2012 Mar;20(3):167-76.


Silvano A, Libanati C, Boonen S, Cummings SR, Ho, Pei-Ran, Wang, Siris E, Lane JM, and the FREEDOM Fracture Writing Group. Denosumab treatment in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis does not interfere with fracture-healing. Results from the FREEDOM Trial. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2012;94:2113-19. Spevak L, Flach CR, Hunter T, Mendelsohn R, Boskey AL. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging parameters describing acid phosphate substitution in biologic hydroxyapatite. Calcified Tissue International. 2013 May;92(5):418-28. Strachna O, Torrecilla D, Reumann MK, Serganova I, Kim J, Gieschler S, Boskey AL, Blasberg RG, Mayer-Kuckuk P. Molecular imaging of the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF) in femoral bone grafts transplanted into living mice. Cell Transplantation. 2013 Apr 12. [Epub ahead of print] Unnanuntana A, Ashfaq K, Ton QV, Kleimeyer JP, Lane JM. The effect of long-term alendronate treatment on cortical thickness of the proximal femur. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2012 Jan;470(1):291-98. Unnanuntana A, Saleh A, Mensah KA, Kleimeyer JP, Lane JM. Atypical femoral fractures: what do we know about them?: AAOS Exhibit Selection. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2013 Jan 16;95(2):e8 1-13.

Berkes MB, Little MT, Lazaro LE, Cymerman RM, Pardee NC, Helfet DL, Dines JS, Lorich DG. Intramedullary allograft fibula as a reduction and fixation tool for treatment of complex proximal humerus fractures with diaphyseal extension. Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. 2013 May 15. [Epub ahead of print] Berkes MB, Little MT, Lorich DG. Open reduction internal fixation of proximal humerus fractures. Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine. 2013 Mar;6(1):47-56. Berkes MB, Little MT, Pardee NC, Lazaro LE, Helfet DL, Lorich DG. Defining the lateral and accessory views of the patella: an anatomic and radiographic study with implications for fracture treatment. Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. 2013 May 15. [Epub ahead of print] Berkes MB, Little MT, Schottel PC, Pardee NC, Zuiderbaan A, Lazaro LE, Helfet DL, Lorich DG. Outcomes of Schatzker II tibial plateau fracture open reduction internal fixation using structural bone grafts. Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. 2013 May 20. [Epub ahead of print] Borrelli J, Pape C, Hak D, Hsu J, Lin S, Giannoudis P, Lane JM. Physiological challenges of bone repair. Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. 2012;26:708-11. Chambers L, Dines JS, Lorich DG, Dines DM. Hemiarthroplasty for proximal humerus fractures. Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine. 2013 Mar;6(1):57-62.

Unnanuntana A, Saleh A, Nguyen JT, Sculco TP, Cornell CN, Mancuso CA, Lane JM. Low vitamin D status does not adversely affect short-term functional outcome after total hip arthroplasty. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2013 Feb;28(2):315-22.

Donnelly E, Saleh A, Unnanuntana A, Lane JM. Atypical femoral fractures: epidemiology, etiology, and patient management. Current Opinion: Supportive and Palliative Care. 2012; (6);3;348-54.

van der Meulen MC, Boskey AL. Atypical subtrochanteric femoral shaft fractures: role for mechanics and bone quality. Arthritis Research & Therapy. 2012 Aug 29;14(4):220.

Doyle JR, Lane JM, Beinborn M, Kopin AS. Naturally occurring HCA1 missense mutations result in loss of function: potential impact on lipid deposition. The Journal of Lipid Research. 2013 Mar;54(3):823-30.

Wei X, Pushalkar S, Estilo C, Wong C, Farooki A, Fornier M, Bohle G, Huryn J, Li Y, Doty S, Saxena D. Molecular profiling of oral microbiota in jawbone samples of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw. Oral Diseases. 2012 Sep;18(6):602-12. Orthopaedic Trauma Service

Dy CJ, Little MTM, Berkes MB, Ma Y, Roberts TR, Helfet DL, Lorich DG. A meta-analysis of reoperation, nonunion and infection after open-reduction and internal fixation of patella fractures. The Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery. 2012 Oct;73(4):928-32.

Amorosa LF, Buirs LD, Bexkens R, Wellman DS, Kloen P, Lorich DG, Helfet DH. A single stage treatment protocol for presumptive aseptic diaphysealnonunions: a review of outcomes. Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. 2013 May 17. [Epub ahead of print]

Fabricant PD, Hirsch BP, Holmes I, Kelly BT, Lorich DG, Helfet DL, Bogner EA, Green DW. A radiographic study of the ossification of the posterior wall of the acetabulum: implications for the diagnosis of pediatric and adolescent hip disorders. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2013 Feb 6;95(3):230-36.

Asprinio DE, Issack PS. Lateral tibial plateau fracture with a displaced posterolateral fragment and fibular head entrapment. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery Case Connector. 2012;2(4):1-7.

Helfet DL, Suk M, Hanson BP, Da Faoite D. Shift needed in evidence-based medicine. Guest editorial. The American Journal of Orthopaedics. 2012 Sept;41(9)396, 412.

Berkes MB, Little MT, Lazaro LE, Cymerman R, Daigl M, Sculco PK, Helfet DL, Lorich DG. Malleolar fractures and their ligamentous equivalents have similar outcomes in supination external rotation Type IV ankle fractures with an anatomic fixation strategy. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Br). 2012 Nov;94(11):1567-72.

Hirsch BP, Unnanuntana A, Cunningham ME, Lane JM. The effect of therapies for osteoporosis on spine fusion: a systematic review. The Spine Journal. 2013 Feb;13(2):190-99. Khmelnitskaya E, Lamont L, Taylor S, Lorich DG, Dines DM, Dines JS. Evaluation and management of proximal humeral fractures. Advances in Orthopedics. 2012 Dec. [Epub ahead of print]

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

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2012-2013 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Krych AJ, Lorich DG, Kelly BT. Osteochondral autograft transfer for a posttraumatic osteochondral defect of the femoral head. American Journal of Orthopedics. 2012 Oct;41(10):472-76. Lane JM. CORR InsightsŽ: Does early functional outcome predict 1-year mortality in elderly patients with hip fracture? Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 Apr 19. [Epub ahead of print] Lane JM, McKiernan F, McKinney R, Ng A, Nieves J, O’Keefe R, Papapoulos S, Howe TS, van der Meulen MC, Weinstein RS, Whyte MP. Atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures: second report of a task force of the American society for bone and mineral research. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2013 May 28. [Epub ahead of print] Lazaro LE, Wellman DS, Pardee NC, Gardner MJ, Toro JB, MacIntyre NR, Helfet DL, Lorich DG. Effect of computerized tomography on classification and treatment plan for patella fractures. Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. 2013 Jun;27(6):336-44. Little MT, Berkes MB, Lazaro LE, Sculco PK, Cymerman RM, Pardee N, Helfet DL, Lorich DG. Comparison of supination external rotation type IV ankle fractures in geriatric versus nongeriatric populations. Foot & Ankle International. 2013 Apr;34(4):512-17. Little MT, Berkes MB, Lazaro LE, Sculco PK, Helfet DL, Lorich DG. Complications following treatment of supination external rotation ankle fractures through the posterolateral approach. Foot & Ankle International. 2013 Apr;34(4):523-29. Macdonald DE, Rapuano BE, Vyas P, Lane JM, Meyers K, Wright TM. Heat and radiofrequency plasma glow discharge pretreatment of a titanium alloy promote bone formation and osseointegration. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry. 2013 May 3. [Epub ahead of print] Mait J, Perino G, Lane JM. Multimodality treatment of a multifocal osteoblastoma-like tumor of the lower extremity: a case report. Skeletal Radiology. 2012:1345-46. Prasarn ML, Ahn J, Helfet DL, Lane JM, Lorich DG. Bisphosphonate-associated femur fractures have high complication rates with operative fixation. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2012 Aug;470(8):2295-301. Prasarn ML, Helfet DL, Kloen P. Management of the mangled extremity. Strategies in Trauma and Limb Reconstruction. 2012 Aug;7(2):57-66. Rebolledo BJ, Gladnick BP, Unnanuntana A, Nguyen JT, Kepler CK, Lane JM. Comparison of unipedicular and bipedicular balloon kyphoplasty for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures: a prospective randomised study. The Bone and Joint Journal. 2013 Mar;95-B(3):401-6. Reinhart KR, Lazaro LE, Ben-Paul NU, Cross MB, Helfet DL, Lane JM, Lorich DG. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D and calcium in low-energy patella fractures. HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery. 2013 Feb;9(1):17-20.

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Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

Ricciardi BF, Paul J, Kim A, Russell LA, Lane JM. Osteoporosis drug therapy strategies in the setting of disease-modifying agents for autoimmune disease. Osteoporosis International. 2013 Feb;24(2):423-32. Saleh A, Hegde VV, Potty AG, Lane JM. Bisphosphonate therapy and atypical fractures. Orthopedic Clinics of North America. 2013 Apr;44(2):137-51. Saleh A, Hegde VV, Potty AG, Schneider R, Cornell CN, Lane JM. Management strategy for symptomatic bisphosphonateassociated incomplete atypical femoral fractures. HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery. 2012 July;8(2):103-110. Saleh A, Vyas PA, Lane JM. Commentary: hypovitaminosis D in patients undergoing kyphoplasty is associated with increased risk of subsequent vertebral fractures. The Spine Journal. 2012 Apr;12(4):313-14. Shane E, Ebeling PR, Abrahamsen B, Adler RA, Brown TD, Cheung AM, Cosman F, Curtis JR, Dell R, Dempster DW, Einhorn TA, Genant HK, Geusens P, Klaushofer K, Shindle MK, Endo Y, Warren RF, Lane JM, Helfet DL, Schwartz EN, Ellis SJ. Stress fractures about the tibia, foot, and ankle. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2012 Mar;20(3):167-76. Silvano A, Libanati C, Boonen S, Cummings SR, Ho, Pei-Ran, Wang, Siris E, Lane JM, and the FREEDOM Fracture Writing Group. Denosumab treatment in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis does not interfere with fracture-healing. Results from the FREEDOM Trial. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2012;94:2113-19. Unnanuntana A, Ashfaq K, Ton QV, Kleimeyer JP, Lane JM. The effect of long-term alendronate treatment on cortical thickness of the proximal femur. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2012 Jan;470(1):291-98. Unnanuntana A, Saleh A, Mensah KA, Kleimeyer JP, Lane JM. Atypical femoral fractures: what do we know about them?: AAOS Exhibit Selection. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2013 Jan 16;95(2):e8 1-13. Unnanuntana A, Saleh A, Nguyen JT, Sculco TP, Cornell CN, Mancuso CA, Lane JM. Low vitamin D status does not adversely affect short-term functional outcome after total hip arthroplasty. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2013 Feb;28(2):315-22. Unnanuntana A, Ton QV, Kleinmeyer JP, Nguyen JT, Lane JM. A fracture does not adversely affect bone mineral density responses after teriparatide treatment. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2012:470:927-36.


