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SUMMER 2012

go! on the WITH

MAGAZINE

Time-Saving Gardening Tips Great Garden Destinations Small-Space Gardening From Garden to Table


10 Gateway

features

Gardening

16

Next Stop, the Huntington

22

Capitol Plants

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Cover photo by Marcy Dugan.

Pictured: Theresa Loe,

co-executive producer of Growing a Greener World (page 30).

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EDITOR’S NOTE

Welcome to Summer 2012

READERS ON THE GO John Raward, Australia

OUR FAVORITE THINGS

Team Hort’s favorite garden gear

LOVIN’ SUMMER

Keep-it-simple gardening tips

FILMING THE WIDE GREEN WORLD

Public television’s garden series

GRANNY’S GARDEN SCHOOL

Where young gardeners sprout

FRIENDLY FLIERS

Container plants for birds and butterflies

36 38 40 GARDENERS ON THE GO!

DUE DILIGENCE

The key to garden trekking

SUMMER PICKS Bright summer plants

CHERRY TOMATOES Easy to love, easy to grow


EDITORIAL

edit@hortmag.com Group Publisher Jamie Markle

Community Leader & Editor Patty Dunning Editor Meghan Shinn

CONTENT CONTRIBUTORS

Patty Dunning, Emily Dydo, Jenny Koester, Fern Richardson, Meghan Shinn, Beth Williams DESIGN & PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Christy Miller

Managing Photographer Ric Deliantoni Photographer Al Parrish

Associate Video Editor Philip Grosvenor ADVERTISING

advertising@hortmag.com VP, Sales Dave Davel

Advertising Sales Jenny Koester 513-531-2690 x11365 Advertising Sales Coordinator Kathy Budsberg F+W MEDIA INC.

Chairman & CEO David Nussbaum CFO James Ogle

President Sara Domville

SVP, Operations Phil Graham

Chief Digital Officer, eMedia Chad Phelps Director, IT Jim Kuster

Director of Finance Trent Miller Events Director Cory Smith

Audience Development Paul Rolnick

Privacy promise: Occasionally, we make portions of our customer list available to other companies so they may contact you about products and services that may be of interest to you. If you prefer that we withhold your name, simply send a note with the magazine name to: List Manager, F+W Media Inc., 10151 Carver

Al Parrish

Road Suite 200, Blue Ash OH 45242.

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GARDENERS ON THE GO!


Thank you for the encouraging messages you sent after reading our first issue of Gardeners On the Go! We heard from gardening professionals who appreciated the reminders that public gardens inspire and delight us in so many ways, and we heard from folks just like you and me who valued the quick shots of smart gardening advice in this electronic format. Tell us what you think of this issue, too, by e-mailing us at edit@hortmag.com with the words “GOTG SUMMER” in the subject line. In keeping with this quote about gratitude, I’m a firm believer that an attitude of gratitude makes me happier and

There shall be eternal summer in the grateful heart. ~Celia Thaxter, American poet

more useful to the world. I’m grateful for the work I Marissa Bowers

do here at Horticulture, and for the life it affords me when I go home. What are you grateful for? Wishing you peace on the garden path,

—Patty Dunning : :

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GARDENERS ON THE GO!

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READERS ON THE GO! •

John Raward, Our Aussie Connection We connected first with this month’s reader on the go through Horticulture’s Facebook page. John answered the call to share photos of a garden visit. Here’s a visual trip “down under” to the Royal Botanic Garden at Cranbourne. Thanks, John! *

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GARDENERS ON THE GO!


Opposite page, clockwise from top: A view from the coffee shop of the red sand garden, reminding visitors that much of Australia is desert. Corrugated iron planters are the rage right now! A view back toward some of the buildings in the garden. This page, clockwise from top: The Rockpool Waterway represents the seasonal flooding, with the water turning off and on regularly. Smooth-barked apple trees line the banks (Angophora costata). This shows Stage 2 of the garden under construction, which is set to open in September 2012. The final photo shows visitors how to incorporate design into their home gardens.

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ARE YOU A GO? GARDENER ON THE Send up to 5 photos from your garden travels with the garden’s name and when you visited, and we might feature your photos in an upcoming issue! E-mail to: edit@hortmag.com, with “GOtG Reader Photos” as the subject line.

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Gateway Gardening Head to St. Louis to see the inspired plantings at the Missouri Botanical Garden

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by Karen Hill, Jennifer Kleeschulte & Julie Hess photographs courtesy of the Missouri Botanical Garden

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he Missouri Botanical Garden is the oldest botanical garden in continuous operation in the United States, with stunning horticultural displays, indoor conservatories and historic structures. Established in 1859, the garden encompasses 79 acres just a stone’s throw from downtown St. Louis.

Rugged, vigorous, colorful daylilies line a pathway in the Jenkins Daylily Garden, inviting visitors to explore the vast collection. Home gardeners can easily replicate this design.

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MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN 4344 Shaw Blvd. St. Louis MO 63110 800-642-8842 mobot.org Visit the garden’s website for open hours, admission fees and more info. This summer the garden is hosting a special Lantern Festival, featuring larger-than-life illuminated scenes crafted from silks and molded steel. Artisans from Zigong, China, spent two months constructing these 26 lantern scenes, which depict Chinese history and symbolism. The exhibit runs through August 19, 2012.

HIGHLIGHTS OF A VISIT

Here are just a few of the distinct gardens you’ll find at the Missouri Botanical Garden: CLIMATRON® This stunning conservatory has become a symbolic image of the Missouri Botanical Garden. A geodesic domed structure covering more than a halfacre, it houses some 1,400 species of plants in a natural, tropical setting.

