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DELEGATIONS Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL)

ELSA • The European Law Students’ Association


Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

These Guidelines are based on the previous editions of ELSA International Delegation’s Handbook. The present edition of the Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL is a result of a joint collaborative work of: Horiana Secară, Academic Coordinator of Delegations to UNCITRAL 2012/13; Milan Fric, Academic Coordinator of Delegations to UNCITRAL 2012/13. The authors express their sincere gratitude to:   

Federica Toscano, Vice President Seminars and Conferences of ELSA International 2012/2013; Ovidiu Răzvan Nistor, the Director for Delegations during 2012/2013; the former ELSA delegates for providing their invaluable and much appreciated output: Corinna Mückenheim, Dena Dervanović, FrantišekVinopal, Helene Frich Hanøy, Julia Constanze Elser, Khareem Sawwaf, Laura Lassila, Laura Matukaityte, Maria Colom Gago, Nadja Maria Brachwitz, Negar Hajrasouliha, Tommy Olayemi, Valerie Wagner.

The format of this Guide was done by Ioan Suciu, VP MKT ELSA Romania 2013/2014. Useful contacts: Vice President of Seminars and Conferences at ELSA International: vpsc@elsa.org Director for Delegations: delegations@elsa.org Academic Coordinators of Delegations to UNCITRAL: duncitral@elsa.org ELSA International 239, Boulevard Général Jacques B-1050 Brussels Belgium E-mail: enquiries@elsa.org Tel: +32 2 646 26 26 Fax: +32 2 646 29

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

Table of Contents

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... I. About the European Law Students´ Association ......................................................................... II. ELSA and International Organisations ...................................................................................... III. United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) ................................ IV. General Rules of Procedures for Observers in UNCITRAL .................................................... V. Task Description of ELSA Delegates ........................................................................................ VI. General Rules of Conduct ......................................................................................................... Attendance .......................................................................................................................... Business Cards..................................................................................................................... Dress Code .......................................................................................................................... Making a Statement............................................................................................................. The Report .......................................................................................................................... Letter of Confirmation ....................................................................................................... Certificate of Participation................................................................................................... VII. Vienna ...................................................................................................................................... ELSA Vienna ...................................................................................................................... General Information ............................................................................................................ Official Websites................................................................................................................. Accommodation .................................................................................................................. Airport and Flights............................................................................................................... Public Transportation.......................................................................................................... Meals .................................................................................................................................. Currency Exchange.............................................................................................................. Opening Times for Shopping.............................................................................................. Emergency Phone Numbers ............................................................................................... VIII. New York ............................................................................................................................... General Information ............................................................................................................ Official Websites………………………............................................................................. Accommodation…………………………………………………………………………... Opening Hours for Shopping .............................................................................................. Currency Exchange.............................................................................................................. Emergency Phone Numbers................................................................................................ IX. Fundraising .............................................................................................................................. X. Experiences and Tips of Former Delegates…............................................................................ XI. ELSA Groups & ELSA Delegations ........................................................................................

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

Introduction The aim of this guideline is to give you all the information you need in order to help you prepare for the UNCITRAL Meeting you were appointed to and to represent ELSA properly. Any relevant feedback or questions are encouraged in order to improve this Guide for future delegates. Therefore, please feel free to contact us.

I. About the European Law Students´ Association

ELSA (The European Law Students' Association) is an international, independent, non-political, nonprofit-making organisation run by and for students. It is comprised of students and recent graduates who are interested in academic and personal excellence in addition to their studies at their universities. ELSA offers law students a perfect platform to develop their existing skills, acquire new skills and meet fellow students and legal professionals throughout Europe. Five law students from Austria, Hungary, Poland and West Germany founded ELSA in 1981. Today ELSA is the world's largest independent law students association and it is represented at nearly 300 law faculties in 41 countries across Europe with membership in excess of 35.000 students and young lawyers. Vision “A just world in which there is respect for human dignity and cultural diversity” Purpose The purpose is to contribute to legal education, to foster mutual understanding and to promote social responsibility of law students and young lawyers by: a) providing opportunities for law students and young lawyers to learn about other cultures and legal systems in a spirit of critical dialogue and scientific co-operation. b) assisting law students and young lawyers to be internationally minded and professionally skilled. c) encouraging law students and young lawyers to act for the good of society. To read more about ELSA, please visit our website: www.elsa.org

