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2015 VNLA Officers & Directors OFFICERS President SONYA L. WESTERVELT Public Relations ‘10 Saunders Brothers Inc 2717 Tye Brook Highway Piney River, VA 22964 (434) 277-5455 sonya@saundersbrothers.com

2 YR DIRECTORS

TOM THOMPSON, Environmental Affairs ‘10 Research Committee Natural Art Landscaping Lancaster Farms 3540 S Belmont Rd 5800 Knotts Neck Rd Richmond VA 23234-2912 Suffolk VA 23435-1353 (804) 674-5703 757-484-4421 Naturalartlandscaping@yaChristopher@lancasterfarms.com hoo.com CHRISTOPHER BROWN ‘13

Vice President BILL GOULDIN Bill Gouldin ‘12 ‘12 Strange’s Florist/Garden Ctrs 12111 W. Broad St. Richmond, VA 23233 804-360-2800 wjg@stranges.com

CRAIG ATTKISSON ‘13 Grower Guide Green Side Up Landscaping PO Box 2026 Glen Allen, VA 23058-2026 804-514-4610

Secretary/ Treasurer VIRGINIA ROCKWELL Legislation ‘12 Gentle Gardener Green Design PO Box 418 Gordonsville, VA 22942-0418 540-832-7031 (cell) 434-531-0467

JOSH ELLINGER, Environmental Affairs‘15 Waynesboro Nurseries PO Box 897 Waynesboro VA 22980-0987 540-946-3800 Cell: 540______ Josh@wnurseries.com

Virginia@GentleGardener.com

Past President MATT SHRECKHISE Communications ‘08 Shreckhise Nurseries PO Box 428 Grottoes, VA 24441-0428 540-249-5761 Matthew@shreckhise.com

Executive Director

craig@gsulandscaping.com

BRENT HUNSINGER, Legislation’15 Brent's Native Plantings 10715 Hamilton's Crossing Dr Fredericksburg, VA 22408 443-655-3410 brenthunsinger@gmail.com DOUG RODES, Membership ‘15 James River Nurseries 13244 Ashland Rd Ashland VA 23005-7504 (804) 798-2020 Cell: (804) 380-5259 drodes@jamesrivernurseries.com

JEFFREY B. MILLER Horticulture Management Associates LLC 383 Coal Hollow Road Christiansburg, VA 24073-6721 Educational Advisors 1-800-476-0055 Fax: 540-382-2716 DR. ROGER HARRIS info@vnla.org VA Tech Horticulture Dept. Head Saunders Hall (0327) Blacksburg, VA 24061-0001 540-231-5451 rharris@vt.edu

VNLA Newsletter VNLA Newsletter

1 YR DIRECTORS

AARON WILLIAMS ‘14 Education Committee Williams Landscape & Design PO Box 7001 Williamsburg VA 23188-7001 757-564-7011 aaron@wldgreen.com

MANTS’ Directors JOHN LANCASTER‘02 Bennett’s Creek Nursery 3613 Bridge Road Suffolk, VA 23435-1807 757-483-1425 john@bcnursery.com ROBIN RINACA – 15 Eastern Shore Nursery of VA PO Box 400 Melfa, VA 23410-0400 757-787-4732 rrinaca@esnursery.com

DANNY SHRECKHISE Shreckhise Nurseries ‘12 PO Box 428 Grottoes, VA 24441-0428 540-249-5761 Danny@shreckhise.com

Educational Advisors DR. JIM OWEN HARAREC 1444 Diamond Springs Rd Virginia Beach, VA 23455 (757) 363-3804 jim.owen@vt.edu

January/February/March 2015 January / February / March 2015

REGIONAL ASSOCIATIONS Central Virginia Nursery & Landscape Assoc. Mary Petres (804) 249-4438 mary@manchestergarden.com Eastern Shore Nurserymen’s Association Stuart Burnley 757-442-3548 hermfarm@verizon.net Hampton Roads Nursery & Landscape Assoc Wes Bray (757) 422-2117 wemows@aol.com Northern Virginia Nursery & Landscape Assoc Chuck Wood (703) 641-4790 chuck@wheats.com Piedmont Landscape Assoc Jessica Primm 434-882-0520 info@piedmontlandscape.org Shenandoah Valley Nursery & Greenhouse Assoc. Matt Shreckhise 540-249-5761 matthew@shreckhise.com

Directors at Large MIKE HILDEBRAND ‘12 James River Nurseries 13244 Ashland Rd Ashland VA 23005-7504 804-798-2020

mchildebrand@ jamesrivernurseries.com CHERYL LAJOIE Certification ‘09 Lancaster Farms 5800 Knotts Neck Rd Suffolk VA 23435-1353 757-484-4421 Cheryl@lancasterfarms.com

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Table of Contents Ad - Bennett's Creek Nursery ...................................... 63 Ad - Bremo Trees......................................................... 64 Ad - Carolina Bark Products ........................................ 50 Ad - Eastern Shore Nursery of Virginia....................... 36 Ad - Fair View Nursery ............................................... 50 Ad - Farm Credit .......................................................... 64 Ad - Goodson and Associates ...................................... 26 Ad - Gossett's Landscape Nursery ............................... 60 Ad - Guthrie Nursery ................................................... 16 Ad - Hanover Farms........................................................ 7 Ad - Hawksridge Farms ............................................... 21 Ad - JOCOPLANTS .................................................... 45 Ad - Lancaster Farms ................................................... 39 Ad - Mid-Atlantic Solutions ........................................ 28 Ad - OHP - Marengo......................................................2 2 Ad - Pender Nursery .................................................... 53 Ad - Plantworks Nursery.............................................. 30 Ad - Shreckhise Nurseries............................................ 14 Ad - Sitelight Id ........................................................... 11 Ad - Turtle Creek Nursery ........................................... 17 Ad - Waynesboro Nurseries ......................................... 9 Ad - Willow Springs Tree Farms ................................. 61 CVNLA - Thanks Short Course sponsors .................... 38 Events - Calendar ......................................................... 62 Events - Farwest Trade Show Sets Course for 2015 ... 56 Events - Shenandoah Valley Plant Symposium ........... 58 Events - The American Boxwood Society 55th Annual Symposium .............................. 56 Events - VA Tech Hahn Garden Gala .......................... 57 Events - VSLD Summer Tour Itinerary ....................... 57 Letter - Agribusiness Council Roundtables ................. 8 Letter - Agriculture in the Classroom .......................... 8 Letter - Agribusiness Council Annual Breakfast Meeting ..............................9 9 Letter - Agribusiness Council State Policy Development Meeting .....................................8 8 Letter – Williams Thank You ...................................... 18 Letter – Niemiera Thank You ........................................99 News - 2012 Census Profiles Virginia Agriculture..... 41 News - 2015 Perennial Plant of the Year™ Geranium xcantabrigiense 'Biokovo' .............. 45 News - Dan River Plants, LLC Suspends Operations .. 23 News - Date Change for New England Grows ........... 40 News - Get Ready to Garden: 2015 is the Year of the Coleus! ..................... 43 News - H-2B Cap Reached for First Half of Year ....... 23 News - Last Call: Imperata "Red Baron" a Legal Noxious Weed ................................. 22 News - MANTS Recap ................................................ 38 News - Maryland Nursery & Landscape Association becomes Maryland Nursery, Landscape, and Greenhouse Association ................................... 37 4

- North College Carolinacampus Nurseryand & Landscape theNews Swarthmore exhibiting over 4,000 Association New Executive Director .............. kinds of ornamental plants, the Arboretum displays some 60 of - OAN Introduces App theNews best trees, shrubs, vines, New and perennials for use in the reto Help Nursery Businesses Connect .............. 40 gion. News - Shemin Landscape Supply joins with Private Garden of Andrew Bunting John Deere Landscapes .................................. 23 News Requirement changes for Belvidere is the home garden of Andrew Bunting who is the VDOT Installation Contractors ........... 22 Curator at the Scott Plant Arboretum of Swarthmore College. News - Virginia's Noxious Weed Regulation ............. 18 Private Garden Jeff ................................................... Jabco and Joe Henderson Obituary - TomofWest 15 President's Message ..................................................... 6 ..6 Private Garden of Charles Cresson “Hedgleigh Spring” Research - Prevention and Management This two-acre garden, home of author/lecturer Charles Cresof Boxwood blight ........................................ 47 son, has been a family property since 1883. The garden was Research Efficacy of bleach ethanol as designed by -his grandfather in the and 1920’s and 1930’s and reon the boxwood blight ................ 46 tains its earlysanitizers 20th Century character. Since 1970, Charles has Research Weed Management in filled the diverse habitats and microclimates with a diverse and 55 extensive plantOrnamental collection. Grasses Ancient ................................... towering white oaks and Table of Contents ......................................................... 4 ..4 black gum surround the house and pre-1850 springhouse, unTips Conservation Landscaping ................................ 25 der planted with mature azaleas, dogwoods and large hardy caTips from SNA .......................................................... 61 mellia hybrids. Tips - Overwintering Perennials .................................. 42 Chanticleer Garden VNLA - Certification Quiz 71 .................................. 33 Chanticleer has been called the# most romantic, imaginative, andVNLA exciting public gardenQuiz in America. The garden is a study - Certification Article .............................. 25 of VNLA textures-and forms, whereSteward foliage trumps flowers, the garEnvironmental of the Year Award . 15 deners lead- Field the design, and even drinking.................. fountains .. are VNLA Day: SAVE THEtheDATE!!! 6 sculptural. is a garden of pleasure and learning, relaxing yet VNLA -ItHonorary Lifetime Membership filled with ideas to takeParkerson home. ...................................... 16 - Charlie VNLA Honorary Lifetime Membership Mt. Cuba-Center - Ennion and Mary Williams ....................... 17 Mt.VNLA Cuba Center is aProfessional botanical garden inspires an appreci- Young of thethat Year: Maslow ..... 14 ation for the beauty and value of native plants and a commitVNLA - Professional of the Year: Paul Saunders ....... 13 ment to protect theContest habitats ................................................ that sustain them. During our visit VNLA - Photo 20 we will get to meet with Travis Beck, the director of horticulVNLA - Plant Something Marketing Program ........... 34 ture and author of a recent book “Principles of Ecological DeVNLA - Member Profile: Saunders Brothers sign”. Celebrating 100 Years .................................. 10 For more information Chris Coen @ 804-475-6767 VNLA – Profile: 2015call President, Sonya Westervelt .... 7 or Katie Sokol @ 540-742-3306 VNLA - Winter Board Meeting Highlights ................ 59

SAVE THE DATE!!! VNLA Management Workshop Wednesday afternoon, August 19

VNLA Field Day

Thursday, August 20 At Shade Tree Farms

VNLA Summer Tour

Friday, August 21 Ruppert Landscapes, Wheats Landscapes - Landscape projects!

January / February / March 2015

VNLA Newsletter

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VNLA VNLAMission, Mission, VNLA Mission, Vision Visionand andObjectives Objectivesfor for2015 2014 Vision and Objectives for 2014

Classified Classified Ads ClassifiedAds Ads

MissionStatement: Statement:To ToEnhance Enhanceand andpromote promoteVirVirMission Mission Statement: To Enhance and promote Virginia’snursery nurseryand andlandscape landscapeindustry. industry. ginia’s ginia’s nursery and landscape industry. Vision:toto tobecome the leader and resource theVirVirVision: leader and resource forforthe Vision: becomethe the leader and resource for the ginianursery nursery and landscape industry. ginia and landscape industry. Virginia nursery and landscape industry.

Objectives Objectives Objectives Educated,Available AvailableSkilled SkilledLabor LaborForce Force-- -Goal: Goal: Educated, Educated, Available Skilled Labor Force Goal: VNLAwill willcontinue continueto promoteprograms programsthat thatwill will VNLA VNLA will continue totopromote promote programs that will education,train trainand andprovide available skilled labor education, skilled labor education, train and provideananavailable available skilled laforce. force. bor force. EffectiveCommunication Communicationand andAdvocacy AdvocacyGOAL: GOAL: Effective Effective Communication and Advocacy GOAL: VNLAwill willeffectively effepctively communication amongstaff, staff, VNLA communication among VNLA will effepctively communication among staff, board,members, members,partners partnersand andthe thecommunity. community. board, board, members, partners and the community. Maximizingand andAllocation AllocationResources Resources-- -GOAL: GOAL: Maximizing Maximizing and Allocation Resources GOAL: VNLAwill willsecure secureincreased increasedfunding fundingfrom fromdiverse diverse VNLA VNLA will secure increased funding from diverse sources and secure the necessary staff, board and comsources and secure the necessary staff, board and comsources and secure the necessary staff, board and mitteemembers members run a dynamic organization. mittee totorun dynamic organization. committee members toarun a dynamic organization. Membershipand andOutreach Outreach-- -GOAL: GOAL:Expand Expandand and Membership Membership and Outreach GOAL: Expand and communicatethe thevalue valueof membership. communicate communicate the value ofofmembership. membership. Stewardship-- GOAL: -GOAL: GOAL:VNLA VNLAwill willpromote promoteadoption adoption Stewardship Stewardship VNLA will promote adoption BestManagement ManagementPractices. Practices. of ofofBest Best Management Practices.

Support VNLA Member Growers!

StrategicMarketing Marketing-- GOAL: -GOAL: GOAL:VNLA VNLAwill willpromote promote Strategic Strategic Marketing VNLA will promote itself as the leader and resource of the green industry. itself itself as as the the leader leader and and resource resourceof ofthe thegreen greenindustry. industry.

Online at www.VNLA.org

Whatare aremembers membersproblems? problems? What What are members problems? Howare arewe wegoing goingto helpthem thembecome become How How are we going totohelp help them become more successful? more successful? more successful?

New Native Plant Section! For a print copy Support VNLA call 1-800-476-0055 email info@vnla.org Support VNLA Member Growers! Support VNLA

Member Member Growers! Online at Growers! www.VNLA.org

Online at www.VNLA.org Online at Plant www.VNLA.org New Native Section! New New Native Plant Section! Native Plant For a print copySection! Fall Review and Test for calla Class 1-800-476-0055 For print copy For a print copy email info@vnla.org 1-800-476-0055 call 1-800-476-0055 Virginiacall Certified Horticulturist info@vnla.org email email info@vnla.org

Crozet, VA Monday’s, 5:30-8:30 p.m. October 20 – December 8 Exam, Saturday, December 13 Location TBA

VNLANewsletter Newsletter VNLA VNLA Newsletter

VNLA Newsletter

July /August / September January / February / March 2014 2015 July/August/September 2014 October/November/December 2014

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President’s Message President’s Message

Well isn’t this exciting! I’m thrilled to continue serving VirWell isn’t this exciting! I’m thrilled to continue Virginia’s nursery and landscape professionals this serving year. Thank ginia’s and landscape year. you fornursery your steadfast supportprofessionals of the VNLAthis over the Thank years. you for that yourit’s steadfast support of the VNLA over the years. I agree a terrific organization doing great things for Ithe agree that it’s a terrific organization doing great things betterment of our industry as whole and look forwardfor to the betterment our industry as whole and look forward to continuing thatof tradition of excellence. continuing that tradition of excellence. As we pass the baton for another As pass take the baton for another year,weI must the opportunity to year, I must take the opportunity to thank the leaders before me, in parthank the leaders before me, in particular, Matt Shreckhise, for his serticular, Shreckhise, hishave service as Matt President in 2014.forWe vice as team President in 2014. have a great assembled forWe 2015 as awegreat assembled for 2015 as lookteam to grow and evolve into the we look to grow and evolve into the organization you need us to be. organization you need us to be. By the time you are reading this, we By timecompleted you are reading this,sucwe willthe have another will have completed another successful MANTS and will be staring earnestly at the calendar cessful and will staring earnestly at theofcalendar and the MANTS weather report forbethe hopeful beginning spring. and the weather report for the hopeful beginning Every year I am taken by how weather dependentof ourspring. busiEvery I amtotaken by how weather dependent our business is.year Here’s a steady season! ness is. Here’s to a steady season! We will have also watched the General Assembly in action. We also watched theof General Assembly in action. Withwill thehave tremendous support the Virginia Agribusiness With the tremendous support of the Virginia Agribusiness Council and our own board volunteers and members, we inCouncil own board volunteers and members, influencedand the our legislative process by providing timely we inforfluenced thepositions legislative by providing information and onprocess numerous issues thattimely could affect mation positionsinon could how weand do business thenumerous future. Soissues far, sothat good. Andaffect new how we do business in the future. So far, so good. this year, we will be honoring our public officialsAnd withnew the this year, of wefive will trees be honoring our public officialsHallowed with the donation to The Journey Through donation of fiveLegacy trees to The Journey Through Hallowed Ground Living Tree Planting Project. Ground Living Legacy Tree Planting Project. Executive Director Jeff Miller has been busy attending Executive Director Jeffacross Miller been busy attending meetings and seminars thehas state. In addition to more meetings and seminars across the state. In addition more traditional industry events, we will have gathered intoNorthtraditional industry events, we willHour have in gathered in Northern Virginia for a Member Happy February after a ern Virginiafirst for time a Member Hour in February after a successful HappyHappy Hour in Richmond in Decemsuccessful first time Happy Hour in Richmond in December. Stay tuned as we look to host more of this type of event ber. Stay to host more of this type of event across thetuned state as in we the look coming months. across the state in the coming months. Field Day is shaping up and will be hosted by Shade Tree Field is shaping and will be hosted Shade Tree Farm Day in Manassas in up August. Summer Tourbywill focus on Farm in Manassas in August. Summer Tour will focus on landscape operations in the Northern Virginia area and landscape operations in the Northern Virginia area and promises to offer terrific insight into how member firms oppromises into how member firmsconoperate. All to ofoffer theseterrific eventsinsight are a wonderful way to keep erate. of your these colleagues events are aand wonderful way to coming keep connectedAll with what’s up and in nected with your what’s the industry. Morecolleagues details areand on the way.up and coming in the industry. More details are on the way.

We Want to Hear from YOU! We Want to Hear from YOU!

Send your comments and suggestions to Send your comments and1-800-476-0055 suggestions to info@vnla.org info@vnla.org 1-800-476-0055

the Swarthmore College campus and exhibiting2015 over 4,000 Vol. 85, No.1; January/February/March 85, No.1;plants, January/February/March 2015some of kinds ofVol. ornamental the Arboretum displays Editor: Jeff Miller the best trees, shrubs, Editor: vines, and perennials for use in the reJeff Miller gion.

Private Garden of Andrew Bunting Belvidere is the home garden of Andrew Bunting who is the Curator at the Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College.

Private Garden of Jeff Jabco and Joe Henderson

383 Coal Hollow Road; Christiansburg, VA 24073-6721

Private Garden of Road; Charles Cresson “Hedgleigh Spring” 383 Coal Hollow Christiansburg, VA 24073-6721

Internet E-mail Address: info@vnla.org This two-acre garden, home of author/lecturer Charles CresInternet E-mail Address: info@vnla.org www.vnla.org (Association Info) son, has been awww.vnla.org family property since 1883. The garden was (Association Info) designed by his grandfather in the 1920’s and 1930’s and rehttps://www.facebook.com/VNLA1932 tains its early 20th Century character. Since 1970, Charles has filled the diversehttps://www.facebook.com/VNLA1932 habitats and microclimates with a diverse and Twitter: @vnla1932 extensive plant collection. Ancient towering white oaks and Twitter: @vnla1932 black gum surround the house and pre-1850 springhouse, unwww.VirginiaGardening.com (Consumer Info) der planted with mature azaleas, dogwoods and large hardy cawww.VirginiaGardening.com (Consumer Info) Telephone: 540-382-0943 or 1-800-476-0055 mellia hybrids. Telephone: 540-382-0943 or 1-800-476-0055 Fax: 540-382-2716 Fax: 540-382-2716 Chanticleer GardenPublished Disclaimer: for your information, Disclaimer: Published for your information, this newsletter is not endorsement Chanticleer has been called the an most romantic, imaginative, this newsletter is not an endorsement for individual products or editorial comments. and exciting public garden in America. The garden is a study for individual products or editorial comments. of textures and forms, where foliage trumps flowers, the gardeners lead the design, and even the drinking fountains are sculptural. It is a garden of pleasure and our learning, We will continue to work on updating look, relaxing buildingyet on We will continue to work on updating our look, building on filled with ideas to take home. our new logo, and finding ways to better communicate what our new logo, and finding ways to better communicate what we are doing to support you and your business. We are alMt. Cuba Center we areopen doing support you your Wetoare ways to to suggestions, so and please dobusiness. not hesitate bealin Mt. Cuba Center is a botanical garden that inspires an appreciways suggestions, so please do not hesitate to be in touch open if weto can be of service. ation the can beauty andservice. value of native plants and a committouchfor if we be of Happy Allhabitats the bestthat to allment to spring! protect the sustain them. During our visit Happy All with the best to allwe will spring! get to meet Travis Beck, the director of horticulture and author of a recent book “Principles of Ecological Design”. Sonya Lepper Westervelt, VNLA President 2015 Sonya Lepper Westervelt, VNLA President 2015 sonya@saundersbrothers.com For more information call Chris Coen @ 804-475-6767 sonya@saundersbrothers.com 434-277-5455 or Katie Sokol @ 540-742-3306 434-277-5455

SAVE THE DATE!!! SAVE THE DATE!!! SAVE THE DATE!!! VNLA Management Workshop VNLA Field Day VNLA Field Day

Wednesday afternoon, August 19

Thursday, August 20 VNLA Field Day Thursday, August 20

At ShadeAugust Tree Farms Thursday, 20 At Shade Tree Farms At Shade Tree Farms

VNLA Summer Tour VNLA Summer Tour VNLA Summer Tour Friday, August 21

Friday, August 21 Ruppert Landscapes, Friday, August 21 Ruppert Landscapes Wheats Landscapes Landscape projects! Ruppert Landscapes Wheats Landscapes & Landscape projects!

Wheats Landscapes & Landscape projects! 6

January / February / March 2015

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Hobbies: Cooking, Running (when I make time!), gardening, loving my family

VNLA - 2015 President, Sonya Westervelt Sonya Lepper Westervelt is originally from Southern Maryland. She is married to Paul Westervelt. Both of them work at Saunders Brothers Nursery. They have one child named Magnolia Bland Westervelt who was born in October of 2013. Maggie,Sonya, Sonyaand andPaul Paul Maggie, Sonya attended Cave Spring High School, in Roanoke Virginia. She attended Virginia Tech and received a degree in Horticulture and Agricultural and Applied Economics in 2005. She then attended the University of Delaware and received a MS degree in Public Horticulture in 2007. HR.HanoverFarms.Ad.9-22.pdf 1 9/22/14 2:53 PM Here is some additional information about Sonya:

Favorite Plant: Only one?! Favorite edible: Solanum lycopersicum, Favorite woody ornamental: Hydrangea quercifolia, Favorite herbaceous ornamental: Amsonia hubrictii, Favorite evergreen tree: Magnolia grandiflora, Favorite deciduous tree: Cercidiphyllum japonicum Favorite Flower Color: Green Dislikes: Dishonesty, odd numbers on a digital screen, hard boiled eggs Dream Vacation: just about anywhere with my family and a substantial food allowance Aspirations: to farm our own land one day Hardest Part of Your Workday: getting there on time Best Part of Your Workday: quiet moments of intense productivity Helpful Hint When Handling Employees: The Golden Rule should always apply. And give credit where credit is due. Best Advice Ever Received: Don’t worry, be happy. Really. Life is much better this way.