Opened in 2005, the George Washington Carver Garden pays homage to the accomplishments of Dr. George Washington Carver, the Missouri-native scientist who influenced 20thcentury agriculture. The focal point of the garden is a life-size bronze statue of a mature Carver wearing a lab coat.

LINNEAN HOUSE Built in 1882 to overwinter palms, tree ferns and citrus trees, it’s the oldest continuously operating display greenhouse in the United States. CHERBONNIER ENGLISH WOODLAND GARDEN This quiet, informal garden features the three vegetation layers typical of a mature woodland—an upper tree canopy, a middle shrub layer and a lower layer of herbaceous perennials and groundcovers. SEIWA-EN JAPANESE GARDEN This 14-acre “Garden of Pure, Clear Harmony and Peace” is one of the largest of its type in the Western Hemisphere and a visitor favorite. BAKEWELL OTTOMAN GARDEN This Ottoman-style walled garden is the first of its kind at a U.S. botanical garden. It is devoted to the enjoyment of the senses, with fragrant flowers and aromatic herbs. JENKINS DAYLILY GARDEN This nationally recognized collection features more than 1,800 daylily varieties, including award winners, wild species, historic varieties and Missouri-bred cultivars. Most bloom throughout June and July, with many re-blooming through late fall. SAMUELS BULB GARDEN AND HECKMAN BULB GARDEN From late February through early November, flowering bulbs and bulbous plants display their brilliance in rolling, brick-lined beds among companion shrubbery, flowering trees and annuals. ZIMMERMAN SENSORY GARDEN Designed to delight the senses, this beautiful garden engages the young and young at heart. KEMPER CENTER FOR HOME GARDENING The 23 distinct residential-scale gardens of the Kemper Center are attractively contained in a spectacularly engineered 8-acre design. A must-see for “doable” inspiration!

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Top left: Bridges link the shore with four islands in the Japanese Garden. This one is named Taikobashi, or Drum Bridge. Above: The Missouri Botanical Garden displays some of the most distinctive pieces of garden sculpture, including Carlo Nicoli’s Victory (of Science Over Ignorance). Left: The low hedges of the Boxwood Garden are shaped to form the initials of Henry Shaw, founder of the Missouri Botanical Garden.

5 DESIGN TIPS FOR BUSY GARDENERS

Julie Hess, a horticulturist at the Missouri Botanical Garden, offers these tips to help reduce maintenance while ensuring a dynamic garden design: 1. ALWAYS PLAN FOR THE PLANT’S ULTIMATE MATURE SIZE. It’s like manna from heaven when a plant geek finds the tree or shrub they’ve been coveting at a great price in a one-gallon container! But just remember—it will grow! Be especially mindful of this when doing foundation plantings. Will the plant eventually cover a window? 2. ALWAYS LEAVE YOURSELF ROOM FOR MAINTENANCE ACCESS. This is another thing to be particularly mindful of with foundation plantings. Leave room between your planting and the house so you can comfortably get in for pruning, debris removal and so on. 3. CHOOSE A SPECIMEN PLANT OR PLANTS TO BE THE “BONES” OF YOUR PLANTING AND WORK AROUND THEM. Once that has been set, decide whether you want to do a repetitive-theme planting or a cottagetype planting with more varied companions. 4. IF YOU’RE GOING FOR THE REPETITIVE THEME, CHOOSE SOMETHING THAT IS A PROVEN PERFORMER IN YOUR AREA, whether it is an ornamental grass,

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small shrub, perennial or annual. If your garden bones are ‘Emperor I’ Japanese maples (Acer palmatum ‘Emperor I’), you might choose a planting combination of ‘Dream Catcher’ beautybush (Kolkwitzia ‘Dream Catcher’) and ‘Northwind’ switch grass (Panicum virgatum ‘Northwind’). This will give you a fountain shape from the beautybush and an upright shape from the switch grass. The blush on the beautybush leaves will pick up the red of the ‘Emperor I’ leaves, and the steely blue of the switch grass is a nice foil for the chartreuse of the beautybush. You can achieve this same color combo on a smaller scale with an annual planting of ‘Savannah’ ruby grass (Melinus nerviglumis ‘Savannah’) and ‘Glennis’ coleus. 5. IF YOU’RE GOING FOR THE COTTAGE LOOK, GO CRAZY! Surround the bones with anything and everything you’ve ever liked or had fun growing. That same ‘Emperor I’ Japanese maple will become a completely different element if you surround it with a riot of color and texture. Perennials will provide a kaleidoscope of color as they go in and out of bloom, annuals will provide color the entire season, tropicals will provide drama (think the huge leaves of bananas or elephant ears). Just for fun, throw in some cherry tomatoes, a colorful pepper like Capsicum annuum ‘Yummy’ or the eggplant named ‘Neon,’ which lives up to its name.

GARDENERS ON THE GO!