Pediatric Orthopaedic Service

Bargman R, Posham R, Boskey AL, Carter E, DiCarlo E, Verdelis K, Raggio CL, Pleshko N. High- and low-dose OPG-Fc cause osteopetrosis-like changes in infant mice. Pediatric Research. 2012 Nov;72(5):495-501. Blanco JS, Perlman SL, Cha HS, Delpizzo K. Multimodal pain management after spinal surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Orthopedics. 2013 Feb 1;36(2):33-35. Chen X, Raggio CL, Campagnola PJ. Second-harmonic generation circular dichroism studies of osteogenesis imperfecta. Optics Letters. 2012 Sep 15;37(18):3837-39. Clohisy JC, Baca G, Beaulé PE, Kim YJ, Larson CM, Millis MB, Podeszwa DA, Schoenecker PL, Sierra RJ, Sink EL, Sucato DJ, Trousdale RT, Zaltz I; ANCHOR Study Group. Descriptive epidemiology of femoroacetabular impingement: a North American cohort of patients undergoing surgery. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 Jun;41(6):1348-56. Dodwell ER. Osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children: current concepts. Current Opinion in Pediatrics. 2013 Feb;25(1):58-63. Dodwell ER, O’Callaghan J, Anthony A, Jellicoe P, Shah M, Curtis C, Clarke H, Hopyan S. Combined glenoid anteversion osteotomy and tendon transfers for brachial plexus birth palsy: early outcomes. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2012 Dec 5;94(23):2145-52. Dodwell ER, Snyder B, Wright J. Off-label use of bone morphogenetic proteins in pediatric spinal arthrodesis. The Journal of the American Medical Association. 2012 Oct 10; 308(14):1429-32. Fabricant PD, Dy CJ, Patel RM, Blanco JS, Doyle SM. Internet search term affects the quality and accuracy of online information about developmental hip dysplasia. Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics. 2013 Jun;33(4):361-65. Fabricant PD, Hirsch BP, Holmes I, Kelly BT, Lorich DG, Helfet DL, Bogner EA, Green DW. A radiographic study of the ossification of the posterior wall of the acetabulum: implications for the diagnosis of pediatric and adolescent hip disorders. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2013 Feb 6;95(3):230-36. Fabricant PD, Jones KJ, Delos D, Cordasco FA, Marx RG, Pearle AD, Warren RF, Green DW. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in the skeletally immature athlete: a review of current concepts: AAOS exhibit selection. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2013 Mar 6;95(5):e28. Giampietro PF, Raggio CL, Blank RD, McCarty C, Broeckel U, Pickart MA. Clinical, genetic and environmental factors associated with congenital vertebral malformations. Molecular Syndromology. 2013 Feb;4(1-2):94-105. Hesemann J, Lauer E, Ziska S, Noonan K, Nemeth B, ScottSchwoerer J, McCarty C, Rasmussen K, Goldberg JM, Sund S, Eickhoff J, Raggio CL, Giampietro PF. Analysis of maternal risk factors associated with congenital vertebral malformations. Spine. 2013 Mar 1;38(5):E293-98.

Heyworth BE, Osei DA, Fabricant PD, Schneider R, Doyle SM, Green DW, Widmann RF, Lyman S, Burke SW, Scher DM. The shorthand bone age assessment: a simpler alternative to current methods. Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics. 2013 Jul-Aug;33(5):569-74. Kepler CK, Pavlov H, Herzog RJ, Rawlins BA, Endo Y, Green DW. Comparison of a fluoroscopic 3-dimensional imaging system and conventional CT in detection of pars fractures in the cadaveric lumbar spine. Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques. 2012 Dec;25(8):429-32. Ladenhauf HN, Fabricant PD, Grossman E, Widmann RF, Green DW. Athletic participation in children with symptomatic spondylolysis in the New York area. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2013 Apr 3. [Epub ahead of print] McCarthy MM, Tucker S, Nguyen JT, Green DW, Imhauser CW, Cordasco FA. Contact stress and kinematic analysis of all-epiphyseal and over-the-top pediatric reconstruction techniques for the anterior cruciate ligament. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 Jun;41(6):1330-39. Milla SS, Coley BD, Karmazyn B, Dempsey-Robertson ME, Dillman JR, Dory CE, Garber M, Hayes LL, Keller MS, Meyer JS, Paidas C, Raske ME, Rigsby CK, Spottswood S, Strouse PJ, Widmann RF, Wootton-Gorges SL. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® limping child – ages 0 to 5 years. Journal of the American College of Radiology. 2012 Aug;9(8):545-53. Morakis E, Sink EL. Advances in hip preservation after slipped capital femoral epiphysis. Instructional Course Lectures. 2013;62:415-28. Pan N, Herzog R, Blanco JS, Nauseef WM, Jenkins S, Kovanlikaya A, Salvatore CM, Toussi SS. Candida albicans osteomyelitis in an infant: a case report and literature review. Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics B. 2013 Apr 17. [Epub ahead of print] Pascual-Garrido C, Moran CJ, Green DW, Cole BJ. Osteochondritis dissecans of the knee in children and adolescents. Current Opinion in Pediatrics. 2013 Feb;25(1):46-51. Rauck RC, LaMont LE, Doyle SM. Pediatric upper extremity stress injuries. Current Opinion in Pediatrics. 2013 Feb;25(1): 40-45. Shea KG, Sink EL, Jacobs JC Jr. Clinical practice guidelines and guideline development. Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics. 2012 Sep;32 Suppl 2:S95-100. Sink EL, Fabricant PD, Pan Z, Dayton MR, Novais E. Results of treatment of femoroacetabular impingement in adolescents with a surgical hip dislocation approach. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 May 8. [Epub ahead of print] Sink EL, Kim YJ. Femoroacetabular impingement: current clinical evidence. Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics 2012 Sep;32 Suppl 2:S166-71.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

53


2012-2013 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Sink EL, Leunig M, Zaltz I, Gilbert JC, Clohisy J; Academic Network for Conservational Hip Outcomes Research Group. Reliability of a complication classification system for orthopaedic surgery. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2012 Aug;470(8):2220-26.

Fabricant PD, Hirsch BP, Holmes I, Kelly BT, Lorich DG, Helfet DL, Bogner EA, Green DW. A radiographic study of the ossification of the posterior wall of the acetabulum: implications for the diagnosis of pediatric and adolescent hip disorders. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2013 Feb 6;95(3):230-36.

Sink EL, Zaltz I. Session Participants. Report of break-out session: management of sequelae of Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2012 Dec;470(12):3462-63.

Fabricant PD, Jones KJ, Delos D, Cordasco FA, Marx RG, Pearle AD, Warren RF, Green DW. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in the skeletally immature athlete: a review of current concepts: AAOS exhibit selection. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2013 Mar 6;95(5):e28.

Tibor LM, Sink EL. Periacetabular osteotomy for hip preservation. Orthopedic Clinics of North America. 2012 Jul;43(3):343-57. Scoliosis Service

Bargman R, Posham R, Boskey AL, Carter E, DiCarlo E, Verdelis K, Raggio CL, Pleshko N. High-and low-dose OPG-Fc cause osteopetrosis-like changes in infant mice. Pediatric Research – Nature. 2012 Nov;72(5):495-501. Bargman R, Posham R, Boskey AL, DiCarlo E, Raggio CL, Pleshko N. Comparable outcomes in fracture reduction and bone properties with RANKL inhibition and alendronate treatment in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta. Osteoporosis International. 2012 Mar;23(3):1141-50. Blanco JS, Perlman SL, Cha HS, Delpizzo K. Multimodal pain management after spinal surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Orthopedics. 2013 Feb;36(2 Suppl):33-35. Blondel B, Schwab F, Bess S, Ames C, Mummaneni PV, Hart R, Smith JS, Shaffrey CI, Burton D, Boachie-Adjei O, Lafage V. Posterior global malalignment after osteotomy for sagittal plane deformity: it happens and here is why. Spine. 2013 Apr 1;38(7):E394-401. Boachie-Adjei O, Anand N, Fleischer G, Kabaish K, Melgar M, Nasca R, Raley T. Letter to the editor: lumbar interbody fusion. Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine. 2013 Mar;18(3):316. Boachie-Adjei O, Cho W, King AB. Axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF) approach for adult scoliosis. European Spine Journal. 2013 Mar;22 Suppl 2:S225-31. Chen X, Raggio CL, Campagnola PJ. Second-harmonic generation circular dichroism studies of osteogenesis imperfecta. Optic Letters. 2012 Sep 15;37(18):3837-39. Damle SR, Rawlins BA, Boachie-Adjei O, Crystal RG, Hidaka C, Cunningham ME. Lumbar spine intervertebral disc gene delivery: a pilot study in Lewis rats. HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery. 2013 Feb;9(1):36-41. Fabricant PD, Dy CJ, Patel RM, Blanco JS, Doyle SM. Internet search term affects the quality and accuracy of online information about developmental hip dysplasia. Journal of Orthopaedics. 2013 Jun;33(4):361-65.