Ad – Hanover Farms

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Specializing in Liriope, Vinca, Ivy, Pachysandra and more... 13262 Spring Road, Rockville, Va 23146 (804) 749-4304 • FAX (804) 749-4350 www.hanoverfarms.com VNLA Newsletter

January / February / March 2015

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Letter – Agribusiness Council Roundtables

Letters -Virginia Agribusiness Council State Policy Development Meeting

On behalf of the Virginia Agribusiness Council, we want to thank you again for supporting us through your sponsorship of our Richmond/Petersburg, Abingdon, Southside, and Eastern Shore roundtables, and specifically as a meal sponsor for our Shenandoah Valley roundtable. Thanks in large part to the outstanding support of members like you, the Council has continued to excel in representing our industry's interest with the legislature. Our Regional Roundtables are one opportunity for us to come together to address the concerns of our members in the presence of important lawmakers and individuals such as the State Forester and Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

On behalf of the Virginia Agribusiness Council, we want to thank you again for your support of our State Policy Development Meeting. Thanks in large part to the outstanding support of members like you, the Council has continued to excel in representing our industry's interest with the legislature. Our State Policy Meeting is one opportunity for us to collectively develop our state policies and select priority issues for the coming year.

Attendance at the Regional Roundtable events has continued to grow each year. Our members have also played a key role in increasing attendance, as well as membership in Virginia Agribusiness Council, as they invite passionate community members to these events. We truly hope that we have succeeded in providing ample opportunities for individuals to speak to agency leaders and legislators in their district and inform them of their needs, as well as the needs of their industry overall. Your sponsorship enables our efforts to promote and defend the business interests of our members and ensured that we were able to provide special attention to each of our members' regions. Your support is greatly appreciated. Katie K. Frazier President, VAC

Letter – Agriculture in the Classroom Thanks to your support of Agriculture in the Classroom, Virginia educators and children will have the opportunity to cultivate an understanding and appreciation for Virginia's leading industry. Thank you for making a difference. Your donation of $1,500 to Agriculture in the Classroom will help to provide free agricultural classroom resources, lessons and training to educators and students. Thank you so much for investing in the future of agriculture through your donation!

Our Chairman, Danny Shreckhise of Shreckhise Nurseries, and I focused on our successful legislative advocacy efforts last year and into the future in maintaining funds for critical industry programs and establishing balanced guidelines for local governments for on-farm activities, defending our industry through legal support of two lawsuits filed by conservation interests against the state, and a renewed focus on membership growth and recruitment. At our Annual Meeting Breakfast, which was held prior to our State Policy Meeting, we were joined by Leighton Cooley, one of the six featured farmers in James Moll's film "Farmland." Cooley delivered a keynote address that stressed the importance of an open-door policy on our farms. Along with the other producers in the film, he expressed a deep love of agriculture and passion for his work. He urged those involved in agriculture who share this passion to make an effort to educate those around us who may not have the same exposure to agriculture as we do. Cooley stated that by taking care of what is in our own front yards, we each have the opportunity to show others where their food comes from and combat the negative misconceptions regarding our industry. It was a truly inspirational and heartfelt address, especially in light of the film screening the night before. Thank you for attending the meeting. Your sponsorship of the State Policy Development Meeting supports our efforts to promote and defend the business interests of our members. Katie K. Frazier President, VAC

Wayne Pryor, President Agriculture in the Classroom, If we can help you with anything, please contact Executive Director Karen Davis at 804-290-1142 or karen.davis@anvafb.com

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January / February / March 2015

VNLA Newsletter


Letters - Virginia Agribusiness Council Annual Breakfast Meeting On behalf of the Virginia Agribusiness Council, we want to thank you again for your support of our Annual Membership Meeting Breakfast. Thanks in large part to the outstanding support of members like you, the Council has continued to excel in representing our industry's interest with the legislature. Our Annual Membership Meeting Breakfast is one opportunity for us to collectively celebrate these successes. Our Chairman, Danny Shreckhise of Shreckhise Nurseries, and I focused on our successful legislative advocacy efforts last year and into the future in maintaining funds for critical industry programs and establishing balanced guidelines for local governments for on-farm activities, defending our industry through legal support of two lawsuits filed by conservation interests against the state, and a renewed focus on membership growth and recruitment. Member Profile – Saunders Brothers Celebrating 100 Years We were joined by Leighton Cooley, one of the six featured farmers in James Moll's film "Farmland," who delivered a keynote address that stressed the importance of an open-door policy on our farms. Along with the other producers in the film, Cooley expressed a deep love of agriculture and passion for his work. He urged those involved in agriculture who share this

passion to make an effort to educate those around us who may not have the same exposure to agriculture as we do. Cooley stated that by taking care of what is in our own front yards, we each have the opportunity to show others where their food comes from and combat the negative misconceptions regarding our industry. It was a truly inspirational and heartfelt address, especially in light of the film screening the night before. Thank you for attending the breakfast. Your sponsorship of the Annual Meeting supports our efforts to promote and defend the business interests of our members. Katie K. Frazier President

Letters - Niemiera I would like to express my sincere thanks to you for funding my Online Woody Plant Database project and the Determining Utilization and Efficiency of Best Management Practices for the Virginia Nursery Industry project. Your support is much appreciated. Alex X. Niemiera, Professor, Director of Undergraduate Curriculum – Horticulture Department, Assistant Dean of Student Programs – College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

[Now online for VNLA Members, Contact info@vnla.org for access]

Ad – Waynesboro Nurseries

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Member Profile – Saunders Brothers Celebrating 100 Years By the 1970s, Saunders Brothers was growing boxwood, azaleas, rhododendrons, hollies, hemlocks, and white pines in a pine grove near the current nursery. As a result of harsh winters towards the end of the decade, it was decided to upgrade to growing in hoop houses.

The John Saunders Family circa 1960

In 1915, five young brothers from a family of eleven children decided to form a partnership and share the money they’d made raising calves, apples, and trapping rabbits. Money became tight when the Great Depression hit, and some of the land had to be sold. Two brothers were forced to leave the partnership to farm on their own. By the end of World War II, the three remaining partners were raising peaches, apples, wheat, corn, tobacco, and cattle.

Spring Is Coming

In the mid-1980’s, the next generation of Saunders brothers began returning home from college (all Virginia Tech graduates). Tom returned with a horticulture degree, Bennett graduated with a degree in Agricultural Economics, and Robert majored in Engineering. Tom married Lyn, a horticulturalist, who studied at Clemson University. During this period, the nursery expanded and the orchards diversified into more varieties of fruit. Many of the current long tenured employees began joining Saunders Brothers around this time.

A Good Day! early 1950

In 1947, Paul Saunders, one of the partner’s sons, at the young age of 13, began propagating his first boxwood. His mother and a science teacher showed him how to take cuttings. Intrigued, he chose the north side of a hill near his home as his propagation site. A friend helped him with the project. They stuck 77 slips into the red earth, watered them every few days from a small creek at the bottom of the hill. From this almost impossibly primitive beginning, 25 of the plants rooted. He was truly excited and bought out his partner for 25 cents. His father eventually fenced a corner of the barnyard for his tiny 4-H project, a move that inaugurated today’s nursery. 10

January / February / March 2015

Foot of the Blue Ridge

VNLA Newsletter


In the early 90’s, Jim returned to Saunders Brothers, with a degree in Animal Science and several years’ experience as an extension agent in Madison County. The nursery continued to expand and diversify into annuals, perennials, and container trees. The end of the decade brought continued demand for larger boxwoods, and the field production program continued to grow.

and Bennett the field production and orchards. Robert directs sales for the nursery while Jim handles human resources. Lyn oversees payroll and accounting.

Paul Saunders and 4-H project

Today, Paul and Tatum Saunders continue to play an active role in the company. Tom manages the container nursery SiteLight .5 pg bw 3ads 10-04.qxd

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Saunders Brothers has become a leader in research of pest and disease resistant boxwood. In addition, they coordinate the National Boxwood Trials where more than sixty Boxwood Trial test cooperators from the United States and several international sites present this comprehensive evaluation of boxwood cultivars. With this research and data, horticulturists and gardeners have access to information that Page 1

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will allow them to come to a reliable conclusion as to the performance of some of the best boxwood cultivars available.

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Today’s Saunders Brothers is comprised of the wholesale nursery, orchard, and farm market. The wholesale nursery consists of approximately 75 acres of container production and 75 acres of field production. They produce over 50 varieties of peaches, apples, Asian pears and nectarines. Saunders Brothers ships over 1,000 products, including annuals, perennials, trees, shrubs, boxwood and fruit, to garden centers, landscapers, re-wholesalers, grocery stores and markets throughout the mid-Atlantic and Northeast, from the Carolina’s to New England.

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As Saunders Brothers celebrates its 100th birthday it continues to stand by the founding principles established by the original brothers back in 1915: faith, trust, and, most importantly, family.

January / February / March 2015

Paul Saunders was the 2014 recipient of Professional of the Year from the VNLA. He was presented with the award at the 2015 MANTS membership meeting.

VNLA Newsletter


VNLA - Paul Saunders honored as the 2014 VNLA Professional of the Year This year’s recipient of the Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association professional of the year goes to an individual whose influence in the field of horticulture, in the state of Virginia and beyond, is immense. He graduated from Vir-

His father eventually fenced a corner of the barnyard for his tiny 4-H project, a move that inaugurated today’s nursery. Today, the nursery and orchard cover more than 350 acres, growing over 1000 varieties of plants and 60 varieties of fruit.

Paul Saunders (l) is presented the Professional of the Year Award by Kevin Warhurst on behalf of his father, the 2013 recipient

Paul Saunders (l) is presented the Professional of the Year Award PaulbySaunders (l) is presented theofProfessional of the Year Award Kevin Warhurst on behalf his father, the 2013 recipient by Kevin Warhurst on behalf of his father, the 2013 recipient

ginia Tech in 1954 with a degree in Agricultural Engineering. In 1957, after spending 3 years in the army he returned home to Piney River, Virginia. He married a farm girl from Franklin County and they began farming alongside his father and uncle in Nelson County. As Paul Harvey would say ‘Here is the rest of the Story’: The year was 1915. Five young brothers from a family of eleven children decided to form a partnership and share the money that had been made raising calves, apples, and trapping rabbits. With the coming of the Great Depression, money became tight some of the land had to be sold and 2 of the partners were forced to leave the partnership and farm on their own. By the end of World War II, the farm was growing peaches, apples, wheat, corn, tobacco, and cattle. In 1947, one of the partner’s sons, at the young age of 13, began propagating his first boxwood. His science teacher and his mother showed him how to make cuttings for propagation. Intrigued, he chose the north side of a hill near his home as his propagation site. A friend helped him with the project. They stuck 77 slips into the red earth, watered them every few days from a small creek at the bottom of the hill. From this almost impossibly primitive beginning, 25 of the plants rooted. He was truly excited and he bought out his partner for 25 cents.

VNLA Newsletter

He and his wife, Tatum, have 7 biological sons and eventually took in two other boys as their own sons also. In addition, they have 32 grandchildren and 5 great grandchildren and many many more adopted children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren. His love of boxwood led him to begin the National Boxwood Trials and participate in an expedition for new boxwood cultivars in the Republic of Georgia. His nursery has helped lead the charge for research and information about boxwood and their pests and diseases and has made that research available to us all. His kind heart, enthusiasm for life, and ability to captivate you with a good old fashioned story, have made him a friend and role model for many. He has been recognized by Virginia Tech and The American Horticultural Society for his commitment to the highest standards of excellence and the VNLA is proud to recognize Paul Saunders as the 2014 Virginia Professional of the Year. Presented by Kevin Warhurst, Merrifield Garden Center, on behalf of his father, Robert Warhurst, the 2013 recipient.

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He has been directly involved in the landscape industry for over fifteen years. Mark currently serves on the Board of Directors for First Citizens Bank, Virginia Technical Institute, and the Virginia Tech Department of Horticulture. He served as president of the VNLA in 2011 and served on the board for seven years.

VNLA - Maslow the 2014 VNLA Young Professional of the Year

He was the recipient of the Top 100 Minority Business Enterprises Award in 2009 and the Outstanding Recent Alumnus for Virginia Tech College of Agriculture and Life Sciences in 2010. Mark is a Virginia Certified Horticulturist. Mark is involved in the community with such organizations as Relay for Life, Interfaith Outreach Association, Boy Scouts of America, Rush Homes and others. In his personal time Mark enjoys spending time with his wife Meredith and daughters Meg and Mia. He is also an aviation enthusiast earning his private pilot's license and instrument rating in 2008. On weekends when Mark is not working with his clients, you are likely to find him tailgating at Virginia Tech football games or at Smith Mountain Lake.

Mark Maslow (l) is presented the first annual VNLA Young Professional of the Year Award

Mark is Owner and President of Southern Landscape Group, Inc located in Evington, VA.

It is my honor to present my friend Mark Maslow with the inaugural VNLA Young Professional of the Year award.

He received his B.S. degree in Horticulture – Landscape Design and a minor in Agricultural Economics from Virginia Tech.

Presented by Matt Shreckhise, 2014 VNLA President

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VNLA - Environmental Steward of the Year Award

fairs Director

negative, impact on our environment by how we operate on a day-today basis.

Therefore, the Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association presents the 2014 Environmental Steward Award to Michele Fletcher, Michele Fletcher Landscape Design, Rockbridge Baths, Virginia.

Michele Fletcher being presented the Environmental Steward of the Year Award by Tom Thompson, VNLA Environmental Af-

A picture is worth a thousand words - we've all heard that old clichĂŠ hundreds of times. Think about it. When I say Life magazine, National Geographic, Matthew Brady, Ansel Adams, the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue, what comes to mind? Pictures, photographs, and I bet more than a few of you can actually remember a specific picture that you've seen. This year's recipient of the Environmental Steward award has been in horticulture since graduating from Tech. She has been on the VNLA board, has been president of and on the board of the VSLD and on the board of the NVNA. She is an award winning landscape designer, a Facebook aficionado who regularly posts bits of landscape and conservation information on several group's pages as well as her own, and is an avid and accomplished photographer who has had several photographs - pictures - win awards in recent years. In 2014, as a member of the Rockbridge Area Conservation Council, they selected two of her photos in a blind selection, as part of a package of ten notecards, which the Council sells as a fundraiser. Most recently she has won a photo contest sponsored by the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay with a photo of Falling Springs falls in Alleghany Co. entitled "Falling Springs Fairyland". Even though she has been working in horticulture for 30 years with an eye toward conservation and sustainability while working closely with conservation groups in her own Alleghany Co., it is for no small reason that she is receiving this award today because of the attention she has gotten for her photographic work and, by extension, the attention she has gotten for the rest of us. For that and everything else, thank you, Michele Fletcher. The prestigious Environmental Steward recipient must be a current VNLA member in good standing with the organization. One award will be presented each year based upon adequately fulfilling, or exceeding the criteria, otherwise, the award will be skipped that year. Recipients have demonstrated due diligence in practicing and utilizing best management principles (BMP), resulting in the least negative impact on our environment. Each individual or company has promoted and shown that our horticultural industry has a more positive, than VNLA Newsletter

Obituary – Tom West We are saddened to report the passing of Tom West. He and his wife operated West Nursery & Garden Center, Mechanicsville. They were long-time members of the VNLA, Virginia Certified Horticulturist and Tom served on the VNLA Board and was very active in the local fire department. WEST, William Thomas Jr. "Tom West," 65, of Mechanicsville, Va., passed away peacefully, in his sleep, Wednesday, January 28, 2015. He is survived by his wife, Aimee Oatman West; daughters, Jennie West Miller (Michael) and Carrie West Galla (Jason Burrow); grandchildren, Catherine and Amy Miller, Conner and Aiden Galla; and a special cousin, Barbara England (Charles). Visitation wason Saturday, January 31, 2015 at the Mechanicsville Chapel of the Bennett Funeral Home, 8014 Lee- Davis Rd., with services following on Monday, February 2, 2015 at 10 a.m. Interment Forest Lawn Cemetery. Contributions, in lieu of flowers, to New Bethesda Baptist Church, 9019 New Bethesda Rd., Mechanicsville, VA

January / February / March 2015

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VNLA - Honorary Lifetime Membership – Charlie Parkerson As your membership chairman and a fellow green industry member, I have the honor and privilege to present this lifetime honorary membership award! This members epitomizes the VNLA’s misMike Hildebrand (l) presenting VNLA sion which is Lifetime Honorary Membership Award "enhance and promote Virginto Charlie Parkerson ia's nursery and landscape industry. I have watched this individual put in numerous hours with the VNLA and other organizations to make our industry a better one!

The VNLA and VNA has existed since 1936! This organization has been blessed with great leadership but none any finer than the one we are honoring today! The amount of service in which he has given to our industry has been observed and without any doubt made all of us better business people. I have personally been able to use his leadership skills to assist me in making better choices in everyday business decisions! The person we would like to honor this morning hails from Suffolk. Started his business in 1969. Lancaster farms. Before that worked with a stalwart in our industry, Junie Lancaster! He has so many accolades, we all be here all morning, but here are a few: VNA executive secretary from 1970 until 1976, ANLA director, SNA director, IPPS director, Virginia Agribusiness Council active member, VDACS Pesticide Board and he invented pot-n-pot and structure-less greenhouses. This guy has done so much for our industry, this is just a few things he did in in his spare time! Personally I believe his biggest attribute was, and still is, sharing knowledge that has made all of us better green industry professionals. He has been the go to entrepreneur in the whole industry for a long time!

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January / February / March 2015

VNLA Newsletter


I was a young buck in the middle of the 70's attending a monthly Richmond nurseryman meeting at Morton's Tea Room in downtown Richmond. Our guest speaker that night was a nurseryman from Suffolk. His passion and energy was not to be missed! Said to myself "what propagation house did he come out of". That night he shared how his new system in propagating worked and then went onto why we should be in the VNLA. What an inspiration, he still does this! I watched him going up and down the aisles yesterday preaching! Well when he finished his informative talk that night it took several us to round him up and put him back in his cage. Put the cage back in the panel truck to haul back to Suffolk .I guess he spent the night in the propagation house.

VNLA - Honorary Lifetime Membership – Ennion and Mary Williams

Many reports over the years from his employees that he would lock himself in the office all night to finish a project! By the way, he and his wife have raised a beautiful family and has managed to have a very successful business that still leads the way! The Commonwealth of Virginia and our industry have been very blessed to have Charlie Parkerson leading the way for so many years. Presented by Mike Hildebrand, James River Nurseries and VNLA Membership Chair.

Ennion and Mary Williams with Mike Hildebrand 

These honorees come to us in a team package! The first member of this package has been instrumental in the nursery industry in our state since the 60's. Ennion’s brief history reads like this. He worked at Watkins Nursery from the middle to latter 60's, then he started

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VNLA Newsletter

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Cherotuck Nursery in1970 with his partner Jack Richardson. Cherotuck Nursery became Dover Nursery in latter 80's. I personally watched him establish a very reputable ,landscape/nursery in central Virginia and at the same time become a leader to all of us in the industry, everyone was always amazed that he could do it with a smile on his face all the time! Now enjoys the outdoor life between Highland and Goochland counties and makes custom furniture in his extensive woodworking shop.

Letter - To VNLA Board and Membership We would like to sincerely thank the Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association Board and its membership for presenting us with the “Lifetime Honorary Membership” award at the January 14, 2015 Membership meeting in Baltimore, Maryland.

Ennion served as VNLA president in 1982 which was the 50th Anniversary of the Virginia Nurserymen’s Association. Family was always foremost and here is where the second part of the package comes in! His wife was so enchanted with the green industry that she became a very active part of it: by becoming Master Gardener. Mary served as VNLA president in 2003 as well as serving as the executive secretary for the CVNLA (formerly the Richmond Nurserymen’s Association) for 20 years. Now she and Ennion do lot of volunteer work. Ennion was one of the founders of the Goochland Ruritan Club and still works on their firewood project for the needy. Mary served as VNLA President in 2003. The new Virginia Certified Horticulturist logo and promotion was initiated along with the start of the VCH quiz in the VNLA Newsletter. Jeff Miller, VNLA executive director, tells me that his file was maxed out under her tenure and is the only VNLA President with a separate computer file. Mary missed nothing, promoting membership and the association and always organized! For many years, she was the VNLA Legislative Director, keeping up with legislation in the General Assembly and alerting members when issues would impact them and representing the VNLA at national legislative conferences in Washington, DC. She also organized the annual gift distribution to members of the General Assembly. She became as the “African Violet” lady. When she passed this job onto the next legislative director, everyone wanted to know where she was! These two have always been there, without hesitation, when the VNLA needed volunteers, whether it was helping staff exhibits at the State Fair, Field Day, Summer Tour, Central Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association meetings and projects, as well as different consumer events. As members of the VNLA, we were the recipients of great leadership that came with smiles and positive attitudes from this team package. Ennion and Mary Williams, we thank you and glad you traveled the distance to be with us.

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It has been a real privilege for us to have had the opportunity to develop lasting relationships with the VNLA members who share the same values and standards that we held during our careers in the nursery industry. Our combined years of being affiliated with the various facets of the horticulture industry and our having many opportunities to work with members who share their love of plants and their appreciation for the hard work it takes to grow them, made it easy for Ennion and me to be committed advocates of the VNLA. Mary & Ennion Williams

News - Virginia’s Noxious Weed Regulation The Regulations for Enforcement of the Noxious Weed Law, 2 VAC 5-317, become effective January 29, 2015. The regulation (i) establishes a two-tier list of plants determined by the Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services to be noxious weeds, (ii) prohibits the movement of noxious weeds or articles capable of transporting noxious weeds into or within the Commonwealth, (iii) identifies eradication activities for certain noxious weeds, and (iv) establishes the Noxious Weeds Advisory Committee. The list of Tier 1 and Tier 2 noxious weeds was developed in consultation with other government agencies, environmental groups, academia, industry and private organizations. The regulation defines Tier 1 noxious weeds as any noxious weed that is not native to the Commonwealth and (i) has no known populations present in the Commonwealth or (ii) is not widely disseminated in the Commonwealth and for which successful eradication or suppression is likely. Tier 2 noxious weeds are defined as any noxious weed that is not native to the Commonwealth, (i) is not widely disseminated in the Commonwealth and (ii) for which successful suppression is feasible but eradication is unlikely.