CREATE A CONTAINER

Follow these ideas from Jennifer Kleeschulte, a horticulturist at the Missouri Botanical Garden, for great summer containers. 1. SUCCULENT SUCCESS Succulents are currently the rage and an excellent waterwise container plant for the gardener on the go. When time is an issue, this container will be the most forgiving when it comes to watering. Try the following combination in a large hypertufa trough. Choose a well-drained medium (1/3 soil, 1/3 sand and 1/3 rock) or try a cacti-and-succulent growing mix from your local garden center. Many of these plants are hardy in USDA Zones 8 through 11. In colder zones, bring your plants indoors when temperatures drop below 40˚F. A: Aeonium ‘Kiwi’ B: Senecio mandraliscae C: Aloe Carmine D: Sempervivum ‘Black’ E: Sempervivum ‘Oddity’ F: Sedum ×rubrotinctum ‘Aurora’ G: Delosperma cooperi

2. JUST ADD CHICKEN No garden is too small to grow your own food. Save space by growing herbs and vegetables in wall units like Woolly Pockets, or by grouping pots together. Try growing edible containers with a theme. Fill them with plants from your favorite cuisine—Thai, Indian, Mexican, Chinese—the possibilities are endless. I call this design “Just Add Chicken.” The herbs chosen can be used in combinations or individually to flavor all kinds of chicken dishes. Pair this container with a lemon tree and voila!, dinner! A: Basil B: Rosemary C: Fern-leaved dill D: Parsley E: Thyme

3. JAWS—A CARNIVOROUS CONTAINER This container is for the plant enthusiast and collector in us all. It will require more care than most, but these bug-eating plants earn their keep as they catch the unsuspecting victims that gather around your patio light. Choose a nonporous container, preferably glazed clay. Line the container with a pond liner and fill with a soilless mixture of half peat and half builder’s sand. Carnivorous plants prefer water more acidic than municipal water sources can provide, and they are sensitive to the minerals and chemicals in treated water. I suggest using rainwater to irrigate the plants. Remember to keep them consistently moist. It is important to note these plants are perennial and will have a dormant period. In areas colder than Zone 6, move the plants indoors when the temperatures are consistently below 30˚F. Move them into a protected but cool environment, such as a garage or basement window well. Bring them outdoors again when the temperatures are consistently above 30˚F. Try these United States natives: • PITCHER PLANTS (SARRACENIA SPP.)—many cultivars available with pitchers from ground level to 3 feet tall. • PRIMROSE BUTTERWORT (PINGUICULA PRIMULIFLORA)—will bloom consistently through the warmer summer months. • SUNDEWS (DROSERA SPP.)—often compared to fireworks because of the tentacles that cover their leaves. • BLADDERWORTS (UTRICULARIA SUBULATA, U. CORNUTA)—not as showy as the others, but interesting. They will fill in the spaces around the other plants and create a more natural look in the container. • VENUS’S FLYTRAP (DIONAEA MUSCIPULA)—these prefer drier growing conditions than the above species, so if you make a mixed container plant, their crowns are a little higher. Diligently remove the flowers to grow larger, healthier traps. There are great sources for plant material, such as California Carnivores. Consult your local carnivorous plant society or the International Carnivorous Plant Society for more suggestions. Come see our display in the Missouri Botanical Garden’s Shoenberg Temperate House, newly renovated by horticulturist Kyle Cheeseborough, or check out my Carnivorous Bog Containers in the Victorian District Garden. * Karen Hill is a public relations officer at the Missouri Botanical Garden. Julie Hess and Jennifer Kleeschulte work as horticulturists at the garden.

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Next Stop,

the Huntington 16 |

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A railroad magnate’s legacy lives on in Southern California photographs courtesy of the Huntington Library

T

he Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens, in San Marino, Calif., include three art galleries and a library of rare books and manuscripts, art, and research materials. These buildings are surrounded by more than a dozen distinct gardens, including the Japanese, Rose, Camellia, Jungle, Australian and Desert gardens. The Huntington was once the home of Henry Huntington, an influential Southern California railroad owner and avid book and art collector. The original gardens were developed mostly by William Hertrich, his grounds superintendent, beginning in 1904. Hertrich and Huntington brought unusual plants from all over the world to the estate, which once served as a working ranch. New gardens have been developed continually since Huntington’s death in 1927. A visit to this unique museum offers inspiration of the artistic, intellectual and, of course, horticultural kind.

HENRY HUNTINGTON Henry Edwards Huntington (1850–1927) played a major role in the growth of Southern California. A railroad magnate, he developed railways that linked mountain, ranchland and coastal communities for trade and tourism. Upon his retirement at age 60, Huntington began to focus on his love of books and his newfound interest in art. His personal book collection makes the basis for the worldrenown Huntington Library. The Huntington Art Museums display the art Henry and his second wife, Arabella—his uncle’s widow and one of the most important art collectors of her day—amassed. After the Huntingtons’ deaths, their home and ranch opened so the collections could be enjoyed by the public and accessed by scholars, as they themselves had planned.

Begun in 1911, the Japanese Garden features a house that was built in Japan and shipped to California in 1904 and a moon bridge built by Japanese craftsman Toichiro Kawai.

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THE HUNTINGTON LIBRARY, ART COLLECTIONS AND BOTANICAL GARDENS 1151 Oxford Rd. San Marino CA 91108 626-405-2100 huntington.org Visit the garden’s Website for open hours, admission fees and more info. There is a Garden Talk and Plant Sale on the second Thursday of every month.

Right: Flanking both sides of the North Vista, these 18thcentury statues depict characters from classical mythology. Below: Echinopsis ‘Flying Saucer,’ a variety of hedgehog cactus, was an offering in the gardens’ April plant sale. Below right: The two-tone blooms of Aloe ‘Tangerine’ are featured in Huntington’s Desert Garden.