54

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

Fu KM, Smith JS, Burton DC, Shaffrey CI, Boachie-Adjei O, Carlson B, Schwab FJ, Lafage V, Hostin R, Bess S, Akbarnia BA, Mundis G, Klineberg E, Gupta M; International Spine Study Group. Outcomes and complications of extension of previous long fusion to the sacro-pelvis: is an anterior approach necessary? World Neurosurgery. 2013 Jan;79(1):177-81. Giampietro PF, Raggio CL, Blank RD, McCarty C, Broeckel U, Pickart MA. Clinical, genetic and environmental factors associated with congenital vertebral malformations. Molecular Syndromology. 2013 Feb;4(1-2):94-105. Green DW, Padula MP, Santos J, Chou J, Milthorpe B, Ben-Nissan B. A therapeutic potential for marine skeletal proteins in bone regeneration. Marine Drugs. 2013 Apr 10;11(4):1203-20. Hart R, Cabalo A, Bess S, Akbarnia B, Boachie-Adjei O, Burton D, Cunningham ME, Gupta M, Hostin R, Kebaish K, Klineberg E, Mundis G, Shaffrey C, Smith JS, Wood K; The International Spine Study Group. Comparison of patient and surgeon perceptions of adverse events following adult spinal deformity surgery. Spine. 2012 Nov 2. [Epub ahead of print] Hesemann J, Lauer E, Ziska S, Noonan K, Nemeth B, ScottSchwoerer J, McCarty C, Rasmussen K, Goldberg JM, Sund S, Eickhoff J, Raggio CL, Giampietro PF. Analysis of maternal risk factors associated with congenital vertebral malformations. Spine. 2013 Mar 1;38(5):E293-98. Heyworth BE, Osei DA, Fabricant PD, Schneider R, Doyle SM, Green DW, Widmann RF, Lyman S, Burke SW, Scher DM. The shorthand bone age assessment: a simpler alternative to current methods. Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics. 2013 Jul-Aug;33(5):569-74. Hostin R, McCarthy I, O’Brien M, Bess S, Line B, Boachie-Adjei O, Burton D, Gupta M, Ames C, Deviren V, Kebaish K, Shaffrey C, Wood K, Hart R; International Spine Study Group. Incidence, mode and location of acute proximal junctional failures following surgical treatment for adult spinal deformity. Spine. 2012 Sep 13. [Epub ahead of print]. Issack PS, Cunningham ME, Pumberger M, Hughes AP, Cammisa FP. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: evaluation and management. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2012 Aug;20(8):527-35. Kepler CK, Pavlov H, Herzog RJ, Rawlins BA, Endo Y, Green DW. Comparison of a fluoroscopic 3-dimensional imaging system and conventional CT in detection of pars fractures in the cadaveric lumbar spine. Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques. 2012 Dec;25(8):429-32.


Kepler CK, Pavlov H, Kim HJ, Green DW, Rawlins BA. Preoperative templating before spinal fusion using a fluoroscopic multiplanar imaging system is as accurate as CT scan and uses substantially less radiation. Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics. 2012 Dec;32(8):e67-71. Kim HJ, Yagi M, Nyugen J, Cunningham ME, Boachie-Adjei O. Combined anterior-posterior surgery is the most important risk factor for developing proximal junctional kyphosis in idiopathic scoliosis. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2012; 470(6): 1633-39. Ladenhauf HN, Fabricant PD, Grossman E, Widmann RF, Green DW. Athletic participation in children with symptomatic spondylolysis in the New York area. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2013 Apr 3. [Epub ahead of print] McCarthy MM, Tucker S, Nguyen JT, Green DW, Imhauser CW, Cordasco FA. Analysis of all-epiphyseal and over-the-top pediatric reconstruction techniques for the anterior cruciate ligament. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 Jun;41(6): 1330-39. Milla SS, Coley BD, Karmazyn B, Dempsey-Robertson ME, Dillman JR, Dory CE, Garber M, Hayes LL, Keller MS, Meyer JS, Paidas C, Raske ME, Rigsby CK, Spottswood S, Strouse PJ, Widmann RF, Wootton-Gorges SL. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® limping child – ages 0 to 5 years. Journal of the American College of Radiology. 2012 Aug;9(8):545-53. Pan N, Herzog R, Blanco JS, Nauseef WM, Jenkins S, Kovanlikaya A, Salvatore CM, Toussi SS. Candida albicans osteomyelitis in an infant: a case report and literature review. Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics B. 2013 Apr 17. [Epub ahead of print] Pascual-Garrido C, Moran CJ, Green DW, Cole BJ. Osteochondritis dissecans of the knee in children and adolescents. Current Opinion in Pediatrics. 2013 Feb;25(1):46-51. Papadopoulos EC, Boachie-Adjei O, Hess WF, Sanchez PerezGrueso FJ, Pellisé F, Gupta M, Lonner B, Paonessa K, Faloon M, Cunningham ME, Kim HJ, Mendelow M, Sacramento C, Yazici M; Foundation of Orthopedics and Complex Spine, New York, NY. Early outcomes and complications of posterior vertebral column resection. The Spine Journal. 2013 Apr 25. [Epub ahead of print] Rebolledo BJ, Nam D, Cross MB, Green DW, Sculco TP. Familial association of femoral trochlear dysplasia with recurrent bilateral patellar dislocation. Orthopedics. 2012 Apr;35(4):e574-79. Schwab FJ, Blondel B, Bess S, Hostin R, Shaffrey CI, Smith JS, Boachie-Adjei O, Burton DC, Akbarnia BA, Mundis GM, Ames CP, Kebaish K, Hart RA, Farcy JP, Lafage V; the International Spine Study Group (ISSG). Radiographical spinopelvic parameters and disability in the setting of adult spinal deformity: a prospective multicenter analysis. Spine. 2013 Jun 1;38(13):E803-E812.

Yagi M, King AB, Boachie-Adjei O. Incidence, risk factors and natural course of proximal junctional kyphosis: surgical outcomes review of adult idiopathic scoliosis. Minimum 5 years of follow-up. Spine. 2012 Aug 1;37(17):1479-89. Yagerman SE, Cross MB, Green DW, Scher DM. Pediatric orthopedic conditions in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Current Opinion in Pediatrics. 2012 Feb;24(1):50-56. Yagi M, King AB, Kim HJ, Cunningham ME, Boachie-Adjei O. Outcome of revision surgery in pediatric spine deformity patients. Spine Deformity. 2013; 1(1):59-67. Yagi M, Patel R, Boachie-Adjei O. Complications and unfavorable clinical outcomes in obese and overweight patients treated for adult lumbar or thoracolumbar scoliosis with combined anterior/ posterior surgery. Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques. 2013 May 22. [Epub ahead of print] Spine Service

Bombardieri AM, Beckman J, Shaw P, Girardi FP, Ma Y, Memtsoudis SG. Comparative utility of centrally versus peripherally transduced venous pressure monitoring in the perioperative period in spine surgery patients. Journal of Clinical Anesthesia. 2012 Nov;24(7):542-48. Borrelli J, Pape C, Hak D, Hsu J, Lin S, Giannoudis P, Lane JM. Physiological challenges of bone repair. Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. 2012;26:708-11. Donnelly E, Meredith DS, Nguyen JT, Gladnick BP, Rebolledo BJ, Shaffer AD, Lorich DG, Lane JM, Boskey AL. Reduced cortical bone compositional heterogeneity with bisphosphonate treatment in postmenopausal women with intertrochanteric and subtorchanteric fractures. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2012:672-78. Donnelly E, Saleh A, Unnanuntana A, Lane JM. Atypical femoral fractures: epidemiology, etiology, and patient management. Current Opinion: Supportive and Palliative Care. 2012; (6);3:348-54. Doyle JR, Lane JM, Beinborn M, Kopin AS. Naturally occurring HCA1 missense mutations result in loss of function: potential impact on lipid deposition. The Journal of Lipid Research. 2013 Mar;54(3):823-30. Dy CJ, Dossous PM, Ton QV, Hollenberg JP, Lorich DG, Lane JM. The medical orthopaedic trauma service: an innovative multidisciplinary team model that decreases in-hospital complications in patients with hip fractures. Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. 2012 Jun;26(6):379-83. Gausden EB, Sama AA, Taher F, Pumberger M, Cammisa FP, Hughes AP. Long-term sequelae of patients with retained drains in spine surgery. Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques. 2012 Jul 24. [Epub ahead of print] Hirsch BP, Unnanuntana A, Cunningham ME, Lane JM. The effect of therapies for osteoporosis on spine fusion: a systematic review. The Spine Journal. 2013 Feb;13(2):190-99.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

55


2012-2013 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Hegde V, Meredith DS, Kepler CK, Huang RC. Management of postoperative spinal infections. World Journal of Orthopedics. 2012 Nov 18;3(11):182-89. Issack PS, Cunningham ME, Pumberger M, Hughes AP, Cammisa FP. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: evaluation and management. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery. 2012 Aug;20(8):527-35. Kepler CK, Huang RC, Sharma AK, Meredith DS, Metitiri O, Sama AA, Girardi FP, Cammisa FP. Factors influencing segmental lumbar lordosis after lateral transpsoas interbody fusion. Orthopaedic Surgery. 2012 May;4(2):71-75.

Mait J, Perino G, Lane JM. Multimodality treatment of a multifocal osteoblastoma-like tumor of the lower extremity: a case report. Skeletal Radiology. 2012:1345-46. Mancuso CA, Cammisa FP, Sama AA, Hughes AP, Girardi FP. Development of an expectations survey for patients undergoing cervical spine surgery. Spine. 2012 Nov 7. [Epub ahead of print]

Kepler CK, Sharma AK, Huang RC, Meredith DS, Girardi FP, Cammisa FP, Sama AA. Indirect foraminal decompression after lateral transpsoas interbody fusion. Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine. 2012 Apr;16(4):329-33.

Memtsoudis SG, Stundner O, Sun X, Chiu YL, Ma Y, Fleischut P, Kerr GE, Girardi FP, Walz JM. Critical care in patients undergoing lumbar spine fusion: a population-based study. Journal of Intensive Care Medicine. 2013 Jun 10. [Epub ahead of print]

Kotwal S, Kawaguchi S, Lebl DR, Hughes A, Huang R, Sama AA, Cammisa FP, Girardi FP. Minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion: clinical and radiographic outcome at a minimum 2-year follow-up. Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques. 2012 Sep 6. [Epub ahead of print]

Meredith DS, Kepler CK, Hirsch B, Nguyen J, Farmer JC, Girardi FP, O’Leary PF, Cammisa FP. The effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplements on perioperative bleeding following posterior spinal arthrodesis. The European Spine Journal. 2012 Dec;21(12):2659-63.

Lane JM. CORR Insights®: Does early functional outcome predict 1-year mortality in elderly patients with hip fracture? Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 Apr 19. [Epub ahead of print]

Meredith DS, Schreiber JJ, Taher F, Cammisa FP, Girardi FP. Lower preoperative hounsfield unit measurements are associated with adjacent segment fracture following spinal fusion. Spine. 2013 Mar 1;38(5):415-18.