January / February / March 2015

VNLA Newsletter


The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) may conduct eradication or suppression activities to prevent the dissemination of Tier 1 noxious weeds. The movement of any Tier 1 or Tier 2 plant or regulated article capable of spreading these plants is prohibited. All eradication or suppression actions by VDACS pursuant to this regulation are subject to funding availability. The regulation prescribes the following two tiers of noxious weeds:

Vitex rotundifolia, Vitex rotundifolia, Beach vitex Beach Vitext

Tier 1 noxious weeds:     

Vitex rotundifolia, Beach vitex Salvinia molesta, Giant salvinia Solanum viarum, Tropical soda apple Heracleum mantegazzianum, Giant hogweed Oplismenus hirtellus spp. undulatifolius, Wavyleaf basketgrass

Heracleum mantegazziaHeracleum num, Giantmantegazzihogweed anum, Giant hogweed

Tier 2 noxious weeds:   

Imperata cylindrica, Cogon grass (see Note below) Lythrum salicaria, Purple loosestrife Ipomoea aquatica, Water spinach

Note: Cogon grass (Cogongrass), which has been sold as an ornamental grass, is now designated as a Tier 2 noxious weed and its movement within the Commonwealth is prohibited unless accompanied by a certificate issued by VDACS. Section 2VAC5-100 the regulation establishes a Noxious Weed Advisory Committee for the purpose of assisting VDACS in the evaluation and risk-assessment of plants that may be declared noxious weeds. The Committee will include representation from Virginia’s nursery and landscape industry, among others. The committee will meet annually to evaluate those weeds which have been proposed for listing. Additions or deletions to the noxious weed list must receive approval from the Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

Salvinia Salviniamolesta, molesta, Giant Giantsalvinia salvinia

Solanum viarum, Tropical Soda Apple Solanum viarum, Tropical Soda Apple

Oplismenus hirtellus hirtellus spp. Oplismenus spp. undulatifoundulatifolius,Wavyleaf WavyleafBasketgrtass basketgrass lius,

Imperata cylindrica, Cogon grass Imperata cylindrica, Cogon grass

If you have any questions, contact Larry Nichols at (804) 786-3515 or Larry.Nichols@vdacs.virginia.gov

Ipomoea aquatica, Water spinach Ipomoea aquatica, Water Spinach

VNLA Newsletter

January / February / March 2015

Lythrum salicaria, Purple loosestrife Lythrum salicaria, Purple loosestrife

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Winner of the January/February/March 2015 Photo Contest

VNLA - Photo Contest Rules The contest is open to any photographer (amateur and professional) except members of Board of Directors of VNLA and their families. Entries are limited to VNLA members and their staff. Each photographer may enter up to three (3) digital images per Newsletter deadline (see #6). E-mail images to info@vnla.org. Include your name, phone number and occupation. One winning entry per photographer per year. You may re-enter non-winning entries. Please e-mail images separately. Feel free to elaborate on any story surrounding the photograph. Photos should be 300 dpi high resolution.

Photo Winner: Rick Baker, VDACS Mid-Atlantic Marketing Tithonia – Mexican Sunflower Win $50, submit your photos! Good Luck and Happy Photographing!

If you don’t see your ad here, neither does anyone else! Call 800-476-0055 or email info@vnla.org for advertising information, today!

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January / February / March 2015

All photographs submitted must have been taken within the past five years. All photographs must be related to the Green Industry. The subject can be located in a nursery, back yard, or in a landscape--just so it is obviously related to the green industry profession. Deadline for submission is 5:00 p.m. on the Newsletter Copy Deadline, which is the 15th of January, April, July, and October. All submissions become the property of the VNLA. Model Release forms are required with each photograph which contains a clearly identifiable person. Release forms are available from the VNLA office, on request, and are also available for download from the VNLA website at Model release in MS Word format or Adobe PDF format. Judging is done by the VNLA Communication Committee. All decisions are final VNLA Newsletter


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News - Last Call: Imperata “Red Baron” a Legal Noxious Weed For the last two and a half years, I have written about noxious weed legislation that was being developed in Virginia, specifically about one “weed” that the nursery and landscape industry grows, sells and plants - Imperata “Red Baron”. The noxious weed legislation refers to it as cogon grass and is most worried about it as it pertains to forage for livestock, but it is Imperata. The legislation that will make this plant illegal to grow, sell, plant or possess is 2 VAC 5-317 - you should look it up and read it. It has gone through the entire legislative process (sometimes twice) and now sits on the governor’s desk waiting for his signature. It’s pretty much a done deal. If you want to know why “Red Baron” is on the list of noxious weeds in Virginia, just do an internet search for “cogon grass”.

News - Upcoming requirement changes for VDOT Plant Installation Contractors starting October 1, 2016 We confirmed this change recently and we're trying to make landscape contractors aware as quickly as we can. Please read this note, paraphrased from the VDOT draft policy. The requirement for Certification will take the form of a VDOT Contract “Copied Note” which includes the following requirements:  

The long and short of it is: If you grow this stuff, stop. If you sell this plant, do it quickly. If you plant Imperata, find a substitute. I’m not privy to what the Governor is going to do with this legislation, maybe he won’t sign it, but there isn’t any reason he wouldn’t; the folks at VDACS can’t start enforcing

the noxious weed regulation until he does sign it, so consider this as your “last call”. Photo Credit: Charles T. Bryson, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org - See more at: http://www.invasive.org/browse/detail.cfm?imgnum=1115008#sthash.yYNz8BW6.dpuf -provided by Tom Thompson, VNLA Environmental Affairs Chair, naturalartlandscaping@yahoo.com

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Effective for all projects with planting installation occurring after October 1, 2016, occurring as a part of VDOT Roadway or other VDOT Site Construction: The Contractor shall furnish, at no additional cost to the Department, a Virginia Horticultural Foundation (VHF) Certified Crew Manager and a Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association (VNLA) Certified Horticulturist to be on site to oversee all aspects of the planting operation. A copy of the certifications shall be provided to the Engineer for verification prior to the beginning of planting operations. These certifications can be held by the same supervisor or by two separate supervisors on-site. Effective for all projects with planting installation occurring after October 1, 2018, occurring as an independent VDOT construction project where the primary aspect of the project, as a percentage of the contract value, involves planting, clearing & grubbing or selective clearing operations: The Contractor shall furnish, at no additional cost to the Department, a Virginia Horticultural Foundation (VHF) Certified Advanced Crew Manager and a Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association (VNLA) Certified Horticulturist to be on site to oversee all aspects of the planting or clearing operations as well as related E&S Controls and Work Zone Safety procedures. A copy of the Advanced Crew Manager’s certificate shall be provided to the Engineer for verification prior to the beginning of planting or clearing operations.

Your company has been listed by VDOT as a plant installation contractor, and with these new requirements are on the horizon, I am writing with future certification dates so your business can prepare. Information about the Certified Horticulturist program can be found at the VNLA website www.vnla.org , and VCH certification opportunities occur throughout the year across the state. Information about the Crew Manager Certification or Advanced Crew Manager Certification can be found on the MAHSC website.

January / February / March 2015

VNLA Newsletter


Crew Manager Certification occurs once per year at the Mid-Atlantic Horticulture Short Course usually in January. In order to have staff certified as a Crew Manager, attendees must attend a 2 day training and pass a written exam. To prepare for the 2016 VDOT requirements, your staff will have an opportunity to attend the 2016 MAHSC certification for the required classwork and exam. The first training course was at the 2015 MAHSC. If you have a Certified Crew Manager in good standing currently on your team, they may attend the Advanced Crew Manager certification which is held every two years. The 2015 Mid-Atlantic Horticulture Short Course program included an Advanced Crew Manager certification; it will not be offered again until the winter of 2017. If I can answer any questions about Virginia Horticultural Foundation's Crew Manager or Advanced Crew Manager programs, please e-mail, Dawn M. Alleman, Education Program Coordinator, program@mahsc.org

News - Dan River Plants, LLC to Suspend Operations Effective Friday, February 13 Danville, Virginia (February 12, 2015) – Dan River Plants, LLC (DRP) will suspend operations effective Friday, February 13 at their Cane Creek facility affecting eleven employees. “This is a difficult announcement to make and an even more difficult decision to reach,” said Mark Gignac, general manager of Dan River Plants. “After several years of trying to build a profitable business, we have come to the conclusion that this business model is not a good fit for this industry.”

News – H-2B Cap Reached for the First Half of Fiscal Year 2015

“Plants are a living entity that aren’t easily controlled in a manufacturing environment and we’ve learned that throughout this entire process,” said Gignac. “This work is highly volatile and our production cycle cannot support our current business model. While this is not the outcome we worked towards, we know that as with all entrepreneurial endeavors, risks are taken and success is not guaranteed.”

USCIS has received a sufficient number of petitions to reach the congressionally mandated limit, or “cap” on the total number of foreign nationals who may seek a visa or otherwise obtain H-2B status for the first half of fiscal year (FY) 2015. Jan. 26, 2015 was the final receipt date for new H-2B worker petitions requesting an employment start date prior to April 1,. 2015.

DRP is a tissue culture business that “clones” plants for a variety of clients throughout the United States. It was the first commercial spinoff for the Center for Sustainable and Renewable Resources (CSRR). CSRR is a collaboration between the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Virginia Tech and the Institute for Advanced Learning & Research (IALR) in Danville.

What Happens Now?  

USCIS will reject new cap-subject H-2B petitions that were received after January 26, 2015, and that request an employment start date prior to April 1, 2015. No cap numbers from the first half of FY 2015 will be available in the second half of FY 2015, which begins April 1, 2015.

USCIS will continue to accept H-2B petitions that are exempt from the congressionally mandated cap. For more information about the H-2B work program, visit our website at http://www.uscis.gov/h-2b or call the National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283. Craig Regelbrugge, Senior Vice President — Industry Advocacy & Research, AmericanHort®

“Dan River Plants made great strides to support the mass production of high-value, specialized plant varieties,” said Gignac. “I am proud of the work our team has done and know that the research that has been diligently catalogued over the past several years will be used to advance new ideas in plant propagation in the future.” Mark Gignac, Dan River Plants LLC, 2311 Cane Creek Parkway, Ringgold VA 24586, 434 822 7053, www.danriverplants.com

News - Shemin Landscape Supply joins with John Deere Landscapes We are pleased to announce that John Deere Landscapes has reached an agreement to acquire Shemin Landscape Supply. Shemin has 29 locations that service 18 major metropolitan markets in the Northeastern, Southeastern, Midwestern regions of the country and Texas. The transaction is expected to close at the end of February.

VNLA Newsletter

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Welcome these New VNLA Members! FirstName  Melvin  Michelli  Tammy  Ryan  Mitchel  Nicole  Lauren  Howard  Alycia   Micah  Kate  Amy  Robyn  William   Scott  Dave  Scott   Marlene  Linda  Amy  Kenny  Ralph  Andrew  John   Arthur  Joe  Darryl  Susan  Corey  Alissa  Tom  Joe 

LastName Bruffy II  Booker  Edwards  Holbrook  Huber  Knudson  Kope  McDowell  McGonegal  Skeen  Wellons  Armstrong  Hartley  Phillips III  Price  Calloway  Kelly  Sehen  Boyer  Chffman  Holderied  Morony  Lawless  Magee  Mathews, Jr  Miller  Tackoor  Hall  Schultz  Schoeny  Vissman  Markell 

CompanyName AMB Lawn & Landscape Management  Apielng Services  Associate ‐ Edwards  Associate ‐ Holbrook  Associate ‐ Huber  Associate ‐ Knudson  Associate ‐ Kope  Associate ‐ McDowell  Associate ‐ McGonegal  Associate ‐ Skeen  Associate ‐ Wellons  City of Colonial Heights  Collegiate School  Custom Lawn Service  David Scott Price Design  Down to Earth Landscaping  Ed's Plant World  E‐Scapes Landscaping  Garden Views  Gregor Gardening & Landscaping Inc  Husqvarna  Instant Shade LLC  Living Colour Landscaping  Magee Design  Mathews Landscaping  Milmont Greenhouses  PlantANT  R & L Landscapes  Schultz Lawnscapes  Snow's Garden Center  Southern Ag  Sunrise Landscape & Design 

The combination of Shemin and JDL will provide increased opportunities for us to work together with you to grow our respective businesses. Thank you for your partnership and support as we continue to expand. We recognize that without your commitment and strong support, our growth and success would not be possible.

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In the near-term, Shemin will continue to purchase and receive products as they have in the past, separate from JDL. We will keep you informed of any planned changes in the future. If you have any questions, please contact Brody Pepper at bpepper@shemin.net , (203) 207-5026 or Frank DeRosa at fderosa@shemin.net , (203) 207-5033

January / February / March 2015

VNLA Newsletter


VNLA - Certification Quiz Article

Engaging in the conservation landscaping practices described here can make an important difference in helping preserve the region’s plants, habitats, and animals, all critical elements in the complex web of life that characterizes the Chesapeake Bay and its surrounding watershed. What is Conservation Landscaping?

Tips – Conservation Landscaping [Part 1 and 2 of an 8-part series]

Why is Conservation Landscaping important in the Chesapeake Bay region? People are a major cause of the Chesapeake Bay’s problems. With so many people living and moving into the Bay watershed, nonpoint source pollution - that is, runoff from streets, farms, construction sites, and our own yards - has become an increasing problem. Contaminants from every home and community - sediments, sewage, manure, fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, and motor oil - can be carried into the Bay from local streams and waterways. Rising sea levels and the sinking of parts of the coastal plain threaten developed lands and natural areas in low lying regions. Scientists predict that climate changes in our region will result in warmer winter temperatures and increased storm severity. These changes affect our plant choices as gardeners and how we manage our landscapes. The Bay is part of a vast interconnected ecosystem, and everything we do on the land affects both local waters and the Bay. Because our actions are so closely linked to the health of the Chesapeake Bay, stewardship of the land and water in developed landscapes is our most effective tool for the Bay’s restoration. How each of us manages property is important to us all. You can embrace the responsibility of caring for the land by following the principles of conservation landscaping at home and in your work. The rewards of a well - maintained conservation landscape are many. It reflects positively on its owner and the professionals who were involved in design and installation. It beautifies the home and neighborhood - or the workplace, school, business, or park. It affords a comfortable place to entertain, relax, play, work, and learn. Most importantly, it provides and promotes a safer and healthier environment for our use and enjoyment, allowing us to live in harmony with local natural resources. VNLA Newsletter

Working with nature to reduce pollution, conservation landscaping incorporates environmentally sensitive design, low impact development, non-invasive native and beneficial plants, and integrated pest management to create diverse landscapes that help protect clean air and water, support wildlife, and provide a healthier and more beautiful human environment. Conservation landscaping supports clean air and water by: •

Using plants that are adapted to local conditions and thus require less fertilizer and pesticides

Trapping localized stormwater on site with rain barrels and rain gardens to ensure slow percolation and increased filtration of nutrients entering the groundwater

Reducing the amount of smog released into the air and the amount of atmospheric deposition of nutrients into our water by reducing the amount of mowable lawn area

Conservation landscaping supports wildlife by: •

Providing a diverse plant environment that attracts greater animal diversity and fosters healthier ecological communities

Creating migratory corridors of conjoined healthy ecological communities

Conservation landscaping supports a healthier and more beautiful human environment by: •

Reducing the amount of pollution entering the environment

Demonstrating the beauty of well - maintained, natural landscaping

THE EIGHT ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS of Conservation Landscaping The following elements represent the practice of conservation landscaping. By implementing these practices, you can contribute to the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay watershed* and improve the region’s water and air quality. Incorporate as many of these elements as possible into your landscape, to benefit all life in our watershed.

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DESIGN TO BENEFIT THE ENVIRONMENT

A conservation landscape: 1. Is designed to benefit the environment and function efficiently and aesthetically for human use and well - being; 2. Uses locally native plants that are appropriate for site conditions; 3. Institutes a management plan for the removal of existing invasive plants and the prevention of future nonnative plant invasions; 4. Provides habitat for wildlife; 5. Promotes healthy air quality and minimizes air pollution;

A conservation landscape is designed to benefit the environment and function efficiently and aesthetically for human use and well - being.

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the site.

Conservation landscape design occurs in the context of nature. It seeks to preserve, enhance, and reduce impacts upon a site’s natural features. Landscape design is the initial investment that allows you to make the most of the site you have without expending resources to drastically alter

HOW

6. Conserves and cleans water; 7. Promotes healthy soils;

To design a conservation landscape:

8. Is managed to conserve energy, reduce waste, and eliminate or minimize the use of pesticides and fertilizers.

Perform a site analysis. Consider the character of the site (or regional attributes), historic uses of the land, soil types, geology, sun, water, natural plant communities, and the environmental features on adjacent properties. Environmental features describe a combination of conditions such as a sunny slope, or a marshy low area.

Choose your goals for the landscape. Consider any specific needs that are related to those goals. Then plan a

*Chesapeake Bay watershed - see a map at pubs.usgs.gov/fs/fs12497/fig1.html

Ad – Goodson and Associates

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landscape that considers Essential Elements 2 through 6 while achieving your goals and meeting your needs. •

Pay attention to phases. For example, don’t put in the landscape before the utility lines are installed. Your landscape design may be simple or involved or somewhere in between. If your project is complex, it is especially important to pay attention to the separate phases of the project and their sequencing.

Think of landscape design as an ongoing process. Update your design and your maintenance plan according to the conditions of the landscape and the needs of the people using it. In many cases, landscape designs will need to be edited annually.

Preserve existing environmental features to the greatest possible degree.

Restore degraded environmental features where opportunities exist. For example, institute an invasive species management plan for an onsite woodland, add to the species diversity of a degraded wetland, or build links between existing isolated habitats.

Take advantage of opportunities to create new environmental features. For example, transition into adjacent natural areas to expand their size or put in a feature that creates a new habitat such as a small pond. Link adjacent natural areas or transition into them. Address the landscape implications of Essential Elements 2 through 8 during the design phase. For example, you could add a pond to the design to create wildlife habitat (Element 4). To improve water quality (Element 6), you could design to reduce impervious surfaces. Or, to promote healthy soil (Element 7), you could design in a compost facility. More information on each Element is found in sections 2 through 8. Keep lawn to the minimum area needed for function. Conventional lawns are composed of alien invasive plants, such as tall fescue, that have high maintenance requirements in terms of water input, fertilization, and herbicide use. However, because they provide a smooth surface for certain recreational activities, a poor habitat for ticks and other pests of concern, and because the look of lawn is so strongly expected from some members of the community, even conservation landscapes often need to contain some lawn to be functional. Also consider the extent to which any conventional lawn that must be present can be maintained with minimized input without compromising function.

Mirror patterns found in nature. For example, naturalistic layering of trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants

provides structure that is both important to wildlife and attractive to people.

VNLA Newsletter

LEARN MORE ABOUT IT GOALS AND NEEDS IN LANDSCAPE DESIGN Choose your goals for the landscape. Consider any specific needs that are related to those goals. Then plan a landscape that considers Essential Elements 2 through 8 while achieving your goals and meeting your needs. GOALS Start by determining your goals for the landscape. Your goals may contain multiple environmental benefits as well as benefits that are not specifically related to the environment but that can be accomplished in an environmentally sound way. Some common examples of landscape goals include: • • • • •

Screening an unsightly view; Creating pollinator habitat in the home landscape; Creating a lovely and functional corporate landscape; Striving for low maintenance; Providing a safe environment for children; Adding more color and interest in a schoolyard setting; Capturing and treating runoff from the site and from adjacent properties.

NEEDS Plan your landscape with your goals in mind, and then consider what you will need in order to achieve your goals. For example: • • •

To screen an unsightly view, you will need a fence with an evergreen vine, or a row of evergreen shrubs or trees. To provide pollinator habitat, choose native plants, including host and nectar plants, a water source, and shelter. To create a lovely and functional corporate landscape, you may still need a parking lot of a certain size and/or type of loading docks. If so, how will you minimize impervious surfaces while maximizing function? Will you need the landscape to be colorful and interesting in all four seasons? Would outdoor trails, rain gardens, and/or picnic tables help you meet your goals? For a low maintenance landscape, install large islands of shrub and tree plantings. How will you keep mowing, and especially mowing around obstacles, to a minimum? To create a safe environment for children, your landscape should be free of potential poisons like fertilizers, herbicides, fungicides and insecticides. Do you know how to recognize poisonous plants and be equipped to eliminate them from the landscape?

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•

To provide color and interest for a school landscape, consider a landscape plan that focuses on spring and fall color when school is in session. Do you also need landscape elements that provide educational benefits, such as rain gardens, water gardens, and pollinator gardens? Do you need interpretive signs?

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Landscape for Life: www.landscapeforlife.org/ Beck, Travis. 2013. Principles of Ecological Landscape Design. Island Press, Washington, DC. 2. NATIVE PLANTS

SIMPLE AND INVOLVED LANDSCAPE DESIGNS

Pay attention to phases. Your landscape design may be simple or involved or somewhere in between. If your project is complex, it will be especially important to pay attention to the separate phases of the project and their sequencing. Do you have a small, simple landscape project or a large, complicated one? A homeowner designing the landscape for a row house has an easier job than the developer of a new commercial project. If your project is small, you may have a hard time fitting in enough species of plants to provide year - round color and interest. If your project is involved, it will be especially important to pay attention to the separate phases of the project and their timing. For example, you will want to make sure all septic or utility lines are dug before the landscaping is installed. ENVIRONMENTAL LANDSCAPE FEATURES: EXISTING AND NEW Preserve existing environmental features to the greatest possible degree. Take advantage of opportunities to create new environmental features where none existed before. In designing a landscape, consider existing landscape features (for example, forests, individual trees that are large or especially ecologically or aesthetically valuable, highly erodible soils, an eagle’s nest, high water tables, waterways and wetlands, meadows, animal communities, areas of undisturbed native soils, rock formations) that can be preserved and folded into the new plan for the landscape. Some landscapes present opportunities to create new environmental components. Examples include planting forests where none have existed for a long time, converting a lawn to a meadow, or constructing a wetland at a closed mine. However, destroying a healthy landscape feature to create another type of feature (for instance, cutting down a mature forest to create a pond) is obviously counter to the intentions of conservation landscaping. REFERENCES AND RESOURCES VNLA Newsletter

The Sustainable SITES Initiative™: www.sustainablesites.org/

A conservation landscape uses locally native plants that are appropriate for site conditions. Native plants are those that are naturally present in this region since the last ice age.* Since records of native plants were not written until the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, most native plant lists refer back to this time. Alien or introduced plants are those that have been brought to the region as a consequence of human action. In conservation landscapes, cultivars (cultivated varieties) of native plants do not deliver the same benefits as the true species of locally native plants and are not considered native plants in this discussion. Balanced communities of native plants contribute to the biodiversity of the landscape. Native plants have co - evolved with associated animals to form interdependent communities. Properly sited native plants are adapted to local conditions. Consequently, once established, they require little extra water, fertilizer, or pesticides. Native plants express the character of our natural landscape in a way that alien plants cannot. Climate change has resulted in a shift in hardiness zones, making it important to learn about the natural ranges of plants. If a plant in your area is growing at the southern limit of its range, it will be harder to continue to grow that plant in future. It is important to preserve the genetic variability of native plants to ensure that some can adapt to climate change. Selecting locally native plants over cultivars can help expand local populations and give them a better chance of surviving and reproducing. *Note: Definitions of native plants vary slightly among groups. CCLC chooses this easy definition for the purposes of this document. The Federal Native Plant Conservation Committee (1994) defines a native as a plant species "that occurs naturally in a particular region, state, ecosystem, and habitat without direct or indirect human actions."