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THE HUNTINGTON BY THE NUMBERS

500,000

120 acres devoted to gardens

price of admission on the first Thursday of each month if tickets are booked in advance by phone or online. General adult admission is typically $15

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size of the gardening staff at the Huntington. They are aided by more than 100 garden volunteers

4,000 000 15, individual rose plants in the Rose Garden. These represent more than 1,200 cultivars

annual visitors to the Huntington, traveling from all over the world

years that the newest garden, the Garden of Flowering Fragrance, has been open. Chinese in style, it showcases native Chinese plants plus traditional structures

108

years since the Lily Ponds, the first area of the gardens to be developed, were begun

species of plants represented throughout the botanical gardens

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CHINESE & JAPANESE GARDENS

One of the oldest gardens at the Huntington and one of the newest represent Asian design style. The Japanese Garden, created between 1911 and 1912, and the new Chinese Garden, opened in 2007, are supremely peaceful places to visit. They also match up well with the Huntington as a whole, because they follow a tradition of symbolism and expressiveness— much like the literary and artistic works in Henry Huntington’s collections. Liu Fang Yuan is the official name of the Chinese Garden; it means the “Garden of Flowering Fragrance.” It comprises artfully arranged, natural-looking scenes as well as important traditional Chinese design elements— hardscape and furnishings that facilitate contemplation; water and rocks placed in careful balance; plants that represent certain seasons and personal attributes; and poetic names and inscriptions inspired by Chinese literature. The Japanese Garden recently underwent an extensive yearlong renovation, during which it was closed to visitors. It reopened to the public in April 2012 with full restorations to its historic structures plus a new tea garden, waterfall and pathways. The garden includes many features central to Japanese garden style, including a raked gravel garden; a bonsai court with more than 70 trees; a bamboo forest; flowering plants such as fruit trees, wisteria, camellias and azaleas; and many varieties of evergreen trees.

SHAKESPEARE GARDEN

The Shakespeare Garden is a tribute to the Huntington Library’s collection of early editions of William Shakespeare’s writings. Designed to resemble a rustic English country scene, it includes dozens of plants mentioned in Shakespeare’s works, accompanied by plaques engraved with relevant quotations. Here are a few of the Shakespearean plants in this unique literary garden: • Poppies • Pansies • Violets • Pinks and carnations • Rosemary

• Daffodils • Irises • Roses • Columbines • Marigolds • Thyme

• Garlic • Woodbine • Grape • Crab apple • Myrtle • Lemon balm

• Fern • Holly • Pomegranate • Primroses • Cowslips • English oak

THE DESERT GARDEN

One Sunday afternoon in 1907, Henry Huntington and his young superintendent, William Hertrich, sat overlooking a barren slope of poor, gravelly soil. Hertrich suggested planting the area with desert plants. “I soon realized the error I had made in mentioning the term ‘cactus garden’ to Mr. Huntington,” Hertrich later recalled. “His first reaction was one of amazement. As a railroad official, he had frequently passed through the American deserts … [and] had a bitter personal encounter with a very spiny variety of opuntia while watching a grading crew along the Southern Pacific line.” Happily, Huntington was persuaded to agree, in part because of his competitive nature—other local estate owners were building cactus collections of their own. Today the Desert Garden includes more than 50,000 succulent plants and enjoys an international reputation. The Desert Garden proves how beautiful the colorful, textural plants of Earth’s driest corners can be. *

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Capitol Plants

Inspiration abounds at the gardens surrounding the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

photographs courtesy of Smithsonian Gardens

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E

stablished in 1972, Smithsonian Gardens is responsible for 10 “outdoor museums” surrounding the many buildings of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. These gardens are spread across more than 180 acres in and around the Smithsonian museums and support centers. They are designed to reflect and extend the museums’ exhibits and educational opportunities in an outdoor setting. Smithsonian Gardens’ mission is “to enrich the Smithsonian experience through exceptional gardens, horticulture exhibits, collections and education.” The gardens are open year-round, and visitation is free and accessible to the disabled. Although there is limited street parking, taking public transportation to see the gardens is recommended.

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Buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis) is an important nectar source for the viceroy butterfly. The Smithsonian’s 11,000-square-foot Butterfly Habitat Garden emphasizes the natural partnerships between plants and butterflies.

GARDENERS ON THE GO!


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1. Black-eyed Susans bloom in June around the National Air and Space Museum. 2. The Smithsonian Gardens features dozens of plant and flower urns with design motifs ranging from lions to seashells. 3. The cascading water of the fountain in front of the Freer Gallery of Art adds to the tranquility of the gallery’s courtyard. 4. The parterre in the Enid A. Haupt Garden provides a pathway to the Smithsonian Castle. 5. In the Mary Livingston Ripley Garden, the walkways were laid out to encourage visitors to slow down and enjoy the plantings. 6. An antique flower container brims with lavender blooms in the Folger Rose Garden. 7.The Smithsonian Institution provides a rustic backdrop for the Folger Rose Garden. 8. Opened in 1998, the Katherine Dulin Folger Rose Garden is a modern rose garden that blooms from the spring through the fall.

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CARING FOR CONTAINERS

Follow these tips from the Smithsonian gardeners to be sure your container plantings stay healthy and beautiful all summer.

SMITHSONIAN GARDENS National Mall Washington, D.C. 20013 202-633-2220 gardens.si.edu

1. Nutrients are quickly depleted in your garden containers. Be sure your potted plants are regularly fed and well watered throughout the summer so your container creations look their best.

This is a network of gardens surrounding the museum buildings of the Smithsonian Institution. The gardens are open year-round, seven days a week. The only gated area is the Enid A. Haupt Garden; the gate is open from dawn to dusk. Visit the Smithsonian Gardens website for exact locations of the various gardens and more info. Special exhibits and events occur throughout the year.

