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I NTERNATIONAL A NDALUSIAN & L USITANO H ORSE A SSOCIATION


ANDALUSIAN PUBLISHING OFFICE LIONHEART PUBLISHING, INC. 506 ROSWELL STREET, SUITE 220 MARIETTA, GA 30060

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ANDALUSIAN MAGAZINE

Contents

President John Llewellyn E-mail: llewellyn@lionhrtpub.com (770) 431-0867, ext. 209 Art Director Alan Brubaker E-mail: albrubaker@lionhrtpub.com (770) 431-0867, ext. 218

On the Cover: HARAS DOS CAVALEIROS upper level winning team at the Pin Oak Charity Horse Show, Working Equitation Championship 2013. Acclaimed trainer Ernesto Tiago is riding the talented young stallion Cossaco RC in the "pole removal" phase of competition. Haras Dos Cavaleiros is a highly respected breeder of Lusitano champions. Owners CARMINA ZAMORANO and RAFAEL CHAVEZ are steadfast supporters of the working equitation discipline who promote the sport by hosting clinics and by sponsoring IALHA and Pin Oak competitions. Haras Dos Cavaleiros is also helping to field a U.S. working equitation team at the FEI World Equestrian Games Normandy 2014.

Assistant Art Director Lindsay Sport E-mail: lindsay@lionhrtpub.com (770) 431-0867, ext. 223 Online Projects/FTP Manager Patton McGinley E-mail: patton@lionhrtpub.com (770) 431-0867, ext. 214 Display Advertising Sales Classifieds, Business Cards, Stallion Directory Advertising & IALHA Membership Handbook Advertising

Lisbeth Hencke E-mail: lisbeth@lionhrtpub.com Office: (757) 410-5836 Cell: (361) 774-3957 Fax: (888) 802-1249

Publishing Editor Jennifer Morrell 2013 Editoral Contact Julie Alonzo E-mail: jalonzo@uoregon.edu

featur e s 8

Training the Working Equitation Horse

Reprints Kelly Millwood E-mail: kelly@lionhrtpub.com (770) 431-0867, ext. 215 Non-member Subscriptions Amy Halvorsen E-mail: amyh@lionhrtpub.com (770) 431-0867, ext. 205

Andalusian recently spoke with Tiago Ernesto, a trainer for Haras Dos Cavaleiros, on what is required to train a horse for working equitation.

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS IALHA members: Included with membership Non-IALHA members: $30 per year

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The temperament and conformation of Iberian horses make them suitable for driving work and disciplines.

de pa rtments 6

Preparing Your Horse to Drive

President’s Letter

By Jenni Johnson

22 2013 IALHA Equine Art Contest

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42 Business Cards

The Iberian Horse in Competitive Jousting Contemporary competitive jousting is making a renaissance in the world of equestrian martial arts.

44 Stallion Listings

By Zhi Zhu (AKA Jan)

46 Judge Training Seminar

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47 Membership Application

Getting Your Driving Horse to the Show Ring

48 Where We Have Been

Six lessons that can get your horse to the show ring By Howard and Erica Peet

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Mail Subscriptions to: Amy Halvorsen Lionheart Publishing, Inc. 506 Roswell Street, Suite 220 Marietta, GA 30060 Phone: (770) 431-0867, ext. 205 Andalusian Magazine (ISSN # 2151-5190) is published quarterly by the International Andalusian and Lusitano Horse Association. POSTMASTER:

Send address changes to:

IALHA, 342 North Main Street, Suite 301, West Hartford, CT 061172507. No part of this publication may be reproduced by any mechanical, photographic or electronic process without prior written permission of the publisher. COPYRIGHT © 2013 IALHA

ANDALUSIAN Magazine is the official Publication of the International Andalusian and Lusitano Horse Association All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. www.ialha.org


Issue 2 | 2013 u ANDALUSIAN MAGAZINE

President’s

Letter

| by Julie Alonzo Dedicated to the Spanish and Portuguese Horse

IALHA PRESIDENT Julie Alonzo

Fashion and Function

IALHA EDITORIAL BOARD Julie Alonzo J.B. Lessels

ANDALUSIAN MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY: For centuries, horses were an essential part of the transportation infrastructure, and the variety of carriages and horses rivaled the eclectic options we find in the modern-day auto industry. Teams of draft horses have, by and large, given way to fleets of Mack trucks, making their strong but lumbering way across the country. Livery stables full of grade horses for a variety of everyday uses have been replaced by garages full of sensible sedans. Those who seek nimble and explosively potent mounts, however, still turn to the Ferrari of the horse world: the Andalusian and Lusitano. Our exotic horses excel in pursuits during which responsiveness and maneuverability are paramount. And, the fact that our horses, like Ferraris, are easy on the eye just adds to their appeal. Last issue, we celebrated the show-ring success of a variety of IALHA horses and riders competing in USDF and USEF shows. Previously, we’ve shared stories of Andalusians and Lusitanos covering impressive ground in competitive or pleasure trail events. In this issue, we highlight the versatility and athleticism of our breed with articles about Andalusians and Lusitanos involved in three different, yet challenging, disciplines: jousting, working equitation and driving. Each of these disciplines has rich, historic roots. Perhaps equally as important, they all are events in which our horses have a bright future. Perhaps it’s time to consider a tune up for you and your Our exotic horses excel horse as you explore new adventures. I hope you enjoy the articles, get inspired, in pursuits during which and race out and ride – or drive – as the responsiveness and case may be! ◗ AM

maneuverability are paramount.

Become part of the IALHA! To learn about the different types of membership and the many perks of being a member, visit:

www.IALHA.org or contact Debbie at Member Services:

860.586.7503, Ext. 554 • MemberServices@ialha.org 6

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IALHA REGISTRY OFFICE 101 Carnoustie, North, #200 Birmingham, AL 35242 Tel: (205) 995-8900 Fax: (205) 995-8966 Email: office@ialha.org www.IALHA.org MEMBERSHIP SERVICES OFFICE 342 North Main Street, Suite 301 West Hartford, CT 06117-2507 Tel: (860) 586-7503 Fax: (860) 586-7550 Email: IALHA@assocoffice.com The primary objectives and purposes of the International Andalusian and Lusitano Horse Association are: (1) to preserve, improve, and maintain the purity of the blood of horses of the Andalusian breed, which includes horses of Spanish origin known as Caballo Pura Raza Española and/or of Portuguese origin, known as Cavalo Puro Sangue Lisitano, or Raça Lusitano, and/or of Spanish/ Portuguese origin, and to promote public interest in the science of breeding Andalusian horses, and to foster, aid, and encourage the breeding, exhibition, and promotion of this breed; and (2) to advance the knowledge and education of the public and members about horses of the Andalusian breed and to promote the acquisition and distribution of knowledge of the history, use and standard, medical and other care and treatment, and propagation of horses of the Andalusian breed. **Only issues, statements, declarations and decisions discussed and agreed upon by vote of the Board of Directors or the membership shall be considered official Association Policy. Any and all other issues, statements, declarations and decisions expressed in any publication, letter, video, speech, discussion or any other communication displaying or not displaying the name of the IALHA or expressed by any Officer, Director, employee or member shall be considered personal opinion and shall not be deemed in any way to be policy of this Association or its members, Officers, Directors or employees. The use of the Association name, letterhead and or logo or any other representation of the IALHA in any media shall not constitute recognition and/or agreement with the contents of such. POSTMASTER:

Send address changes to:

IALHA, 342 North Main Street, Suite 301, West Hartford, CT 061172507. No part of this publication may be reproduced by any mechanical, photographic or electronic process without prior written permission of the publisher. COPYRIGHT © 2013 IALHA

ANDALUSIAN Magazine is the official Publication of the International Andalusian and Lusitano Horse Association All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. www.ialha.org


Training the

Working Equitation Horse Andalusian Magazine recently spoke with Tiago Ernesto, a trainer for Haras Dos Cavaleiros, on what is required to train a horse for working equitation. Following is what he had to say. 8

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Opposite Page: Antonio Garcia Rolán riding Adagio DC, both from Haras Dos Cavaleiros, demonstrates the proper technique of the sidepass pole. The pair are coming toward the camera performing the sidepass in traverse. This is an advanced movement and earns a higher score, when done well, than a leg yield.

Andalusian: How do you start a horse for working equitation? Tiago: Starting a horse for working equitation is exactly the same as starting a horse for any other discipline. You begin by teaching the horse to carry a saddle, to understand the rein aids, and to carry a rider. When the horse is under saddle, the next step is the basic work also common to all disciplines. You teach the horse to move forward, calmly and regularly at a walk, trot and canter; to halt and stand quietly; to yield to leg and rein pressure; and to move in straight lines as well as different size circles. This early work should not be rushed, and each horse progresses at its own pace. After these two steps, I start to work a lot on the quality of the walk and canter, while using the trot daily to help improve the horse’s balance. Once a horse has the basics, I begin to introduce all the lateral work (shoulder-in, leg yield and half-pass). These are essential for developing a good working equitation horse. At about this same time, I also start to introduce walk pirouettes and, eventually, canter pirouettes. The last thing I really focus on is flying lead changes, but all the early work I do builds the horse’s ability to perform flying changes. It’s important never to forget the gymnastic work, because our horses must build the strength to be able to work in collection and to perform

In the Figure 8, Tiago Ernesto riding Cossaco RC, Haras Dos Cavaleiros horse and rider, do a flying lead change in the middle of the Figure 8. The change at this point is an important part of the score in this obstacle, as well as the slalom and drum (cloverleaf) obstacles.

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WORKING EQUITATION

the movements required in both the dressage tests and while working the obstacles.

Andalusian: How much time do you spend working on dressage versus obstacles? Tiago: All horses are different. Each horse tells us the

work they need and where we need to work more. When I think about it, though, in general, I spend more time working on dressage, especially in the beginning of the horse’s career. This really is the foundation for everything else. Working on the dressage movements is where the horse builds strength and balance, and where straightness, bend, cadence and rhythm are formed.

Andalusian: At what point do you introduce speed? Tiago: It is important to introduce speed gradually. I usually start step by step, depending on the horse’s balance on the obstacles. But we should never forget that a good speed test is the one in which we use the least possi-

ble space, and not necessarily the greatest speed. Having a horse who can maintain balance in very tight turns can really help reduce the time in the speed phase.

Andalusian: Talk about how you prepare a horse to learn flying changes. Tiago: Before I begin training for the flying changes, I have to prepare the horse and the canter in order to avoid creating resistance and tension. It is important to keep in mind that flying changes involve a change of direction and not a change of speed. Because of that, I need to work at different speeds at the canter and counter canter to help the horse develop its strength. I also have to introduce the horse to simple changes, so it begins to understand the cues associated with a lead change. After we have all this work done, the flying changes should start coming without trouble, just with slight aide changes: I cue for the change in lead by shifting my weight slightly to the side I want the horse to change to, and then keep my weight there waiting for the horse to change lead.