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

II. ELSA and International Organisations

The European Law Students’ Association has gained a notable name and reputation in the international community. ELSA is well-known in the world of international organisations and ELSA still makes international institutions aware of the fact that in case they are looking for a partner among students’ organisations for cooperation, there is ELSA to rely on. ELSA aspires to be the student partner of the legal profession in Europe (and beyond its borders), as well as of international organisations. ELSA has a special status and cooperation with:  UNESCO (UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation);  ECOSOC (UN Economic and Social Council);  UNCITRAL (UN Commission on International Trade Law);  Council of Europe;  World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO);  Coalition for the International Criminal Court (CICC). ELSA Delegation ELSA Delegations are regulated in the Decision Book under Institutional Relations and in the Guidelines for the selection of ELSA Delegations. The delegations are appointed by the International Board of ELSA International according to the candidates’ qualifications, contribution to the ELSA network and motivation. The applicant:  shall be a member of ELSA or its alumni organisation;  should have a solid ELSA background and an active participation in ELSA’s activities;  should have an academic competence in the field of law connected to the work of the institution and the topic of the event; It is up to the discretion of ELSA International to appoint the members of the Delegation, using the principles of objectivity, neutrality and equality. Our Special Status ELSA has gained consultative status with several United Nations’ bodies. In 1994 ELSA was granted Consultative Status in Category C in UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), in 1997 ELSA obtained Special Consultative Status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council (UN ECOSOC) and Consultative Status with the UN Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL),. Furthermore, in 2000 ELSA was granted consultative status (recently renamed to Participatory Status) with the Council of Europe.

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

In October 2005, ELSA finally obtained Observer Status with the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO).

III. United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL)

The United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) was established by the General Assembly in 1966 (Resolution 2205(XXI) of 17 December 1966). In establishing the Commission, the General Assembly recognized that disparities in national laws governing international trade created obstacles to the flow of trade, and it regarded the Commission as the vehicle by which the United Nations could play a more active role in reducing or removing these obstacles. UNCITRAL is the core legal body of the United Nations system in the field of international trade law. A legal body with universal membership specializing in commercial law reform worldwide for over 40 years. UNCITRAL's business is the modernization and harmonization of rules on international business.1 Trade means faster growth, higher living standards, and new opportunities through commerce. In order to increase these opportunities worldwide, UNCITRAL is formulating modern, fair, and harmonized rules on commercial transactions. These include:  Conventions, model laws and rules which are acceptable worldwide  Legal and legislative guides and recommendations of great practical value  Updated information on case law and enactments of uniform commercial law  Technical assistance in law reform projects  Regional and national seminars on uniform commercial law ELSA obtained Observer Status with the UNCITRAL in 1997. MEMBERSHIP The Commission comprises 60 member States elected by the United Nations General Assembly for a term of six years (the term of half the members expires every three years). Membership is structured to ensure representation of the world's various geographic regions and its principal economic and legal systems. WORK METHODS Texts designed to simplify trade transactions and reduce associated costs 1

http://www.uncitral.org/pdf/english/uncitral-leaflet-e.pdf;