2. Consider the size, color and shape of your container when planning a design. Plants should be in scale with the container’s size and possibly echo the container’s shape. Leaf and flower colors should complement and not compete with the pot. 3. Don’t be afraid to mix edible plants into your decorative containers. Herbs and vegetables can add beautiful color and interest to your containers, and you benefit from the fresh produce!

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DESIGN TIPS

The horticulturists at the Smithsonian Gardens offer these tips for improving your garden’s design: 1. Be curve conscious. Give your garden shape. By incorporating curves into your landscape you will encourage exploration. This will also create a visually dynamic space. Use edging, box hedges or brick walls to create definition for those curves. Add lighting, and you’ll be able to enjoy your shapely escape day or night. 2. Take a seat. Many gardens are designed to be tranquil spaces. Use seating in your favorite spots to relax and enjoy the view. Place cast-iron benches in the shade to cool down or in the sun to warm you up. Either way, the inclusion of seating will enable you to enjoy your beautiful creation. 3. Make a splash with a water feature. Fountains help create a soulful experience that speaks to all the senses. Listen to the sound, enjoy the view or let the cool mist wash over you. Add a water feature to your garden and excite your senses. 4. Go up a notch—think vertically. Adding height to a garden can make a dynamic visual experience. Incorporating grasses, flowers and foliage with tall and angular trees carries the eye throughout the space. 5. Formal is fabulous. Formal gardens are both visually arresting and sophisticated. Create elegant lines and shapes by pairing different flowers and colors together. Add decorative urns or sculptures to accentuate the space. A formal garden will transport you to a world of refinement.

Clay sculptures titled Always Becoming greet visitors on the south side of the National Museum of the American Indian.

NATIVE PLANTS

Here’s a handful of favorite plants at the Smithsonian Gardens that are native to the United States: SWAMP MILKWEED (ASCLEPIAS INCARNATA)—This pink-flowered perennial is native to swamps and prairies across eastern North America. It’s a great choice for an area with poor drainage, as it will tolerate even the muckiest clay. It attracts hummingbirds and butterflies, and it hosts the caterpillars of monarch and queen butterflies. Full to part sun. USDA Zones 3–9. JOE-PYE WEED (EUPATORIUM PURPUREUM)—Another pink-flowered, moisture-loving perennial, joe-pye weed hails from much of eastern North America. It’s a favorite of native bees and butterflies, and its flowers have a sweet vanilla scent. Pinching the stems in early summer results in a more compact plant and heavier flowering. Full sun to light shade. Zones 4–8. BLACK-EYED SUSAN (RUDBECKIA HIRTA)—This classic prairie perennial can be short-lived, but its cheerful blooms earn it space in the garden. Native to plains and pastures of most of North America, it will grow in sun or shade, wet or dry soil. Zones 3–7. COMMON BUTTONBUSH (CEPHALANTHUS OCCIDENTALIS)—This shrub grows 6- to 12-feet tall, sometimes forming a multistemmed small tree. It grows well in wet soil. Its ball-like white flowers, a favorite of viceroy butterflies, give way to button-like fruits; both make it highly ornamental. Native to swamps of eastern North America, it requires full sun to part shade. Zones 5–9. YELLOW WAKEROBIN (TRILLIUM LUTEUM)—After it blooms in spring this low-growing perennial dies back to the ground. If happy, it will spread to form a nice colony. Native to damp woodlands of the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast, it likes regular water and part to full shade. Zones 4–8.*

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GARDENERS ON THE GO!


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TIME-SAVING TIPS •

Lovin’ Summer Five ways to make the most of your gardening time this summer by Meghan Shinn

Summer can be the best of times and the worst of times. On one hand, many plants reach their flowering peak in summer, and the garden can look lush and lively. On the other hand, sticky weather can make it unpleasant to garden, and it can mean the demise of certain plants. These tips will help you cut down on your garden work, enjoy your garden better and conquer summer’s little challenges with ease.

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Put pots and other objects to clever use hiding bare or boring spots in the summer garden. Bare spots pop up when a plant dies, spring bulbs or cool-season annuals go dormant, or where perennials have not yet reached full size. You can always fill the gaps with summer annuals, but garden art or gorgeous empty pots offer a no-maintenance alternative!


Take notes and photos throughout the summer. Don’t trust yourself to remember much past Labor Day just how plants performed and looked all season. Good notes and photos will make it easy and enjoyable to plan next year’s improvements over the winter.

Use a slow-release or controlled-release fertilizer rather than a water-soluble feed. The former require just one application at the start of the season, as opposed to weekly or biweekly.

Water with soaker hoses. It takes a little time to set up a system of soaker hoses, but from there on watering will be smooth sailing. Soaker hoses deliver water slowly a n d d i re c t l y. T h e y e limina te w a s te f ul runoff, and because they don’t wet plants’ leaves, they can cut down on foliar diseases like powdery mildew. Put them on a timer and your watering job gets even easier.

Fill window boxes with vermiculite instead of soil, then sink potted annuals into the vermiculite. This makes the boxes much lighter. The vermiculite also insulates the pots, keeping them cooler and slower to dry out, and makes it very easy to swap out the summer annuals for cool-season varieties when fall comes around. *

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GARDENERS ON THE GO!