Andalusian: Talk about how you train for the different obstacles. Tiago: Personally, I divide the obstacles into two extremely different groups. In the first group are those obstacles that require time for the horse to get used to and become confident with. These obstacles include the bridge, the bull, the lance and the gate. For some horses, the sidepass pole, backing through an “L” and the corri-

Here Carlos Salguero riding Diablo DC, Haras Dos Cavaleiros horse and rider, round a pole in the Slalom between Posts. Notice the collection and impulsion as they weave between the posts. 10

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Antonio Garcia Rolán skewers the ring off the back of the bull riding Adagio DC, a Haras Dos Cavaleiros pair. This obstacle is frequently in the middle, between the Remove a Pole from and Placement into a barrel. While accuracy does count, especially in the Speed phase, a controlled gait and lack of fear are more important in the Ease of Handling phase.

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WORKING EQUITATION

dor also are in this group. These obstacles are more demanding on the horse’s compliance and trust of his rider. In the second group are those obstacles that require technique and a lot of daily training and conditioning for the horse to be able to perform them. These obstacles include the slalom, the barrels and the cloverleaf around the drums. What makes these obstacles so hard is that they ask for a really strong horse that needs to maintain a good, balanced, rhythmic canter, while also completing numerous flying changes. The only way to improve on these obstacles is to have consistent training, with lots of repetition to improve the horse’s balance during, after and between obstacles.

Tiago Ernesto riding Cossaco RC, Haras Dos Cavaleiros horse and rider, wind their way around a post in the Slalom between Parallel Posts. While similar to the other slalom obstacle, this obstacle requires loops around posts rather than a weave. The pair is at speed in this photo so you will notice they are closer to the post than they would be if done during the Ease of Handling phase.

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Andalusian: What can riders do at a competition to improve their scores? Tiago: In the Dressage phase, it’s important to be precise about performing the movements exactly as they are outlined in the course. Knowing what you are supposed to do throughout the whole test is important, if you want to earn a good score. For the Ease of Handling phase, I think it’s important, when walking the course, to be able to think about what you can do for each horse to help it move smoothly through and between each of the obstacles. Use the walkthrough as a chance to consider how you will leave each obstacle, so you set up a good approach for the next one. For the Speed phase, again the most important thing is to think about a strategy for going through and between the obstacles in such a way that you can cut as many seconds off your time as possible. Too many riders focus on galloping fast, instead of thinking about how to spend the least amount of time possible as they complete the course. Really think about your strategy and technique, rather than blindly racing through the course. Remember, too, that it’s important not to ruin the horse’s attitude and trust in your hands. Don’t push the horse beyond where the two of you are ready to go, or you will end up causing future problems. ◗ AM

Rebecca Algar riding the Haras Dos Cavaleiros horse Campino DC demonstrates a smooth and controlled opening of the gate during Ease of Handling.

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Preparing Your

Horse to Drive By Jenni Johnson I was excited when IALHA asked me to write about preparing your horse to drive. I would love to see more Iberians competing in harness. The temperament and conformation of our horses make most of them quite suitable for driving work and disciplines. However, trying to write an article about starting a horse in harness brings similar challenges to writing an article on starting a horse under saddle. It’s a subject for books, clinics, training videos and years upon years of lessons and experience.

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Reading horses and knowing when they are ready for the next step cannot be explained easily in written form and, like all training with horses, can mean the vital difference between a positive experience for horse and human, and potential disaster. This challenge is compounded by the many diverse training methods used by different people. Hitching and training a green horse to drive can be rewarding, but also can be a dangerous situation for even the experienced trainer. Horses are flight animals by nature, and attaching a vehicle on wheels to an animal conditioned to run away from what it fears can have fatal results. In this article, I will focus on some of the groundwork I have found useful in preparing my training horses to drive, prior to their first hitch. The article will stop just short of “putting to” (hitching).

The thing that cannot be emphasized enough in driving preparation is the groundwork, groundwork, groundwork. So groundwork is the focus here. Putting to and driving the green horse is a subject for a separate article. A significant amount of time should be spent on each of the following steps. When your horse is ready to hitch, a knowledgeable local trainer who knows you and your horse will be your best resource. What makes a good driving horse?

Above: Expand the horses' comfort zone as you build their trust in you as their leader.

MANY OF THE ATTRIBUTES that make a good riding horse carry over into the driving world. A sound body and excellent character are paramount, of course, but what else? A strong shoulder and broad chest will make your equine’s job easier by distributing pull contact over a larger surface area. A willing attitude goes far, and, while many of us desire a sensitive animal for performance, an overly sensitive or fractious horse is not suitable for driving and can be a danger to both itself and others, if driven. It seems a common misconception that horses unsuitable for riding might, at least, have a career in harness. If there are holes or issues with your horse’s previous training, those issues undoubtedly will show up in front of a carriage. Take the time to address those issues first, remembering that not all horses have what it takes to be driving horses. Ask yourself what type of driving you want to do. Different demands are placed on a fine harness horse than on Sunday road drivers or combined driving athletes. Leading and voice commands

YOUR HORSE SHOULD be a solid citizen on the ground before progressing to additional training. If he pulls or balks while leading or has an otherwise disagreeable temperament for basic handling, those issues need to be addressed before moving forward. Lead your horse from both sides, and take it on walks out and about on your farm as well as off the property where it lives. In everyday activities like leading in the stable and to and from its turn out area, begin using clear and consistent voice commands that will transfer to your driving Left: Labyrinth Fiona, a 3-year-old Lusitano mare, beginning her driving education.

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DRIVING

ASSISTANTS/HEADERS: training. In driving, your voice is one of your Use assistants when you have them available and every time you are aids, in addition to your reins and whip. introducing something new to your horse. Having a knowledgeable person Your horse already may know to walk attached to the head of your animal for safety allows you to stay in the long when you tug on the lead or step forward. lining or ground driving position. Use this to teach the horse your new voice A handler can stay on a slack lead when not needed, and should stay commands. Say the new command you are quietly behind the blinkers of the horse. Instruction, direction and praise trying to teach first, immediately followed by should be given to the horse by the person ground driving it, rather than the the aid it understands. For example: If the header, as the horse must learn to listen to and trust the person with the reins horse knows how to walk forward from a tug whose voice is coming from behind it. on its lead, say “And Walk,” then immediately tug on the lead. Continue to reinforce your voice, until your horse Driving can be a wonderful opportunity to share your walks forward on your voice command alone. Say its horses with friends and family who may not otherwise be name or another word to get its attention preceding the horse people. A relaxing carriage ride can involve a lot of command. If you eventually will be driving pairs or mul- chatter and banter, and having a distinct way of speaking tiples, it is a good habit to get your horse used to its name to your horse will help your equine partner know when or a word that is used only for that horse. I find myself you are speaking to it, and not just having a conversation using the word “and” before a command. with a passenger. For example “And Walk,” “And Whoa,” or for my mare Educating yourself Viva, I might say, “Viva, Walk,” or “Viva, Whoa.” FAMILIARIZE YOURSELF with the harness and its It is the extra word or name that tells your horse, “I’m going to tell you something; pay attention.” I uncon- parts, before introducing it to your horse. If you aren’t sciously use a different voice when talking to my driving already working with a trainer, find one who can help horses and have even been told I talk in some indis- you with proper fit and adjustments to the harness. Putting a harness on a green horse for the first time cernible mix of accents from no real country. should not be when you learn which parts go where. If you are new to driving, you are probably not the best person to teach your horse to drive. Find a mentor, if you cannot find a driving trainer, and read books and watch videos. Take lessons and audit clinics. Volunteer at driving events, and join the American Driving Society and your local driving club. If you are sending your horse to a driving trainer to be started, don’t forget about your own education, if you will ever be taking the reins yourself. Just like riding, driving is a partnership between horse and driver, and both you and your horse need a proper education. You wouldn’t think of starting a horse under saddle if you didn’t know how to ride. The same should go for driving. Take responsibility for educating yourself, before trying to train your horse on a subject with which you are unfamiliar. Always try to set you and your horse up for success; educating yourself first will put you on this path. General desensitization

ONCE YOUR HORSE is competent with general handling, start to introduce objects, sights and sounds that it may find scary. Introduce these slowly, pushing the horse Left Top: Header is used for safety and to encourage the horse forward as we transition from a lunging form to a ground driving form. Left: Introducing long lines: inside line is attached to halter (not bridle) while she becomes comfortable with outside line running along her side and rear.

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horse and its reactions in uncomfortable situations. You also will see where additional training time should be spent. The term “bomb proofing” has been used for this type of training. While no horse is ever truly bombproof, it will do you well to take the time on the ground to get your horse as close to that “bombproof ” ideal as possible, prior to hitching. Once you feel competent with your horse in halter, you can come back to this training with your horse in harness, in blinkers, and even while being ground driven. Again, we are working from the familiar to the new, always working to expand the horse’s comfort zone. Above: Once a horse is relaxed being led in the harness, attach the breeching to the traces to form a circle around his body. He can then be lunged in this manner. The breaching can be adjusted slightly lower for training than for driving.

to expand its comfort zone and build its trust in you as a leader. Use a soft polo wrap, and run it between your horse’s legs and under the base of his tail to simulate a crupper. Ask your horse to walk over, under and through a variety of man-made and natural obstacles. Get the horse used to different noises and sounds. If available, expose it to other horses being driven. While there are some specific sounds to which a driving horse needs to become accustomed, like the rattle of the carriage behind the horse, for example, most of this work is about teaching your horse to trust and listen to you in uncomfortable situations. This is much more important than desensitizing to specific objects or sounds. We cannot possibly desensitize our equine partners to every single thing that may be encountered in the real world, but we can set the horses up for success by teaching them that, although something might be scary, the horses will be ok. It is your responsibility to make sure they are. Exposing your horse in hand to scary situations over which you have control will help you better “read” your

Above: Your horse is ready to start pulling objects when he is pulling strongly and confidently against the assistant’s pressure on the traces.