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A conservation landscape contains locally native plants that are appropriate for site conditions: • • •

• • •

See resources listed below to determine which plants are native to your site. Choose the right plant for the right place. Select plants suited to existing soil, moisture, sunlight, and other site conditions. When selecting a long - lived plant, consider how that plant is likely to grow as the climate shifts to warmer winters and more extreme periods of drought and flooding. Native plants may occasionally be obtained from the wild, as with plant rescues or wild seed collection. In general, however, native plants should not be taken directly from the wild. To find commercial sources of native plants, see resources listed below. Always ask nurseries about the source of the native species sold. Include a diversity of native plants to provide a wide variety of benefits. Pick native plants that complement nearby natural areas by using similar species composition. For example, when planting adjacent to an oak - hickory forest, consider selecting species from that natural community.

LEARN MORE ABOUT IT

REGION Region is defined as within about a 200 - mile radius of, and in the same physiographic province (Coastal Plain, Piedmont, Mountain) as, the site to be planted. CULTIVARS Cultivated varieties (cultivars) are available for many native plants. These plants have been nursery grown as “improved” selections to provide plants with certain physical characteristics, such as a different flower color, a particular foliage shape, early bloom time, or compact size. All the plants belonging to a particular cultivar are genetically identical. Although gardening with cultivars may be suitable to meet aesthetic goals, those planning habitat projects to provide food and cover for wildlife should use as many true species (not cultivars) as possible. No one really knows how these cultivars will affect the wildlife that depends on local native plant species for food. If a local native plant's bloom period, color, fragrance, or flower shape is changed, it could have a serious detrimental effect on the hummingbirds, bees, butterflies, and other wildlife that may use that plant. True species are most suited for use by native wildlife, and planting them will increase your chances of attracting these creatures.

Ad – Plantworks Nursery

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In addition, research has shown that some cultivars breed with local native plants and thus decrease a population's fitness or ability to survive in an area. If the planting site is near designated natural areas, it is best to avoid using cultivars so that these genetically homogenous plants don’t end up cross - breeding with native species and “contaminating” or changing the natural gene pool. Since cultivars often lack the genetic diversity necessary to adapt to local environmental conditions, they may not thrive, and cross - breeding could lead to eventual extinction of existing natives. Since we can’t know the full extent of how this would affect local nativ plant populations and all life that is interdependent with them, we must work to protect natural biodiversity. Cultivars of locally rare species may be available in the nursery trade but should not be used for landscaping - check state and Federal lists of rare, threatened, and endangered species at www.fws.gov/endangered.

Plants labeled as “native” or “wildflower” are not necessarily native to our region. It is important to refer to an independent reference for the local region in which the plants will be planted. Check with your state's Natural Heritage office, consult regional flora, or find resources through a local native plant society.

CO - EVOLUTION AND INTERDEPENDENCE

Native plant nurseries in Virginia: vnps.org/wp/vnps - native - plant - nurseries - and - plant - sales/

Charles Darwin’s work contributes much to our understanding of evolution. There are specific relationships: an insect that specializes in feeding on nectar from deep flowers is dependent upon a deep - flowered plant. The plant, in turn, is specialized for being pollinated by insects with long mouthparts. We don’t know all of these relationships, but we understand that countless numbers exist and that they are critical to sustaining life as we know it. Organisms both cooperate and compete in ecosystems. The interrelationships and interdependencies of these organisms are related to the long - term stability of populations and ecosystems - what allows Earth to be self-sustaining.

Even though a plant seems to occur naturally or “grow wild” in your yard or in the wild, this does not mean that the plant is native. Many alien plants “grow wild,” and these are called “naturalized” or, in extreme cases, invasive. This means that these plants have the ability to spread and thrive outside of their cultivated location, potentially threatening the integrity of nearby natural areas. Native Plant Nurseries Native plant nurseries in Maryland: www.mdflora.org/publications/nurseries.html

Native plant nurseries in the Chesapeake Bay region: www.fws.gov/chesapeakebay/bayscapes/bsresources/bs - nurseries.html

In order to reproduce, many plants depend upon insects or other creatures for pollination and seed dispersal. Some of these animals have evolved to use specific plants as sources of food (usually nectar or pollen). The exchange of genetic material through pollination (sexual reproduction) allows ensuing generations of plants to adapt to environmental conditions and survive through natural selection. The great diversity of organisms is the result of more than 3.5 billion years of evolution that has filled the world with life forms. There are 100,000 kinds of insects and 1,200 birds and mammals that are involved in pollinating both wild plants and our cultivated crops worldwide. Wild pollinators are responsible for about one third of the food that humans eat. Habitat loss and fragmentation, and use of chemical pesticides, are major causes of reduced pollinator populations. See more on co - evolution at www.ditext.com/ehrlich/appendix.html. See also: The flower and the fly: long insect mouthparts and deep floral tubes…, Natural History, March, 2005 by Laura A. Session and Steven D. Johnson.

WHICH PLANTS ARE NATIVE TO MY SITE, AND WHERE CAN I PURCHASE THEM? VNLA Newsletter

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REFERENCES AND RESOURCES Slattery, Britt E., Kathryn Reshetiloff, and Susan M. Zwicker. Native Plants for Wildlife Habitat and Conservation Landscaping: Chesapeake Bay Watershed. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Chesapeake Bay Field Office, 2005. www.nps.gov/plants/pubs/chesapeake/index.htm Delaware Native Plant Society (DNPS): www.delawarenativeplants.org Maryland Native Plant Society (MNPS): www.mdflora.org Virginia Native Plant Society (VNPS): www.vnps.org Pennsylvania Native Plant Society: www.pawildflower.org West Virginia Native Plant Society www.wvnps.org Lady Bird Johnson Wlildflower Center's Native Plant Bibliography: www.wildflower.org/bibliography/ Plant Conservation Alliance: www.nps.gov/plants PLANTS National Database, U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resource Conservation Service: plants.usda.gov

Flora of Delaware, Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, 2001.

Audubon at - DC: www.audubonathome.org and www.audubonmddc.org Maryland Bay - Wise Program: www.extension.umd.edu/baywise Chesapeake Conservation Landscaping Council: www.ChesapeakeLandscape.org Ecological Landscaping Association: www.ecolandscaping.org Environmental Protection Agency's Green Landscaping with Native Plants: www.epa.gov/greenacres Maryland Home and Garden Information Center (MD Cooperative Extension): www.extension.umd.edu/hgic Missouri Botanic Gardens Plantfinder: www.mobot.org Native Plants for Conservation, Restoration & Landscaping (including grassland plants; set of brochures): www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural_heritage/nativeplants.shtml Native Plants Network (propagation information): www.nativeplantnetwork.org/network

www.dnrec.state.de.us/fw/floraform.pdf

National Wildlife Federation's Backyard Habitats Program: www.nwf.org/backyard

The Plants of Pennsylvania: An Illustrated Manual, Ann Fowler Rhoads, Timothy A. Block, 2nd ed. 2007.

The Wild Ones (organization of natural landscapers): www.for-wild.org

www.upenn.edu/pennpress/book/14335.html

Hightshoe, Gary L. Native Trees, Shrubs, and Vines for Urban and Rural America: A Planting Design Manual for Environmental Designers. 1987, John Wiley & Sons.

Landscaping with Native Plants in Pennsylvania: www.dcnr.state.pa.us/forestry/wildplant/native.aspx Flora of North America: hua.huh.harvard.edu/FNA/ Flora of Virginia: www.floraofvirginia.org Flora of Virginia online: www.vaplantatlas.org Flora of the Washington - Baltimore Area, Smithsonian Institution: persoon.si.edu/DCflora/ Integrated Taxonomic Information System (authority on current Latin names for plants and animals): www.itis.gov/ U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service Silvics Manual (tree identification, info, etc.): www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/table_of_contents.htm Virginia Tech’s Dendrology website for identifying woody plants: for Chesapeake Bay: www.allianceforthebay.orgwww.cnr.vt.edu/dendro/dendrology/idit.htm

Leopold, Donald J. Native Plants of the Northeast: a Guide for Gardening and Conservation. 2005, Timber Press.

Complete the Complete the Quiz Quiz on on page and1 CEU page 31 and33get get CEUVirginia for your for1your Virginia Certified Certified Horticulturist Horticulturist Re-certification! re-certification!

The Alliance BayScapes Program, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, including links to references, nurseries, and more: Home, National Audubon Society and Audubon Marylandwww.fws.gov/ChesapeakeBay/Bayscapes.htm

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VNLA - Certification Quiz # 71 If you are a Virginia Certified Horticultu33rist, answer the following questions from the previous article, mark your answers on the card insert to the left and mail or fax back to the VNLA office towards your recertification CEU’s for your Virginia Certified Horticulturist.

4. When planning a conservation landscape design, one should always: a. Think of the design as an ongoing process. b. Plant what the customer wants. c. Plant only trees and shrubs. d. None of the above. 5. Tall fescue, a conventional lawn choice, is an alien invasive plant. a. True b. False

Conservation Landscaping Guidelines Intro, Chapter 1 & 2 Quiz Jan/Feb/March 2015 Prepared by: Nanette R. Whitt 1. The major causes of the Chesapeake Bay’s pollution problem are/is: a. People b. Rising sea levels c. Sinking coastal plains d. All of the above 2. Which is not supported by conservation landscaping: a. Clean air and water b. Wild life c. Climate changes d. Healthier and more beauty ful human environments

6. When planning a conservation landscape, one should: a. Keep lawn to a minimum area. b. Preserve existing environ mental features when possible. c. Choose goals for the landscape. d. All of the above 7. Most native plant lists were written in the 16th century a. True b. False 8. Cultivars of native plants deliver the same benefits as the true species of locally native plants after they have been in the landscape for: a. 1 year b. 5 years c. 10 years d. None of the above

a. Hardiness zone b. Region c. Agricultural zone d. Country 10. Climate changes have not yet shifted the hardiness zones. a. True b. False 11. Once established, native plants require: a. Little extra water b. Fertilizer c. Pesticides d. All of the above 12. When planting habitat projects to provide food and cover for wildlife, which type of plant should be selected? a. True species b. Cultivars c. True species and cultivars d. None of the above 13. Some cultivars breed with native plants and increase the population’s fitness. a. True b. False 14. Wild pollinators are responsible for how much of the food eaten by humans? a. 1/8 b. 1/4 c. 1/3 d. 2/3

3. A conservation landscape uses locally native plants that are appropriate for the site. a. True b. False

VNLA Newsletter

9. By definition, native plants are those that are naturally present in this ________, since the last ice age.

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VNLA – Plant Something Marketing Program

In just two words, the tagline for a relatively new, but rapidly growing, green industry marketing campaign says it all. Plant anything, really, tree, shrub, perennial, annual, and you can help to improve the environment, your personal economy and even your well-being. It's the sort of shortbut-sweet motivating phrase that piques consumers' curiosity and starts them thinking ... then talking ... then acting. And it appears to be just the sort of promotional campaign the green industry is ready for.” If you attended any of a number of trade shows and conferences this year, you've probably seen ““Plant Something”” material, whether you picked up a brochure and a bumper sticker or visited the booth. Although the program began a few years ago in Arizona, it's reaching out across the country to recruit more partners in this grassroots endeavor. What is it? On the surface, the “Plant Something” campaign may look like a simple public awareness campaign. It's somewhat similar to "Got Milk?" in that its generic tagline doesn't promote any single producer or individual product. Aimed at consumers, the ostensible goal is to catch their attention and encourage them to, well, plant something. At its core, however, the program is intended to increase sales for member growers and garden centers and, by extension, help to grow the greater green industry. In fact, because it is supported by funding through the USDA Farm Bill Specialty Crop Block Grant program, its function must be to work toward increasing the consumption of a specialty crop-in this case, ornamental plants. Hasn't this been tried before? Let's back up a bit. Remember "Plants for America," the proposed promotion order that was sowed in the early 1990s but never took root? It had a similar goal-to place ornamental plants front and center in the mind of the consumer, thus driving up sales to benefit growers. The funding, though, was the sticking point. As Plants for America was structured, support dollars would come from the industry in the form of nominal levies on containers and plant sales. The program ultimately failed, primarily due to the proposed funding scheme. It was viewed by many as a form of taxation, leading growers across the country to sign a petition of nonsupport that was published in this magazine. But “Plant Something” takes a different approach, and although the funding does come from a government grant, the program itself was built from the ground up. A real grassroots movement

Developed by the Arizona Nursery Association and adopted by partners across the country [including Virginia], the “Plant Something!” marketing program has built momentum by starting from the ground up. It’s a simple statement, but it packs a powerful message: “Plant Something”! 34

About four or five years ago, Arizona Nursery Association board members approached executive director Cheryl Goar with a challenge. "When the economy was absolutely at its worst," Goar recalls, "our board came to me and said, 'We need some help here; we need something in the form of marketing.' Because Arizona was so construction-based and the

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VNLA Newsletter


economy had basically tanked in 2007, 2008, things were really tough."

for the nursery industry, but we've come at it from the ground up rather than the top down." The ANA turned to Park & Co, a full-service advertising agency in Phoenix, for help. The firm had created the award-winning "Water-Use It Wisely" campaign (www.wateruseitwisely.com ) that began in Phoenix and quickly spread nationwide. "We realized that we're a bunch of nursery owners; we're not an ad agency," Goar explains. "They knew the right questions to ask. They kept nursery people in a room all day long-that was a feat in itself. What it really taught me is that our industry had all these answers, but we didn't know the right questions to ask to get the right information." The ad pros returned to the group with only two promo ideas, but, as Goar says, one was "head and shoulders above" anything the board had imagined. The graphic featured a vacant lot between two high-rise buildings in Phoenix, with an enormous plant stake stuck in the barren ground. The stake said, very simply, "Plant Something!" The message was clear: No matter where you start, you can make a difference if you take that one simple step. It's not just about "pretty"

Something had to be done to encourage sales, Goar explains, "So we came up with this idea for (a promotional campaign) and to apply for a specialty crop grant to fund it. Such grants are a part of the greater Farm Bill, which distributes funds to the department of agriculture in each state, proportionate to the percentage of specialty crops grown there. Every state is different, and funds are distributed differently in each state. In Arizona, Goar says, "They actually believe in getting all the money out to the specialty crop growers in the state. No one producer alone can apply; it can only benefit groups of producers. So the vegetable association can apply [for grant money], and the nursery association can apply-anyone who's doing something that benefits a broad group.'' She emphasizes that a project funded by this type of grant "has to increase the consumption of that specialty crop. That's kind of the bar. And our state takes education, marketing and research proposals," but the ANA concentrated on a marketing proposal. "The nursery industry has turned down marketing campaigns over the years," Goar admits. "Without a common product, no one's been able to dissect that puzzle and figure out how that would work for our industry. But what we're trying to do is work from the grassroots up. If everyone is promoting the same message, maybe we get that momentum VNLA Newsletter

With the guidance of Park & Co, the Arizona growers came to understand not only how consumers see the green industry, but how we need to connect with them in order to sell. Goar explains, ''The other advice that I think is really critical to our industry right now is the agency told us we just don't have the luxury- to talk about our product as something 'pretty.' We just don't have that anymore. You have to promote the environmental, the financial and the health benefits." The brand statement The “Plant Something” brand statement delivers the spirit of the campaign without relying on heavy-handed salesspeak” It takes into consideration the admonition that the industry no longer can afford to sell beauty alone. The economic, environmental and health befits of gardening will drive participation – and sales – through the hands of a new generation. Here’s how the “Plant Something” brand presents its mission: ‘Embracing the “New Normal” realities in people’s lives., the “Plant Something” movement is a fun, semi-radical groundswell that motivates all to enrich their private and public environments by encouraging a simple, rewarding acts that can grow to a canopy of value and beauty for a richer world.”

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bought into the program through a specialty crop block Yes, the plants are beautiful and they brighten up a yard, but grant of their own. The “Plant Something” plant stake-the consumers want to know what else they stand to gain. "Evegreen and yellow graphic presentation that represents the rything in this campaign talks about increasing your campaign-is protected under Federal trademark, but otherproperty value, getting out and exercising in the garden, wise, plant tags, ads, radio spots, bumper stickers, buttons and and basically cleaning the air," Goar says. “We don't talk so on-all can be tailored to fit. In fact, partners share the prodabout 'it looks good.' We know we're competing with ucts they've developed through a Dropbox application adminHGTV every day on 'let's paint the bedroom and get a new istered by the ANA. They are free to adopt and adapt, as long bedspread rather than redo the landscape’. And we're talkas the trademark is honored. ing about that long-term value." ESN-117 Map Ad/4.5x7.25 8/30/04 10:27 AM Page 1

Ad – Eastern Shore Nursery of Virginia

The team developed a number of products that help to educate the public in a short-attention-span manner- on the benefits of planting. Bumper stickers and window clings urge consumers, "Don't Just Stand There, Plant Something”!" Posters and magazine ads briefly describe economic, environmental and health benefits. Take, for example, the "Cash Money" ad featuring a seed packet that touts, "Large Bloom, Fast Growing C-Notes." The copy at the bottom states, "Who says money doesn't grow on trees? Have you seen what a beautiful yard can do for your property value? By adding a quality land- scape to your home, you can boost its resale value by up to 15%. Learn how green investments pay high returns at http://plantsomething.org ." Where Arizona stresses environmental and financial gains, the Idaho Nursery & Landscape Association has chosen to emphasize healthy living. "They have billboards all over Idaho that say, 'Gardening Eases Stress' and 'Gardening Grows Good Health'," Goar says. "They're absolutely beautiful, and they tied it in with a buy local/plant local program as well. The INLA actually wrote an entire grant on the health benefits and were successful in getting it" on that basis. All of the products, including 30-second radio spots, can be customized by partner associations-those groups that have 36

WH O C A R E S T H AT WE’RE PLANTED ON THE EASTERN SHORE? Maybe you should care. The Eastern Shore of Virginia is unique place – a narrow peninsula between the Atlantic Ocean and the Chesapeake Bay. Thanks to the Gulf Stream, we’re blessed with temperate growing conditions, refreshing shore breezes and plenty of sunshine year round. Which gives us the perfect environment Eastern for growing happy, healthy plants. Plus we’re in Shore the ideal location to get our plants to you ASAP. Nursery Of Call Eastern Shore Nursery of Virginia Virginia today to order plants that have the best start in life money can buy. Keller, Virginia • 1-800-323-3008 • www.esnursery.com January / February / March 2015

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The program has a website (www.plant-something.org ) that features a 30-second animated video called "Imagine That!" Animation is used to help keep the message generic; no particular location or plant can be identified. The voice- over relates how planting can "raise your property value and lower your blood pressure." This landing page is where partner states link to their individual sites.

Does it work? The bottom line sometimes can be a moving target, and given the twists and turns of a recovering economy, it's difficult to pin- point the specific effects of a young promotional campaign. And a formal survey hasn't yet been conducted in Arizona. But Goar points out that growers there reported a 10 percent increase in plant sales between 2010 and 2011. "I would love to say that the increase was the result of my campaign in Arizona, but the economy did continue to improve in those years," Goar says. "Was it all due to “Plant Something”? No. But are we starting to be recognized? Are we starting to get people to think and talk about planting? Absolutely." It may have started in Arizona, but the association's board is eager to see this campaign grow well beyond the borders of the Grand Canyon State. "Our board is forwarding-thinking," Goar says, "and they've been very altruistic in this venture. It became obvious that we had something, and why would we not share it for the betterment of the industry?" The VNLA has joined this program and has ideas and marketing materials you can download and customize for y-our business marketing and website at http://www.vnla.org/Plant-Something/PlantSomething-for-VNLA-Members or contact the VNLA office at info@vnla.org or 1-800-476-0055

So what does the future hold for “Plant Something”? Plans for the next few years include adding new promotional materials, such as truck wraps and a “Plant Something” app for smartphone use, as well as a revision of the website as more partners come on board. But growth beyond the products has been the plan all along. Eventually, “Plant Something” ve1y well might become a separate entity, no longer administered by the Arizona Nursery Association. "It could be its own company," Goar explain s, "because it's on the brink now. Our goal is for this to outgrow us. The ultimate goal is, at some point, that “Plant Something” is too large for us to manage, and that's a good thing. That's a very good thing." Reprinted with permission: Sally Benson is the editorial director for American Nurseryman. sbenson@mooserivermedia.com

News - Maryland Nursery & Landscape Association becomes Maryland Nursery, Landscape, and Greenhouse Association Name Change Reflects Association's Growth and Importance to Horticulture Industry Baltimore, Md. - The Maryland Nursery and Landscape Association (MNLA) announced today that it has expanded its reach to become The Maryland Nursery, Landscape, and Greenhouse Association or MNLGA. The approval for such action was granted by the membership at the MNLA's annual meeting in January. The change comes as a result of the planned dissolution of the former Maryland Greenhouse Growers Association and the invitation for those members to join the existing and renamed association. "The greenhouse association has collaborated with the Maryland Nursery and Landscape Association on events, education, and industry issues and a myriad of other projects for the past 15 years or more," said MNLGA Executive Director Vanessa Akehurst Finney. "Inviting them into the renamed association is not only complimentary; it makes the Maryland Nursery, Landscape, and Greenhouse Association or MNLGA an even stronger industry voice than it was previously," said Finney. "The upcoming 12th annual Chesapeake Green Horticultural Symposium or "Chessie Green" as it is commonly known is a perfect example of our collaborative efforts," she continued. Held annually at the Maritime Institute in Linthicum, this pesticide recertification event has educated and accommodated the recertification requirements for over 1,000 industry members throughout the years. This year's symposium will be held February 19 and 20th. The MNLGA will benefit by adding even more voice to legislative and regulatory issues which affect the horticulture industry in general. Horticulture is the number two commodity in the state of Maryland under the Department of Agriculture with annual sales in excess of $1 billion dollars. There are not nearly enough citizens or elected officials who know this and the MNLGA welcomes the additional voices to help spread that message. The Maryland Nursery, Landscape, and Greenhouse Association will introduce its revised logo, updated website and publications over the coming months. In the meantime, for the latest information, visit our website or call us at (410) 823-8684. Vanessa Finney, Executive Director, Maryland Nursery, Landscape and Greenhouse Association, 410-823-8684, office@mnlaonline.org

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CVNLA Thanks to all CVNLA 2015 Short Course sponsors

Gold Sponsors

Silver Sponsors

13% increase over 2014's show.