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PLANT TRAVELER •

Filming the Wide Green World We travel the country to spotlight great gardens and gardeners by Theresa Loe

Top left: Students at the Edible Schoolyard, in Berkeley, Calif., learn about gardening as part of their middle school curriculum. Top right: Will Allen, creator of Growing Power in Milwaukee, Wis., and Joe Lamp’l, Growing A Greener World host, discuss Will’s unique city farming model that’s now being emulated throughout the United States. Center: Growing A Greener World crew members scout a film site in the Edible Schoolyard gardens. Bottom: Nathan Lyon, co-host and chef, and Joe check out student-created garden markers at Edible Schoolyard, which was founded in part by renowned chef Alice Waters.

Growing A Greener World is our national gardening series on public television. Our mission is to tell the stories of people and places making a difference in this world through gardening and eco-friendly living. Hosted by veteran television host and nationally recognized authority on gardening, Joe Lamp’l, we travel the country looking for inspiring stories of environmental stewardship, community and sustainability. We are currently in our third season and have covered everything from city homesteading and backyard chicken keeping to rooftop gardens and young farmers in sustainable agriculture. In each episode, we try to include simple DIY projects and handy gardening tips along with the featured garden story. And then for added flavor, our resident chef and co-host, Nathan Lyon, cooks up something delicious with locally grown, in-season produce. Because our show is broadcast nationally, travel is a huge part of our series. We want to showcase every part of the country and, luckily for us, we have a great online community of viewers on Facebook, Twitter and GrowingAGreenerWorld.com who are quick with suggestions. The stories we tell tend to fall into one of three categories: people, organizations or places. Some of our most interesting stories have been about single individuals who are doing amazing things. One example is Will Allen of Growing Power. He is a pioneering city farmer who is providing equal access to healthy, affordable food for people

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from all walks of life in the middle of the Milwaukee, Wis. He openly shares his knowledge, and now his strategic system of city farming is being emulated all over the country. We have also featured some inspiring organizations like the Seed Savers Exchange in Iowa that are working hard to save North America’s endangered heirloom seeds. They not only maintain thousands of viable seeds as a seed bank, but they also teach others how to harvest, store and share seeds. They are passing on our gardening heritage, making a real difference in the world. Another great story coming up in season three is the Sol Food Mobile Bus in Durham, N.C. This is the story of four young people who are traveling the country in a converted school bus teaching about gardening, nutrition, composting, alternative fuels and outdoor living. The bus is sustainable in that it runs on waste vegetable oil, has a living green-roof, mobile greenhouse and solar panels. We were really impressed by this project and are catching up with them on several stops throughout the year. One of the places we visited recently was the Edible Schoolyard in Berkley, Calif. Founded in part by chef Alice Waters of the Chez Panisse Restaurant, this middle school uses the garden as an integrated part of its everyday school curriculum. Imagine going to a school where you are taught gardening, environmental stewardship and how to cook with what you grow! These kids understand the value of the

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Top: Growing Power, a city farming model pioneered by farmer Will Allen, provides locally grown, affordable food for people of all walks of life. Below: Joe, Will and the production crew go over some notes before the camera rolls.


outdoors over the video screen. They have a full kitchen classroom; the day we were there, the children made pasta as part of their study of Italy. It was incredible. Working for a television show like Growing A Greener World is an incredible ride. We get to visually tell gardening stories that inspire and inform and meet the gardeners who are making a difference. Every season brings a new set of stories, and we can’t wait to share them with all of you. *

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Above: Seed Savers Exchange maintains thousands of viable, yet endangered, North American seeds,and also harvests, stores and shares seeds to perpetuate gardening heritage. Above inset: Seed Savers Exchange co-founder Diane Ott Whealy strolls through an heirloom apple orchard. Bottom: Growing A Greener World’s Theresa Loe shares her charming backyard homestead as part of the national gardening series. See more of what she does at www.LivingHomegrown.com.


COMMUNITY GARDEN SPOTLIGHT •

CINCINNATI,

Ohio

Right: Fowers and vegetables are grown and tended on school property by elementary school students. Right insert: Roberta Paolo (aka Granny) instills an appreciation of gardening in the children who cross her path.

Granny’s Garden School Elementary students cultivate an understanding of gardening and appreciation for nature’s beauty

Roberta Paolo (aka Granny) harbors a love for gardening and believes that flowers are for picking. Many years ago, noticing her grandchildren’s fascination with the the plants in her garden, Roberta created a community garden at Loveland Elementary School in Loveland, Ohio, where all the schoolchildren could have the chance to enjoy the simple splendor of flowers. Today, 10 years later, Roberta’s school flower garden has blossomed into Granny’s Garden School. It includes 100 vegetable and flower beds, a small apple

orchard and a three-quarter mile nature trail on the Loveland Primary and Elementary School property. The impact of Granny’s Garden School has spread beyond the classroom. Community members are invited to help maintain the gardens yearround; Eagle Scouts oversee the completion of various projects in the garden; and more than 275 educators from across the country have visited the gardens to learn how to establish a school garden program of their own. *

MORE!

READ MORE ABOUT ROBERTA AND GRANNY’S GARDEN SCHOOL AT HORTMAG.COM/GARDENS-AND-GARDENERS /GRANNYSGARDEN

by Emily Dydo

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SMALL SPACES •

Friendly Fliers Welcome winged wildlife with potted plants by Fern Richardson

Container plants for butterflies Butterflies are typically attracted to flowers that face upward, with the center of the flower (where the pollen and nectar are stored) exposed to the sky. These types of flowers are easy for them to land on and insert their mouthparts for a sip of nectar. Avoid flowers that are tubular in shape

A variegated fritillary on butterfly weed.