Lunging and long lining

LUNGE YOUR HORSE using your clear voice commands, and expect your horse to respond quickly to your commands. When I ask a horse to walk on the lunge, I expect it to walk – not jig, trot or play to get out energy until the horse is ready to work (that is what pasture time is for) – but to walk. When you ask the horse to trot, it should pop right up into a working trot, and come back to walk or whoa immediately, when asked. Your horse should not be allowed to turn and face its handler when stopped. One of the most important commands you can teach your horse is to “stand.” The word you use for this does not matter; however, your horse must learn a command that means do not move. Your horse should master walk, trot, canter, whoa and stand, all on the lunge line, before progressing. Once you and your horse are confidently working with your voice commands on the lunge, it’s time to introduce the long lines. Add an outside line first when intro- Above Top: Once a skill is mastered in ducing a secondary rein, the arena, work outside in a controlled environment to expand the comfort attaching it to the halter the zone and introduce new sights and first time your horse is get- sounds. ting used to lines around its Above: Once your horse is competent body. with general handling, introduce objects, The feel of the line sights, and sounds that may be scary to around the horse’s rear end them. Issue 2 | 2013

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KEEPING SAFE and legs will be a new sensation – both in We all want to keep our horses safe, don’t forget about you. Adjustments motion and while standing. I prefer to teach will need to be made in close quarters to your horse. You will be a near my training horses to long line in a plain distance to your horse’s hind hooves while ground driving. Protect yourself surcingle and open bridle (without blinkand your assistants by always wearing gloves and a helmet. Consider ers). While the horses may be learning about investing in a body protector, use quick-release snaps and shackles, and wearing harness in the same time frame, I always carry an emergency knife. keep harnessing and long lining lessons separate while the horses are learning each. Focus on one thing in each lesson. A horse should be or cotton rope. Once the long lining without harness, and independently should horse is standing relaxed in be wearing harness without issue, before long lines are harness, lead your horse in added to a harnessed horse. its new tack. A harness in motion feels different than a Wearing harness harness at rest, and your ONCE YOU ARE knowledgeable about the harness, horse is likely to get a little its parts and functions, and are familiar with its fit and goosey to the crupper the proper adjustments, you can start to introduce it to your first time it moves with it on. Quality gloves are important horse. Horses that have worked in hand and worn a Take the time to praise Above: safety equipment - both to protect your surcingle, or are already going under saddle, usually have any and all relaxation. Make hands, and to give a secure grip on the little objection to most of the harness parts. lots of transitions from the reins. The biggest objections usually come with the crupper halt to the walk, while leadand when taught breaching. Some trainers allow the ing. When your horse is relaxed, add a few steps of trot in horse to get used to wearing harness in a stall or round hand. Be sure to praise your horse even (especially) if this pen. I dislike the “let ‘em work it out” method, whereby a is uneventful. The goal is for the entire process to be syshorse is left loose to buck or run away from the equip- tematic enough that it is all uneventful. ment, or are lunged ad nauseam, until the horse tires or Once a horse is relaxed being led around in properly gives in. I prefer to slowly introduce new things in an fitted harness, I attach the breaching to the traces, formenvironment over which you have control, while posi- ing a circle around the horse, and start to lunge it in this tively reinforcing every baby step. manner. Over time, you can make this adjustment When harnessing, note whether your horse is becom- shorter, so the breaching is felt around the horse’s rear ing tense being touched in a particular area. This may with less movement. need more desensitizing by hand or with a soft polo wrap For some horses, all this may be done in one session; for others, it may take days or weeks of building upon the previous lessons. If you get a reaction, do not stop what you are doing, but do not progress to the next step until your horse relaxes into what you are asking. If you get a strong reaction, back up a step and progress at a slower pace, to where you were when the strong reaction occurred. This is true for all training, not just harnessing. Most inexperienced young horses will buck or kick out when lunged with crupper or taught breaching the first time. Correct this behavior by immediately sending the horses forward with your voice and whip. If the bucking or kicking continues, go back to walking and trotting the horses in hand, or keep your transition times shorter. Always immediately correct kicking in Above: A noisy wheelbarrow simulates the sounds of a cart. harness. Failure to address this issue early on will put you and your horse’s safety in jeopardy, if you move on Right: Basic starting equipment: PVC training shafts and a tire to hitching in the future. attached to a training singletree. Your horse should quietly walk, trot and canter both directions on the lunge in harness, prior to long lining in harness. Your horse should understand long lining in an open bridle, prior to long lining the horse with blinkers. You might want to revisit long lining without the harness 18

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Above: Emphasize turning in your training shafts as this is where your horse will feel the restriction of the shafts on his sides and shoulder.

to confirm that you and your horse are ready to do it in harness. You will start to slowly move from the center of the circle to a more direct line behind your horse, while also moving closer to the horse at the walk (and trot if you can keep up at a jog with steady hands). This is the transition time from long lining to ground driving. Concentrate on transitions, changes of direction and bend. Work on using just the aids you will have available

when driving: reins, voice and whip. You cannot spend too much time at this stage. Once your horse is proficient in the ring being ground driven, explore the outside world in long reins. Your horse should be wearing a halter under its bridle, and an assistant can walk along beside the horse for safety on a loose lead, just behind its blinkers, as you explore new environments on foot. Simulation of sounds and environment

WITH YOUR ASSISTANT quietly and loosely

Above: If you don’t have training shafts, you can use PVC pipe to get your horse used to the feel of a shaft on his side.

attached to your horse’s head (for safety, not for guidance), start to add additional stimuli while ground driving. Another assistant can roll an empty wheelbarrow with a couple of rakes in it quietly behind you. Based on your horse’s reaction to this sound, you can ask your

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DRIVING

If you don’t have a second assistant,

assistant to get progressively louder and closer with the noise. it’s better to lead your horse at the head, while the Leave some buckets or other items on assistant you have pulls on the traces. the ground that you can kick as you pass by. Sounds that may not have bothered your horse before may be quite frightening when it is not help encourage it forward until the horse learns it can allowed to turn and face them. Do not progress until move into the pressure on its chest. Once the horse your horse is relaxed and able to handle surrounding understands this concept, your other assistant will add stimuli without incident. progressively more pressure to the traces, while walking behind your horse. Your horse is ready to start pulling Learning to pull objects when it is pulling strongly and confidently FROM THE BEGINNING of our equines’ lives, we against the assistant’s pressure on the traces. have taught the horses to move away from pressure. If A tire is a good object to start pulling. Get your horse we push on the horses’ sides to move over, we reward used to the sound of a tire being dragged behind it by an them by releasing the pressure. When we lead the horses, assistant. Then progress to attaching the tire to a schoolwe apply pressure to the halters that is released when the ing singletree attached to the traces for your horse to horses respond. It has been ingrained in the well-trained drag. Spend as long as needed at this stage. Just like with horse to respond to pressure by moving away from it. the harness and long lines, I take my training horses out Now we are changing the rules: We are going to ask a and about the farm while dragging the tire. In addition to horse that has been taught its whole life to move away pulling in an outside environment, a tire being dragged from pressure to move into it. To pull into the breast col- over different surfaces, like gravel, will provide more lar and to hold back on the breaching are things a dri- sounds to get used to. ving horse must learn. It is no wonder many horses are If you don’t have training shafts, you can use PVC confused by this request. pipe to get your horse used to the feel of a shaft on its To teach your horse to move into the breast collar, it side. Have an assistant hold it beside the horse, and walk is ideal to have two assistants. While you are in the along with it at each gait. Get your horse used to the feel ground driving position, one assistant will be attached of your mock shafts pressing into its shoulder and sides to the halter for safety. Your other assistant holds the as it turns into them. Emphasize turning in your traintraces or a training singletree attached to your traces. ing shafts, as this is where your horse will feel the restricAsk your horse to walk forward and have your assistant tion of the shafts on its sides and shoulder. start to slowly add pressure Training shafts and tire can be combined along with to the traces. long lining. I expect my horses to be able to quietly long If you don’t have a second line at all gaits (including canter) in training shafts, while assistant, it’s better to lead pulling a tire, before I would consider hitching them. your horse at the head, while Take your time, and combine steps once each step is masthe assistant you have pulls tered. You can even work through cones or other obstaon the traces. The focus here cles at each of these steps. is on moving into pressure Seek help from those with experience, do not rush and pulling into the breast anything, praise routinely and have fun! ◗ AM collar – the ground driving Jenni Johnson is the owner of JC Andalusians LLC in element is secondary. It’s Barboursville, Va., where she breeds and trains Andalusians more important to have a and Lusitanos. The training focus at JC Andalusians is on young horses and driving. Johnson is the 2012 IALHA handler at the horse’s head Professional Horsewoman of the for this lesson, both for Year and is an active competitor learning the lesson and for in combined driving events. your safety. There should be much praise when your horse moves forward. If your Above: Get your horse used to the horse is confused, stops or sound of a tire being dragged behind him tries to back up away from by an assistant. Then progress to attachthe pressure on its chest, ing the tire to a schooling single tree lighten the pressure and use attached to the traces for your horse to drag. stronger aids. Ask your assistant at the horse’s head to 20

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Soul Searching Art contest entries celebrate the essence of the horse By Kay Laake and Nancy Holman “Frères d’Âmes” mixed media by Elise Genest

If you’ve visited the IALHA website or Facebook page recently, you likely have been awed by the images of Andalusians and Lusitanos submitted by global artists for the 2013 IALHA Equine Art Contest. This year, the winning artist is Elise Genest, a Canadian painter and photographer from the Quebec City area, whose work is entirely devoted to horses. Her work, “Frères d’Âmes” (Soul Brothers), was selected to grace the 2013 IALHA National Championship Show program cover as well as apparel, posters and other merchandise. Though Elise is only 29 years old, she has many years of experience in the equine world, and her passion for the horse provides a powerful stimulus for her to perfect her techniques as an artist. She grew up in a family of artists, became involved in raising horses at an early age, and quickly learned some of their secrets. Her ability to share her enthusiasm with other horse lovers is evident in the beautiful calendars and prints for which she is known. Since 2005, Elise has exhibited her work at major equestrian events in Canada and the United States. Elise will win a free booth at the 2013 IALHA National Championship Horse Show, and a print of “Frères d’Âmes” will be displayed in the Silent Auction at the Nationals. The subjects for “Frères d’Âmes” are Cruzerio and Zairo, Lusitanos from Interago Lusitanos, now at Treasure Coast Dressage in Florida. The art method is mixed media on canvas, 36 x 48 inches. 22

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Our contest in 2013 attracted many incredible artists, from high-profile professionals to new, yet-to-be discovered artists. The difficult selection process for the Show Committee and Board of Directors was guided by the need to choose a work that uniquely represents our breeds, shows well on the cover and on apparel, and grabs the heart of the viewer. “Frères d’Âmes” does that and more.