News – MANTS Recap Mid-Atlantic Nursery Trade Show Transforms Baltimore Convention Center into Garden Oasis for 45th Annual Event Premier Green Industry Trade Show Brings Over Eleven Thousand Green Industry Enthusiasts to Baltimore for Three Day Convention Baltimore, Md. - The Mid-Atlantic Nursery Trade Show (MANTSTM), the premier green industry marketplace for businesses, transformed the Baltimore Convention Center into a garden oasis again this year for their 45th annual trade show which took place from January 14-16. 38

11,030 paid registrants (including exhibitors) traveled to Baltimore for the green industry gathering to do business, network and learn about the hottest horticultural trends for 2015. The show's total attendance is a 7% increase over the 2014 show. Green Industry companies and professionals from 44 states and 13 additional countries exhibited at, or attended, MANTS in 2015. 964 exhibiting companies filled over 1,534 booths which were spread out over the 300,000+ square feet of contiguous exhibit space at the Baltimore Convention Center. 3,655 non-exhibiting/buying companies were also represented, a

"All of us here at the Mid-Atlantic Nursery Trade Show are thrilled to have completed our 45th successful year of providing a marketplace for the horticultural industry," said Vanessa Finney, Executive Vice President of MANTS. "MANTS 2015 had a substantial increase in attendance which is exciting for us, but more importantly, very good for the industry overall. While we realize that last year's weather kept many people from traveling to the show, we can't help but be grateful that the industry recognizes the importance of MANTS as a place where business gets done. And we hope this is a trend that continues in the years to come."

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"We are humbled by the show's reputation and couldn't do what we do without the help and support of the Baltimore Convention Center, Visit Baltimore, and all of our wonderful hotels and restaurants that work with us throughout the year to provide amenities for our guests," Finney added. Among the thousands of buyers, shoppers, and horticultural industry leaders and businesses converging on the show floor this year was first time MANTS attendee Sarah Blevins of S.J. Blevins Berries in Hopewell Township, PA. Blevins is a horticultural entrepreneur and in the process of setting up a greenhouse for her new berry farm. "If I came back every day of the show, I don't think I could see everything, it's huge!" said Blevins after her first trip out on the show floor. "I'm getting all kinds of new ideas. My sense is that [the exhibitors] really love what they're doing, that they're not just here to make a living. I think that what I'm finding with my business is that it's a part of your life and you just love it, everything else is an extension of that, and that is the sense I'm getting here, they're all farmers at heart." See more about Blevins's first time on the show floor and her thoughts on MANTS at http://youtu.be/bOtOUcgQ8IY.

slow time of the year. Many companies and groups host happy hours and meetings at nearby restaurants and hotels surrounding the Convention Center are filled with guests of the show.

To see specific information regarding the economic impact MANTS had on the city of Baltimore after their 2014 show, please view our infographic here: http://www.mants.com/documents/MANTS_Economic_Infographic_Flat.pdf. In 2016, MANTS will take place from January 6 - 8 at the Baltimore Convention Center. Check www.mants.com or www.Twitter.com/MANTSBaltimore for updates and news on the show over the next year. Mid-Atlantic Nursery Trade Show (MANTS): The Mid-Atlantic Nursery Trade Show, MANTS, is known as the Masterpiece of Trade ShowsTM and is sponsored by the State Nursery and Landscape Associations of Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia. MANTS is the place horticulture industry leaders gather every January because MANTS means business. The show covers over 300,000 square feet of contiguous exhibit space at the Baltimore Convention Center and draws exhibiting companies and attendees from throughout the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and Asia. (410) 296-6959 www.mants.com, Twitter.com/MANTSBaltimore

MANTS continues to have a large economic impact on the city of Baltimore, bringing in thousands of out-of-town guests who enhance business for the hospitality industry in an otherwise

Ad – Lancaster Farms

Quality is a Matter of Choice

5800 Knotts Neck Road Suffolk, Virginia 23435

(757)484-4421 (800)336-2200 www.lancasterfarms.com Annuals ❀ Azaleas ❀ Broad Leafs ❀ Conifers ❀ Fruits ❀ Perennials ❀ Roses ❀ Shade & Flowering Trees VNLA Newsletter

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News - Date Change for New England Grows

News - OAN Introduces New App to Help Nursery Businesses Connect

The big news from Boston this week—other than a Patriots Super Bowl win and another 2 ft. of snow coming in the next week—is the announcement that New England Grows is changing its dates. And it’s a significant change, too, moving from the first week in February to the week directly after Thanksgiving. That would make the next occurrence of New England Grows happening December 2-4 of this year. It would also make Grows one of the first industry trade shows of the season.

The Oregon Association of Nurseries (OAN) has introduced a new app for iOS devices, and soon Android devices that will help nursery industry businesses connect with each other.

Last week I spoke to Virginia Wood, executive director of New England Grows, about the reasons for changing the dates. They’ve been planning the new dates for more than a year but the ideas really did develop out of surveying both vendors and attendees for at least three years. “What we did ask on the survey was if there was one thing you could change at Grows, what would it be?” Virginia said. “One of those possible responses was a different time of year, earlier in the buying cycle.” That option was chosen by more than half of the respondents. One big reason for the change is all this snow. “For the past four out of five years, we’ve been significantly impacted by snow in Boston. It’s really not sustainable given what is happening to the climate,” Virginia said. “About 45% of our constituents are snow and ice management. It’s not just that people can't make it into the city, they just won’t because they are busy doing their jobs. That lasts well beyond the snow event, and it makes it really challenging.” Add on top of that the trouble snow causes for vendors and attendees to travel, and it seems the only smart decision was to shift the show’s dates. Why December and not January? December is earlier in the buying season. “We found through focus groups that a lot of them, particularly from the buyers’ standpoint, are on hiatus in February—either laid off or not around—so these earlier dates are going to allow more of their people to participate in the event.” There’s a limbo period, as Virginia calls it, between the end of the season from a cleanup and fieldwork standpoint and the snow and ice removal. Ellen Wells, Editor-at-Large, Green Profit

The Oregon Nursery Map app is the new, digital counterpart to the OAN’s printed Wholesale Nursery Map. Buyers, truckers and green industry professionals have long used the paper map to find wholesale nurseries in the Portland area, the Willamette Valley, and greater Oregon. With the rise of smartphones equipped with GPS technology, creating a digital solution made sense on many levels. “It’s more than a map,” said Scott Ekstrom, who works at Ekstrom Nursery and is president of the OAN Mt. Hood Chapter. “We believe it will be an on-the-road, time-saving device if you are a landscaper, plant buyer, or a grower reaching out to a network of suppliers and growers.” The iOS version of the app is available in the iTunes Store now. An Android version will be available in January. Both versions are priced at $4.99. The app will help users find the most efficient routes between destinations. This will be especially useful for out-ofstate visitors who are eager to see the state’s gorgeous plant material, but don’t know the lay of the land. They’ll discover a wealth of information about each grower, including what they are selling. At the press of a button, the user will be able to call nurseries and verify availability. “The app’s functionality provides nursery contact information and links to the OAN’s online Nursery Guide, which is a searchable directory of plants, products and services,” Ekstrom said. “So if a contractor is on a job site, for example, and needs to quickly find more plant material, a glance at the Oregon Nursery Map app will tell them which nurseries or suppliers are nearby. “Technology is changing how business is done,” Ekstrom added. “I have seen people, young and older, working from

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their phones while sitting in front of a desk or laptop computer, out in the field, or in the car or truck. The phone is the go-to device for websites, emails, directions, or to make calls. Phones and apps can do everything, except grow the tree.” The Oregon Nursery Map app is a project of the OAN Mt. Hood Chapter to raise funds for horticulture student scholarships. Businesses will pay to be featured on the app, and users will pay a nominal amount to download it. Currently, approximately 130 OAN member nurseries and suppliers are “pinned” on the map. The goal is to build that to 400. Meanwhile, the paper map will remain available and is still appreciated by many growers. “As more of the industry embraces digital tools to save valuable time, we felt it was important to anticipate where demand would be in the near future and longer term,” Ekstrom said. “Creating the Oregon Map App is a significant investment for the Mt. Hood Chapter and the OAN to make, but we want to help members of the industry connect more easily with Oregon suppliers. The Oregon Nursery Map app will help make that happen.” The Oregon Association of Nurseries (OAN), based in Wilsonville, represents more than 900 wholesale growers, retailers, landscapers and suppliers. Oregon’s ornamental horticulture industry is the state’s largest agricultural commodity, with annual sales of $745 million. Oregon’s nursery industry is a traded sector; nearly 75 percent of the nursery plants grown in Oregon are shipped out of state. For more information, visit www.oan.org or call 503-682-5089. CONTACT: Curt Kipp, Senior Manager of Publications, 503.682.5089

News - 2012 Census Profiles Virginia Agriculture Market Value of Products Sold Up 29 % from 2007 Census On May 2, the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) released final figures from the 2012 Census of Agriculture. These final results follow preliminary figures released by Governor McAuliffe on February 24 indicating many growth areas in Virginia agriculture. According to the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS), the final results confirm those earlier figures and reveal several key trends for Virginia:    

The market value of all agriculture products sold was $3.75 billion, up 29 percent from $2.91 billion in 2007 The market value for crops sold was $1.36 billion, up 58.5 percent from $858 million in 2007 The market value for livestock sold was 2.39 billion, up 16.9 percent from 2.05 billion in 2007 The average value of agriculture products sold per farm was $81,540 compared to $61,334 in 2007.

VNLA Newsletter

“This is exciting news for Virginia’s agricultural producers,” said Todd Haymore, Secretary of Agriculture and Forestry. “Agriculture is Virginia’s largest industry, and today we learned that in market value and other areas, the industry has grown considerably since the last census in 2007. While the number of farms declined during the last five years, we actually have more acreage in farms now than then. There are still challenges facing our family farms and producers, but I’m hopeful that as the global economy improves we’ll continue to see more opportunities for our diversified agricultural economy to grow and prosper.” Key statistics from Virginia include:    

Land in farms, 8.30 million acres, is up 2.4 percent from 8.10 million acres in 2007 In 2012, the number of farms in Virginia totaled 46,030, down 2.9 percent (or 1,353 farms) from 47,383 farms in 2007 The average size of a Virginia farm was 180 acres compared to 171 acres in 2007 The average age of the principal farm operator was 59.5 years, compared to 58.2 years in 2007 There were 38,377 principal male operators and 7,653 principal female operators in 2012, compared to 39,537 male and 7,846 female in 2007.

The National Agricultural Statistics Services (NASS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture released census figures May 2 for the entire nation. The census results share a wide-range of information about what agricultural products were raised in the United States in 2012, and where, how and by whom these products were grown. The data, which is reported at the national, state and county level, will help farmers, ranchers, local officials, agribusinesses and others make decisions for the future. “The 2012 Census of Agriculture provides a wide range of demographic, economic, land, crop and livestock production information as well as first-time or expanded data,” said Herman Ellison, Virginia’s State Statistician with NASS. “Many of these data about Virginia and our counties are only collected and reported as part of the every-five-year census.” To provide easier access to the data, NASS created a number of online tools for people to find and use census data, including: Quick Stats 2.0 – an online database to retrieve customized tables (a new tutorial video provides easy-to-follow instructions); API – a tool for developer; Agricultural Atlas Maps - profiles of the nation’s agriculture at the county-level in a series of multicolor pattern and dot maps and Desktop Data Query Tool- a downloadable desktop tool to analyze data without internet access once you have downloaded and installed this tool. For more information about the Census of Agriculture including all the final 2012 Census of Agriculture results, and tools to access and share the data, visit www.agcensus.usda.gov .

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Tips – Overwintering Perennials I’m in a love/hate relationship with over-wintered perennials. I love the early sales, but hate the added risk. I prefer quick turns— the less time a plant is on the ground, the less time I have to screw it up. But when done well, overwintering results in gorgeous plants early to market and an additional turn of the space. Its been so successful for us that, over the last 10 years, we've increased overwintered perennial production by a little more than 600%, Really. Our biggest challenge to overwintering perennials is water. Too little water and then dry to death. But too much and they rot. In summer, a little too dry on a hot day can render a plant unsellable for weeks due to marginal foliar burn, so if we question whether or not to water in summer, we water. In winter, we reverse that rule. It's remarkable how dry many perennials can be without damage in the winter and I confess I've killed way more with too much water than too little. So when we question whether or not to water in winter, we don't water. My ideal for most perennials mid-winter is a moist bottom with a dry top. That keeps the roots happy and keeps my Botrytis threat low on any remaining top growth. We grow in 100% pine bark on the floor of coveted hoop houses. The floor is weed fabric over black poly over earth. The houses are all graded to allow drainage, but when covered, the water runs off the uphill side only to run hack under the baseboard and under the crop. If the houses were perfectly graded like those drool worthy sloped flood floors. Then everything would water evenly. But I have the redneck version and water channels a little differently through every house. It's not as bad as it sounds, as water doesn't pool anywhere, but we do have to hand water the high and dry spots. Occasionally, we reach a point where the whole house is so uneven that we water every-thing thoroughly to bring it back to the same saturated starting point before letting them dry down again. Our second biggest challenge is fertilizer. Plants appear to be in suspended animation for much of winter not growing at all for weeks or months on end. But it gets warm enough in the hoop houses for out top dressed slow-release fertilizer to release a little along. Since we also run the plants as dry as possible that fertilizer can accumulate and do significant damage when we finally water. Regular pour keep us it line there and also help us keep an eye on pH. For reasons I still don't understand, the media in our dianthus nips often be-

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comes more acidic over the season. Regular monitoring allows us to periodically correct it with liquid feed rather than the much more cumbersome liquid lime.

Our third biggest challenge a new one for me temperature swings. We had higher losses than usual last winter. Losses in crops that I thought were at least tough if not bulletproof, (My thanks go out to perennial guru Paul Pilon, who solved the mystery in an early version of the Perennial Pulse) In part of Virginia, a normal winter night is at or below freezing with days above freezing. We get .t few single-digit lows each winter, but not many. With that in mind, when we experienced repeated temperature swings into the teens or low, 20s as plants started to wake up, I didn't blink an eye. Our plants spend all winter in unheated houses and they're perennials for goodness sake— they can take the cold, right? While they can take the cold when it gets cold and stays cold, I overestimated then ability to tolerate sudden cold snaps while they're waking up. This year, we'll keep a closer eye on those sudden drops in temperature during the critical waking tip period and turn on the heat to take the edge off the cold, Not enough to make them soft, but enough to keep then, from freezing. For all its challenges, winter production may be my favorite because when those gorgeous little planties start to break dormancy, I get to experience the magic of spring before everyone else ... and I love that. Paul Westervelt is Annual & Perennial Production Manager for Saunders Brothers, Inc. in Piney River, VA; reprinted with permission, GROWER TALKS, December 2014

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News - Get Ready to Garden: 2015 is the Year of the Coleus!

Coleus leaf texture can be quite variable with large, small, twisted, elongated, scalloped, lobed, finger-like, “duck’s foot” (webbed feet), etc. Leaf texture for coleus should be a serious consideration when selecting and using coleus as the visual contribution is significant.

Coleus Abbey Road

With the continued emphasis on foliage in our gardens, the wide and exciting range of coleus varieties available should nicely augment one's planting palette. Chosen as the annual for the National Garden Bureau’s 2015 program, coleus is a durable plant with very significant gardening potential for almost all gardeners and their garden situations. History Coleus has gone through various phases of popularity over the past couple of centuries. This member of the mint family comes in a wide range of coloration, leaf texture and plant form. Considered an herbaceous perennial in its native range, coleus are used primarily as annuals. Previously grouped into different species or classified as hybrids, coleus (formerly Coleus blumei and Coleus hybridus) are now all placed under Solenostemon scutellarioides (2006). As of 2012, taxonomic authorities consider the correct name for the coleus to be Plectranthus scutellariodes. While modern coleus breeding focuses on new color combinations and foliage characteristics, other considerations such as sun tolerance, delayed flowering, more prolific branching and an emphasis on more compact and trailing forms have become more prominent. Coleus Basics The primary ornamental feature of coleus is the foliage which can be green, pink, yellow, orange, red, dark maroon (almost black), brown, cream and white. This plethora of colors and combinations lends itself to the other common names for coleus of painted nettle or flame nettle. While some gardeners will leave the small flowers, it’s recommended that you pinch these back to a leaf node to encourage more energy into stem and foliage growth and not flowering. Coleus left to flower may lose vigor as the plant puts energy into seed production. VNLA Newsletter

The variability in patterns is truly amazing with solid colors, splashes, blotches, streaks, flecks, margins and veins. Color intensity may be affected by sunlight, heat sensitivity and other conditions. The term “sun coleus” refers to selections that tolerate more direct sunlight. Darker cultivars tend to tolerate more sun while lighter varieties benefit from some degree of shade to minimize leaf scorching. Morning sun and dappled afternoon shade tends to maintain consistent foliage coloration. Too little light will encourage a weakstemmed, less vigorous plant without optimal coloration. For sunny areas consider these varieties: any of the Stained Glassworks varieties, the Wizard, Versa and Marquee series, or any variety with the word sun in its name.

Coleus can be grouped into three basic plant forms including upright, rounded and prostrate/trailing. Frequent snipping, pinching and trimming can help modify form although the trailing forms have great value at the edge of a container, in a hanging basket or as a groundcover becoming a colorful, living mulch. When selecting a variety, there are many to choose from and you can base your choices on foliage color, leaf texture and/or plant form. Please refer to this picturesque slide show to see some wonderful new varieties. While this list is not comprehensive, NGB Members are an excellent source for information regarding coleus breeding efforts and currently available varieties. Planting & Proper Care Coleus has long been considered a shade plant but their best leaf coloration is achieved with morning sun and some degree of afternoon shade. Many varieties do well in both shade and part sun, such as the ColorBlaze, Fairway, Superfine Rainbow, Main Street and Kong series. Some varieties can take quite a bit of sun as long as they are not allowed to dry out. Coleus are quite tolerant of a wide range of soil conditions. Coleus enjoy the heat and cold, overly damp soils can result in leaf drop and encourage disease. Plant coleus after any danger of frost has passed when soil temperatures have warmed sufficiently and evening temperatures are above 60 degrees F. Light fertilization is recommended, particularly in containers. To maintain plant form, pinch back most varieties every few weeks to prevent flower formation. This directs the plant’s energy into additional branching and foliage creation instead of flowering, thereby creating a fuller plant. When pinching off flowers, do so throughout the entire summer to create a full, lush plant. Pinch just above a set of leaves or

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branching junction for the best appearance (don’t leave a stub!). Getting Started Raising coleus from seeds is relatively easy. Seed strains offer uniformity and may include mixes or consistent coloration with identical plants. Seed packets can be quite affordable and a wide range of coleus varieties available from seed vendors. Time seed sowing to be 8-12 weeks before the last frost date. Sow seeds in at least three inches of growing medium (maintain at 70 degrees F) and seeds should be sown on the surface as they require light to germinate. Welltimed, even watering, misting (for humidity) and frequent observation are encouraged. Overwintering coleus plants as houseplants is an option although temperatures near 70 degrees F are required. Rotate plants and pinch back as needed to maintain form. Consider grow lights to provide adequate winter lighting conditions. Designing With Coleus Solid color coleus varieties such as Redhead and Lime Delight Premium Sun (both bred for the sun) can be very impactful and make a statement in the mixed border while those with variable coloration may become “color echoes” for neighboring plants with similar (or contrasting) flower and/or foliage colors. The repetition of certain coleus colors and form can lend unity and harmony in the garden. While a solitary specimen can add a “punch” of color, consider the impact of mass planting as well. Foliage with lighter coloration can provide illumination in shadier locations while dark colors (for example, any coleus with Chocolate its name) in the same setting will create depth and contrast. Consider coleus just one of many available tools in your gardening “toolbox.” Coleus in Containers All coleus have excellent container potential if they are given adequate well-draining soil mix, reasonable nutrients and the proper sun exposure to thrive. Avoid windy locations as coleus can be prone to breakage in extreme winds. Slow release fertilizers are recommended for your containers although half strength liquid fertilizer applied every 2 weeks over the growing season should be sufficient. Coleus do not show their best coloration if over fertilized so be conservative and consistent. You may want to consider water retention additives to help alleviate some watering needs, particularly in sunny locations. Drainage is vital so consider adding additional drainage holes as needed. The container style, color and ultimate placement should also be considered in advance. Coleus filled containers, if moveable, allow for instant color as they can be positioned as needed and used to add color, provide immediate interest and accent areas of the garden, deck or patio.

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Coleus certainly has the potential to be included in hanging basket arrangements. Some of the trailing selections are ideal for the edge of an elevated container while larger varieties can be utilized for a strong foliage contribution in the center of the basket. Consider watering needs as coleus are naturally thirsty and a hanging basket can be one of the most challenging situations in terms of moisture retention and associated watering needs. Wind protection is also warranted.

the Swarthmore College campus and exhibiting over 4,000 Coleus kinds of Problems ornamental plants, the Arboretum displays some of the best trees,become shrubs, stressed vines, and for and use in the reColeus may byperennials lack of heat moisture. gion.

Excessive or inadequate moisture may lead to challenges

Private Garden of Andrew Bunting with insects or diseases. A healthy coleus plant is the best

defense against these challenges. Slugs, snails, spider Belvidere is the home garden of Andrew Bunting who mites, is the mealybugs, and occasionally aphids may be chalCurator at thewhiteflies Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College.

lenges under certain conditions. While there are few fungi, bacteria and viruses that affect coleus, there may be occaPrivate Garden of Charles Cresson “Hedgleigh Spring” sional issues of stem rot, root rot or downy mildew which all have a direct relationship moisture inputs and associThis two-acre garden, home oftoauthor/lecturer Charles Cresson, been a conditions. family property since 1883. garden was ated has growing Relocating the The plant, pinching designed by his grandfather in the 1920’s and 1930’s and rehealthy cuttings for re-establishment or removing the plant tains its early 20th Century character. Since 1970, Charles has might be options to consider. Healthy, young plants will frefilled the diverse habitats and microclimates with a diverse and quently outgrow some of Ancient these challenges properly extensive plant collection. towering if white oaks “enand couraged” or may never exhibit problems because of their black gum surround the house and pre-1850 springhouse, unvigor. der planted with mature azaleas, dogwoods and large hardy caPrivate Garden of Jeff Jabco and Joe Henderson

mellia hybrids.