Thomas G. Barnes/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

It can often be a challenge to keep wildlife from eating your plants, so providing food sources is the easiest part of creating a wildlife sanctuary. The best way to attract birds, bees and butterflies is to use native plants. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center and the National Wildlife Federation have native plant finders on their websites (see Resources). Also be sure to select heirloom varieties and cottage garden favorites for your wildlife garden. Many modern sunflowers, for example, have been bred to have no pollen at all. What a disappointment that must be to the wildlife that stops by those plants. But the varieties of sunflowers your grandmother and her friends grew? Whoa, Nelly! They have lots of pollen for bees, and later in the season, those heirloom sunflowers make seeds that birds absolutely adore.

because butterflies can’t crawl into the area where the nectar is, the way bees can, and they don’t have the specialized beak that hummingbirds use to drink from those sorts of flowers. Different butterflies like the nectar from different flowers. To get a diverse group of butterflies, select a variety of plants known to attract them. Try picking plants that bloom on a staggered schedule so that flowers will always be available for a butterfly drink. Also, groups of the

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same plant are more likely to be noticed by butterflies than just one butterfly-friendly plant. Appleblossom grass (Gaura lindheimeri). Many butterflies— including duskywings, red-banded hairstreaks, and skippers— adore the glorious pink foam of flowers that appleblossom grass will produce. The plants are only about 15 inches tall, but the flower wands stretch up another 12 inches. Container-hardy in USDA Zones 7 to 9.


Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta). Gorgeous gold flowers with brown centers will satiate both the gardener’s desire for beauty and the butterfly’s need for nectar. Perfect for containers are dwarf varieties like Rudbeckia hirta ‘Viette’s Little Suzy’ which only gets to 18 inches tall. Hardy to Zone 5 in containers. Butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa). If you live in the path of the Monarch butterfly, plant a few pots of aptly named butterfly weed. The bright orange flat-topped flowers grow 24 inches tall in all but the deepest pots (where they can reach 36 inches). Hardy in zones 5 to 10 in containers. Chrysanthemums (Chrysanthemum spp.). Available in a mind-boggling array of different forms, chrysanthemums are highly revered around the world—in the southern United States there are even parades to celebrate this plant. Luckily, many butterflies agree with the hype. Choose from several dwarf varieties under 15 inches tall, such as ‘Molimba’ marguerite daisy (C. frutescens ‘Molimba’). Another chrysanthemum benefit is that they’re just as edible to humans as butterflies: Try adding the slightly bitter flowers to salads, or include them in a vegetarian fondue spread with an Asian-style dipping sauce. Unless you live in Zones 10 or 11, treat as an annual.

St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum). Butterflies love the nectar that comes along with the showy tufts of yellow stamens. St. John’s wort blooms for about 6 weeks, topping out at about 24 inches tall. Hardy in Zones 5 to 8 when grown in containers.

Container plants for birds Birds look for plants that provide seeds and berries to keep their bellies full. Your feathered guests will be especially happy if you give them something to snack on during winter by growing bushes, like holly, that produce edible (to them) berries that are left on the plant. Asters (Aster spp). These provide flowers that you’ll enjoy in late summer and fall, as well as seeds for songbirds and nesting material. While birds love them, you’ll also see bees and butterflies stopping by too. I’m especially fond of the wonderfully scented aromatic aster (A. oblongifolius) that forms 2 foot mounds; hardy in zones 4 to 9 in containers. Coral bells (Heuchera spp.). Long wands of white or pink flowers appear in spring and lure hummingbirds like crazy. Check out sexy ‘Dolce Blackcurrant’ with its frosted black leaves (container-hardy in Zones 5 to 9), or the warm orange and rust tones of ‘Marmalade’ (contain-

er-hardy in Zones 5 to 11). Both plants form low mounds under 12 inches. Mexican honeysuckle ( Justicia spicigera). An excellent hummingbird plant for hot, arid climates, Mexican honeysuckle can be found growing naturally as a 6-foot shrub (feel free to prune hard to keep it a size you can manage) or trained as a patio tree. Container-hardy in Zones 9 to 11. Ornamental sages (Salvia spp.). Two words: hummingbird magnet. Hummingbirds especially love the beautiful red flower spikes of pineapple sage (S. elegans), whose leaves smell exactly as you would expect (hardy in Zones 9 to 11). I am particular to blue anise sage (S. guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’), which produces gorgeous tubular flowers and is container-hardy in Zones 8 to 11. Plants range from just 12 inches to more than 36 inches tall, though they respond very well to hard pruning. Winterberry holly (Ilex verticillata). This plant produces red berries that hold well into winter (hence the common name) and are enjoyed by cedar waxwings, bluebirds and robins. If you plant winterberry shrubs in several large planter boxes, they will grow quite tall and form a nice privacy screen. Containerhardy in Zones 5 to 9. *

Taken from Small-Space Container Gardens: Transform Your Balcony, Porch, or Patio with Fruits, Flowers, Foliage, and Herbs © Copyright 2012 by Fern Richardson. Published by Timber Press, Portland, Ore. Used by permission of the publisher. All rights reserved.

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GARDEN TRAVEL TIPS•

Due Diligence The key to successful garden trekking in the Big Apple and beyond by Jenny Koester Recently I traveled to New York City to explore some of its public gardens. As I put the final touches together for my trip, I realized how easy it is to get caught up in planning and how that just adds stress. You can never see it all in one trip, and chances are you haven’t seen any of it yet. So relax! Have a short hit list of must-see gardens and sights, then simply go with the flow. Follow your nose and remember—some of the best garden discoveries come by chance. Here are three garden-trekking tips that stand out to me as I reflect on my NYC trip.