“Flying Changes” by Lisa Harding www.ialha.org


This year’s art contest featured photography, acrylic, mixed media, watercolor, graphite, oil, sculpture and other media from artists in the United States, Canada, France and Netherlands. Be sure to visit www.IALHA.org to see all 50 entries, and to visit the artists’ websites. Some of their works also can be found in the Art Auction section of IALHA Classified section. A true passion for the horse is a common thread among the artists, whether they are Andalusian/Lusitano owners or only admirers. Marti Adrian, inspired by her own Andalusian, submitted a print of her bronze sculpture, “El Andaluz,” and says she hopes her love of nature and all living things comes through in her art, so that it “touches the hearts of others of like mind.” Amy Larson sums up the sentiment of these artists, when she describes her work, “Trilogy.” “I began on the left with a planned image representing the history of equestrian artistry and followed with a second image that arrived completely from the fires of my own appreciative imagination,” Larson says. “The third image in Trilogy defied my intention for drama and became instead, a quiet study of my sweet and gentle Andalusian mare. The finished piece is a trilogy of honor, admiration and celebration for this very inspiring and magnificent creature.” ◗ AM

“Trilogy” graphite by Amy Larson

“Tornado XXXVIII” photograph by Terri Cage

“El Andaluz” bronze sculpture by Marti Adrian

“Light in the Dark” by Debra Colleen Arney

“Flamenco” acrylic by Paula Collewijn

“Kabileño” by 2012 winning artist, Frédérique Lavergne Issue 2 | 2013

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IALHA Best Lusitano Breeder, U.S.A. for two consecutive years: 2011-2012 Unanime Da Broa A Veiga-bred stallion from Portugal, Unanime is the only Recommended Stallion (APSL Reprodutor Recomendado) in the United States of America. ¬ There are very few worldwide. He has offspring in France, Spain, Portugal, Mexico and the U.S.A. Unanime is one of the world· s most important Lusitano stallions, not only for the many international titles he has earned, but also because of his prepotency as a breeding stallion, invariably passing on his strength, conformation and beauty. ¬ His offspring Distinto DC was awarded with a Gold Medal at the Feria Nacional do Cavalo Golegá, Portugal 2012. CASCAIS, PORTUGAL 2009 Male Champion Sire Champion Champion of Champions 2 Gold Medals in the National Championship

2011 IALHA NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP HORSE SHOW & CHARITY

National Champion Lusitano Stallions 6 Years and Over

2012 IALHA NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP AND FOUNDATION CELEBRATION

Reserve Champion and BES BEST MOVEMENT AWARD Lusitano Stallions 6 Years and Over¬ ¬ ¬

NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP PORTUGAL 2004

First Place and Gold Medal Class 3 Years

GOLEGA CHAMPIONSHIP 2005

First Place and Gold Medal Class 4 Years

Unanime Da Broa Unanime’s oŃ spring Distinto DC Gold Medal Feria National do Cavalo Golega Portugal 2012


X-Perto DC VIII CHAMPIONSHIP OF THE LUSITANO HORSE IN MÉXICO 2004: First Place, Gold Medal Colts 1 Year Young Champion National Champion Champion of the Breed IX CHAMPIONSHIP OF THE LUSITANO HORSE IN MÉXICO 2006: National Champion Best Horse Born in Mexico Male Champion PIN OAK U.S.A 2011: Champion of Morphology Sport Horse Champion Champion in Dressage Sport Horse in Hand

Cristal DC 2012 IALHA National Reserve Champion Lusitano Stallions 4 & 5 Year Olds and BEST MOVEMENT MEDAL The Pin Oak Charity Horse Show 2012 First Place Dressage Sport Horse Breeding and Stallions 4 & Older

Donatello DC IALHA National Champion 2012 Lusitano Saddle Geldings and BEST MOVEMENT MEDAL

Diablo DC IALHA NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP HORSE SHOW & CHARITY 2011 National Reserve Champion Lusitano Stallions 4 and 5 Year Olds The Pin Oak Charity Horse Show 2012 Working Equitation Champion 2012 IALHA NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP AND FOUNDATION CELEBRATION Working Equitation Champion

Gabacho DC The Pin Oak Charity Horse Show 2012 First Place Dressage Sport Horse Breeding and Colts 3 & Under First Place Specialty Yearling Colts Futurity

EQUESTRIAN CENTER ျ TRAINING ျ BOARDING ျ SALE ျ STALLIONS AT STUD ျ YOUNG STOCK ျ TEST DRIVE 26427 Peden Road Magnolia,Texas 77355 Email: info@harasdoscavaleiros.com www.harasdoscavaleiros.com Tel. 281 259 4861 / 710 8932 info@harasdc.us www.harasdc.us


The Iberian Horse in Competitive Jousting BY ZHI ZHU (AKA JAN)

Jousting is one of the oldest equestrian sports in the world (horse racing generally is believed to be the oldest). In medieval and renaissance Europe, jousting tournaments were the most popular sporting events around. Knights who did well in tournaments were given the same kind of adoration that successful football and basketball players are given today. However, military technology advanced, and armoured warriors on horseback became obsolete. And, after a few tragic jousting accidents in which members of the nobility were severely injured or killed, competitive jousting tournaments faded into obscurity. 26

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Today, most people are familiar with the choreographed or theatrical jousting seen in the movies or at renaissance fairs: performances in which men in fanciful armour charge at one another with lances; knock each other off their horses; and continue the combat on foot, usually with www.ialha.org


Clockwise from opposite page top left: Opposite Page Top Left: Andreas Wenzel on Sigismund Opposite Page Middle: Virginia Hankins and Casanova Left: Alix Van Zijl on Torero Andreas; Wenzel on Sigismund Opposite Page Bottom: Andreas Wenzel on Sigismund; Petter Ellingsen on Talento Opposite Page Far Left, Bottom: Alix Van Zijl on Talento

big clanging swords and lots of fake blood. Choreographed jousting certainly requires a great deal of skill and training, but it is not the same as the sport of contemporary competitive jousting, which is making a renaissance (pun intended) in the world of equestrian martial arts. Although the term jousting has come to refer specifically to two people on horses cantering toward each other with lances, jousting originally referred to a variety of mounted exercises used to train knights for battle. These exercises eventually evolved into a spectator sport, and the jousting tournament became a popular form of entertainment. What most people now call “jousting” originally was referred to as “tilting,” since the divider between the two lanes down which the horses cantered was called a “tilt.” All jousting tournaments included tilting, but most also included other forms of equestrian martial arts such as mounted skill at arms (MSA) and mounted melee. It took a special horse with specific training to be competitive in the different aspects of a jousting tournament. The horse used by knights in medieval and renaissance times, both in battle and in the sport of jousting, was frequently referred to as a “destrier.” A destrier was not a specific breed of horse, but rather a certain type of horse – one with solid bones, strong muscles and the intelligence and agility to perform the types of movements required in the various forms of equestrian martial arts.

Unfortunately, historical sources can be vague, confusing and, sometimes, flat out contradictory, so the exact nature of destriers is still a subject for debate. Baroque breeds such as the Andalusian, Lusitano and the various crosses of these breeds are very much the type of horse that could have been considered a destrier. Many contemporary jousters concerned with historical accuracy choose to use Iberian horses as their jousting mounts, because they believe the horse to be the closest modern equivalent to the type of war horse actually used by knights. Others choose to use Spanish and Portuguese horses, because their intelligence, agility and athleticism make them particularly well suited for certain aspects of contemporary competitive jousting, particularly mounted skill at arms (MSA) and mounted melee. The sport of competitive jousting has been growing in popularity around the world. While many different types and breeds of horses are used in contemporary competitive jousting, Andalusian and Lusitano horses are popular with European jousters, and a growing number of North American and Australian jousters are beginning to appreciate the qualities that Iberian horses can bring to the new/old extreme sport of jousting. Training a horse to joust

MUCH LIKE ANY OTHER equestrian sport, one must start with the basics. Although some jousting horses originally are trained in Western or other styles of riding, most U.S. jousters and nearly all international jousters prefer their jousting horses to have a solid foundation in classical dressage. Classical dressage originally was developed as a way to train horses for mounted combat, so it is an excellent basis on which to build the skills used in jousting tournaments. Before any horse can be trained and used for jousting, two things must occur. First, the horse must be well trained – enough to walk, trot, canter, turn, stop and back up with little to no effort. If he can do these things in a controlled, collected manner, and is capable of and trained to do more advanced dressage movements, then that’s even better. Second, jousters must be skilled enough to cue the horse to do all these things using one hand on the reins, their seat and their legs without having to think about it. Riding the horse must require almost no concentration from the jouster, in order to allow the jouster to concentrate on controlling and targeting the lance, the sword, the spear, etc. Issue 2 | 2013

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JOUSTING Joust training has a number of different steps, and different people will complete these steps in different orders, depending on the rider, the horse and what seems best at any given time. Although the following steps are presented in a certain order, they do not have to be carried out exactly in this order. Mounted skill at arms (MSA)

JUST LIKE IN MEDIEVAL and renaissance times, the first thing modern jousters and joustWenzel on Sigismund; Joram Van Essen on Zogo; Alix Van Zijl on ing horses usually learn are the exercises referred Andreas Talento; Arne Koets on Maximillian to as mounted skill at arms (MSA). A wide variety of these skills exist, sometimes with variations on the aware, are serving as cues for the horse. If the horse keeps same skill. They are first practiced at the walk, then the changing speed or going in unexpected directions, the trot, and then the canter. Some of the more common horse may not be trying to avoid the equipment; it may MSA exercises are: be that he is simply trying to obey what he believes are • The Cut and Thrust: using a sword to chop in half cues given to him by the jouster. Of course, it also may be and/or skewer some form of fruit or vegetable (cabthat the horse still is nervous about the jousting equipbages are a popular choice) balanced on top of a post ment, and more desensitization is needed. • The Spear Throw: throwing a short spear or javelin In competitions, the MSA can be run as “individual at a target (sometimes something representing a skills,” or a “combined course.” MSA – individual skills deer or other animal, and sometimes concentric cirmeans jousters compete in one skill at a time. After cles placed on a bale of hay) everyone is finished competing in that skill, the next skill • Tent-Pegging: using a long spear to pop tent pegs (or is run. MSA – combined course means that a variety of something representing tent pegs) from the ground skills are tested in one run. MSA – combined course may • Pig-Sticking: using a long spear to impale and ride look similar to a working equitation course. Although, in off with a small faux “pig” (obviously, real pigs are MSA, the skills are related to equestrian martial arts, not used today) rather than to cattle working traditions. • Tilting at Rings: guiding a lance (or sometimes a One final skill frequently used in training, but not spear) through a series of loosely hung rings and often seen in MSA competitions, is tilting against the carrying them off; sometimes the rings get progresshock quintain. Unlike the regular quintain, the shock sively smaller down the length of the course quintain can vary greatly in design, and it does not spin • Tilting Against the Quintain: guiding a lance to hit easily. In fact, it usually does not spin at all. It is weighted the target on the quintain to make it spin; the more to the ground or uses strong springs to provide resistance spins the better. against being knocked over. The shock quintain is used to train jousters and their horses to withstand the shock of Since armour is not usually worn during MSA compe- hitting the opposing rider with their lances. After all, the titions, the only two things the horse must learn at this force of the hit goes both directions to some extent point are: first, to ignore the various weapons and equip- (though that varies, depending on the style of lance used). ment used in MSA, and second, to cope with the changAfter mastering a variety of MSA skills, especially tilting body positions of the rider as the jouster swings a ing against the quintain and/or the shock quintain, the sword, throws a javelin, thrusts with a spear or aims and novice jouster and horse should be ready to learn how to strikes with a lance. tilt against another jouster. Unless a horse is extremely spooky, a general desensitization process will serve to train them to ignore the var- Tilting against another jouster UNLIKE MSA, tilting against another jouster always ious weapons. However, some horses, especially highly trained or very sensitive horses, may have trouble under- requires armour, so the first thing the horse must learn is standing the difference between the jouster’s movements to accept the noise and weight of a jouster wearing as he attempts the various skills, and the movements armour, as well as how it changes the way a rider moves. Although a properly fitted set of armour does not change used to cue changes in speed or direction. As with any equestrian skill, it is best for an inexperi- the way a person moves very much, even the best armour enced jouster to learn to joust on an experienced jousting still affects a jouster’s balance and movement to some horse. However, since this is not always possible, it is extent. Some horses don’t seem to be bothered by important for the novice jouster to remember that the armour at all; others are terrified of it and require a lot of movements, even those of which he is not consciously work to become desensitized. 28