Lane JM, McKiernan F, McKinney R, Ng A, Nieves J, O’Keefe R, Papapoulos S, Howe TS, van der Meulen MC, Weinstein RS, Whyte MP. Atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures: second report of a task force of the American society for bone and mineral research. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2013 May 28. [Epub ahead of print]

Meredith DS, Taher F, Cammisa FP, Girardi FP. Incidence, diagnosis, and management of sacral fractures following multilevel spinal arthrodesis. The Spine Journal. 2013 Apr 23. [Epub ahead of print]

Lebl DR. Bone morphogenetic protein in complex cervical spine surgery: a safe biologic adjunct? World Journal of Orthopaedics. 2013 Apr 18;4(2):53-57.

Papadakis M, Aggeliki L, Papadopoulos EC, Girardi FP. Common surgical complications in degenerative spinal surgery. World Journal of Orthopedics. 2013 Apr 18;4(2):62-66.

Lebl DR, Bono CM, Velmahos G, Metkar U, Nguyen J, Harris MB. Vertebral artery injury associated with blunt cervical spine trauma – a multivariate regression analysis. Spine. 2013 Apr 9. [Epub ahead of print]

Paul O, Barker JU, Lane JM, Helfet DL, Lorich DG. Functional and radiographic outcomes of intertrochanteric hip fractures treated with calcar reduction, compression, and trochanteric entry nailing. Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. 2012 Mar;26(3):148-54.

Lebl DR, Cammisa FP, Girardi FP, Wright TM, Abjornson C. The mechanical performance of cervical total disc replacements in vivo: prospective retrieval analysis of prodisc-C devices. Spine. 2012 Dec 15;37(26):2151-60. Lebl DR, Cammisa FP, Sama AA, Mo F, Girardi FP. Posterior transacral transvertebral reamed lumbar interbody fusion for L5-S1 arthrodesis. Techniques in Orthopaedics. Sept 2012, 27(3): 219-21. Lebl DR, Girardi FP. Isolated cervical spine facet joint tumoral calcinosis. The Spine Journal. 2013 Feb;13(2):208-9. Lykissas MG, Cho W, Aichmair A, Sama AA, Hughes AP, Lebl DR, Du JY, Cammisa FP, Girardi FP. Is there any relation between the amount of curve correction and postoperative neurologic deficit or pain in patients undergoing stand-alone lateral lumbar interbody fusion? Spine. 2013 May 24. [Epub ahead of print]

56

Macdonald DE, Rapuano BE, Vyas P, Lane JM, Meyers K, Wright TM. Heat and radiofrequency plasma glow discharge pretreatment of a titanium alloy promote bone formation and osseointegration. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry. 2013 May 3. [Epub ahead of print]

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

Mo F, Lebl DR, Girardi FP. Anterior C1-C2 arthrodesis. Techniques in Orthopaedics. 2012 27:143-44.

Prasarn ML, Ahn J, Helfet DL, Lane JM, Lorich DG. Bisphosphonate-associated femur fractures have high complication rates with operative fixation. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2012;470;2295-301. Pumberger M, Hughes AP, Girardi FP, Gogia J, Kotwal SY, Thaler C, Sama AA. Influence of surgical experience on the efficiency of discectomy in TLIF: a cadaveric testing in 40 levels. Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques. 2012 Dec;25(8):E254-8. Pumberger M, Hughes AP, Huang R, Sama AA, Cammisa FP, Girardi FP. Neurologic deficit following lateral lumbar interbody fusion. European Spine Journal. 2012 June; 21(6):1192-99.


Rebolledo BJ, Gladnick BP, Unnanuntana A, Nguyen JT, Kepler CK, Lane JM. Comparison of unipedicular and bipedicular balloon kyphoplasty for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures: a prospective randomised study. The Bone & Joint Journal. 2013 Mar;95-B(3):401-6. Reinhart K, Lazaro LE, Cross M, Ben-Paul NU, Lane JM, Helfet DL, Lorich DG. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D and calcium in low-energy patella fractures. HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery. 2012 Feb;9(1):17-20. Ricciardi BF, Paul J, Kim A, Russell LA, Lane JM. Osteoporosis drug therapy strategies in the setting of disease-modifying agents for autoimmune disease. Osteoporosis International. 2013 Feb;24(2):423-32. Saleh A, Hegde VV, Potty AG, Lane JM. Bisphosphonate therapy and atypical fractures. Orthopedic Clinics of North America. 2013 Apr;44(2):137-51. Saleh A, Hegde VV, Potty AG, Schneider R, Cornell CN, Lane JM. Management strategy for symptomatic bisphosphonateassociated incomplete atypical femoral fractures. HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery. 2012 July;8(2):103-110. Saleh A, Vyas PA, Lane JM. Commentary: hypovitaminosis D in patients undergoing kyphoplasty is associated with increased risk of subsequent vertebral fractures. The Spine Journal. 2012 Apr;12(4):313-14. Silvano A, Libanati C, Boonen S, Cummings SR, Ho, Pei-Ran, Wang, Siris E, Lane JM, and the FREEDOM Fracture Writing Group. Denosumab treatment in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis does not interfere with fracture-healing. Results from the FREEDOM Trial. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2012;94:2113-19. Taher F, Bokums K, Aichmair A, Hughes AP. C1-C2 instability with severe occipital headache in the setting of vertebral artery facet complex erosion. European Spine Journal. 2013 Apr 25. [Epub ahead of print] Taher F, Essig D, Lebl DR, Hughes AP, Sama AA, Cammisa FP, Girardi FP. Lumbar degenerative disc disease: current and future concepts of diagnosis and management. Advanced Orthopaedics. 2012;970752. Taher F, Hughes AP, Sama AA, Zeldin R, Schneider R, Holodny EI, Lebl DR, Fantini GA, Nguyen J, Cammisa FP, Girardi FP. How safe is lateral lumbar interbody fusion for the surgeon? A prospective in vivo radiation exposure study. Spine. 2013 Jan 15. [Epub ahead of print] Taher F, Lebl DR, Cammisa FP, Pinter DW, Sun DY, Girardi FP. Transient neurological deficit following midthoracic decompression for severe stenosis: a series of three cases. European Spine Journal. 2013 May 14. [Epub ahead of print] Taher F, Lebl DR, Hughes AP, Girardi FP. Contralateral psoas seroma after transpsoas lumbar interbody fusion with bone morphogenetic protein-2 implantation. The Spine Journal. 2013 Feb;13(2):e1-5.

Unnanuntana A, Ashfaq K, Ton QV, Kleimeyer JP, Lane JM. The effect of long-term alendronate treatment on cortical thickness of the proximal femur. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2012 Jan;470(1):291-98. Unnanuntana A, Saleh A, Mensah KA, Kleimeyer JP, Lane JM. Atypical femoral fractures: what do we know about them? AAOS Exhibit Selection. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2013 Jan 16;95(2):e8 1-13. Unnanuntana A, Saleh A, Nguyen JT, Sculco TP, Cornell CN, Mancuso CA, Lane JM. Low vitamin D status does not adversely affect short-term functional outcome after total hip arthroplasty. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2013 Feb;28(2):315-22. Virk S, Sandhu HS, Khan SN. Cost effectiveness analysis of graft options in spinal fusion surgery using a Markov model. Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques. 2012 Oct;25(7):E204-10. Yue J, Zhang K, Bai HX, Du J, Cammisa FP, Abjornson C, Mo F. A comparison of 1-level versus 2-level prodisc arthroplasty patients: a prospective study with minimum of 5-year follow-up. Spine 2013 Jun 15;38(14):1194-8. Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service

Angeline ME, Gee AO, Shindle M, Warren RF, Rodeo SA. The effects of vitamin D deficiency in athletes. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 Feb;41(2):461-64. Angeline ME, Rodeo SA. Biologics in the management of rotator cuff surgery. Clinics in Sports Medicine. 2012 Oct;31(4):645-63. Bedi A, Chen T, Santner TJ, El-Amin S, Kelly NH, Warren RF, Maher SA. Changes in dynamic medial tibiofemoral contact mechanics and kinematics after injury of the anterior cruciate ligament: a cadaveric model. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Part H, Journal of Engineering in Medicine. 2013 Jun 26. [Epub ahead of print] Bedi A, Kelly BT. Femoroacetabular impingement. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2013 Jan 2;95(1):82-92. Bedi A, Kelly BT, Khanduja V. Arthroscopic hip preservation surgery: current concepts and perspective. The Bone & Joint Journal. 2013 Jan;95-B(1):10-9. Bedi A, Kelly N, Baad M, Fox AJ, Ma Y, Warren RF, Maher SA. Dynamic contact mechanics of radial tears of the lateral meniscus: implications for treatment. Arthroscopy. 2012 Mar;28(3):372-81. Bedi A, Maak T, Walsh C, Rodeo SA, Grande D, Dines DM, Dines JS. Cytokines in rotator cuff degeneration and repair. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 2012; 21(2):218-27. Bedi A, Thompson M, Uliana C, Magennis E, Kelly BT. Assessment of range of motion and contact zones with commonly performed physical exam maneuvers for femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI): what do these tests mean? Hip International: The Journal of Clinical and Experimental Research on Hip Pathology and Therapy. 2013 Jun 17:0.