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

are developed by working groups comprising all member States of UNCITRAL, which meet once or twice per year at United Nations Headquarters in New York and at the Vienna International Centre at Vienna. Non-member States and interested international organizations (as ELSA International) are also invited and can actively contribute to the work since decisions are taken by consensus, not by vote. Observers are permitted to participate in discussions at sessions of the Commission and its working groups to the same extent as members. Draft texts completed by these working groups are submitted to UNCITRAL for finalization and adoption at its annual session. TRADE LAW TEXTS UNCITRAL develops different types of texts to modernize and harmonize the law of international trade. These texts are generally legislative in nature, such as conventions, model laws and legislative guides, or non-legislative texts such as contractual rules that can be incorporated into commercial contracts and legal guides. 1) Convention: an agreement among States establishing obligations binding upon those States that ratify or accede to it. Model law: a set of model legislative provisions that States can adopt by enacting it into national law. 2) Legislative guide: a text that provides guidance for the development of laws, discussing relevant policy issues and choices and recommending appropriate legislative solutions. 3) Contractual rules: standard clauses or rules designed to be included in commercial contracts. 4) Legal guide: a text that provides guidance for the drafting of contracts, discussing relevant issues and recommending solutions appropriate to particular circumstances. TECHNICAL LEGISLATIVE ASSISTANCE One of UNCITRAL's priorities is providing technical legislative assistance for modernization of trade laws and commercial practices. In addition to promoting understanding of international trade law texts and the benefits they can bring to the expansion of international trade, UNCITRAL assists States to develop the laws required to implement these legislative texts and commercial associations to promote the use of non-legislative rules. CLOUT The Case Law on UNCITRAL Texts system is a collection of court decisions and arbitral awards interpreting UNCITRAL texts. Currently, CLOUT includes case abstracts in the six United Nations languages on the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG) (Vienna, 1980) and the UNCITRAL Model Law on International Commercial Arbitration (1985). Other texts will be added as case law becomes available. ACHIEVEMENTS Over the last decades, UNCITRAL has completed major international texts on the sale of goods, transport, dispute resolution, procurement and infrastructure development, international payments, electronic commerce and insolvency. International arbitration, transport law, electronic commerce, insolvency law, security interests and public procurement are the focus of current work. Sale of goods: o United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (Vienna, 1980); o UNCITRAL Legal Guide on International Countertrade Transactions (1992). 7


Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

Transport of goods: United Nations Convention on the Carriage of Goods by Sea (Hamburg, 1978). Dispute resolution:  UNCITRAL Arbitration Rules (1976);  UNCITRAL Conciliation Rules (1980);  Recommendations to assist arbitral tribunals and other interested bodies with regard to arbitrations under the UNCITRAL Arbitration Rules (1982);  UNCITRAL Model Law on International Commercial Arbitration (1985);  UNCITRAL Notes on Organizing Arbitral Proceedings (1996);  UNCITRAL Model Law on International Commercial Conciliation (2002)."

IV. General Rules of Procedures for Observers in UNCITRAL

Observers at UNCITRAL have to respect different Rules of Procedures for Observers when they are participating in the sessions. In the following chapter the most important rules will be clarified by printing the important extractions. The Director General shall invite such States and intergovernmental organizations to be presented as observers as are entitled to observers status under a treaty or agreement. In addition, each body shall decide, in a general way or for any particular session or meeting, which other states and organizations shall be invited to be represented as observers. Observers shall be accredited by the competent authority of their State or the competent representative of their organization, in a letter, note or telegram addressed to the Director General; if they represent a State, such communication shall preferably be effected by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Conduct of Business Observers may take part in debates at the invitation of the Chairman but they shall not have the right to vote.