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JOUSTING TERMS

JOUSTING The next thing a jousting horse must learn is to wait patiently at one end of the tilt, until cued, and then to canter down the length of the tilt and to halt at the other end. This may not sound difficult, but some horses get excited and will want to run down the tilt lane as soon as they see it. Other horses may not want to stop at the end. Many in the sport have heard about the jouster who tried to train an eventing horse named Duchess to tilt, but gave it up as a bad idea when Duchess kept trying to jump the fence at the end of the tilt yard. Learning to face the opposing horse also can be difficult for some horses. Certain horses, usually nervous or submissive horses, are scared by the opposing horse and rider and are unwilling to face them in the tilt, no matter what. However, most horses can be taught to ignore the oncoming horse by starting both horses at the walk, and then slowly working up to a canter. And, some horses that seem to relish the chance to face down the opposing horse. In Texas, a jousting mare named Plum would famously pin her ears, snake her neck and even snap at the opposing horses as she passed them. She made more than one horse shy away at the most inopportune moment, distracting its rider and causing the lance to go off target. Plum was an unregistered horse whose exact breeding was unknown, but she was a great horse on which novice jousters could learn to tilt. Because of their extreme sensitivity, Iberian horses are not always the best horses on which novice jousters should tilt. According to international jouster and tournament organizer, Arne Koets, “The more talented the horse, the more confidence and skill the rider needs, yet the further the horse will bring him.” A sensitive horse that will do quite well with an experienced jouster may balk when ridden by an inexperienced jouster. This is not necessarily a reflection of the novice jouster’s riding skill, but, quite likely, a reflection of the novice jouster’s emotions. Tilting is an extremely dangerous sport, and it is quite natural for an inexperienced (or even an experienced) jouster to be nervous when facing another jouster in the tilt, especially during a tournament. Horses as sensitive as are many Iberian horses, may pick up on that nervousness and become nervous. 30

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Tilt: the barrier between the two opposing jousters. It can be a solid fence, a wooden rail, a length of fabric or even a simple rope. Counter Tilt: a barrier, usually shorter in height than the tilt that defines the outside edge of the lane down which the jousters will canter. It can be a wooden rail or a simple rope. Not every tilt yard includes a counter tilt. Tilt Yard: the area where the tilt is set up. Tilting: the original term for what now is referred to generally as jousting. Lyst Field or Lysts: the arena or designated area where the jousting tournament takes place. The lyst field includes not just the tilt tard, but also the areas for mounted melee, mounted skill at arms and/or any other activity included in the tournament. Tenan: the jouster considered to be defending the field in a series of jousting passes. Venan: the jouster considered to be challenging the defender of the field in a series of jousting passes. Chamfron: armour for protecting the horse’s face. It can be made of leather or metal. Caparison: the fancy cloth that covers the horse during tournaments. It usually displays the jouster’s colors and, sometimes, their coat of arms. It does not provide any protection; it is purely to help identify the jousters. Ecranche: a small wooden shield strapped onto a jouster’s left shoulder. Ecranches were common jousting targets used from the late-14th century to the early-16th century, and usually were painted with the jouster’s heraldry. Grand Guard: a small metal shield bolted onto the jouster’s left shoulder. It may be smooth or have a series of raised grids, and was a common jousting target used in the mid- to late-16th century. Coronel: the shaped cap (frequently crown shaped) that is placed on the tip of the lance. Coronels come in a variety of shapes and materials. Vamplate: the flared round metal “shield” that sits on the base of the lance, just in front of the jouster’s hand. Some lances include vamplates, and some do not. Mounted Melee: any of a variety of forms of mounted combat performed as a sporting competition, rather than an actual battle. There are team melees and individual melees (every participant versus every other participant), timed melees, elimination melees and crest melees. Mounted Skill at Arms (MSA): a variety of skills used to train for mounted combat. MSA may include tilting at rings, cut and thrust, thrown spear, tilting against the quintain, pig-sticking, tent-pegging and other tests of skill. MSA – Individual Skills: a competition in which each skill is performed individually. MSA – Combined Course: a competition in which a number of different skills are combined into one run. An MSA – combined course is similar to a working equitation course. Quintain: an apparatus with a small shield or target set at approximately the height to represent an opposing jouster’s shield. The target is on one end of a spinning plank that has a weighted bag on the other end. The Quintain is used to practice controlling the lance, so that you can hit the tip of the lance against a small target. Shock Quintain: a shield or target heavily weighted or attached to the ground with springs in such a way that is difficult to knock over. It is used to train both rider and horse to withstand the shock of hitting the opposing rider with the lance. King of Arms: the main referee for the tournament. Lady of Honour: the one who assures everyone behaves with chivalry/good sportsmanship. Her duties and amount of authority may vary from tournament to tournament, and some tournaments do not have a Lady of Honour. Line Judges: referees that help the King of Arms with scoring and assuring all the safety rules are followed. Ground Crew: the absolutely essential personnel who set up and take down the tilt and other equipment; who hand lances to the jousters during the tournament; remove broken lance pieces from the tilt yard; and who generally assure everything that needs to happen actually happens. Squires: people who help specific jousters with their armour and equipment during a tournament. They frequently also act as ground crew.

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COMPETITIVE JOUSTING RESOURCES

JOUSTING

One reason for jousters to be nervous is • The Jousting Life: a website that includes news, photos, videos and other that in tilting, unlike almost any other sport, information about the new/old sport of competitive jousting. It also includes there is no defense. Jousters are expected to lists of competitive jousting tournaments and jousting troupes, as well as present their shields and themselves in the way many other useful links. www.TheJoustingLife.com that makes it easiest for them to be struck. A • The International Jousting League (IJL): the oldest and largest contemporary jouster who dodges the opponent’s lance or competitive jousting league. The IJL encompasses all of the more popular who fails to present the shield properly may be equestrian martial arts, including tilting, MSA, mounted melee and mounted penalized or even disqualified from a tournaarchery. users.skynet.be/hackamores/IJL/IJL.htm ment. Learning to “present” properly is as • The International Jousting Association – USA (IJA-USA) important a part of learning to tilt as learning www.ija-usa.com/index.html to hit your opponent with your lance. For the jousting horse, one of the most dif• The International Jousting Association – Canada (IJA-Canada) ficult things can be learning to ignore the senwww.cricketlane.ca/joust-canada/index.html sation of its rider getting hit with the lance. • The Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA): some, but not all, branches of During early training, many horses will stop the SCA, a historic re-enactment group, include competitive jousting among or run out, either in confusion or in an their activities. www.sca.org attempt to get back underneath the riders who suddenly have become unbalanced. The • A’Plaisance LTD: a company that produces competitive jousting tournaments only way to train both rider and horse to and demonstrations. www.APlaisance.com accept getting hit is to allow a trusted oppo• WorldJoust Tournaments: a company that produces competitive jousting nent to hit them again and again. It is impostournaments and demonstrations. www.WorldJoust.com sible to practice tilting without an opponent, • “Jousting in Medieval and Renaissance Iberia” by Noel Fallows: a modern and, frequently, the person a jouster is pracbook containing translations of historic texts about jousting. ticing with one day will be the same jouster he faces in competition the day after. Tilting is, in a sense, a team sport – not just in regard to such as Andalusians and Lusitanos, can really show off the teamwork required of horse and rider, but also their intelligence, athleticism and agility. In mounted melee, riders use some form of sword-like because opposing jousters must, to a certain degree, work together in order for the competition to work. If one weapon to strike other riders anywhere on their bodies from jouster takes off down the tilt before the other jouster is the waist, up. Various weapons can be used in mounted ready, it does not give one jouster the advantage, it simply melee, including actual blunted steel swords, carved woodmeans that the pass has to be re-run. The two opposing en batons, lightly padded rattan sticks, or “whack-bonks” (a jousters must work together to get the timing of the pass piece of PVC pipe covered with a piece of a pool noodle). correct. Also, as mentioned previously, each jouster must Though not often seen in serious competition, whackbonks frequently are used when practicing for melee. present the best target possible to his opponent. Part of training a horse for melee is desensitizing him In jousting, chivalry is not just an abstract concept; it is a necessary part of the sport. Because tilting and mounted to having the sword-like weapon of choice swung around melee are such dangerous activi- him. The desensitization process also can include rubties, it is vitally important that bing the weapon against the horse and even lightly tapcompeting jousters trust one ping him with it. During the actual melee, hitting the another to be as concerned for horse is, of course, absolutely forbidden and will result in their opponents’ safety as for severe penalties against the rider who does so. The other part of training a horse for melee is getting their own. him used to moving in and around other horses in a The mounted melee “combat” situation. This is where intelligence, athleticism WHILE MANY PEOPLE and agility combined with higher level dressage skills realconsider tilting to be the most ly can be useful. Riding a horse that is capable of collecexciting part of a jousting tour- tion, lateral work, turns on the forehand, turns on the nament, others prefer watching haunches, and that is sensitive to his rider’s every move the mounted melee, because of makes it much easier to attack and evade other riders. the high degree of skill – of both Once, during a melee practice, an Andalusian/Lusitano rider and horse – that can be cross named Shadowfax wound up inside a group of cirdemonstrated. During the cling combatants. Although he had never been trained mounted melee, the higher level beyond second-level dressage, he performed a lovely condressage skills are most useful. trolled and collected three-quarter canter pirouette before Andreas Wenzel on Sigismund Horses capable of these skills, breaking out of the center of the circle. 32