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2012-2013 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Berkes MB, Little MT, Lazaro LE, Cymerman RM, Pardee NC, Helfet DL, Dines JS, Lorich DG. Intramedullary allograft fibula as a reduction and fixation tool for treatment of complex proximal humerus fractures with diaphyseal extension. Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. 2013 May 15. [Epub ahead of print] Bevelaqua AC, Hayter CL, Feinberg JH, Rodeo SA. Posterior interosseous neuropathy: electrodiagnostic evaluation. HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery. 2012;8(1):184-89. Chambers L, Dines JS, Lorich DG, Dines DM. Hemiarthroplasty for proximal humerus fractures. Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine. 2013 Mar;6(1):57-62. Chaudhury S, de La Lama M, Adler RS, Gulotta LV, Skonieczki B, Chang A, Moley P, Cordasco F, Hannafin J, Fealy S. Plateletrich plasma for the treatment of lateral epicondylitis: sonographic assessment of tendon morphology and vascularity (pilot study). Skeletal Radiology. 2013 Jan;42(1):91-97. Chaudhury S, Dines JS, Delos D, Warren RF, Voigt C, Rodeo SA. The role of fatty infiltration in the pathophysiology and outcomes of rotator cuff repair: a review article. Arthritis Care & Research. 2012 Jan;64(1):76-82. Chaudhury S, Gasinu S, Rodeo SA. Bilateral anterior and posterior glenohumeral stabilization using Achilles tendon allograft augmentation in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 2012 Jun;21(6):e1-5. Chaudhury S, Rodeo SA. Healing of the rotator cuff: affecting the biologic and mechanical environment. Current Orthopaedic Practice. 23(1):18-22, January/February 2012. Chen JL, Allen CR, Stephens TE, Haas AK, Huston LJ, Wright RW, Feeley BT; Multicenter ACL Revision Study (MARS) Group, (Hannafin JA, contributing author). Differences in mechanisms of failure, intraoperative findings, and surgical characteristics between single- and multiple-revision ACL reconstructions: a MARS cohort study. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 Jul;41(7):1571-8. Citak M, Suero EM, Citak M, Dunbar NJ, Branch SH, Conditt MA, Banks SA, Pearle AD. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: is robotic technology more accurate than conventional technique? The Knee. 2013 Aug;20(4):268-71. Coale RM, Hollister SJ, Dines JS, Allen AA, Bedi A. Anatomic considerations of transclavicular-transcoracoid drilling for coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 2013 Jan;22(1):137-44. Cross MB, Nam D, Plaskos C, Sherman SL, Lyman S, Pearle AD, Mayman DJ. Recutting the distal femur to increase maximal knee extension during TKA causes coronal plane laxity in mid-flexion. The Knee. 2012 Dec;19(6):875-79. Cross MB, Raphael BS, Maak TG, Plaskos C, Egidy CC, Pearle AD. Characterization of the orientation and isometry of Humphrey’s ligament. The Knee. 2013 May 6. [Epub ahead of print]

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Cummings SH, Grande D, Hee CK, Kestler HK, Roden CM, Shah NV, Razzano P, Dines DM, Chahine N, Dines JS. Effect of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB-coated sutures on Achilles tendon healing in a rat model: a histological and biomechanical study. Journal of Tissue Engineering. 2012;3(1):2041731412453577. Dawson CK, Suero EM, Pearle AD. Variability in knee laxity in anterior cruciate ligament deficiency using a mechanized model. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy. 2013 Apr;21(4):784-88. Dines JS, Dodson CC, McGarry MH, Oh JH, Altchek DW, Lee TQ. Contribution of osseous and muscular stabilizing effects with the Latarjet procedure for anterior instability without glenoid bone loss. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 2013 May 7. [Epub ahead of print] Dines JS, Jones KJ, Kahlenberg C, Rosenbaum A, Osbahr DC, Altchek DW, Dodson CC, Altchek, DW. Collateral ligament reconstruction revisited: the procedure I use and why. Sports Health. 2012 Sep;4(5):433-37. Druskin SC, Rodeo SA. Novel treatment of a failed quadriceps tendon repair in a diabetic patient using a patella-quadriceps tendon allograft. HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery. Online First Article. September 2012. Dwyer T, Marx RG, Whelan D. Outcomes of treatment of multiple ligament knee injuries. The Journal of Knee Surgery. 2012 Sep;25(4):317-26. [Review] Dy CJ, Kitay A, Garg R, Kang L, Feinberg JH, Wolfe SW. Neurotization to innervate the deltoid and biceps. Journal of Hand Surgery (Am). 2013 Feb;38(2):237-40. Edelstein J, Ranawat A, Enseki KR, Yun RJ, Draovitch P. Postoperative guidelines following hip arthroscopy. Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine. 2012 Mar;5(1):15-23. Fabricant PD, Heyworth BE, Kelly BT. Hip arthroscopy improves symptoms associated with FAI in selected adolescent athletes. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2012 Jan;470(1):261-69. Fabricant PD, Hirsch BP, Holmes I, Kelly BT, Lorich DG, Helfet DL, Bogner EA, Green DW. A radiographic study of the ossification of the posterior wall of the acetabulum: implications for the diagnosis of pediatric and adolescent hip disorders. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2013 Feb 6;95(3):230-36. Fabricant PD, Jones KJ, Delos D, Cordasco FA, Marx RG, Pearle AD, Warren RF, Green DW. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in the skeletally immature athlete: a review of current concepts. AAOS exhibit selection. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2013 Mar 6;95(5):e28. Franzone JM, Vitale MA, Shubin Stein BE, Ahmad CS. Is there an association between chronicity of patellar instability and patellofemoral cartilage lesions? An arthroscopic assessment of chondral injury. Journal of Knee Surgery. 2012 Nov;25(5):411-16.


Galano GJ, Weisenthal BM, Altchek DW. Articular shear of the anterior-inferior quadrant of the glenoid: a glenolabral articular disruption lesion variant. The American Journal of Orthopedics. 2013 Jan;42(1):41-43.

Hetsroni I, Lyman S, Pearle AD, Marx RG. The effect of lateral opening wedge distal femoral osteotomy on medial knee opening: clinical and biomechanical factors. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy. 2013 Jan 25. [Epub ahead of print]

Ghomrawi HM, Mancuso CA, Westrich GH, Marx RG, Mushlin AI; Expectations Discordance Study Group. Discordance in TKA expectations between patients and surgeons. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 Jan;471(1):175-80.

Hettrich CM, Gasinu S, Beamer BS, Fox A, Ying O, Deng XH, Rodeo SA. The effect of immobilization on the native and repaired tendon-to-bone interface. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2013 May 15;95(10):925-30.

Goolsby MA, Barrack MT, Nattiv A. A displaced femoral neck stress fracture in an amenorrheic adolescent female runner. Sports Health. 2012 Jul;4(4):352-56.

Hosea TM, Hannafin JA. Rowing injuries. Sports Health. 4(3):236-45.

Griffin DR, Parsons N, Mohtadi NG, Safran MR; Multicenter Arthroscopy of the Hip Outcomes Research Network. A short version of the International Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-12) for use in routine clinical practice. Arthroscopy. 2012 May;28(5):611-66; quiz 616-18. Gulotta LV, Choi D, Marinello P, Knutson Z, Lipman J, Wright TM, Cordasco FA, Craig EV, Warren RF. Humeral component retroversion in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty: a biomechanical study. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 2012 Sep;21(9):1121-27. Gulotta LV, Choi D, Marinello P, Wright T, Cordasco FA, Craig EV, Warren RF. Anterior deltoid deficiency in reverse total shoulder replacement: a biomechanical study with cadavers. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Br). 2012 Dec;94(12):1666-69. Halpern BC, Chaudhury S, Rodeo SA. The role of plateletrich plasma in inducing musculoskeletal tissue healing. HSS Journal: The Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery. 2012 July;8(2):137-45. Halpern BC, Chaudhury S, Rodeo SA, Hayter C, Bogner E, Potter HG, Nguyen J. Clinical and MRI outcomes after platelet-rich plasma treatment for knee osteoarthritis. Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine. 2013 May;23(3):238-39. Hammoud S, Bedi A, Magennis E, Meyers WC, Kelly BT. High incidence of athletic pubalgia symptoms in professional athletes with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement. Arthroscopy. 2012 Oct;28(10):1388-95. Hetsroni I, Dela Torre K, Duke G, Lyman S, Kelly BT. Sex differences of hip morphology in young adults with hip pain and labral tears. Arthroscopy. 2013 Jan;29(1):54-63. Hetsroni I, Delos D, Fives G, Boyle BW, Lillemoe K, Marx RG. Nonoperative treatment for anterior cruciate ligament injury in recreational alpine skiers. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy. 2012 Nov 28. [Epub ahead of print] Hetsroni I, Larson CM, Dela Torre K, Zbeda RM, Magennis E, Kelly BT. Anterior inferior iliac spine deformity as an extraarticular source for hip impingement: a series of 10 patients treated with arthroscopic decompression. Arthroscopy. 2012 Sep 14; (12)01447-48.

Imhauser C, Mauro C, Choi D, Rosenberg E, Mathew S, Nguyen J, Ma Y, Wickiewicz T. Abnormal tibiofemoral contact stress and its association with altered kinematics after center-center anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: an in vitro study. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 Apr;41(4):815-25. Jensen A, Kelly AM, Kelly JD 4th. Arthroscopic removal of proximal femoral locking screws: a novel application of hip arthroscopy. Orthopedics. 2013 Jul;1;36(7):523-26. Jones KJ, Conte S, Patterson N, ElAttrache NS, Dines JS. Functional outcomes following revision ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction in Major League Baseball pitchers. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 2013 May;22(5):642-46. Jones KJ, Dines DM, Gulotta L, Dines JS. Management of proximal humerus fractures utilizing reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine. 2013 Mar;6(1):63-70. Jones KJ, Kahlenberg CA, Dodson CC, Nam D, Williams RJ, Altchek DW. Arthroscopic capsular plication for microtraumatic anterior shoulder instability in overhead athletes. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2012 Sep;40(9):2009-14. Jost PW, Khair MM, Chen DX, Wright TM, Kelly AM, Rodeo SA. Suture number determines strength of rotator cuff repair. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2012 Jul 18;94(14): e1001-07. Katz JN, Brophy RH, Chaisson CE, de Chaves L, Cole BJ, Dahm DL, Donnell-Fink LA, Guermazi A, Haas AK, Jones MH, Levy BA, Mandl LA, Martin SD, Marx RG, Miniaci A, Matava MJ, Palmisano J, Reinke EK, Richardson BE, Rome BN, Safran-Norton CE, Skoniecki DJ, Solomon DH, Smith MV, Spindler KP, Stuart MJ, Wright J, Wright RW, Losina E. Surgery versus physical therapy for a meniscal tear and osteoarthritis. The New England Journal of Medicine. 2013 May 2;368(18):1675-84. Katz JN, Chaisson CE, Cole B, Guermazi A, Hunter DJ, Jones M, Levy BA, Mandl LA, Martin S, Marx RG, Safran-Norton C, Roemer FW, Skoniecki D, Solomon DH, Spindler KP, Wright J, Wright RW, Losina E. The MeTeOR trial (Meniscal Tear in Osteoarthritis Research): rationale and design features. Contemporary Clinical Trials. 2012 Nov;33(6):1189-96. Kelly BT, Maak TG, Larson CM, Bedi A, Zaltz I. Sports hip injuries: assessment and management. Instructional Course Lectures. 2013;62:515-31.