Summary

Chanticleer Garden

The consideration of easy-to-grow coleus in the landscape

Chanticleer has been called the most romantic, imaginative, is prudent for all gardeners as they consider the potential and exciting public garden in America. The garden is a study merits of this in where the mixed border andflowers, container. of textures andplant forms, foliage trumps theLowgarmaintenance coleus can make a huge impact in the garden deners lead the design, and even the drinking fountains are and the wide of available selections assures a promissculptural. It isrange a garden of pleasure and learning, relaxing yet filled with ideas to popular take home. ing future for this plant during 2015, the Year of the

Coleus, and well beyond! Mt. Cuba Center Founded in 1920, Nationalgarden Gardenthat Bureau is a an non-profit Mt. Cuba Center is athe botanical inspires appreciorganization whose mission improve the quality of life ation for the beauty and value isoftonative plants and a committhrough usesustain of seedsthem. and plants. ment to protect the increased habitats that During our visit we will get to meet with Travis Beck, the director of horticulThe National Garden Bureau recognizes and thanks Mark ture and author of a recent book “Principles of Ecological DeDwyer sign”. of Rotary Gardens as author of this fact sheet, which is provided as an educational service of the National Garden BuForThere moreare information call Chris 804-475-6767 reau. no limitations on theCoen use. @ Please credit the Naor Katie Sokol @ 540-742-3306 tional Garden Bureau.

SAVE THE DATE!!! VNLA Management Workshop Wednesday afternoon, August 19

VNLA Field Day

Thursday, August 20 At Shade Tree Farms

VNLA Summer Tour

Friday, August 21 Ruppert Landscapes, Wheats Landscapes - Landscape projects!

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News - 2015 Perennial Plant of the Year™ Geranium xcantabrigiense ‘Biokovo’ 2015 Perenial Plant of the Year™

Geranium x cantabrigiense ‘Biokovo’ Photo by Todd Boland

The Perennial Plant Association membership has voted and the 2015 Perennial Plant of the Year™ is Geranium xcantabrigiense ‘Biokovo’. Yes, that is a big name for this excellent groundcover type perennial that only reaches 6-10” high. ’Biokovo’ is a naturally occurring hybrid of Geranium dalmaticum and Geranium macrorrhizum found in the Biokovo Mountains of the Dalmatia region of present-day Croatia. Blooming in late spring ‘Biokovo’ has delightful masses of 5petaled white flowers, about ¾” diameter, that are tinged pink at the base of each petal and have darker pink center stamens. The overall effect is that of a blushing pink geranium. An interesting attraction is the flower ‘bud’ that is somewhat inflated

– actually made up of the sepals which are redder than the petals. When the flower opens the lightly tinged pink flowers provide a handsome contrast to the sepals and stamens. The aromatic foliage has rounded leaf edges, is a medium green color and is semi-evergreen in most climates. This geranium is a spreading, rhizomatous plant, meaning it spreads by sending out runners. However, not being a deeply rooted perennial, removal is not strenuous. Best garden placement is as a ground cover or in the front of the border. It also does well in rock gardens. ‘Biokovo’ does well in average, medium, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. It is easy to grow and only requires deadheading (removing old flowers) to keep it looking good. It forms an attractive mound that offers scarlet and orange fall colors to your garden. Cut away any dead foliage in the spring and ‘Biokovo’ is ready for the garden season. Plant ‘Biokovo’ next to Japanese painted fern. Pick up color echoes between the pink flowers and maroon foliage tones that contrast with the silver streaks in the fern fronds. It also pairs nicely with late spring blooming Penstemons such as ‘Prairie Dusk’ with clear purple flowers, or ‘Pink Rock Candy’ offering bright pink flowers on compact stems. To learn more about the Perennial Plant of the Year™ Program and past winners, visit www.perennialplant.org

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Research - Efficacy of bleach and ethanol as sanitizers on the boxwood blight pathogen, Calonectria pseudonaviculata

Introduction Boxwood blight, caused by Calonectria pseudonaviculata is a relatively new disease of boxwood in Virginia. The disease was first described in the United Kingdom in the mid1990s and by 2002 had spread to several other European countries and New Zealand. In September 2011 boxwood blight was reported for the first time in North America. The disease results in leaf spotting, defoliation, formation of long dark cankers and dieback. This pathogen has a potential to be inadvertently spread as spores (conidia and microsclerotia) and other pathogen structures (e.g. mycelium) in plant debris on infested equipment, tools and footwear. To help reduce this risk; nursery, landscape and regulatory professionals who work with and around boxwood need effective, affordable and practical sanitizer options to combat the spread of this disease. We developed a simple and practical assay to test sanitizers on the boxwood blight pathogen and used this assay to test the efficacy of bleach and ethanol as sanitizers on conidia and pieces of leaf litter infected with the boxwood blight pathogen.

Brief Summary of Procedures Testing efficacy of sanitizers on infected leaf debris and conidia Suspensions of infected leaf tissue and conidia were applied to the surface of filter paper, equally distributing the suspensions over the filter paper. The infested filter paper was then air dried for an hour. Filter paper infested with infected leaf litter were treated with .5 ml Lysol Disinfectant Brand III aerosol spray with 58% alcohol and 0.1% dimethyl benzyl ammonium saccharinate (sprayed into a beaker then pipetted), diluted Lysol Concentrate with o-Benzyl-p-chlorophenol (1:100 dilution), ethanol at (5, 10, 25, 50, 70 and 46

95%), and 1:9 bleach (5.25% sodium hypochlorite). The sanitizers were applied evenly over the infested filter paper surface using a pipette. Filter paper infested with conidia was treated with Lysol Disinfectant (Brand III) aerosol spray, ethanol (50, 70 and 95%), and 1:9 bleach (5.25% sodium hypochlorite) as described above. Sterile distilled water was applied to control treatments. The infested filter papers were air dried for 30 minutes after the sanitizers were applied. The treated filter papers were then placed infested side down onto acidified PDA plates so the side infested with leaf debris or conidia that was treated with a sanitizer was in contact with the media. The filter paper was lightly pressed onto the plates making sure it was in direct contact with the plates. The filter paper on the plates was incubated at ambient light and temperature and readings of colony forming units (CFUs) of C. pseudonaviculata growing directly from the filter paper were taken at 7 days. The filter paper was then removed from all treatments at day 7 and CFU readings of the boxwood blight pathogen were taken again at 14 and 21 days. Treatments were completed in replicates of three and experiments were repeated once.

Results and Discussion Of the products tested, ethanol at concentrations of 70% or greater and Lysol Disinfectant Brand III with 58% alcohol and .1% dimethyl benzyl ammonium saccharinate were consistently effective at killing or preventing the apparent growth of the boxwood blight pathogen when applied to infected leaf debris and conidia (see figure 1 and table 1). Lysol Disinfectant (Brand III) and denatured ethanol are available in many department, grocery stores and pharmacies at relatively affordable prices. These products are preferable to bleach and other caustic materials when applying to metal tools on a smaller scale as they are non-corrosive. Ethanol and Lysol Disinfectant Brand III are effective options for landscape, nursery professionals and regulatory inspectors who need an affordable and convenient sanitizer to apply to footwear and tools between site visits. It is important to always clean/thoroughly rinse the surface you are attempting to sanitize before applying the sanitizer to the potentially infested surface. The surface of shoes, tools and equipment should be free of visible pieces of leaf debris and mud as the sanitizers may react with soil rendering them ineffective and sanitizers may not effectively penetrate larger pieces of infected plant debris. While bleach was not 100% effective at killing the boxwood blight pathogen in infected leaf debris, bleach was consistently effective at killing conidia (see table 1). Bleach may still be the best alternative to use for larger jobs where using ethanol and Lysol Disinfectant

January / February / March 2015

VNLA Newsletter


Brand III may be cost prohibitive or impractical to spray or apply over large surface areas. For tasks such as sanitizing floors, large bench surfaces, or many pots/containers bleach may still be the most practical and affordable choice. For a full summary of sanitizers that have been tested on the boxwood blight pathogen visit: http://www.ext.vt.edu/topics/agriculture/commercial-horticulture/boxwood-blight/ Infected leaf debris

Overview of 2012, 2013, and 2014 trials

Conidia

Treatment

Avg. CFUs

SD

Avg. CFUs

SD

Control

19.8

7.9

40.8

12.8

Lysol Concentrate

2.8

1.8

Not tested

Lysol Disinfectant Brand III

0.0

0.0

0.0

5% Ethanol

15.2

8.4

Not tested

0.0

10% Ethanol

7.0

2.8

Not tested

25% Ethanol

0.7

0.8

Not tested

50% Ethanol

0.0

0.0

27.5

12.5

70% Ethanol

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

95% Ethanol

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

1.10 Bleach (Clorox)

5.2

3.4

0.0

0.0

Table 1. Average colony forming units (CFUs) growing on acidified PDA plates 14 days after infected leaf debris and conidia were treated with sanitizer. Ethanol at concentrations of 70% and greater, and Lysol Disinfectant (Brand III) with 58% alcohol and .1% dimethyl benzyl ammonium saccharinate were the only treatments consistently effective at killing or preventing the apparent growth of the boxwood blight pathogen when applied to infected leaf debris and conidia. Standard deviation (SD) is from the combined data of 2 replicate experiments with 3 replicates within an experiment. Norm Dart, and Caryn Allen, Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Richmond, VA 23226; Chuanxue Hong, Virginia Tech, Hampton Roads Agricultural Research and Experimental Station, Virginia Beach, VA 23455. VNLA Newsletter

Research - 2014 VNLA FINAL REPORT for research on Prevention and Management of Boxwood blight

2014 was our third year of field trials in Western NC and at NCSU investigating the management of boxwood blight. We made good progress in 2012 and 2013 by identifying the most effective commercially available fungicides, as well as screening over 50 different commercial Buxus cultivars for field tolerance / resistance to the disease; we also evaluated a number of experimental cultivars. Our 2014 trials were focused on generating more host resistance data on additional commercial and experimental cultivars and validating these findings so that industry can move forward with the production of new boxwood types based on numerous years (replications) of disease data. Growers are relying on our current findings in their selection of cultivars for future production. Miranda Ganci, Mike Benson and I feel confident about the research we generated. In the fall of 2013 we also established a field site to monitor box blight progression on disease tolerant cultivars over time and more space is available in this field for additional plantings. I am hopeful the new faculty member in this position (when hired) and the station director at the MHCREC will be interested in continuing this research. I have decided to submit all 3 years of data from 2012, 2013 and 2014 trials which involved commercial cultivars; experimental cultivar data has already been supplied to those collaborators. It is easier to see the conclusions of our cultivar research when all 3 years of data are supplied in one final report. Data from each individual year is reported separately, so you can also see our progress over time and the work we conducted to fulfill each yearly commitment. Please contact me if you have additional questions regarding this research. My ultimate goal in conducting this work

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was to put important science‐based information/recommendations in the hands of the people (boxwood growers) that needed it most, and as timely and efficiently as possible. I still care very deeply about this disease and the growers propagating boxwood and want to make sure our data is utilized and understood. Thank you for supporting us these past few years‐ without support from the WV, VA and NC Nursery & Landscape Associations, as well as Saunders Brothers Nursery, we could not have conducted most of this research. Ted Mays has also been very valuable regarding his insights and disease observations. Miranda Ganci’s thesis chapter 2 (abbreviated): Susceptibility of commercial Buxus species and cultivars to the boxwood blight pathogen Cylindrocladium buxicola Boxwood blight is a foliar disease caused by the fungal pathogen Cylindrocladium buxicola. As infection progresses, leaf lesions often expand in a zonate pattern and leaves defoliate. This disease was first described in the UK in the mid to late 1990s (10). Epidemics of boxwood blight have resulted in economic and emotional loss due to the financial and historical value of boxwood. The use of host resistance is a sustainable and affordable disease management strategy. As such, researchers in Europe began conducting host susceptibility assays in hopes of identifying boxwood blight resistant Buxus cultivars in the mid to late 2000s (7‐9). In 2011, boxwood blight was detected in the United States (12). It was immediately apparent that this disease would be economically important in NC and elsewhere in the U.S. because the pathogen destroyed millions of dollars of container and field boxwood in a relatively short time period (12). Boxwood cultivars most severely impacted were B. sempervirens ‘American’ and ‘Suffruticosa’; these cultivars are the most popular, most commonly grown, and apparently most susceptible to boxwood blight among boxwood cultivars grown in the U.S. After the U.S. detection of boxwood blight, host resistance screening of Buxus germplasm commonly found in the U.S. nursery trade was identified as an important objective. In previous host resistance studies performed on Buxus cultivars the Asiatic types were identified as generally more resistant than the European types (7, 8). With ample genetic diversity in species of Buxus the use of host resistance could be a practical disease management strategy for future boxwood plantings. Over 95 species of Buxus have been identified with indigenous origins around the globe (19). The most common in the nursery trade are cultivars and hybrids of the European type B. sempervirens. Other popular cultivated species are of Asiatic origin and these include B. harlandii, B. microphylla (littleleaf), and B. sinica (Korean). Cultivars of B. sinica var. insularis are commonly referred to as Korean boxwood and occasionally referred to as B. microphylla var. koreana. Van Laere et al. (19) performed 48

genetic analysis of Buxus and found that the European species B. sempervirens and B. balearica clustered together and the Asiatic cultivar B. colchica also grouped within this cluster (it has leaf morphology similar to B. sempervirens). Batdorf (2) provides evidence that B. colchica is a synonym for B. sempervirens. The Asiatic species, B. microphylla (the Korean types were categorized under this species name), B. harlandii, B. hyrcana, B. myrica, B. henyri, B. bodinieri, and B. wallichiana clustered together (19). Previously, the cultivar ‘Justin Brouwers’ had been classified with B. sinica var. insularis. However, Van Laere et al. (19) identified that ‘Justin Brouwers’ had been misclassified and it actually belongs with the B. sempervirens group. Morphologically, the European species are characterized as having elliptical, darker green leaves with an acute tip (B. colchica and B. wallichiana also have this leaf morphology) (19) and the Asiatic species are described as having oblanceolate to obovate medium green leaves with an obtuse tip (13). Flower morphology does not distinguish European from Asiatic species (21, 22). Hybrid boxwood cultivars such as Buxus ‘Green Gem’, ‘Green Mound’, ‘Green Mountain’, and ‘Green Velvet’ have been developed from crosses between B. sempervirens and B. microphylla (reportedly Korean types) (20). These are commonly known as the Sheridan hybrids as they were introduced by Sheridan nurseries of Oakville, Ontario, Canada. Disease resistance in plants is the ability to actively reduce pathogen development and reproduction and decrease disease development (1, 15, 16). Tolerance is commonly used to describe a host on which pathogen colonization and reproduction are not reduced relative to susceptible types even though there are less symptoms or yield loss compared to a susceptible host (6, 15). Resistance in plants can be identified by the expression of a major gene (complete resistance) or many genes (quantitative resistance) (16, 18). The basis for tolerance is less understood and it might be related to the concept of avoidance; wherein yield loss is not incurred or symptoms do not develop in abundance due to factors such as leaf shape or plant architecture. The terms ‘resistance’ and ‘tolerance’ are often used interchangeably, however, throughout this publication the term ‘resistance’ will be used to describe reduced disease development on the host. The objective of this study was to screen commercial Buxus cultivars for resistance to Cylindrocladium buxicola. MATERIALS AND METHODS Susceptibility of commercial boxwood cultivars to the boxwood blight pathogen was evaluated in 2012, 2013, and 2014 at the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research Station in Mills River, NC. Experiments were performed on plants on a shaded container pad with daily overhead irrigation.

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VNLA Newsletter


2012 container pad trial

Note: The VNLA funded $25,000 as a budget line item to help fund this research and the VNA Horticulture Research Foundation funded $6,500. In the 2012 trial, 23 cultivars of boxwood were randomized in plots within each of four blocks. The experiment consisted of a randomized complete block design. Each plot consisted of six subsamples of a test cultivar and two inoculum reservoir plants (Fig. 1). This design was used to simulate natural plant to plant spread of the pathogen instead of exposing plants to extraordinarily high concentrations of the pathogen by artificial inoculation. Test cultivars were placed around inoculated B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’ plants; these were the inoculum reservoir plants. The experiment also included positive and negative control plots, which consisted of six B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’ plants surrounding either two inoculum reservoir plants or two non‐inoculated B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’ plants, respectively. Test cultivars were donated from Saunders Brothers nursery. The test cultivars ranged in age from approximately two to five years old. Most test cultivars ranged from 10.16 cm to 60.96 cm height and were most commonly growing in 3.8 liter (1 gal) containers, although some plants were grown in 7.6 (2 gal) or 11.4 liter (3 gal) containers, which contained either field (clay loam) soil or pine bark soilless potting media. The inoculum consisted of a combination of isolates collected from infected field‐grown and container‐grown boxwood leaves in NC during boxwood blight disease epidemics in 2011 and 2012. Inoculum was prepared by growing C. buxicola on full strength potato dextrose agar for 30 days. A conidial suspension for inoculum was prepared by flattening aerial mycelium with a VNLA Newsletter

semi‐micro spatula and cultures were placed inside of an incubator (constant 22 °C, 18 h photoperiod with fluorescent light). After an incubation period of five days, conidia were dislodged from the culture and into a collection beaker with a stream of water dispensed from a hand held spray bottle. The suspension was filtered through cheesecloth and the concentration of conidia was counted using a hemocytometer. The inoculum reservoir plants were direct spray inoculated with a 10,000 conidia/ml suspension until run‐off with a hand held pump up sprayer on 12 Jul 2012. After inoculation the plants were covered with plastic bags in order to increase humidity in the plant canopy; this is ideal for boxwood blight disease development. The bags were removed from the plants the following morning and irrigated daily every 1.5 to 2 h for a 10 to 15 min duration from 9:00 am until 8:00 pm to sustain leaf wetness. Irrigation output was approximately 0.5 cm/10 min duration. On 16 Jul 2012, 4 days post inoculation (dpi) of the inoculum reservoir plants, the test cultivars were placed around the inoculum reservoir plants. The test cultivar containers were touching the containers of the inoculum reservoir plants; however, due to the variation in test cultivar plant size the distance between the test cultivar leaves and inoculum reservoir leaves ranged from approximately 2.54 cm to 15.24 cm (Fig. 1). On 16 July 2012 irrigation was changed to four times daily for a 30 min duration. Disease did not develop as quickly as was expected on the positive control. On 31 Jul 2012, 19 dpi, the inoculum reservoir plants had over 75% diseased and defoliated leaves, but the susceptible positive control B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’ had less than 10% diseased leaves and defoliation. To increase disease development, a direct inoculation of the test cultivars was performed on 8 Aug 2012 with a 1,000 conidia/ml suspension until run‐off. Disease evaluations were performed on 10 Aug 2012 (19 days of exposure to the inoculum reservoir plants), 24 Aug 2012 (36 days of exposure to the inoculum reservoir plants), and 9 Sep 2012 (50 days of exposure to the inoculum reservoir plants). Disease severity was evaluated as percent of diseased and defoliated leaves with a modified Horsfall‐ Barratt scale (11) (0 = 0, 1 = 1 lesion, 2 = 0.6 to 3%, 3 = 3 to 6%, 4 = 6 to 12%, 5 = 12 to 25%, 6 = 25 to 50%, 7 = 50 to 75%, 8 = 75 to 87%, 9 = 87 to 94%, 10 = 94 to 97%, 11 = 97 to 100%, 12 = 100%). Leaf drop was evaluated with a qualitative scale; none, trace < 1%, low = 1 to 10%, moderate = 10 to 30%, and high > 30%. The disease severity and leaf drop rating was assigned to the group of six subsamples for each test cultivar within each block. 2013 container pad trial. In the 2013 experiment, 29 commercial cultivars were arranged in a randomized complete block design. The experiment design this year was different from the year prior due to a limited number of plants provided by the supplier; each of six blocks included a single subsample

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plant of each test cultivar arranged randomly into plots. Each plot consisted of six different test cultivars and two inoculum reservoir plants (Fig. 1). This differed from the 2012 experiment because in that experiment each of four blocks consisted of a random arrangement of plots where each plot contained six subsample plants of the same test cultivar. The 2013 experiment included a plant of B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’ in each plot as a positive control (Fig. 1) and B. sinica var. insularis ‘Nana’ and B. microphylla var. japonica ‘Green Beauty’ as negative controls. These cultivars expressed resistance in the 2012 experiment. Test cultivars were donated from Longwood gardens, Saunders Brothers nursery, and Spring Meadow nursery. All nurseries were free of boxwood blight disease. The test cultivars ranged in age from approximately two to five years old. Most test cultivar plants ranged from 10.16 cm to 60.96 cm height and were most commonly growing in 3.8 liter (1 gal) containers, although some were in 7.6 (2 gal) or 11.4 liter (3 gal) containers, which contained either field (clay loam) soil or pine bark soilless potting media. Test cultivars were delivered to the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research Station on 17 Apr 2013 and they did not receive any fungicide application in the spring of 2013 prior to delivery. On 16 May 2013 10‐6‐4 granular fertilizer was applied at a rate of 21 g per 3.8 liter and on 24 May 2013 dolomitic lime was applied at a rate of 30 g per 3.8 liter. On 3 Jun 2013, the

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insecticide, dinotefuran was applied at a rate of 0.6 g per 3.8 liter of suspension for the control of fungus gnats. The inoculum reservoir plants were inoculated with a 10,000 conidia/ml suspension to run‐off, as described previously, on 24 May 2013. The following morning, the plastic bags were removed from the plants and daily irrigation was applied every two h for a 10 min duration from 6:00 am until 10:00 pm. Irrigation output was approximately 0.5 cm/10 min duration. On 29 May 2013, 5 days post inoculation (dpi) of the inoculum reservoir plants, the test cultivars were placed around the inoculum reservoir plants. On 3 Jun 2013 (5 days of exposure to the inoculum reservoir plants) irrigation was changed to four times daily for a 10 min duration. By 6 Jun 2013 (13 dpi) the inoculum reservoir plants had 3 to 6% diseased leaves and the positive control B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’ had 1% diseased leaves. By 13 Jun 2013 (20 dpi) the inoculum reservoir plants were showing 50‐75% diseased and defoliated leaves and the positive control B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’ plants had over 20% diseased and defoliated leaves. Disease evaluations were performed on 14 Jun 2013 (16 days of exposure to the inoculum reservoir plants) and 21 Jun 2013 (23 days of exposure to the inoculum reservoir plants). Disease severity was evaluated as percent of diseased leaves with a modified Horsfall‐Barratt scale; this differed from the 2012 and 2014 experiments where disease

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severity was evaluated as percent of diseased and defoliated leaves. Leaf drop was evaluated with the same qualitative scale as described previously. After the rating performed on 21 Jun 2013, the test cultivars with an average HorsfallBarratt rating of 5 or above (> 12%) were removed from the experiment because they were considered susceptible. In order to verify field resistance, the 14 remaining cultivars plus the positive control, B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’, were direct spray inoculated with a suspension of 10,000 conidia/ml on 21 Jun 2013 and placed in plastic bags overnight. Over the next 82 days disease development was minimal so the test cultivars were direct inoculated a second time with a suspension of 15,000 conidia/ml on 11 Sep 2013. A disease severity evaluation was performed on 10 Sep 2013 (81 days after the inoculation on 21 Jun 2013). Disease severity was evaluated as percent of diseased and defoliated leaves with a modified Horsfall‐Barratt scale (similar to the 2012 and 2014 experiments). Leaf drop was evaluated with a qualitative scale: none, trace, low, moderate, and high. On 16 Oct 2013, the cultivars that remained in the 2013 experiment were transplanted from pots on the container pad to a 1 x 1 meter spacing in an outdoor field adjacent to the container pad; one plant per test cultivar was randomly arranged in each of 5 blocks. The field was in full sun and did not have overhead irrigation (drip irrigation lines were installed). A final disease severity evaluation was done for the field‐planted cultivars on 15 Nov 2013 (147 days after the inoculation on 21 Jun 2013).