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Admittedly, his rider, Douglas Wagner, had been trained in higher level dressage, and Shadowfax probably could not have performed such an advanced move without guidance from his rider. Nevertheless, while watching mounted melees, it is fascinating to see dressage movements that seem rather abstract when performed during a dressage test take on practical meaning when performed during mounted combat. International jouster Douglas Wagner describes his experiences riding Shadowfax: “Riding Shadowfax in the hunt [fox hunting] and the joust, particularly in the melee, was great fun. He certainly possesses strength and talent, but also needs firm direction. Shadow’s energy is a bit like a compressed spring, with ready power just on the verge of getting away from you. With attention, consistency, and by keeping him focused, his rider can use that power in very athletic ways. Initially, he was insecure and scattered. However, once convinced that I was serious about my cues, he proved to be a great mount. In the melee, I found I was able get where I wanted, how I wanted, making for excellent approaches and escapes.” A number of different styles of mounted melee exist. With individual melees, each competitor versus every other competitor; and with team melees, teams of jousters work together to overcome the opposing team. During timed melees, the melee will continue for a predetermined amount of time, and then judges will determine who won. With elimination melees, competitors are on their honour to remove themselves from combat after receiving a certain number and/or type of blows. Another form of elimination melee is the crest melee. In a crest melee, each competitor attaches a crest to the top of his helm. The crests can be elaborate papier mâché creations representing the jouster’s coat of arms or something as simple as a balloon. The goal is to use your weapon to knock the opponents’ crests off of their heads (or burst their balloons). The last team or individual jouster who still has a crest on his helm is the winner. All the jousters who helped provide information for this article seem to agree that the mounted melee is where the difference between riding an Iberian horse and any other kind of horse is most obvious. In describing the experi-

ence of riding an Iberian horse in melee, they have made statements like: “I have used [Solo, a PRE x Arab gelding] as a melee horse in training, which was an exquisite pleasure. He offers lead changes like Sigismund (a PRE stallion), but will also do a canter pirouette like it’s super-easy.” – International jouster, Andreas Wenzel

“...but for the mounted skill at arms (especially when in a combined course) and particularly the melee, [Iberian

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JOUSTING horses] are just way better. We did a training on the weekend with only Iberian horses plus one murgese. It was amazing what even the slightly less experienced riders managed: canter pirouettes, lead changes, repulons, all just in a day’s work – in armour, one handed, in a fight – with six horses or so in the heap.” – International jouster and tournament organizer, Arne Koets

International jouster Wouter Nicolai has been riding his PRE stallion, Flamenco, in jousting Alix Van Zijl on Talento tournaments for eight seasons. When asked why Iberian horses are a good choice for jousters, he Of course, not all horses – not even all Iberian horses responded, “The PRE and other baroque horses descend – have what it takes to make a good jousting horse. from horses that were bred for warfare, which means they are, in a way, ‘built for combat.’ This especially What makes a good jousting horse? A GOOD JOUSTING HORSE must be healthy, athreveals itself in the melee, where an Andalusian (and other baroque breeds) will often be superior to any letic, brave and willing. Almost any horse can be trained to compete in MSA – more modern breed. Although training is still the most important for any horse and rider, the potential of most individual skills. A good horse is one that is not bothered by baroque horses is, in my opinion, far greater than any the equipment used in MSA and understands that not all of its rider’s movements are riding cues. MSA – combined modern breed.”

SOME IBERIAN JOUSTING HORSES: Maximillian Maximillian is a 7-year-old, 15.3-hand, Andalusian gelding, owned and ridden by international jouster and tournament organizer Arne Koets. They have competed in about 30 tournaments across three countries, including their home country of Germany. They have won or placed in a number of these tournaments. They came in second overall in “The Grand Tournament of Sankt Wendel.” They would have come in first, but Arne persuaded the judges to give some of his points to a jouster he had injured accidentally during the tournament, which placed the injured jouster in the lead. “My horse is called Maximilian,” says Koets. “I ride him up to twice a day, at least six days a week. I have only had him since August 2011. We spent a lot of time making a bond. Grooming, and riding of course, but also just hanging out, cuddling, doing exercises on the ground, playing with a large ball, etc. When traveling, he really looks for me for company. Max can be belligerent at times, and has a strong will, but he has become a reliable steed as his performances in Denmark, England and Germany have shown. That he is now capable of doing pirouettes and lead changes makes him a joy to ride in the melee.”

“The day I first saw him was just like an industry picture – a beautiful proud animal overlooking a herd on a hill bathed in sunlight. I call him my lucky star because his purchase date was July 7, 2007 – or 7/7/07 – and he has taken me to incredible adventures and experiences that I am truly blessed to partner with him on. Literally anything I have ever thrown at him he has gone in with a fun-loving and kind attitude.”

Torero Torero is a 6-year-old, 16-hand, Andalusian stallion owned and ridden by international jouster Alix van Zijl and various other jousters, including Bertus Brokamp. He has competed in about 15 tournaments in their home country of the Netherlands and in Germany, including the prestigious “Grand Tournament of Sankt Wendel.” “The horse I ride is a 6-year-old Andalusian stallion called Torero,” says van Zijl. “I bought him a couple of years ago in Spain. He is a very willing horse, and very sensitive, which makes him a charm to ride in the melee. You just have to think what you want, and he’ll do it for you. In the joust, he goes straight as an arrow and as fast as well.”

Casanova Casanova is a 12-year-old, 16-hand, Azteca gelding, owned and ridden by Virginia Hankins. They have been jousting in the SCA for seven years, and have also done a number of demonstrations and re-enactments for various renaissance fairs and in the live action stunt industry. They currently reside in California. “Casanova, my 16-hand coal black Azteca, is a stunning example of the breed,” says Hankins.

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Talento Talento is Torero’s half-brother. He is also a 6-yearold Andalusian stallion owned and ridden by international jouster Alix van Zijl and, occasionally, other jousters. Talento is a bit shorter than Torero at 15.1 hands. Talento also made the journey from their home in the Netherlands to Germany to compete in “The Grand Tournament of Sankt Wendel,” where he was ridden by international jouster, Petter Ellingsen.

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course is a bit more difficult, and may require a more intelligent and athletic horse in order to do well in competition. However, it is in training for the tilt and the mounted melee, during which most horses have problems. One of the first things that should be done when deciding on whether to train a horse to tilt or compete in mounted melee is to see how it reacts to another horse cantering toward it. The easiest way to do this is to ride two horses in a circle in opposite directions. Start at a walk or a trot, and then increase to a canter. At first, the inside horse should stay well inside the circle the outer horse is making. Then, the riders gradually can shift the two horses as close to each other as possible, without risking the riders bumping knees. Depending on how adventurous the riders are feeling, they can try directing their horses, so that the inside horse and outside horse switch positions after each pass. If the horse is comfortable with having another horse canter past it at close range, then it will probably do well with facing another horse in the tilt. If the horse is obviously scared when another horse canters towards it, and continues to react with fear even after several attempts, then it might not be temperamentally suited for jousting. According to well-known international jouster and tournament organizer, Arne Koets, who owns both an

“Talento likes to be ‘ridden,’ which means a lot of contact on the legs,” says van Zijl. “No legs...no obedient horse, just a horse that goes where he wants. Legs on, and you have the safest, most obedient horse ever. He was ridden by Petter Ellingsen during “The Grand Tournament of Sankt Wendel,” and Petter really liked Talento. You can stop him in a run, walk backward to the start of the tilt and do it again.”

Shadowfax Shadowfax is an 11-year-old, 17-hand, Andalusian/Lusitano gelding owned by Jan Hutchinson and ridden by her husband, jouster Ryan Saathoff, as well as international jousters Theresa Wendland, Douglas Wagner and Luke Binks. Shadowfax originally was trained in dressage and is still fairly new to the sport of jousting. He has only competed in a few tournaments and performed in demonstrations in his home state of Texas. “Shadow’s natural athleticism and lightness to the aids makes him a great candidate for the Equestrian Martial Arts,” says Saathoff. “Because he is so athletic, it’s easy to forget that, in many respects, he is still a rather green horse, and I have to be careful to not overwhelm him by asking him for too much, too quickly. Recently, we’ve been concentrating on our dressage, not only to improve his musculature and conditioning, but also to help improve his confidence. Because of his high intelligence and sensitivity, he is improving quickly, and we hope to return to the lysts very soon!”

Flamenco Flamenco is a 14-year-old, 15.3-hand, Andalusian stallion owned and ridden by international jouster, Wouter Nicolai. Flamenco and Wouter have been jousting together for seven years and have participated in close to 400

Andalusian and a Lusitano and who has ridden a variety of jousting horse in MSA, the tilt and mounted melee: “A draft horse is like a pick-up truck to joust on. An Andalusian is like a Mercedes. A Lusitano is like a Lamborghini.” Conclusion

CONTEMPORARY competitive jousting is a growing sport, one in which Iberian horses could do very well. As in other equestrian sports, competitors are not separated by gender. Both male and female jousters compete against each other in tournament. Although currently there are more male jousters than female, the number of female jousters is growing. In fact, one of the most active and highest ranked jousters in the International Jousting League is international jouster Sarah Hay, who was the 2012 Australian National Jousting Champion. Although jousting can be a lot of fun, and almost anyone can learn to compete in MSA, tilting and mounted melee are extremely dangerous equestrian martial arts. If you wish to learn how to joust, find an experienced jouster to teach you. You can find out more about competitive jousting and where you can learn how to participate in the sport from the sidebar, “Competitive Jousting Resources,” p. 32. ◗ AM

jousts and melees in their home country of the Netherlands as well as in Belgium, France and Denmark. “I bought Flamenco in 2006, my first season of jousting,” says Nicolai. “Flamenco is easy to handle on the ground, he is patient and polite to people and other horses. When riding, he is sensitive and eager to work and learn. He is also easily distracted, and gets annoyed if the rider makes a mistake. He is good, though not particularly keen on jousting, but loves the melee, which is also what he is best at. My own goals are to keep improving my skill and that of the horse to (unachievable) perfection and try to get as close as possible to experiencing a 15th century tournament. Flamenco is, most of all, a very reliable and steady jousting horse I can trust.”

Sigismund Sigismund is an Andalusian gelding, owned and ridden by Arne Koets and also by international jouster, Andreas Wenzel. He was one of four Andalusians ridden in “The Grand Tournament of Sankt Wendel,” one of the most prestigious jousting tournaments in modern times. “I have ridden Sigismund in the joust and melee at Sankt Wendel, and during some of the relevant training sessions,” says Wenzel. “We won the Squires’ Tournament together, which involved achieving the highest aggregate score of all participants (104 points) and winning all three [team] melees. We achieved, by far, the highest score of any competitor in the melee, so he was the highest-scoring melee horse in the lineup.”