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2012-2013 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Khmelnitskaya E, Lamont LE, Taylor SA, Lorich DG, Dines DM, Dines JS. Evaluation and management of proximal humerus fractures. Advances in Orthopedics. 2012;2012:861598.

Kuhn JE, Dunn WR, Sanders R, An Q, Baumgarten KM, Bishop JY, Brophy RH, Carey JL, Holloway BG, Jones GL, Ma CB, Marx RG, McCarty EC, Poddar SK, Smith MV, Spencer EE, Vidal AF, Wolf BR, Wright RW; MOON Shoulder Group. Effectiveness of physical therapy in treating atraumatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears: a multicenter prospective cohort study. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 2013 Mar 26. [Epub ahead of print]

Klingenstein GG, Zbeda RM, Bedi A, Magennis E, Kelly BT. Prevalence and preoperative demographic and radiographic predictors of bilateral femoroacetabular impingement. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 Apr;41(4):762-68.

Ladenhauf HN, Graziano J, Marx RG. Anterior cruciate ligament prevention strategies: are they effective in young athletes – current concepts and review of literature. Current Opinion in Pediatrics. 2013 Feb;25(1):64-71.

Knesek M, Skendzel JG, Dines JS, Altchek DW, Allen AA, Bedi A. Diagnosis and management of superior labral anterior posterior tears in throwing athletes. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 Feb;41(2):444-60.

Larson CM, Sikka RS, Sardelli MC, Byrd JW, Kelly BT, Jain RK, Giveans MR. Increasing alpha angle is predictive of athleticrelated “hip” and “groin” pain in collegiate national football league prospects. Arthroscopy. 2013 Mar;29(3):405-10.

Kocher MS, Frank JS, Nasreddine AY, Safran MR, Philippon MJ, Sekiya JK, Kelly BT, Byrd JW, Guanche CA, Martin HD, Clohisy JC, Mohtadi NG, Griffin DR, Sampson TG, Leunig M, Larson CM, Ilizaliturri VM Jr, McCarthy JC, Gambacorta PG. Intra-abdominal fluid extravasation during hip arthroscopy: a survey of the MAHORN Group. Arthroscopy. 2012 Nov;28(11):1654-60.

Li X, Dines JS, Gorman M, Limpisvasti O, Gambardella R, Yocum L. Anconeus epitrochlearis as a source of medial elbow pain in baseball players. Orthopedics. 2012; 35(7):e1129-32.

Koff MF, Shah P, Pownder S, Romero B, Williams R, Gilbert S, Maher SA, Fortier LA, Rodeo SA, Potter HG. Correlation of meniscal T2* with multiphoton microscopy, and change of articular cartilage T2 in an ovine model of meniscal repair. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage. 2013 May 13. [Epub ahead of print]

Li X, Knutson Z, Choi D, Lobatto D, Lipman J, Craig EV, Warren RF, Gulotta LV. Effects of glenosphere positioning on impingement-free internal and external rotation after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 2013 Jun;22(6):807-13.

Kraeutler MJ, Williams GR Jr, Cohen SB, Ciccotti MG, Tucker BS, Dines JS, Altchek DW, Dodson CC. Inter- and intraobserver reliability of the radiographic diagnosis and treatment of acromioclavicular joint separations. Orthopedics. 2012;35(10):e1483-87.

Lopez V, Galano GJ, Black CM, Gupta AT, James DE, Kelleher KM, Allen AA. Profile of an American Amateur Rugby Union Sevens Series. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2012 Jan;40(1):179-84.

Khan FA, Lipman JD, Pearle AD, Boland PJ, Healey JH. Surgical technique: computer-generated custom jigs improve accuracy of wide resection of bone tumors. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 Jun;471(6):2007-16.

Kraeutler,MJ, Williams, GR Jr., Cohen, SB, Ciccotti, MG, Tucker, BS, Dines, JS, Krych A, Kohen R, Rodeo SA, Barnes R, Warren RF, Hotchkiss R. Acute brachialis muscle rupture caused by closed elbow dislocation in a professional American football player. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 2012 Jul;21(7):e1-5. Krych AJ, Lorich DG, Kelly BT. Osteochondral autograft transfer for a posttraumatic osteochondral defect of the femoral head. The American Journal of Orthopedics. 2012 Oct;41(10):472-76.

Li X, Gorman M, Dines JS, Limpisvasti O. Isolated tear of the pectoralis minor tendon in a high school football player. Orthopedics. 2012;35(8):e1272-75.

Luther N, Niogi S, Kutner K, Rodeo SA, Shetty T, Warren RF, Weiss L, Barnes R, Zimmerman R, Tsiouris A, Hartl R. Diffusion tensor and susceptibility-weighted imaging in concussion: assessment of National Football League players. Neurosurgery. 2012 Aug;71(2):E558. Lynch TS, Terry MA, Bedi A, Kelly BT. Hip arthroscopic surgery: patient evaluation, current indications, and outcomes. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 May;41(5): 1174-89.

Krych AJ, Thompson M, Knutson Z, Scoon J, Coleman SH. Arthroscopic labral repair versus selective labral debridement in female patients with femoroacetabular impingement: a prospective randomized study. Arthroscopy. 2013 Jan;29(1):46-53.

Maak TG, Osei D, Delos D, Taylor S, Warren RF, Weiland AJ. Peripheral nerve injuries in sports-related surgery: presentation, evaluation, and management: AAOS exhibit selection. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2012 Aug 15;94(16):e1211-10. [Review]

Krych AJ, Thompson M, Larson CM, Byrd JW, Kelly BT. Is posterior hip instability associated with cam and pincer deformity? Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2012 Dec;470(12):3390-97.

Marx RG. Anatomic double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was superior to conventional single-bundle reconstruction. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2013 Feb 20;95(4):365. Marx RG. CORR Insights™: Risk of thromboembolism in shoulder arthroplasty: effect of implant type and traumatic indication. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 May;471(5):1582-83.

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Marx RG. Single- versus double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 Feb;471(2):363-67. McCarthy MM, Graziano J, Green DW, Cordasco FA. All-epiphyseal, all-inside anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction technique for skeletally immature patients. Arthroscopy Techniques. 2012 Nov 22;1(2):e231-39. McCarthy MM, Strickland SM. Patellofemoral pain: an update on diagnostic and treatment options. Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine. 2013 Jun;6(2):188-94. McCarthy MM, Tucker S, Nguyen J, Green DW, Imhauser CW, Cordasco FA. Contact stress and kinematic analysis of all-epiphyseal and over-the-top pediatric reconstruction techniques for the anterior cruciate ligament. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 Jun;41(6):1330-39. McCarthy MM, Voos JE, Nguyen JT, Callahan L, Hannafin JA. Injury profile in elite female basketball athletes at the Women’s National Basketball Association combine. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 Mar;41(3):645-51. McConkey MO, Amendola A, Ramme AJ, Dunn WR, Flanigan DC, Britton CL; MOON Knee Group, Wolf BR, Spindler KP, Carey JL, Cox CL, Kaeding CC, Wright RW, Matava MJ, Brophy RH, Smith MV, McCarty EC, Vida AF, Wolcott M, Marx RG, Parker RD, Andrish JF, Jones MH. Arthroscopic agreement among surgeons on anterior cruciate ligament tunnel placement. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2012 Dec;40(12):2737-46. Meredith DS, Jones KJ, Barnes R, Rodeo SA, Cammisa FP, Warren RF. Operative and nonoperative treatment of cervical disc herniation in National Football League athletes. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 Jun 20. [Epub ahead of print] Milone MT, Bedi A, Poultsides L, Magennis E, Byrd JW, Larson CM, Kelly BT. Novel CT-based three-dimensional software improves the characterization of cam morphology. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 Jan 30. [Epub ahead of print] Moorman CT, Warren RF, Deng XH, Wickiewicz TL, Torzilli PA. Role of coracoacromial ligament and related structures in glenohumeral stability: a cadaveric study. Journal of Surgical Orthopaedic Advances. 2012 Winter;21(4):210-17. Morgan JA, Dahm D, Levy B, Stuart MJ, MARS Study Group (Hannafin JA, Marx RG, contributing authors). Femoral tunnel malposition in ACL revision reconstruction. Journal of Knee Surgery. 2012 Nov;25(5):361-68. Naal FD, Miozzari HH, Kelly BT, Magennis EM, Leunig M, Noetzli HP. The Hip Sports Activity Scale (HSAS) for patients with femoroacetabular impingement. Hip International: The Journal of Clinical and Experimental Research on Hip Pathology and Therapy. 2013 Mar-Apr;23(2):204-11.

Nam D, Maak TG, Raphael BS, Kepler CK, Cross MB, Warren RF. Rotator cuff tear arthropathy: evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment: AAOS exhibit selection. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2012 Mar 21;94(6):e34. Nam D, Maher PA, Rebolledo BJ, Nawabi DH, McLawhorn AS, Pearle AD. Patient specific cutting guides versus an imageless, computer-assisted surgery system in total knee arthroplasty. The Knee. 2013 Aug;20(4):263-67. Nam D, McArthur BA, Cross MB, Pearle AD, Mayman DJ, Haas SB. Patient-specific instrumentation in total knee arthroplasty: a review. Journal of Knee Surgery. 2012 Jul;25(3):213-19. [Review] Nattiv A, Kennedy G, Barrack MT, Abdelkerim A, Goolsby MA, Arends JC, Seeger LL. Correlation of MRI grading of bone stress injuries with clinical risk factors and return to play: a 5-year prospective study in collegiate track and field athletes. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 Jul 3. [Epub ahead of print] Nguyen US, Dufour AB, Positano RG, Dines JS, Dodson CC, Gagnon DG, Hillstrom HJ, Hannan MT. The occurrence of ipsilateral or contralateral foot disorders and hand dominance: the Framingham Foot Study. Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association. 2013 Jan-Feb;103(1):16-23. Noonan B, Bancroft RW, Dines JS, Bedi A. Heat- and cold-induced injuries in athletes: evaluation and management. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2012 Dec;20(12):744-54. Oak N, Mendez-Zfass M, Lesniak BP, Larson CM, Kelly BT, Bedi A. Complications in hip arthroscopy. Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Review. 2013 Jun;21(2):97-105. O’Brien SJ, Taylor SA, DiPietro JR, Newman AM, Drakos MC, Voos JE. The arthroscopic “subdeltoid approach” to the anterior shoulder. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 2013 Apr;22(4):e6-10. Ozturk BY, Kelly BT. Heterotopic ossification in portal sites following hip arthroscopy. Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery. 2013 Jul;133(7):979-84. Packer JD, Day MS, Nguyen JT, Hobart SJ, Hannafin JA, Metzl JD. Functional outcomes and patient satisfaction after fasciotomy for chronic exertional compartment syndrome. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 Feb;41(2):430-36. Robertson CM, Chen CT, Shindle MK, Cordasco FA, Rodeo SA, Warren RF. Failed healing of rotator cuff repair correlates with altered collagenase and gelatinase in supraspinatus and subscapularis tendons. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2012 Sep;40(9):1993-2001. Rodeo SA, Ma R, Moran C, Fortier L, Frawley RJ, Cunningham ME, Maher SA. What’s new in orthopaedic research. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2012 Dec 19;94(24):2289-95.