2014 container pad trial In the 2014 experiment, 60 commercial cultivars were arranged in a randomized complete block design. Of the 60 cultivars, 32 had been previously tested in either 2012 or 2013. The experiment consisted of a randomized complete block design as described for the 2013 experiment (Fig. 1). As in 2013, the 2014 experiment included a plant of B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’ in each plot as a positive control and B. sinica var. insularis ‘Nana’ and B. microphylla var. japonica ‘Green Beauty’ as negative controls. Test cultivars were donated from Saunders Brothers nursery and Spring Meadow nursery. The test cultivars ranged in age from approximately two to five years old. Most test cultivar plants ranged from 10.16 cm to 60.96 cm height and were most commonly growing in 3.8 liter (1 gal) containers, although some were in 7.6 (2 gal) or 11.4 liter (3 gal) containers, which contained either field (clay loam) soil or pine bark soilless potting media. Test cultivars were delivered to the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research Station on 4 Apr 2014 and they did not receive any fungicide application in the spring of 2014 prior to delivery. The inoculum reservoir plants were inoculated with a 10,000 conidia/ml suspension to run‐off, as described previously, on 26 May 2014. The following morning, the VNLA Newsletter

plastic bags were removed from the plants and daily irrigation was applied every two h for a 10 min duration from 6:00 am until 10:00 pm. Irrigation output was approximately 0.5 cm/10 min duration. On 2 June 2014, 7 days post inoculation (dpi) of the inoculum reservoir plants, the test cultivars were placed around the inoculum reservoir plants. On 9 Jun 2014 (7 days of exposure to the inoculum reservoir plants) irrigation was changed to four times daily for a 10 min duration. By 9 Jun 2014 (14 dpi) the inoculum reservoir plants had 6 to 12% diseased leaves and the positive control B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’ had 3 to 6% diseased leaves. By 17 Jun 2014 (22 dpi) the inoculum reservoir plants were showing 50‐75% diseased and defoliated leaves and the positive control B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’ plants had over 20% diseased and defoliated leaves. Disease evaluations were performed on 10 Jun 2014 (8 days of exposure to the inoculum reservoir plants), 17 Jun 2014 (15 days of exposure to the inoculum reservoir plants) and 26 Jun 2014 (24 days of exposure to the inoculum reservoir plants). After the rating performed on 26 Jun 2014, the test cultivars with an average Horsfall‐Barratt rating of 5 or above (> 12%) were removed from the experiment because they were considered susceptible. The 48 remaining cultivars plus the positive control, B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’, were direct spray inoculated with a suspension of 10,000 conidia/ml on 27 Jun 2014 and placed in plastic bags overnight. Disease severity evaluation was performed on 3 July 2014 (6 dpi), 10 July 2014 (13 dpi), 17 July 2014 (20 dpi), and 25 Aug 2014 (59 dpi). Disease severity was evaluated as percent of diseased and defoliated leaves with a modified HorsfallBarratt scale. Leaf drop was evaluated with a qualitative scale as previously described. Weather data for the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research Station were obtained from the CRONOS Database (State Climate Office of NC). Effect of geographic origin on disease severity The effect of the geographic origin of Buxus species on disease severity was evaluated for test cultivars in the 2012, 2013, and 2014 container pad trials and in the detached branch trial.

RESULTS 2012 container pad trial. For the container pad experiment conducted in 2012 the analysis of variance indicated that cultivar significantly affected disease severity (P < 0.0001) after 50 days of test cultivar exposure to the inoculum reservoir plants (7 Sep 2012). There was a wide range of disease severity ratings for the cultivars tested. Disease severity ranged from 0.025% for B. microphylla var. japonica ‘Green Beauty’ to 61% for B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’ (positive control). High and moderate leaf drop occurred most commonly on the cultivars with the highest disease severity rating. The

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unexposed negative controls of B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’ incurred 22% diseased and defoliated leaves indicating that inoculum spread to the plants from the inoculum reservoir plants in other plots (Fig. 3). Significant disease development in the 2012 container pad experiment did not begin until the second week in August; approximately three and a half weeks after the test cultivars were moved next to the inoculum reservoir plants (Fig. 4).

2013 container pad trial There was abundant rainfall during the 2013 experiment. Significant disease development began on the test cultivars about two weeks after the plants were placed next to the inoculum reservoir plants (Fig. 5). Cultivar significantly affected disease severity (P < 0.0001) after 23 days of test cultivar exposure to the inoculum reservoir plants (21 Jun 2013). As in the 2012 experiment there was a wide range of disease severity ratings. The cultivars B. sempervirens ‘Aurea Pendula’, ‘Latifolia Maculata’, ‘Arborescens’, ‘Denmark’, and ‘Handsworthii’ had ratings above 40% diseased leaves which was higher than the rating of 35% for the positive control B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’. The cultivars included as negative controls had low disease severity ratings, with 1% diseased leaves for B. microphylla var. japonica ‘Green Beauty’ and 5% for B. sinica var. insularis ‘Nana’ (Fig. 6). For the disease severity evaluations conducted after the test cultivars were direct inoculated, the analysis of variance indicated that cultivar significantly affected disease severity at 81 dpi (10 Sep 2013) (P < 0.0001) and 147 dpi (15 Nov 2013) (P < 0.0001). There was a slight increase in the disease severity ratings on 10 Sep 2013 for plants that were inoculated directly, including; B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’, ‘Rotundifolia’, ‘Hohman’s Dwarf’, B. sp. ‘Franklin’s Gem’, B. sinica var. insularis ‘Nana’, B. sp. ‘Wedding Ring’, and B. microphylla var. japonica ‘Green Beauty’ compared to the disease severity ratings recorded after 23 days of test cultivar exposure to the inoculum reservoir plants (21 Jun 2013) (Fig. 6&7). However, there was a decrease in disease severity ratings for all cultivars between 81 and 147 dpi with the exception of B. harlandii ‘Richard’ (Fig. 7).

2014 container pad trial There was abundant rainfall during the 2014 experiment. Significant disease development began on the test cultivars about 1.5 weeks after the plants were placed next to the inoculum reservoir plants (Fig. 8). Cultivar significantly affected disease severity (P < 0.0001) after 24 days of test cultivar exposure to the inoculum reservoir plants (26 Jun 2014). As in the 2012 and 2013 experiments there was a wide range of disease severity ratings. The cultivars B. mi52

crophylla var. japonica ‘Morris Midget’ and ‘Grace Hendricks Philips’ had ratings above 50% diseased and defoliated leaves which was higher than the rating of 48% for the positive control B. sempervirens ‘Suffruticosa’. The cultivars B. microphylla ‘Winter Gem’, ‘John Baldwin’, and ‘Jim Stauffer’, B. harlandii and B. harlandii ‘Richard’, and B. sp. ‘Wee Willie’ had low disease severity ratings, with less than 1% diseased and defoliated leaves. The cultivars included as negative controls had low disease development as well, with less than 3% diseased and defoliated leaves for both B. microphylla ‘Green Beauty’ and B. sinica var. insularis ‘Nana’ (Fig. 9). For the disease severity evaluations conducted after the test cultivars were direct inoculated, the analysis of variance indicated that cultivar significantly affected disease severity at 59 dpi (25 Aug 2014) (P < 0.0001). Disease severity ratings ranged from 0.7% for B. harlandii ‘Richard’ to 99% for B. sempervirens ‘Jensen’ and the positive control ‘Suffruticosa’ (Fig. 10). Effect of geographic origin on disease severity In the three years of container pad experiments and the detached branch trial, the geographic origin of Buxus species had a significant effect (P < 0.0001) on disease severity response as indicated by an analysis of variance. Overall, the European group (B. sempervirens) cultivars had the highest disease severity while the cultivars in the Asiatic group had the lowest disease severity ratings (Fig. 12). DISCUSSION The disease severity ratings recorded for all of the experiments indicated a wide range of susceptibility in Buxus cultivars to the boxwood blight pathogen C. buxicola. In this study, the Asiatic types generally expressed more resistance than the European types; this is similar to the results found in previous host resistance studies (7, 8). In the 2012 container pad trial the cultivars were exposed to the pathogen by placing them adjacent to the inoculum reservoir plants rather than inoculating them directly with the pathogen. In general, the B. sempervirens types had higher disease severity ratings than the Asiatic types (which include B. harlandii, B. microphylla, and B. sinica) in the 2012 experiment. However, there were exceptions; B. sempervirens ‘Dee Runk’ and ‘Fastigiata’ had the lowest disease severity ratings of the B. sempervirens types. They have an upright and moderately compact plant architecture and a columnar growth pattern. It is possible that there is less humidity (and therefore less disease development) in the canopy of ‘Dee Runk’ and ‘Fastigiata’ compared to the dense canopies of the susceptible cultivars B. sempervirens ‘American’ and ‘Suffruticosa’. In contrast, B. microphylla ‘Morris Midget’ and ‘Morris Dwarf’ were more susceptible than most of the Asiatic types. They have a very dense and

January / February / March 2015

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VNLA Pender ad half page_VNLA pender half page ad 1/15/14 11:21 AM Pag

compact plant architecture, which suggests that high humid-

News – Virginia Agribusiness  ity within the plant canopy contributes to disease development in these cultivars. Banquet & Town Hall Meeting 

As in 2012, cultivars in the 2013 trial were exposed to the Ad pathogen via the inoculum reservoir plants. In this experiment there were relatively more B. sempervirens types (20) in comparison to Asiatic types (8). Nevertheless, putative resistance was most frequently found in the Asiatic types. The B. sempervirens types which had a disease severity ratNEW AD ing of less than 20%: B. sempervirens ‘Angustifolia’, ‘Rotundifolia’, and ‘Longwood’, all have an upright growth pattern and moderately dense canopy.

Ad – Pender Nursery – Pender Nursery

In the 2014 container pad experiment the Asiatic cultivars tended to be more resistant than the European cultivars. Notable exceptions include B. microphylla ‘Morris Midget’ and ‘Grace Hendrick Phillips’. Both of these cultivars have a dense canopy and compact plant architecture and were Via Green Industry Council members install plants and flowers  identified as susceptible in 2012. In contrast to the results for the Virginia Agribusiness Council Banquet.   from 2013, B. sempervirens ‘Longwood’ was one of the (front) Lorene Blackwood,  (l‐r) Bill Bonwell, Gwynn Hubbard,    most susceptible of the B. sempervirens types in 2014. NoPeggy Seay, Cary Gouldin  tably, the ‘Longwood’ plants in the 2014 experiment were smaller and putatively younger than the plants in the 2013 experiment. In the future it is important to conduct disease resistance screens on plants of the same age in each experiment. Considering that C. buxicola was identified in the U.S. in 2011 there was not time to cultivate plants of the same age for the initial resistance screens that were conducted for this study. The goal of this study was to screen Buxus cultivars for resistance to the boxwood blight pathogen C. buxicola. Over 80 cultivars were screened and a wide range of resistance was observed, with the Asiatic types generally expressing more resistance. Because it would be difficult to continually spray preventative fungicides James River Nurseries installing plants on a frequent James River Nurseries installing plans   and sodlandscape from Brookmeade Farm on susceptible basisand sod from Brookmeade Sod Farm  in the to manage Sod this disease cultivars, resistant cultivars should be planted into landscapes to effectively manage boxwood blight. Considering the high economic and historical value of some B. sempervirens plantings, caution should be used during site selection for resistant cultivars. They incur relatively low levels of pathogen development and presumably reproduction, but they are not immune. The resistant cultivars can serve as inoculum reservoirs and transfer the pathogen and boxwood blight disease to locations with established susceptible cultivars. Additionally, site selection for resistant cultivars is limited to the hardiness zones for which they are adapted; Batdorf (3) provides extensive reference to hardiness zones for cultivars of Buxus. Future studies should investigate the Town Hall meeting at Grelen Nurseries, Orange, VA  nature of the resistance in Buxus cultivars so that they may be effectively used in boxwood breeding programs.

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LITERATURE CITED 1. Barker, K. R. 1993. Resistance/tolerance and related concepts/terminology in plant nematology. Plant Disease 77:111‐113. 2. Batdorf, L. R. 2004. B. sempervirens. Pages 83‐230 in: Boxwood; an illustrated encyclopedia. The American Boxwood Society, Boyce, VA. 3. Batdo rf, L. R. 2004. Boxwood; an illustrated encyclopedia. The American Boxwood Society, Boyce, VA. 4. Bock, C. H., Gottwald, T. R., Parker, P. E., Ferrandino, F., Welham, S., van den Bosch, F., and Parnell, S. 2010. Some consequences of using the Horsfall‐Barratt scale for hypothesis testing. Phytopathology 100:1030‐1041. 5. Bock, C. H., Wood, B. W., van den Bosch, F., Parnell, S., and Gottwald, T. R. 2013. The effect of Hosfall‐Barratt category size on the accuracy and reliability of estimates of pecan scab severity. Plant Disease 97:797‐806. 6. Cobb, N. A. 1984. Contributions to an economic knowledge of Australian rusts (Uredinae). Agric. Gaz N.S.W. 5:239‐250. 7. Ehsen, B. 2011. In der Afachlichkeit Gibt es deutliche Sortenunterschiede. Deutsche Baumschule 8:48‐49. 8. Gehesquière, B. 2014. Cylindrocladium buxicola nom. cons. prop. (syn. Calonectria pseudonaviculata) on Buxus: molecular characterization, epidemiology, host resistance and fungicide control. PhD Thesis. Ghent University, Belgium. 289 p. 9. Henricot, B., Gorton, C., Denton, G., and Denton, J. 2008. Studies on the control of Cylindrocladium buxicola using fungicides and host resistance. Plant Disease 92:1273‐1279. 10. Henricot, B., Pérez Sierra, A., and Prior, C. 2000. A new blight disease on Buxus in the UK caused by the fungus Cylindrocladium. Plant Pathology 49:805‐805. 11. Horsfall, J. G., and Barratt, R. W. 1945. An improved grading system for measuring plant diseases (Abstr.). Phytopathology 35:655. 12. Ivors, K. L., Lacey, L. W., Milks, D. C., Douglas, S. M., Inman, M. K., Marra, R. E., and LaMondia, J. A. 2012. First report of boxwood blight caused by Cylindrocladium pseudonaviculatum in the United States. Plant Disease 96:1070‐1070. 13. Larson, P. D. 1999. Boxwood: its history, cultivation, propagation and descriptions. Foliar Press, Virginia. 14. Michalska, A. M., Zimnoch‐Guzowska, E., Sobkowiak, S., and Plich, J. 2011. Resistance of potato to stem infection by Phytophthora infestans 54

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16.

17.

18. 19.

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and a comparison to detached leaflet and field resistance assessments. Am. J. Pot. Res. 88:367‐373. Mussel, H. 1980. Tolerance to disease. Pages 39‐51 in: Plant Diseases: An Advanced Treatise. J. G. Horsfall and E. B. Cowling, eds. Academic Press, London. Pataky, J. K., and Carson, M. L. 2004. Host resistance. Pages 295‐312 in: Plant pathology: concepts and laboratory exercises. R. N. Trigiano, M. T. Windham and A. S. Windham, eds. CRC Press, Boca Raton. Poolsawat, O., Tharapreuksapong, A., Wongkaew, S., Chaowiset, W., and Tantasawat, P. 2012. Laboratory and field evaluations of resistance to Sphaceloma ampelinum causing anthracnose of grapevine. Australasian Plant Pathol. 41:263‐269. Van der Plank, J. E. 1968. Disease Resistance in Plants. Academic Press, New York. Van Laere, K., Hermans, D., Leus, L., and Van Huylenbroeck, J. 2011. Genetic relationships in European and Asiatic Buxus species based on AFLP markers, genome sizes and chromosome numbers. Plant Systematics and Evolution 293:1‐11. Van Trier, H., and Hermans, D. 2005. Buxus. von Balthazar, M., and Endress, P. K. 2002. Development of inflorescences and flowers in Buxaceae and the problem of perianth interpretation. Int. J Plant Sci 163:847‐876. von Balthazar, M., and Endress, P. K. 2002. Reproductive structures and systematics of Buxaceae. Bot J Linn Soc 140:193‐228.

Principal Investigator Dr. Kelly Ivors, Associate Professor, Dept. of Horticulture & Crop Science, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA (since March 2014). kivors@calpoly.edu ; cell 828‐ 337‐1765 This funding was provided when I was an Associate Professor & Extension Specialist at NC State University in Mills River for research conducted by my plant pathology team for the 2014 field season: graduate student Miranda Ganci, lab technicians Landis Lacey and Dreama Milks, and field technician Chris Holmberg. I honor my research commitments, hence I am submitting this final report on our boxwood blight research to the Virginia Nursery & Landscape Association. Although I am no longer conducting research on boxwood blight due to lack of the disease in California and environmental conditions that do not promote infection (no rain, like… no rain at all!), others at NCSU including Dr. Marc Cubeta and his graduate student Megan Miller are continuing to conduct studies on this pathosystem. [Editor’s Note: for copies the Figures and Charts referenced, contact the VNLA Office for a complete copy of the report (research@vnla.org or 1-800-476-0055) or go online to http://www.vnla.org/Research/Boxwood-Blight-Info ]

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Research - Weed Management in Ornamental Grasses Through research supported by the Virginia Nurserymen's Horticultural Research Foundation, I have been evaluating tolerance of newly-planted ornamental grasses to preemergence herbicides. There has been considerable interest in ornamental grasses for use in home and commercial landscapes. Nurseries commonly produce ornamental grasses in containers, where weed control is an important production concern. Weed control is most important at planting time. As ornamental grasses grow and fill in containers, there is less opportunity for weeds to invade. Weeds are commonly controlled in container production through the use of preemergence herbicides, supplemented by hand weeding. After a review of the label for common preemergence herbicides used in container production, it was found that many commonly-grown grasses have few to no preemergence herbicides registered for use.

I obtained well-rooted liners of Chinense pennisetum (Pennisetum alopecuroides), feather reed grass (Calamagrostis acutiflora), little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium), switch grass (Panicum virgatum), weeping lovegrass (Eragrostis curvula), and northern sea oats (Chasmanthium latifolium) and planted them into one gallon containers of pine bark. The preemergence herbicide I evaluated were Pendulum 2G (pendimethalin) at 3, 6, and 12 pounds active ingredient (ai) per acre, Gallery (isoxaben) at 1.0. 2.0, and 4.0 lb. ai/A, and Dimension 2EW (dithiopyr) at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 lb. ai/A. These rates represent the anticipated use rate (1X), twice the use rate (2X) and four times the use rate (4X). Ideally we would like to see a 4X tolerance in a crop for an herbicide registration. In such a case, an accidental overlap in spray, resulting in a 2X application rate, should not result in adverse effects to the plant. The three herbicides were chosen based on the expected tolerance by ornamental

VNLA Newsletter

grasses. I also evaluated combinations of Gallery plus Dimension and Gallery plus Pendulum AquaCap as these combinations would result in broader spectrum weed control. Herbicides were applied four days after planting and all treatments were repeated 6 weeks later. Overhead irrigation was applied immediately after application. At the time of the first herbicide application, plant height in inches was: Panicum 12.5”, Schizachyrium 9.5”, Calamagrostis 18”, Eragrostis 18.5”, Pennisetum 16”, and Chasmanthium 14”. We took shoot fresh weight of each ornamental grass at one month after each application. No injury was seen in the foliage of any of the 6 ornamental grasses when evaluated visually. At one month after the first application, no herbicide treatment reduced shoot fresh weight of Schizachyrium, Panicum, Eragrostis, Pennisetum, or Chasmanthium, although there appeared to be a slight decrease in Panicum shoot weight at the highest rate of Gallery. Dimension at 2 lb. ai/A (4X rate) reduced shoot weight of Calamagrostis compared to untreated plants, and the two lower rates of Dimension appeared to reduce shoot weight in this species. After the second herbicide application, no treatment reduced regrowth shoot weight of Schizachyrium, Panicum, Eragrostis, or Pennisetum, although Pendulum-containing treatments appeared to cause approximately a 10% reduction in Schizachyrium regrowth weight. Dimension at 2 lb. ai/A (4X rate) appeared to reduce regrowth shoot weight of Calamagrostis. Pendulum AquaCap plus Gallery reduced shoot weight in Chasmanthium, although all herbicide treatments appeared to cause a decrease in shoot weight of this species. When compared to untreated plants, no herbicide treatment reduced seed head production in Schizachyrium, Panicum, Pennisetum, or Chasmanthium. Eragrostis and Calamagrostis did not produce seed heads during the trial. Weed control increased as the herbicide rate increased. At the lowest rate tested (1X rate), Gallery, Dimension, and Pendulum all provided similar control of mulberry weed (69-80%). At the lowest rate tested, Dimension provided the best spotted spurge control. In general, Pennisetum alopecuroides, Calamagrostis acutiflora, Schizachyrium scoparium, Panicum virgatum, Chasmanthium latifolium, and Eragrostis curvula appear to have acceptable tolerance to Pendulum 2G, Gallery SC, and Dimension 2EW, although some reduction in growth could occur, especially at above-labeled rates following 2 applications. For broader spectrum control, Gallery plus either Pendulum AquaCap or Dimension 2EW appear to be promising treatments for the ornamental grasses evaluated. I hope to continue my research on weed control in ornamental grasses. One area that I would like to explore is controlling emerged annual grass and broadleaf weeds in ornamental grasses using available postemergence herbicides. Jeffrey Derr, a professor of weed science with Virginia Tech, is located at the Hampton Roads Ag. Research and Extension Center in Virginia Beach. JDERR@VT.EDU

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Events - The American Boxwood Society invites you to the 55th Annual Symposium “Timeless Gardens, Timeless Boxwood” the Swarthmore College campus and exhibiting over 4,000 May 19-22, 2015. kinds of ornamental plants, the Arboretum displays some of Longwood Gardens, Kennett the best trees, shrubs, vines, and perennialsSquare, for use in PA the region.