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DRIVING

Driving Horse to the Show Ring

Getting Your

By Howard and Erica Peet â&#x20AC;˘

Photos Courtesy of Peet Equestrian

It took us a long time to figure out how to approach this article. We found our inspiration for this article in our amateurs. Our amateurs come to us for many different reasons. Some come just to enjoy the ride, with no care in the world about winning. Some are all about the blue ribbon. Some say they want one thing, but really want another. Regardless of whom you are or the reason you want to get to the show ring, the truth is that you cannot put the carriage before the horse. Above Top: Crucero II ESB practicing for show Above: As De Copas J.M. showing

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Lesson 1

FORWARD MOVEMENT that develops impulsion is the first goal of the driving horse, without exception. Impulsion is when the horse reaches farther underneath itself without speeding up, allowing the horse to elevate its shoulder and create a frame to work within. So, how do we create this magic moment in our driving horses? The horse must learn to pull into the traces and keep contact through them from the breast collar to the whiffletree, without resistance from the cart or the driver. If your cart is too heavy for the horse, it will cause the horse to lunge into the harness and teach the horse to stay off of the pressure, causing your horse to stay off of the traces. Another way to ruin impulsion is if the driver is too heavy handed and causes a jerking motion when the horse walks into the traces. This is bad, and most beginning drivers do this. The driving horse must learn to pull and relax. Therefore, developing confidence is key to making a solid driving horse. The driver must take full responsibility for all of the equipment and for everything that happens to the horse, without exception. Driving is different from saddle work. In saddle work, you fall off and you get back on. Not so for the driving horse; accidents are not pretty. It also is important to be aware of your equitation while you drive. The driver should have one leg braced forward so that, in case of a 60-to-zero halt, you do not go flying over your cart. Keep your back straight and head up, always looking ahead. We drive mostly from our elbows. In order to do so, you must learn to slide up and down the rein efficiently to keep the proper contact with the horse. We define proper contact the way: The traces are not loose, and the horse is pulling the cart forward without resistance from the driver. When we give lessons, most of the time, we reach over and check the amount of contact in the lines. Usually, the contact is too heavy in the beginning driver, due to fear. So, we make the driver

Luna working circle keeping wither between rein

soften the contact, or we take the lines away from him, so the horse can “pull” and relax. Regardless of what your cues are, make them clear and dependable. We say “Walk” to walk, and we “cluck” to trot. We adjust the strong trot to normal trot by saying “Easy.” We go from normal trot to walk by saying “Whoop walk.” We say “whoa” to stop. Our horses know what these cues are, and we depend on them for a safe work environment. Now, it is time for you to work safely. Lesson 2

THE HORSE is your dance partner. Therefore, you lead and it follows – not the other way around. You are in charge of the speed and direction of the horse at all times. Plain and simple – always. If you are not in charge, you are in danger of having an accident. Exercise 1 is to learn to allow your horse to pull the cart and relax. The key to getting what you want with horses is to be what you want at all times. If you want a relaxed horse, you must be relaxed. This is why choosing your teacher is important. Lesson 3

Luna trotting circle and moving shoulder over

EXERCISE 2 is to walk a circle without the horse stopping when you make an adjustment to keep the horse on the circle, because the shoulder will drift and the horse will want to over bend and not move its hooves in the direction you are bending its face. Keeping the horse’s spine in alignment with how you want to move its feet is

Desi crossing over

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DRIVING

engage your whip at the saddle. If the exercise was done properly, the horse will want to come back in the corners of the square. Simply drive the horse forward with the whip, and ask for engagement versus speed, while keeping the withers of the horse exactly between your hands without a counter bend in the horse’s head. Every horse has a less flexible side, so you will need to remember this during this exercise. Lesson 5

Desi using half halts to control shoulder

important. So, we drive with a series of half halts that do not have time limits, in order to teach the horse what we want. It does not matter to us if it takes 20 strides of whatever gait for the horse to do what we want. What matters is just that the horse will let us lead and guide as its partner. If we want to guide the driving horse to the left, we support with the right line. Support means that you do not counter-arc the horse or, more important, you do not inhibit the horse’s forward movement because of too much contact. Then, we half halt on the left line. The more finished horse will simply allow you to guide its shoulder to the left by stepping with its left leg to the left, and then following with its right front leg. Then allow the horse to pull the cart forward and relax. The more inexperienced driving horse will resist you, and probably throw its head around in defiance. You must support and ask without losing forward movement. It will take time for you to have total control of the horse’s shoulder. Change your cues to work the other side. Lesson 4

WALK A SQUARE and halt in the corners. Your driving horse will learn many things from this exercise. Most important to a show horse is to learn to give you a strong trot while not getting heavy in the bridle, and to keep its shoulders in position while trotting, in order to create rhythm at the trot. Once you can walk and halt and move the shoulder Desi trotting a square at will, it is time to 40

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IT IS TIME TO WORK along the rail and ask your horse for a stronger trot. Remember that muscle development is important. Horses are not machines, and muscle is created with hard work. Don’t ask for too much to start. We like to count rhythm in the horse by watching the horse’s hoof land on the ground and count. For instance, I may watch the left front hoof. Every time it lands, I say “Now” in my mind. “Now, now, now.” And so on. We work for rhythm without asking too much of the horse in the beginning. Acertijo strong trot

Lesson 6

ONCE YOU HAVE all the basics down, it’s time to drive a class to perfection at home. Enter the work area at a walk, and walk along the rail to the left. We always start our driving horses off at the walk. One reason is to let the horses learn to relax. But, it is more than that. In order to win your national title, you must walk when the judge calls for you to walk. When we feel that the horse is warmed up at the walk, we ask for a normal trot. We like our normal trot to be controlled and rhythmical. Then, we ask for the strong trot, whereby the horse should elevate and engage more. We come back to the walk through the normal trot. We practice the change of direction at the walk a lot. We do not like tight little turns to change direction. Rather, we move the shoulder and walk forward, and so on, until we are walking a straight line across the arena. We work the right side at the trot, both normal and strong. Then, we trot around the arena until the horse is relaxed, and come in to the center of the arena and line up and halt. We stand for quite a while if needed. The horse needs to stand focused, meaning it is not flipping its head around. Take your time here; patience is key. Back your horse four steps and walk forward back into line. Repeat if needed. ◗ AM www.ialha.org


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S T A L L I O N

LISTINGS $135 per year (4 issues) To include your stallion listing in each issue of Andalusian, contact: Lisbeth Hencke – 757.410.5836 • lisbeth@lionhrtpub.com Name: Ali-Baba Breed: Cruzado Portuguese (Lusitano) Size: 16.1H Color: Bay Sire/Dam: Omega x Papoila Stud Fee: $750 Purebred / $750 Cross

Bio: Ali-Baba (2005) was imported from Portugal in 2010 from Luis Valencia’s Stable. He has won numerous dressage championships at recognized dressage shows including highest scoring 3rd Level horse in 2012. He is currently showing 4th Level and training PSG. Owner: Diana Dusevic Address: British Columbia, Canada • youtube: “Cruzado Lusitano Ali-baba” Contact Info: 604.828.9950 • Diana-dusevic@idexx.com

Name: Alijo Breed: Andalusian Size: 16.0H Color: Double dilute w/single Gray Sire/Dam: Xerox HM x Guindaleza R Stud Fee: $1,500 Purebred / $1,000 Cross Bio: Alijo has started his breeding and riding career, and already has four beautiful foals on the ground. He has a super temperament, willingness to learn and spectacular movement. Alijo is a double dilute so he will produce buckskins, palominos, smokey blacks, also carries a single copy of the gray gene. Owner: Steven and Lori Bohn of Fallon Mustang Ranch Address: 10691 S.R. 27 Pullman, WA 99163 • www.spanishhorsesoffallon.com Contact Info: 509.595.3883 • fancymustang@yahoo.com

Name: Chateaubriant do Passagarda Breed: Lusitano Size: 16.1H Color: Buckskin Sire/Dam: Othelo do Retiro x Maricota das Videiras Stud Fee: $1,500 Purebred / $1,000 Cross Bio: 2012 USEF National Champion Andalusian/Lusitano Halter Horse of Year. 2012 IALHA High Point Purebred Halter Horse. Region 3 and 6 Region Champion Senior, Amateur and Lusitano Stallion. Champion under eight different judges! Imported from Brazil, APSL revised. Owner: Gareth A. Selwood of Selwood Park Andalusians Address: Youngstown, NY 14174 • www.chateaustallion.com Contact Info: 262.325.0283 • selwoodp@idcnet.com

Name: El Espiritu Breed: Andalusian Size: 16.3H Color: Heterozygous Gray (carries chestnut) Sire/Dam: Gaucho III x Legitima V Stud Fee: For Sale – Standing at Stud Bio: Espiritu is a powerhouse FEI dressage horse like his Grand Prix sire Gaucho. He has multiple Championships and has shown PSG and is schooling Intermediaire 1; easy tempis, started piaffe & passage, power extended trot and awesome laterals. Excellent first cycle conception rates w/fresh and frozen semen. Owner: Jennifer Coyle Johnson of JC Andalusians Address: Barboursville, VA • www.JCAndalusians.com Contact Info: 540.832.7631 • Jenni@JCAndalusians.com

Name: SL Fortuno Breed: Andalusian Size: 15.2H Color: Gray Sire/Dam: Impetuoso D x Madrina SOR Stud Fee: $1,100 Purebred / $600 Cross

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Bio: National and Regional Breed Champion w/National Top 5 honors in working equitation and Western Pleasure. OUTSTANDING temperament, type, and trainability. Owner: Susannah Rogers of Colorado Andalusians Address: Aurora, CO • www.ColoradoAndalusian.com Contact Info: 303.210.6901 • Baroquehorses1@aol.com

Name: Melanio EW Breed: Andalusian Size: 16.1H Color: Black (homozygous) Sire/Dam: Genio III x Electra TG Stud Fee: Private Treaty: Purebred / Cross $1,300 Bio: Melanio is a rare black Andalusian stallion. Melanio inherited the best of his sire, notable Genio III (from Spain) and his dam, Electra TG (from Mexico), a Multi-Champion and Res. Champion Halter Mare. Melanio is a Halter Champion and earned a Best-Movement Medal. He is a proven top breeding sire with more than 60 percent fillies. Owner: Craig and Suzanne Furber of Edelweiss Farms Address: Healdsburg, CA 95448 • www.melanioew.com Contact Info: 707.433.7106 or 916.687.6870 • edelweis@sonic.net

Name: Oriundo VG Breed: PRE Andalusian (ANCCE) Size: 15.3+H Color: Smokey Black Sire/Dam: Moret II x Oriunda VI Stud Fee: Private Treaty Bio: “Oreo” carries cream – produces Buckskin. See his cream and cream/pearl babies on our website. Foals have exceptional temperaments. Currently in high school training. Quality, movement and color! Imported from Spain. Contact us for stud fees and special promotions. Owner: Sommer Ranch Address: Murrieta, CA • www.sommerranch.com Contact Info: 951.304.0437 • sommerranch@gmail.com

Name: Pasqual Breed: Andalusian, IALHA #2937(S) Size: 15.3H Color: White Sire/Dam: Ofendido VII x RBF Primarissa Stud Fee: $2,000 Purebred / $1,500 Part Andalusian, $700 Cross Bio: Pasqual is a stunning 16-year-old IALHA registered stallion. Excellent confirmation and temperament! Out of prestigous Ofendido, Jenson, and Ufano bloodlines. Doma Vaquera, initiating Doma Classica. For STUD and FOR SALE. Owner: Israel Gutierrez of Hacienda Laubela Address: Rancho Cucamonga, CA • www.laubela.com Contact Info: 951.662.3988 • israel@laubela.com

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Name: Pescador ESF Breed: Andalusian Size: 15.3H Color: Gray Sire/Dam: Silver Solamente x Jimena de la Parra Stud Fee: $1,000 Purebred / $800 Cross Bio: Magnificent, athletic, level-headed, open & amateur dressage Champion. USDF All-Breeds Champion, 1st & 2nd Level Open. Reserve Champion, 1st Level A/A. Showing 3rd, schooling 4th + Piaffe & Passage. Owner: Pamela and John Pirkle Address: Standing in Riverside, CA • www.RanchoElLucero.com Contact Info: 714.402.7006 • RanchoElLucero@aol.com