Research. Expand the enjoyment of your visit by researching the history of the garden and those who played a critical role in its development and design. I appreciate a garden more when I am aware of its historical significance and the people who designed the garden. Reading about a garden lets me experience, or at least reflect on, the garden before I ever step foot within it. Many garden trips are once-in-a-lifetime journeys, so I am all for extending the experience.

Routes. When I plan my travels, I spend time studying the transportation options. For New York City, I relied on subway, rail and buses. While I will never have the routes memorized, I learned enough to get around town without much worry. Keeping a map on hand was also a big help.

Relax. I have learned not to schedule every minute of every day, but some of the best discoveries are found by asking, What’s around that corner? When I ask nicely that nice doorman often lets me see! I like to pick a walking route that weaves through a few parks and gardens, and then I eagerly veer off course without much concern. I have all day to explore, and I have allowed ample time for extra discoveries. I never want to tell myself, You don’t have time to go down that street—you have a schedule to keep! *

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GARDENERS ON THE GO!


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PLANT PROFILES •

Summer Picks

Four low-care beauties for midsummer color HOSTA ‘GUACAMOLE’ has all you could ask for in a hosta: large leaves, fragrant summer flowers and a rugged disposition. It tolerates full sun as well as shade, quickly growing to 2 feet tall and 3 feet wide, with large two-tone leaves. Zones 3–9.

‘BLUE CHIP’ BUTTERFLY BUSH (Buddleja ‘Blue Chip’) stands apart from other butterfly bushes because it stays just 30 inches tall and wide, and it won’t spread by seed. It blooms from midsummer to frost and needs no pruning. Full sun. For the garden or containers. Zones 5–9.

COREOPSIS ‘SIENNA SUNSET’ makes a great alternative to the usual yellow tickseeds. This 20-inch perennial blooms all summer in shades of burnt orange and pale peach. It doesn’t mind dry weather or poor soil. Full sun. Zones 5–9.

COSMOS are a must for the summer garden, given their extreme heat tolerance and abundant bloom. They’re great within the garden or used as a quick-growing low annual hedge. Cosmos tolerate drought, but water them to promote more and larger flowers. Full sun. Annual. *

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KITCHEN GARDENING •

Cherry Tomatoes Easy to love and even easier to grow

by Meghan Shinn recipe via SmittenKitchen.com

Provided you have a sunny spot and just a little bit of space—a container will do just fine—there’s no reason not to grow cherry tomatoes. These plucky plants will reward very little effort with a plethora of small, sweet fruit. Between their easy-care nature and their fruits’ flavor and size, these plants are also a great way to get kids interested in both gardening and healthy eating. The most common cherry tomatoes are indeterminate vari-

Slow-Roasted Tomatoes INGREDIENTS

Cherry, grape or small Roma tomatoes Whole gloves of garlic, unpeeled Olive oil Herbs such as thyme or rosemary (optional) DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 225°F. Halve each cherry or grape tomato crosswise, (Roma tomato lengthwise) and arrange on a parchment-lined baking sheet along with the cloves of garlic. Drizzle with olive oil, just enough to make the tomatoes glisten. Sprinkle herbs on, if you are using them, and salt and pepper, though go easily on these because the finished product will be so flavorful you’ll need very little to help it along. Bake the tomatoes in the oven for about three hours. You want the tomatoes to be shriveled and dry, but with a little juice left inside. This could take more or less time depending on the size of your tomatoes.

SHOPPING LIST • CHERRY, GRAPE OR SMALL ROMA TOMATOES • WHOLE GLOVES OF GARLIC, UNPEELED • OLIVE OIL

• HERBS SUCH AS THYME OR ROSEMARY Either use them right away or let them cool, cover them (OPTIONAL)

with some extra olive oil and keep them in the fridge for the best summer condiment, ever. And for snacking.

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GARDENERS ON THE GO!


eties, meaning that the plant will continue to grow and set fruit until it is killed by the first frosts of fall. These include popular varieties like ‘Super Sweet 100’ and ‘Sungold.’ On the upside, this means you’ll have a continual supply of cherry tomatoes for salads, snacks and simple pasta sauces. On the downside, you will need to offer the plant some kind of support as it grows taller and taller. But this is simple to do with a tomato cage, stakes

or even the railing of a deck or balcony. If you’d prefer to skip the staking and to harvest your tomatoes in one go, such as for canning, then look for a “determinate” or “patio” variety. To keep your cherry tomato plant happy, just make sure it

receives a full day of sun (at least six hours) and regular watering. Use a slow-release fertilizer at planting time. They like about an inch of water a week. Pay special attention to watering if you’re growing them in containers, which can dry out quickly. * Try this: Gently rub your hands on your herbs and even your tomato plants, then close your eyes and breathe in the calming scents.

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Tell me, what is it you p l a n to do with your ONE wil d and precious life? —FROM ”THE SUMMER DAY” BY MARY OLIVER


next issue Watch for our fall issue, to be released in late September 2012. It will include plant picks for fall interest; fall garden tips and tricks; more visits to exciting public gardens; advice from fellow gardeners on the go; and much more. In the meantime keep in touch with us online:

facebook.com/ HorticultureMagazine

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Gardener's On the Go Summer 2012