Nam D, Khamaisy S, Gladnick BP, Paul S, Pearle AD. Is tibiofemoral subluxation correctable in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty? Journal of Arthroplasty. 2013 Apr 5. [Epub ahead of print]

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2012-2013 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Rozbruch SR, Fryman C, Schachter LF, Bigman D, Marx RG. Growth arrest of the tibia after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: lengthening and deformity correction with the Taylor Spatial Frame. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 Jul;41(7):1636-41. Schreiber JJ, Warren RF, Hotchkiss RN, Daluiski A. An online video investigation into the mechanism of elbow dislocation. Journal of Hand Surgery (Am). 2013 Mar;38(3):488-94. Shah V, Bendele A, Dines JS, Kestler HK, Hollinger JO, Chahine NO, Hee CK. Dose-response effect of an intra-tendon application of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB) in a rat Achilles tendinopathy model. Journal of Orthopaedic Research. 2013 Mar;31(3):413-20. Spindler KP, Parker RD, Andrish JT, Kaeding CC, Wright RW, Marx RG, McCarty EC, Amendola A, Dunn WR, Huston LJ, Harrell FE Jr; MOON Group. Prognosis and predictors of ACL reconstructions using the MOON cohort: a model for comparative effectiveness studies. Journal of Orthopaedic Research. 2013 Jan;31(1):2-9. Stasiak ME, Wiznia D, Alzoobaee S, Ciccotti MC, Imhauser CW, Voigt C, Torzilli PA, Deng XH, Rodeo SA. A novel device to apply controlled flexion and extension to the rat knee following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Journal of Biomechanical Engineering. 2012 Apr;134(4):041008. Suero EM, Citak M, Claps C, Pearle AD, Plaskos C. Variations in ankle registration using two different anatomic landmarks: a radiographic study. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy. 2012 Aug 9. [Epub ahead of print] Suero EM, Citak M, Lo D, Krych AJ, Craig EV, Pearle AD. Use of a custom alignment guide to improve glenoid component position in total shoulder arthroplasty. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy. 2012 Aug 30. [Epub ahead of print] Suero EM, Citak M, Njoku IU, Pearle AD. Does the type of tibial component affect mechanical alignment in unicompartmental knee replacement? Technology and Health Care. 2013;21(1):81-85. Suero EM, Njoku IU, Voigt MR, Lin J, Koenig D, Pearle AD. The role of the iliotibial band during the pivot shift test. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy. 2012 Oct 27. [Epub ahead of print] Suslak AG, Mather RC 3rd, Kelly BT, Nho SJ. Improved arthroscopic visualization of peripheral compartment. Arthroscopy Techniques. 2012 Apr 13;1(1):e57-62. Taylor SA, Hannafin JA. Evaluation and management of elbow tendinopathy. Sports Health. 2012 Sep;4(5):384-93. Taylor SA, Rodeo SA. Augmentation techniques for isolated meniscal tears. Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine. 2013 Jun;6(2):95-101. Wanich T, Dines JS, Dines DM, Gambardella R, Yocum LA. Batter’s shoulder: can athletes return to play at the same level after operative treatment? Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2012 Jun;470(6):1565-70.

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Wanivenhaus F, Fox A, Chaudhury S, Rodeo SA. Epidemiology of injuries and prevention strategies in competitive swimming. Sports Health. 2012 May;4(3):246-51. Wolfe SW, Strauss HL, Garg R, Feinberg J. Use of bioabsorbable nerve conduits as an adjunct to brachial plexus micro-neurorraphy. Journal of Hand Surgery (Am). 2012 Oct;37(10):1980-85. YaDeau JT, Tedore T, Goytizolo EA, Kim DH, Green DS, Westrick A, Fan R, Rade MC, Ranawat AS, Coleman SH, Kelly BT. Lumbar plexus blockade reduces pain after hip arthroscopy: a prospective randomized controlled trial. Anesthesia & Analgesia. 2012 Oct;115(4):968-72. Zaltz I, Kelly BT, Hetsroni I, Bedi A. The crossover sign overestimates acetabular retroversion. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2012 Nov 8. [Epub ahead of print.] Department of Biomechanics

Allon AA, Ng KW, Hammoud S, Russell BH, Jones CM, Rivera JJ, Schwartz J, Hook M, Maher SA. Augmenting the articular cartilage-implant interface: Functionalizing with a collagen adhesion protein. Journal of Biomedical Research Materials Part A. 2012 Aug;100(8):2168-75. Brock GR, Kim G, Ingraffea AR, Andrews JC, Pianetta P, van der Meulen MC. Nanoscale examination of microdamage in sheep cortical bone using synchrotron radiation transmission x-ray microscopy. PLoS One. 2013;8(3):e57942. [Epub ahead of print] Burket JC, Brooks DJ, MacLeay JM, Baker SP, Boskey AL, van der Meulen MC. Variations in nanomechanical properties and tissue composition within trabeculae from an ovine model of osteoporosis and treatment. Bone. 2013 Jan;52(1):326-36. Cross MB, Nam D, van der Meulen MC, Bostrom MP. A rare case of a bisphosphonate-induced peri-prosthetic femoral fracture. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Br). 2012 Jul;94(7):994-97. Fahlgren A, Yang X, Ciani C, Ryan JA, Kelly N, Ko FC, van der Meulen MC, Bostrom MP. The effects of PTH, loading and surgical insult on cancellous bone at the bone-implant interface in the rabbit. Bone. 2013 Feb;52(2):718-24. Guo H, Maher SA, Spilker RL. Biphasic finite element contact analysis of the knee joint using an augmented Lagrangian method. Medical Engineering & Physics. 2013 Mar 13. [Epub ahead of print] Heyse TJ, Elpers ME, Nawabi DH, Wright TM, Haas SB. Oxidized zirconium versus cobalt-chromium in TKA: profilometry of retrieved femoral components. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 May 25. [Epub ahead of print] Heyse TJ, Ries MD, Bellemans J, Goodman SB, Scott RD, Wright TM, Lipman JD, Schwarzkopf R, Figgie MP. Total knee arthroplasty in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 Jun 13. [Epub ahead of print]


Jost PW, Khair MM, Chen DX, Wright TM, Kelly AM, Rodeo SA. Suture number determines strength of rotator cuff repair. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2012 Jul 18;94(14):e100. Khan FA, Lipman JD, Pearle AD, Boland PJ, Healey JH. Surgical technique: computer-generated custom jigs improve accuracy of wide resection of bone tumors. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 Jun;471(6):2007-16. Klingenstein GG, Yeager AM, Lipman JD, Westrich GH. Computerized range of motion analysis following dual mobility total hip arthroplasty, traditional total hip arthroplasty, and hip resurfacing. The Journal of Arthroplasty. 2013 Mar 8. [Epub ahead of print] Klingenstein GG, Yeager AM, Lipman JD, Westrich GH. Increased range of motion to impingement with large head total hip arthroplasty: point of diminishing returns. Hip International. 2012 May-Jun;22(3):261-65. Kim G, Boskey AL, Baker SP, van der Meulen MC. Improved prediction of rat cortical bone mechanical behavior using composite beam theory to integrate tissue level properties. Journal of Biomechanics. 2012 Nov 15;45(16):2784-90. Ko FC, Dragomir C, Plumb DA, Goldring SR, Wright TM, Goldring MB, van der Meulen MC. In vivo cyclic compression causes cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone changes in mouse tibiae. Arthritis & Rheumatism. 2013 Jun;65(6):1569-78. Lee AT, Schrumpf MA, Choi D, Meyers KN, Patel R, Wright TM, Hotchkiss RN, Daluiski A. The influence of gravity on the unstable elbow. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 2013 Jan;22(1):81-87. Lynch ME, Brooks D, Mohanan S, Lee MJ, Polamraju P, Dent K, Bonassar L, van der Meulen MC, Fischbach C. In vivo tibial compression decreases osteolysis and tumor formation in a human metastatic breast cancer model. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2013 May 3. [Epub ahead of print] Macdonald DE, Rapuano BE, Vyas P, Lane JM, Meyers K, Wright TM. Heat and radiofrequency plasma glow discharge pretreatment of a titanium alloy promote bone formation and osseointegration. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry. 2013 May 3. [Epub ahead of print]

Padgett DE, Wright TM. That’s why we call it BIOmechanics! Commentary on an article by H. John Cooper, MD, et al: adverse local tissue reaction arising from corrosion at the femoral neck-body junction in a dual-taper stem with a cobalt-chromium modular neck. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (Am). 2013 May 15;95(10):e711-2. Sevenler D, Buckley MR, Kim G, van der Meulen MC, Cohen I, Bonassar LJ. Spatial periodicity in growth plate shear mechanical properties is disrupted by vitamin D deficiency. Journal of Biomechanics. 2013 Jun 21;46(10):1597-603. Shane E, Ebeling PR, Abrahamsen B, Adler RA, Brown TD, Cheung AM, Cosman F, Curtis JR, Dell R, Dempster DW, Einhorn TA, Genant HK, Geusens P, Klaushofer K, Lane JM, McKiernan F, McKinney R, Ng A, Nieves J, O’Keefe R, Papapoulos S, Howe TS, van der Meulen MC, Weinstein RS, Whyte MP. Atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures: second report of a task force of the American society for bone and mineral research. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2013 May 28. [Epub ahead of print] Stoner K, Jerabek SA, Tow S, Wright TM, Padgett DE. Rotating platform has no surface damage advantage over fixed-bearing TKA. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2013 Jan;471(1):76-85. van der Meulen MC, Allali G, Rieger SW, Assal F, Vuilleumier P. The influence of individual motor imagery ability on cerebral recruitment during gait imagery. Human Brain Mapping. 2012 Sep 27. [Epub ahead of print] van der Meulen MC, Boskey AL. Atypical subtrochanteric femoral shaft fractures: role for mechanics and bone quality. Arthritis Research & Therapy. 2012 Aug 29;14(4):220. Yang X, Willie BM, Beach JM, Wright TM, van der Meulen MC, Bostrom MP. Trabecular bone adaptation to loading in a rabbit model is not magnitude-dependent. Journal of Orthopaedic Research. 2013 Jun;31(6):930-34.