Name: Portos Breed: Andalusian Size: 16.1+H Color: Bay Sire/Dam: Boreas BB x Amorosa Stud Fee: $1,500 Purebred / $700 Cross Bio: 2010 IALHA Region 1 Stallion of the year 3-year-old; 2010 IALHA Gold Medal Movement; Portos is an elegant bay stallion with extraordinary movements, temper, and natural ability with breathtaking extensions and flexibility allowing for extraordinary balance and collection. Owner: Israel Gutierrez of Hacienda Laubela Address: Rancho Cucamonga, CA • www.laubela.com Contact Info: 951.662.3988 • israel@laubela.com

Name: Saphiro Breed: Lusitano Size: 15.3H Color: Cremello (eeAACrCrgg) Sire/Dam: Umbaba x Epoca Stud Fee: $2,500 Lus./$2,000 And./$1,250 others Bio: Saphiro is solidly built w/substantial bone and excellent type. He has huge overstep at the walk, strong topline, lofty movement and a rocking canter that’s a dream to ride. His profile is classically baroque and his temperament is exceptional! Saphiro is Agouti dominant color tested w/no gray. Owner: Jennifer Coyle Johnson of JC Andalusians Address: Barboursville, VA • www.JCAndalusians.com Contact Info: 540.832.7631 • Jenni@JCAndalusians.com

Name: Sonhador CD Breed: Lusitano Size: 16.0H Color: Buckskin (EE AA NCr) Sire/Dam: Nostradamus do Mirante x Heraldica Stud Fee: $1,500 Purebred / $1,000 Cross Bio: Striking, rare Buckskin PSL. Sonhador is Heterozygous for the creme gene - EE AA NCr. Classic conformation, winning movement w/elegant neck. 2nd Level dressage w/work in Piaffe and Changes. Exceptionally kind temperament. Proven sire 33+ foals, crosses beautifully. Owner: Dominique C. Pecorelli Address: 911 Oak Lane, Escondido, CA 92029 • www.LusitanoGold.com Contact Info: 619.890.7741 • Dominique@lusitanogold.com

Name: Triunfador XXIV Breed: PRE Size: 16.3H Color: Homozygous Black (EEaa) Sire/Dam: Hebreo XIX x Triunfadora XIV Stud Fee: Private Treaty Bio: Qualified, María Fernanda Escalera brand, Champion of Sevilla, three-time SICAB Top 5, seven gold medals in Spain, offspring with 14 gold medals, only black qualified and only PRE in the U.S. with 3 qualified offspring. “The best black PRE today, magnificent stud” - trofeo caballo. “Phenomenal movement” - el caballo español. Owner: Leonardo and María Mandina of Hacienda del Sol Address: 6730 69 Street, Vero Beach, FL 32967 • www.hds-andalusians.com Contact Info: 772.770.1563 • espana1@gate.net

Name: Verso Do Retiro Breed: Lusitano Size: 16.3H Color: Buckskin Sire/Dam: Othelo Do Retiro x Harpa V Stud Fee: $1,500 Lusitanos / $1,000 Cross Bio: Verso is a tall, flashy athletic stallion. Approved for breeding in Brazil, he was highly rated in his stallion testing, his two babies are firmly stamped by Verso with buckskin coats and his wonderful head and neck. Following successful 2009 and 2010 seasons, Verso will compete again in the 2011 show season PSG. He is easy to handle, a joy to ride with a kind, playful temperament. Address: Santa Rosa Equestrian Center • www.srequestrian.com Contact Info: 707.975.2097 • tracy@srequestrian.com

Name: Zipilli Breed: Azteca Size: 15.3H Color: Gray Sire/Dam: Palmerin Jim (Andalusian) x Maya (Azteca) Stud Fee: $1,500 Purebred / $800 Cross Bio: Zipilli is an imported registered 3/4 PRE Azteca stallion in the Mexican association for Azteca horse breeders (AMCCRA). Bred by the prestigious Domecq Ranch, Zipilli carries Poseido lines and is a foundation stallion for Azteca breeders. Zipilli is an elegant horse with tremendous presence, wonderful temperament and has great movement and extension. Frozen semen available. Owner: Israel Gutierrez of Hacienda Laubela Address: Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91739 • www.laubela.com Contact Info: 951.662.3988 • israel@laubela.com

Include your listing HERE! IMAGE

$135 per year (4 issues)

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Email your information: Name of Horse/Breed/Size/Color/Sire x Dam/Stud Fees A Bio (40-words or less of text), a print optimized image (300dpi) and your preferred address and contact information

contact: Lisbeth Hencke – 757.410.5836 • lisbeth@lionhrtpub.com

Issue 2 | 2013

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ANDALUSIAN

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International

Judge Training Seminar An overview of the International Judge Training Seminar, hosted by Haras Dos Cavaleiros By Marilyn Hite, Manager, Sierra Nevada Lusitanos, and Carlos Carneiro, Trainer, Classical Equines

We recently attended an excellent week-long seminar on working equitation judging techniques at Haras Dos Cavaleiros in Magnolia, Texas. The seminar was given by Dr. Claudia Elsner Matos, who represents the World Association for Working Equitation (WAWE) as judge instructor and also serves as a judge internationally. Dr. Matos tutored us through each of the phases: dressage, ease of handling, speed (a timed phase doing the obstacle course) and the cow trial. All working equitation competitions include dressage, ease of handling, and speed. The cow trial is optional for many competitions, depending on the venue and on whether team competition is offered. Working equitation is a relatively new sport based on historical equestrian traditions. Competitions began in Europe in 1996 as a way to promote the traditions related to working cattle. The competitions highlight these skills and showcase them as a modern equestrian art. Let’s look at each phase from a judge’s perspective: Dressage

WORKING EQUITATION DRESSAGE represents the skills the horse and rider use when working with cattle in the field. Important elements include correct and pure gaits, impulsion and submission, and rhythm and regularity. Impulsion is the eager, yet controlled, energy of the horse. Submission is the willingness of the horse to engage impulsion and collection simultaneously and continuously whenever asked for it. All of these elements are important in transitions between gaits. The correct execution of lead changes and the accuracy of patterns are also considered important. Dramatic extended trots are not included in working equitation dressage because this gait is not used when working with cows. The collective marks represent an overview of the paces, impulsion, submission, and rider. The rider marks take into consideration the position and seat of the rider, the imperceptible use of the aids, and the consistency of the performance. Ease of Handling

THE OBSTACLE COURSE represents a re-creation of obstacles found in the field while working cattle. Judges look for all the same elements as in the dressage test, such as submission, impulsion and collection, rhythm and regularly in all movements, as well as correct execution of lead changes and collected transitions throughout the obstacle course. The judge assesses a great deal of data simultaneously and must accurately reflect the strengths and weaknesses of the performance, obstacle by obstacle, 46

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Issue 2 | 2013

and from obstacle to obstacle. The collective marks are also judged in this phase of competition. Speed

THE SPEED PHASE is quite exciting! Some changes are made to the obstacles. For instance, the gate is normally changed from a panel gate to a rope suspended between two panels. Riders choose the fastest way to make their way through the course because in this phase every second counts! Judging of the speed phase includes ensuring that the competitor has gone through the obstacles in the proper sequence, assessing penalties for refusals (or eliminating competitors if they have more than three refusals at any one obstacle), and confirming that the contestant has completed each obstacle properly. Cow Trial

THE COW TRIAL is a speed test worked as a team of three or four riders. Each rider draws the number of the cow he or she will work. The cows are kept at one end of the arena beyond a line marked across the width of the arena. One team-member at a time works his or her cow by crossing over the line, separating the cow from the herd, and driving it over the line. Once the cow is over the line, that same competitor and his/her team-members, who are not allowed to cross the line into the ‘containment zone’ drive the cow to the far end of the arena as fast as possible into a designated area. Once the cow enters the designated area, the rider has completed his or her individual part of the team competition and the next rider competed. Some riders choose to carry a garrocha (pole) during this phase. Judges watch to be sure that only the designated competitor crosses into the containment zone and that no additional cattle cross the line along with the designated animal that the competitor is working. ◗ AM Editor’s Note: The IALHA and USEF collaborated to provide partial scholarships to two judges to attend this judging seminar as well: Scholarship recipients Judith Warner and Paula Kierkegaard both attended the seminar. Thank you, Haras Dos Cavaleiros and USEF for making this opportunity possible!

www.ialha.org


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Where We

Have Been

I n d e x you have a submission for Where We Have | Submissions: Do Been, highlighting interesting places you have been with your IALHA horse? For consideration in future issues, send photos with brief information to InfoShare@ialha.org. Please put Where We Have Been in the subject line.

Here are photos of just a few of the great IALHA members promoting our breed this year through the IALHA Ambassador Program. More than 12 grants have been awarded, thus far, in 2013 to help provide materials and booth space at events across the regions. It is not too late to apply for a grant for this year or next. You’ll find an application, plus more photos and stories, on the Ambassador page on IALHA.org. ◗ AM

t o

Adver tisers 36-37

Adalid International, Inc.

42

Caballos del Corazón

19

C-MOR Cart Sales

42

Fhoenix Soft Tree Saddles

2-3, 42

G Andalusians

42

Glen Aryn Farm

42

Gloriosa Farms

29

Hacienda Laubela

9 C1, 5,

Half Moon Dressage Haras Dos Cavaleiros

24-25

Ambassador Crystal Harper at Horse3 in Manitoba, CN, April 12-13

Photo from Ambassador Dana Nordin, from the Saskatchewan Equine Expo, Feb. 15-17

21

JC Andalusians

42

La Tienda Española

42

Lyric Dressage

1, 7, 13,

MC Horse Training

31, 43, C3

The IALHA Ambassador Booth at the Horse Expo 2013, Sacramento, CA

33

Moonbrook Farm Andalusians

42

Musa Lusitana

41

Rancho Godinez

C4

Rivera’s Andalusian Farm

C2

Rothrock Andalusians

11

Santa Rosa Equestrian Center

43

The Iberian Connection

43

There Be Dragons Farm

43

Twin Creeks Ranch

9

Viva Iberica

Become part of the IALHA! To learn about the different types of membership and the many perks of being a member, visit:

www.IALHA.org or contact Debbie at Member Services:

Ambassador, Michel Paulin, and group from Keberica, at Salon du Cheval, in Quebec, CN, May 10-12. From left, Michel Paulin, Nathalie Nadege (Michel’s wife), Krystel and Gino (owners of Galento), and Galento. 48

ANDALUSIAN

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Issue 2 | 2013

phone: 860.586.7503, Ext. 554 email: MemberServices@ialha.org www.ialha.org


Andalusian magazine 2013 02  

www.ialha.org

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