Private Garden of Andrew Bunting Belvidere is the home garden of Andrew Bunting who is the Curator at the Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College.

Private Garden of Jeff Jabco and Joe Henderson Private Garden of Charles Cresson “Hedgleigh Spring” This two-acre garden, home of author/lecturer Charles Cresson, has been a family property since 1883. The garden was designed by his grandfather in the 1920’s and 1930’s and retains its early 20th Century character. Since 1970, Charles has filled the diverse habitats and microclimates with a diverse and extensive plant collection. Ancient towering white oaks and black gum surround the house and pre-1850 springhouse, under planted with mature azaleas, dogwoods and large hardy camellia hybrids. The theme for this year’s Symposium is “Timeless Gardens,

Timeless Boxwood”, Chanticleer Garden and will feature speakers and tours ranging from the boxwood and gardens of the du Pont famChanticleer has been called the most romantic, imaginative, ily to the historic gardens of prominent Quaker families in and exciting public garden in America. The garden is a study the Philadelphia area. where May isfoliage an exciting to visit the of textures and forms, trumps time flowers, the garBrandywine Valley, as and colorful blooms will be are at deners lead the design, even spring the drinking fountains their peak. It is a garden of pleasure and learning, relaxing yet sculptural. filled with ideas to take home.

Registration and more details, check our website for details: Mt. Cuba Center www.americanboxwoodsociety.org Mt. Cuba Center Boxwood is a botanical garden(ABS) that inspires appreciThe American Society is a an non-profit ation for the beauty and value of native plants and a commitmembership organization founded in 1961 and devoted to ment to protect the habitats that sustain them. During our visit the appreciation, scientific understanding, and propagation we will get to meet with Travis Beck, the director of horticulof theand genus Buxus L. It was organized byof a group of amature author of a recent book “Principles Ecological Deteur and professional boxwood enthusiasts. sign”. more information call Chris TheFor American Boxwood Society, P.O.Coen Box @ 85,804-475-6767 Boyce, Virginia or Katie Sokol @ 540-742-3306 22620, amboxwoodsociety@gmail.com

SAVE THE DATE!!! VNLA Management Workshop Wednesday afternoon, August 19

VNLA Field Day

Thursday, August 20 At Shade Tree Farms

VNLA Summer Tour

Friday, August 21 Ruppert Landscapes, Wheats Landscapes - Landscape projects! 56

Events - Farwest Trade Show Sets Course for 2015 Keynote Speaker Ron Rosenberg Wilsonville, Oregon (November 4, 2014) - Finding and realizing opportunity in the horticulture industry is the focus for the 2015 Farwest Trade Show, August 27-29, 2015, in Events – Shenandoah Valley Plant Portland, Ore. Award-winning marketing and customer serSymposium vice expert Ron Rosenberg will bring his brand of business and professional development to Farwest to help growers, retailers, landscapers, wholesale buyers and suppliers discover hidden opportunities and then take action for positive outcomes. Rosenberg's free keynote address – Must be Present to Win: The Secret to Finding the Opportunities in Business and Life that Other People Miss! – On Thursday, August 27, will highlight specific strategies for tangible results. His pro-gram will focus on recognizing and creating valuable opportunities, developing efficient marketing initiatives for improved and measurable results, rekindling potential and inspiring passion. "The timing is perfect for Ron's real-world message of opportunity and action," says Allan Niemi, Director of Events and Education at the Oregon Association of Nurseries, producers of the Farwest Trade Show. "Farwest provides the information and ideas to help the industry thrive. The industry is on the rebound from the recession. Rosenberg's keynote address will accelerate its momentum and unleash the power of its potential." Rosenberg's presentations are recognized nationally for their blend of solid business strategies and step-by-step approaches. His riveting, interactive style incorporates innovative learning tools to drive home key points and create memorable experiences. Rosenberg is noted for applying his expertise to industry specific audiences. He will share his take on opportunities and challenges the horticulture industry is facing. In addition to Rosenberg's keynote address, he will host a webinar for Farwest exhibitors titled How to Turn Your Trade Show Booth into an ATM. He will also conduct two seminar sessions during the Show. How to Dominate Your Market Niche studies an effective approach to marketing that doubles and triples return on marketing dollars invested. Beyond Time Management: How to Get Twice the Work Done in Half the Time develops proven strategies to focus on what we do best and learn how to eliminate, automate, or outsource everything else. Rosenberg is founder and owner of Quality Talk, based in North Carolina. He presents to businesses and associations all over the world, is a winner of the prestigious International Marketer of the Year award, and authored Double

January / February / March 2015

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Your Memory in 90 Minutes and Breaking Out of the Change Trap. "Ron's participation will set the stage for an inspiring Farwest," states Niemi. "It promises to be another year of growth for the industry and Farwest will be in the thick of it as we round out the Show with the best in education, exhibits, networking, and knowledge and idea-based experiences." The Oregon Association of Nurseries (OAN), based in Wilsonville, represents more than 900 wholesale growers, retailers, landscapers and suppliers. Oregon's ornamental horticulture industry is the state's largest agricultural commodity, with annual sales of $745 million. Oregon's nursery industry is a traded sector; nearly 75 percent of the nursery plants grown in Oregon are shipped out of state. For information, visit www.oan.org or call 503-682-5089. The Farwest Trade Show, the largest trade show in the west, is produced by the Oregon Association of Nurseries (OAN), a trade organization that represents and serves the interests of the ornamental horticulture industry. Any revenue realized by the OAN is reinvested into the industry through education, research, marketing support and government relations. For more information about the 2015 Farwest Trade Show, visit www.FarwestShow.com or call 503-682-5089. CONTACTS: Ann Murphy, Marketing Director, Oregon Association of Nurseries, amurphy@oan.org or 503-307-8378, Tom Kegley, Tom Kegley Communications, tkegley@rev.net , 843991-4366

Events – VA Tech Hahn Garden Gala SAVE THE DATE!

Events – VSLD 2015 Summer Tour Itinerary July 21, 2015 7:15 -7:30 am - Depart from Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, Richmond 9:30 -10 am - Arrive/Depart from NOVA location (Springfield exit 169) 2:00 – 4:00 pm - Guided tour of the Scott Arboretum with Julie Jenney. Swarthmore, PA http://www.scottarboretum.org/ 4:20 – 5:20pm - Private Garden of Andrew Bunting: 408 Vassar Avenue, Swarthmore, PA 5:45 pm - Arrival back at hotel; Best Western Plus, Concordville, PA Dinner on your own; we suggest Concordville Inn at the hotel July 22, 2015 9 – 10:00 am Private garden of Jeff Jabco and Joe Henderson: 551 Cornell Avenue Swarthmore http://www.flickriver.com/pho tos/karlgercens/sets/72157625008761089/ 10:15 – 11:30 am Private garden of Charles Cresson: 32 Amherst Avenue Swarthmore, PA http://gardenwalkgardentalk.com/ 2014/12/04/charles-cresson-gardens-part-1/ 12:15 Lunch at Chanticleer (Wayne, PA) 1:30 – 3:00 pm - Tour Chanticleer Gardens www.chanticleergarden.org 3:30 – 5:00 pm - Arrive back at hotel and take a break 5:15 pm - Depart for Terrain 5:30- 6:45 pm - Shopping at Terrain Garden Center http://www.shopterrain.com/glen-mills/ 6:45- 8:15 pm - Dinner on your own; we suggest Terrain’s Café or there are a few other options within walking distance. 8:30 pm - Arrival back at hotel Best Western Plus July 23, 2015

Mark your calendars for June 13, 2015, for the 11th Annual Garden Gala at the Hahn Horticulture Garden on the Virginia Tech Campus. This annual event draws people from all over for a wonderful afternoon of gardens, auctions and friendly people. Of course there’s always plenty to eat and drink too! http://www.hort.vt.edu/hhg/

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8:00 – 9:00 am - Travel to Delaware 9:00 – 10:00 am - Private garden of (to be determined) 10:30 – 12:30 - Mt. Cuba Center (Delaware) http://www.mtcubacenter.org/ 12:30- 1:15 Lunch at Mt. Cuba 1:30 pm - Group depart 4:00 pm - Arrival back at Springfield location 6:00 pm - Arrival back at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden 2015 GARDEN TOUR INFORMATION Scott Arboretum Tour The Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College is a garden of ideas and suggestions. Encompassing more than 300 acres of

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the Swarthmore College campus and exhibiting over 4,000 kinds of ornamental plants, the Arboretum displays some of the best trees, shrubs, vines, and perennials for use in the region.

Events – Shenandoah Valley Plant Symposium

Private Garden of Andrew Bunting

Save the Date

Belvidere is the home garden of Andrew Bunting who is the Curator at the Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College.

Private Garden of Jeff Jabco and Joe Henderson Private Garden of Charles Cresson “Hedgleigh Spring” This two-acre garden, home of author/lecturer Charles Cresson, has been a family property since 1883. The garden was designed by his grandfather in the 1920’s and 1930’s and retains its early 20th Century character. Since 1970, Charles has filled the diverse habitats and microclimates with a diverse and extensive plant collection. Ancient towering white oaks and black gum surround the house and pre-1850 springhouse, under planted with mature azaleas, dogwoods and large hardy camellia hybrids.

Chanticleer Garden Chanticleer has been called the most romantic, imaginative, and exciting public garden in America. The garden is a study of textures and forms, where foliage trumps flowers, the gardeners lead the design, and even the drinking fountains are sculptural. It is a garden of pleasure and learning, relaxing yet filled with ideas to take home.

Mt. Cuba Center Mt. Cuba Center is a botanical garden that inspires an appreciation for the beauty and value of native plants and a commitment to protect the habitats that sustain them. During our visit we will get to meet with Travis Beck, the director of horticulture and author of a recent book “Principles of Ecological Design”. For more information call Chris Coen @ 804-475-6767 or Katie Sokol @ 540-742-3306

SAVE THE DATE!!! VNLA Management Workshop

March 20, 2015

4thAnnual

Join us on the first day of Spring

8am-4pm $80.00 early registration fee until Jan. 16 Be inspired by nationally renowned experts as they present their favorite ideas and solutions for all your planting problems. It will be just what the doctor (or horticulturist in this case) ordered as winter ends and the spring planting season begins. This event offers something for everyone from the novice home gardener to experienced horticulturist. The proceeds will supplement the horticulture program’s budget to provide more for the community.

Wednesday afternoon, August 19

VNLA Field Day

Thursday, August 20 At Shade Tree Farms

VNLA Summer Tour

Friday, August 21 Ruppert Landscapes, Wheats Landscapes - Landscape projects!

540-942-6735 www.waynesboro.va.us parksandrec@ci.waynesboro.va.us

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VNLA - Winter Board Meeting Tuesday, January 13, 2015 – 1-5 pm Baltimore Convention Center, Rm. 334

Fall Board Meeting Synopsis As a result of our recent Strategic Planning Meeting and Board Training, the board has adopted a new format for meetings using a consent agenda which will expedite routine reports and allow more time for discussion and planning. Reports are sent to the board before the meeting and unless there is a request for action or a motion on a recommendation, they are listed on the consent agenda and all approved as a block. The board has also adopted a more structured use of “Robert’s Rules of Order” to keep the meetings more efficient.  2015 Field Day and Summer Tour. Shade Tree Farms has space for a site and Wheat’s Landscaping and Ruppert Landscaping are open to be tour sites. Speaker programs could be at the hotel the day before like the 2014 Lean Management workshop.  Certification – A motion was made to continue adding on modules to the VCH manuals, seconded and passed.  Legislation – Outreach to the General Assembly is planned for around February 26. The VNLA will participate in the Hallowed Ground program with 5 trees to be planted and certificates to be copied to the legislators. There will be a planting ceremony in the Orange County area.  MANTS - There is still an exhibitor waiting list, with 967 current exhibitors, 90 of which are new in 2015. The MANTS Housing Bureau has booked over 5,202 rooms with Wednesday night the peak. There will be a press conference on Thursday morning with 45 registrations. Robin Rinaca will officially become a VNLA representative on the MANTS Board at the February MANTS Board Meeting. The Board thanked Tom Saunders for his 17 years of service and leadership on the MANTS Board.  Strategic Plan for 2015 – Matt Shreckhise led a discussion of the new strategic plan and specifics to be added/deleted/updated. Action 1.1 – VNLA will restructure and increase dues. The membership and executive committee will put together a dues re-structuring program proposal and present it to the board. Action 1.2 – Growers Guide will become a revenue generator. A motion was made to ask members more specific questions on the Guide to Virginia Growers on their views on moving from print version of the Guide to an all online guide on the next member survey, seconded and passed. VNLA Newsletter

Action 1.3 – The Virginia Certified Horticulturist program will become a net revenue generator – tabled for later discussion Action 1.4 – Streamline sponsorship structure. A motion was made to combine it with Action 1.1 and change the due date to 6/1/15, seconded and passed. Action 2.1 – Make VNLA mobile accessible through changes to the website and the addition of an app. Report: almost completed. Action 2.2 – Create web-based seminars – it was the consensus to have a major webinar three times a year from the HARAREC office. Topics will be selected based on needs of the membership. A list of subjects will be developed by the spring board meeting. Action 2.3 – VNLA will improve its outreach to prospective members and the state’s regional associations. A successful Christmas Happy Hour social event was held on December 10 in Richmond. Another one will be planned for the Northern Virginia area before the spring season. Action 2.4 – VNLA will upgrade its member database to gather a greater amount of demographic information. Members will be contacted to see who else should be receiving electronic correspondence in their company and a message at the login to remind members to update their information. Action 3.1 – Governance Task Force will review and update current Board policies and practices. The Governance Task Force will be the Executive Committee and five non-board members, chaired by Sonya Westervelt. The task force first meeting by 3/1/15 and will try Go-To-Meetings for a conference call and then make recommendations to the full board by 6/1/15. Action 3.1a – Bylaws – Vice President Bill Gouldin will chair a review of the current Bylaws, which will be sent out to the Board to review and comment. Action 3.1d – Board recruitment and orientation will be planned for the spring meeting. Action 3.1e – Executive Director position description. Sonya Westervelt will review the job description for the next contract renewal. Action 3.2 – Executive Director Succession Plan. The Succession Planning Committee has met via conference call and will begin planning in 2016. Review of VNLA website, Grower Guide, CapWiz Legislative Alerts, VNLA account login – Jeff Miller did an online review of the VNLA website and the VNLA association management software. The next VNLA Board Meeting will be the Spring Board Meeting, Wednesday, February 25, 2015 in Charlottesville VNLA Summer Board Meeting, Saturday, June 13, 2015

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News - North Carolina Nursery & Landscape Association Announces New Executive Director The North Carolina Nursery & Landscape Association (NCNLA), has announced the selection of Corey Connors as its new executive director. Connors will fill the vacancy created by Ross Williams’ retirement, December 1, 2014. The selection was made after a national search and selection process by NCNLA. “We are very pleased to announce this appointment,” reported Michael Dickey, President of NCNLA. “Corey will bring leadership and vision to NCNLA’s programs and a deep sense of commitment to serving the green industry. His successful experience serving national trade associations as an advocate and coalition builder will guide NCNLA into a new era of service to our members.” Connors served as Director of Legislative Relations for the American Nursery & Landscape Association from 2007 2010. In that capacity, he worked closely with state nursery and landscape associations across the country including the NCNLA. He provided leadership for many important regulatory and legislative issues through the ANLA Lighthouse Program. Since 2011 he has served as Senior Director of

Government Relations for the Society of American Florists. His primary responsibilities at SAF have included advocacy and outreach, coalition development, and strategic planning. He created and managed the coalition to develop and support legislation addressing ACA compliance issues for highly seasonal employers and chaired the national Main Street Business Coalition. Connors received his Master of Arts degree from George Washington University and Bachelor of Arts from Clarion University. “I am thrilled and honored to have the opportunity to work with North Carolina’s nursery and landscape industry again. I look forward to working with our dedicated volunteer leaders and staff to tell this industry’s great story: the products and services that NCNLA members provide offer far more value than meets the eye. They are essential investments that provide cost-effective, meaningful solutions to the consumer.” The North Carolina Nursery and Landscape Association (NCNLA) represents growers, landscapers, retail garden centers, suppliers, horticulture students and educators. NCNLA’s ultimate goal is to benefit its members’ economic, professional and personal growth. More information about NCNLA can be found at www.ncnla.com.

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Tips - from SNA Connect with SNA Members SNA provides you with a network of industry professionals to make your search for horticultural products and services easy. To locate a company or a person, Search the SNA Online Membership Directory. http://sna.org/page-975969 Or, to locate a product Search the SNA Member Products Directory. Can't find what you're looking for? Send us an email at mail@sna.org , or give us a call at 678.809.9992. We're here to help! SNA Career Network The SNA Career Network is provided as a service to the industry. For current listings of open positions, follow the link provided. http://sna.org/page-1506352 Got a job listing? We can list your position to help you find that perfect person! Simply email us at mail@sna.org

set your business on a more profitable course. Full of takeaways, these sessions offer innovative ideas, and sound practical advice for personal and business growth. You'll discover the latest plants and industry trends, ways to increase profit, and solutions to some of your toughest issues. Conveniently Located. Easy In and Out. The Georgia International Convention Center (GICC), conveniently located adjacent to Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport and minutes from downtown Atlanta, is Georgia’s newest and second largest convention center featuring more than 400,000 SF of meeting space - all on one level. The ATL SkyTrain, a free light rail train linking the GICC to the airport and rental car center, coupled with excellent transportation connections from across the U.S., and a wide array of affordable nearby hotels and restaurants offers participants added convenience. SNA 2015... Bringing the Best of the Southeast Together Plants. Products. People. Marketplace, Education and More.

Ad - Willow Springs Tree Farms We invite you to join thousands of industry professionals in Atlanta for this one-of-a-kind regional event! SNA 2015 is a fusion of the Southern Plant Conference, SNA Research Conference, the SNA Annual Business Meeting, and SNA State Officer’s Conference with the SNA Regional Marketplace to bring one unparalleled event - all under one roof! Plants, Products, People. SNA 2015 will bring the brightest minds in horticulture together... breeders, growers, retailers, landscapers, researchers, manufacturers, distributors, and service providers, from across the Southeast. It’s the perfect platform for networking, learning, launching new products, and cultivating new business relationships. Marketplace, Education and More. This regional marketplace will showcase the best plants and related garden products. The product mix will include ornamental trees and shrubs, color, related landscape and outdoor living products, garden gifts and accessories, seasonal products, and more. Educational sessions geared specifically for growers, retailers, and landscapers will help you VNLA Newsletter

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Upcoming Events March 20, 2015, Shenandoah Valley Plant Symposium, Waynesboro. Presented by Waynesboro Parks and Recreation Department, At Best Western Inn & Suites Conference Center, Waynesboro, VA 22980 www.waynesboro.va.us April 17-18, 2015, Middle Atlantic Chapter - American Rhododendron Society, Raleigh, VA www.macars.org April 19-25, 2015, Historic Garden Week in Virginia, http://www.vagardenweek.org/ May 19-22, 2015, American Boxwood Society 55th Annual Symposium, Longwood Gardens, Kennett Square, PA http://www.boxwoodsociety.org/abs_symposium.html

For a Current Calendar of all Green Industry Events, go: http://www.vnla.org/Calendar

NEW Interactive Calendar! VNLA – Successful Holiday Happy Hour Social in Richmond

May 20, 2015, VNLA Virginia Certified Horticulturist Exam, Monroe Technical Center, Leesburg, VA www.vnla.org June 10, 2015, VNLA Virginia Certified Horticulturist Exam, at Lancaster Farms, Suffolk, VA www.vnla.org June 13, 2015, VNLA Summer Board Meeting, Blacksburg, VA info@vnla.org 1-800-476-0055 June 13, 2015, VA Tech Hahn Horticulture Garden Gala, Blacksburg, VA http://www.hort.vt.edu/hhg/ June 18-20, 2015, American Hosta Convention, “Back to the Future”, Raleigh, NC www.2015ahsconvention.com July 11-14, 2015, AmericanHort “Cultivate ‘15”, Greater Columbus Convention Center, Columbus, OH www.americanhort.org 614-487-1117 July 21-23, 2015, Southern Nursery Association Trade Show, Southern Plant Conference, SNA Research Conference, the SNA Annual Business Meeting, and SNA State Officer’s Conference www.sna.org July 27-August1, 2015, Perennial Plant Symposium, Baltimore, MD http://www.perennialplant.org/ July 29-30, 2015 PANTS Trade Show, Philadelphia, PA http://www.pantshow.com/ August 12-14, 2015 Virginia Christmas Tree Growers Association Annual Conference and Farm Tour, Roanoke, VA www.VirginiaChristmasTrees.org 540-382-7310 secretary@VirginiaChristmasTreeGrowers.org August 12-15, 2015, SUMMER GREEN ROADSHOW, in Hickory, NC https://ncnla.memberclicks.net/summergreen-road-show August 18-20, 2015, IGC Show East, Baltimore Convention Center, www.IGCshow.com 203-682-1664

The VNLA held a successful Holiday Happy Hour on December 10th at the American Tap Room in Richmond. Over 60 members and friends attended for beverages, snacks and networking. There will be additional events held in other areas of the state throughout the year. Contact the VNLA office (info@vnla.org or 1-800-476-0055 if you are interested in helping coordinate an event in your area!

August 19-21, 2015 VNLA Workshop, Field Day & Summer Tour, Northern Virginia www.vnla.org 1-800-476-0055 August 27-29, 2015, Farwest Trade Show, Portland, OR http://www.oan.org/?64 January 7-9, 2016, MANTS Trade Show, Baltimore, MD http://mants.com/ 62

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VNLA Quarter Newsletter Jan/Feb/Mar 2015  

Quarterly publication of the Virginia Nursery & Landscape Association (VNLA) To Enhance and promote Virginia’s nursery and landscape industr...

VNLA Quarter Newsletter Jan/Feb/Mar 2015  

Quarterly publication of the Virginia Nursery & Landscape Association (VNLA) To Enhance and promote Virginia’s nursery and landscape industr...

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