McCarthy MM, Tucker S, Nguyen JT, Green DW, Imhauser CW, Cordasco FA. Contact stress and kinematic analysis of all-epiphyseal and over-the-top pediatric reconstruction techniques for the anterior cruciate ligament. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 Jun;41(6):1330-39. Ng KW, Wanivenhaus F, Chen T, Abrams VD, Torzilli PA, Warren RF, Maher SA. Differential cross-linking and radioprotective effects of genipin on mature bovine and human patella tendons. Cell and Tissue Banking. 2013 Mar;14(1):21-32. Padgett DE, Cottrell J, Kelly N, Gelber J, Farrell C, Wright TM. Retrieval analysis of nonmodular constrained tibial inserts after primary total knee replacement. Orthopedic Clinics of North America. 2012 Nov;43(5):e39-43.

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Hospital for Special Surgery 2012-2013 Orthopaedic Surgery Graduating Residents

Front row, from left: Dr. Edward V. Craig, Dr. Thomas P. Sculco, Dr. Mathias P. Bostrom; second row, from left: Dr. Benjamin A. McArthur, Dr. Moira M. McCarthy, Dr. Alison F. Kitay, Dr. Samuel A. Taylor; third row, from left: Dr. Marschall B. Berkes, Dr. Milton T.M. Little

Academic Leadership Thomas P. Sculco, MD Surgeon-in-Chief

Academic Awards Nancy Kane Bischoff Mentor Award Thomas P. Sculco, MD

Mathias P. Bostrom, MD Program Director, Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Program

Samuel Delgado, CST, Award for Outstanding Educator and Mentor to Residents in the OR Lincoln Tugwell, CST

Edward V. Craig, MD, MPH Associate Program Director, Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Program

Richard S. Laskin, MD, Young Attending Award Joshua S. Dines, MD

Alejandro Leali, MD PGY-1 Faculty Mentor

Jean C. McDaniel Award for Professionalism, Ethics and Peer Leadership Samuel A. Taylor, MD

2012-2013 Orthopaedic Surgery Graduating Residents Marschall B. Berkes, MD United States Air Force Germany (Pending)

Lewis Clark Wagner, MD, Award for Excellence in Orthopaedic Clinical/Translational Research Benjamin A. McArthur, MD Intra-articular Continuously-Infused Ropivacaine vs. Epidural Plus Femoral Nerve Block for Pain Control Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blinded Trial

Alison F. Kitay, MD Hand Fellowship Brigham and Women’s Hospital Milton T.M. Little, MD Trauma Fellowship University of Washington, Harborview Medical Center Benjamin A. McArthur, MD Arthroplasty Fellowship Mayo Clinic Moira M. McCarthy, MD Sports Medicine Fellowship Hospital for Special Surgery Samuel A. Taylor, MD, Sports Medicine Fellowship Hospital for Special Surgery 64

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

Russell F. Warren, MD, Award for Excellence in Orthopaedic Basic/Translational Research Alison F. Kitay, MD Parathyroid Hormone and Alendronate Reduce Fractures and Alter Bone Quality in an oim/oim Mouse Model of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Philip D. Wilson, Jr., MD, Teaching Award John H. Healey, MD


Hospital for Special Surgery 2012-2013 Orthopaedic Surgery Graduating FELLOWS

Front row: Dr. Thomas P. Sculco, Surgeon-in-Chief, and Dr. John S. Blanco, Chair, Fellowship Programs

Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement Division Matthew P. Abdel, MD Michael P. Ast, MD Trevor R. Banka, MD Thomas John, MD Denis Nam, MD Joseph Ogyaadu, MB, BCh Lucas Pugh, MD, MBA, MPH Jeffrey D. Stimac, MD Jonathan M. Vigdorchik, MD Center for Hip Preservation Olusanjo Adeoye, MD, MBA Foot and Ankle Service MaCalus V. Hogan, MD Eric Lloyd, MD Christine M. Seaworth, MD Hand and Upper Extremity Service Eugene Ek, MBBS, PhD Thomas Owen, MD Nina Suh, MD Limb Lengthening and Complex Reconstruction Service Yatin Kirane, MBBS, D.Ortho, MS, PhD Saravanaraja Muthusamy, MBBS, MS Metabolic Bone Disease/ Musculoskeletal Oncology Service Pingal Desai, MD Parth Vyas, MD

Stavros Niarchos Foundation International Fellowship Vasileios Sakellariou, MD, PhD Orthopaedic Trauma Service Jason Halvorson, MD Jeremy LaMothe, MD Ryan Martin, MD Pediatric Orthopaedic Service O. Folorunsho Edobor-Osula, MD, MPH Scoliosis/Spine Service Motasem Al Maaieh, MD Woojin Cho, MD, PhD Mazda Farshad Tabrizi, MD Marios-Nikolaos Lykissas, MD Ali Maziad, MD (John R. Cobb Spine/Scoliosis Fellow) Joshua Schroeder, MD Haruki Ueda, MD Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service Tiffany M. Bohan, MD (Primary Care) K. Lauchlan Chambers, MD, MPH Demetris Delos, MD Kristofer Jones, MD Richard Kang, MD Richard Ma, MD (Research Fellow) Andrew Merritt, MD Cathal Moran, MD (International Fellow) Danyal H. Nawabi, MD

Philip D. Wilson, MD, Award for Excellence in Orthopaedic Surgery Research Denis Nam, MD Extramedullary Guides versus Portable Navigation for Tibial Alignment in Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized, Controlled Trial Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

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2012-2013 NOTABLE ACHIEVEMENTS

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Surgeon-in-Chief Thomas P. Sculco, MD 212.774.2478

Chair, Fellowship Committee John S. Blanco, MD 646.797.8366

Clinical Director Charles N. Cornell, MD 212.606.1414

Orthopaedic Research Director Jo A. Hannafin, MD, PhD 212.606.1469

Academic Director and Program Director, Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Program Mathias P. Bostrom, MD 212.606.1674

Faculty Development Director Scott W. Wolfe, MD 212.606.1529

Orthopaedic Surgery Services

Adult Reconstruction and Joint Replacement Division Douglas E. Padgett, MD, Chief, Hip Service 212.606.1642 Steven B. Haas, MD, Chief, Knee Service 212.606.1852 Mark P. Figgie, MD, Chief, Surgical Arthritis Service 212.606.1932 Foot and Ankle Service Jonathan T. Deland, MD, Co-Chief 212.606.1665 Matthew M. Roberts, MD, Co-Chief 212.606.1181 Hand and Upper Extremity Service Edward A. Athanasian, MD, Chief 212.606.1962 Limb Lengthening and Complex Reconstruction Service S. Robert Rozbruch, MD, Chief 212.606.1415

Adult Ambulatory Care Center Alejandro Leali, MD, Medical Director 212.606.1433 Department of Biomechanics Timothy M. Wright, PhD, Director 212.606.1093 66

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

Metabolic Bone Disease/ Musculoskeletal Oncology Service Joseph M. Lane, MD, Chief 212.606.1172 Orthopaedic Trauma Service David L. Helfet, MD, Chief 212.606.1888 Pediatric Orthopaedic Service Roger F. Widmann, MD, Chief 212.606.1325 Scoliosis Service Oheneba Boachi-Adjei, MD, Chief 212.606.1948 Spine Service Frank P. Cammisa, Jr., MD, Chief 212.606.1946 Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service David W. Altchek, MD, Co-Chief 212.606.1909 Scott A. Rodeo, MD, Co-Chief 212.606.1513 Research Division Steven R. Goldring, MD, Chief Scientific Officer 212.606.2394


Department of Orthopaedic Surgery The 2012-2013 Annual Report of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery is produced by Education & Academic Affairs of Hospital for Special Surgery. Laura Robbins, DSW Senior Vice President Education & Academic Affairs Designated Institutional Officer, GME Marcia Ennis Director Education Publications & Communications Linda Errante Robert Pryzgoda Managing Editors Judy Pommett Associate Editor Ali Wilcox Art Director Robert Essel Major Photography Brad Hess Contributing Photography

About Hospital for Special Surgery Founded in 1863, Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) is a world leader in orthopaedics, rheumatology and rehabilitation. HSS is nationally ranked No. 1 in orthopaedics, No. 4 in rheumatology, and No. 5 in geriatrics by U.S.News & World Report (2013-14), and is the first hospital in New York State to receive Magnet Recognition for Excellence in Nursing Service from the American Nurses Credentialing Center three consecutive times. Located in New York City, HSS also serves patients in the regional area with physician offices in Greenwich, Long Island, and Queens, and serves Florida patients with an outpatient rehabilitation office in South Florida. Patients choose to come to Hospital for Special Surgery from across the United States and from around the world. HSS has one of the lowest infection rates in the country. From 2008 to 2013, HSS has been a recipient of the HealthGrades Joint Replacement Excellence Award. HSS is a member of the NewYork-Presbyterian Healthcare System and an affiliate of Weill Cornell Medical College and as such all Hospital for Special Surgery medical staff are faculty of Weill Cornell. The Hospital’s Research Division is internationally recognized as a leader in the investigation of musculoskeletal and autoimmune diseases. Hospital for Special Surgery is located in New York City and online at www.hss.edu.

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Hospital for Special Surgery 535 East 70th Street New York, NY 10021 www.hss.edu

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 2012-2013 Annual Report

212.606.1000

A Return to Form and Function: The Essential Work of Hospital for Special Surgery Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 2012-2013 Annual Report