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

V. Task Description of ELSA Delegates

It is not only a great honour that ELSA has a consultative status at UNCITRAL, but also a great opportunity for each participant of a delegation. To cope with this responsibility that each delegation member has, some rules should urgently be considered while participating as a delegate in a session: 1) Submitting Represent ELSA International in a professional manner; 2) Be academically well-prepared; 3) Observe the proceedings of the event, attend all meetings and prepare working materials if requested; 4) Carry out legal research in the framework of the events on the legal topics; 5) Distribute revised editions of relevant ELSA materials to other delegations and organisations; 6) Inform ELSA International in advance of any official positions or statements the Delegation wishes to make, attaching a summary of the scientific background (the positions or statements can be announced only after the approval of ELSA International); 7) Attend briefings and meetings organised by the Head of Delegation and report all activities carried out; 8) Forward all the contacts made during the event to ELSA International to ensure that the Network can benefit from them; 9) Give feedback to ELSA by: - a report and an evaluation questionnaire to ELSA International within a month after the end of the event; - Being available to give a presentation to requesting Local Groups in the applicant's country. ELSA International will also appoint one Head of Delegation (HoD) out of the delegation. The HoD is responsible for the delegation and due to this special responsibility different aspects should be considered: 1) Ensure that the work of the Delegation is conducted in accordance with the aim and purpose of ELSA and with the Institutional Relations regulations of the Council Meeting Decision Book; 2) Co-ordinate and prepare the delegation academically; 3) Ensure high quality work and appearance during the event; 4) Ensure that a report is submitted on time to ELSA International.

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

VI. General Rules of Conduct

Attendance It is extremely important that every delegate attends all the sessions, in order to show a professional and serious image towards the institutions and organisations. Skipping sessions does not leave a good impression among the other delegates and it is harmful for ELSA’s reputation. It is the Head of Delegation’s responsibility to check the attendance. At the end of the first day or on the second day of the session, a list of participants should be made available to the delegates at the registry. The Head of Delegations should make sure that names of all delegates are spelt correctly. If some of the delegates were not able to actually take part in the delegation, the Head of Delegation should ask personnel at the registry to delete the respective name from the list. Business Cards Especially the Head of Delegation should have business cards when attending the meeting, since it is most likely that you will receive business cards from the other participants. You should print the business cards yourself, but you can find a template through the following link: www.elsaportugal.org/marketing/en/ Dress Code2 The clothes that delegates use during the sessions should be formal. The primary objective of the dress code is to show a professional image outwardly by wearing a unified outfit. This will also create a team atmosphere among the delegates. Suits A suit always looks professional and is the best option. Be sure to keep suits clean and wrinkle-free. Shirts & Tops Males should wear a collared button-down shirt. Females may wear a blouse, sweater or button-down shirt. Dresses are also appropriate as long as they are adequate in length (see the rules set for skirt length). No T-Shirts. Pants & Bottoms Slacks and suit pants are acceptable, preferably in dark colours. Females may wear skirts but should also wear pantyhose or stockings. Skirts should not be more than two inches above the knee. No jeans or shorts. Shoes Females may wear high-heels but they may prove uncomfortable after some time. Open-toe shoes are not recommended. Males should wear dress shoes. No sneakers or flip-flops.

2These

recommendations are from the United Nations Association of the United States of America (UNA-USA). For further information, please visit: www.unausa.org

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

Hair The hair should be kept professional at all times; hair style should not detract from the overall appearance. Jewellery & Piercings Piercings on face that is not for cultural purposes or on the ears, it is best to remove the rings or studs during the conference for a professional presentation. Making a Statement ELSA is an independent and entirely non-political association. Through the sending of delegations to various institutions ELSA provides a forum for its members to take part in the work of international institutions, thus providing an opportunity to broaden the participants' legal and cultural understanding. The contribution in working groups and assembly sessions should from an official ELSA point of view be strictly academic, through for example input on various legal aspects of a topic or similar. Any statement submitted will be seen as the official standpoint of ELSA’s 42 National groups. Therefore, a statement is only allowed to contain objective and neutral legal input or legal opinions on a certain matter discussed at the session in order not to compromise ELSA’s non-political status. This cannot be stressed enough. ELSA should not take part in making policy guiding decisions. The Report The report should be written and submitted as a Word or Pdf document to the Academic Coordinator(s) for Delegations to UNCITRAL at duncitral(at)elsa.org and to the Director for Delegations at delegations(at)elsa.org. All the reports will be published on ELSA Online (www.elsa.org) and will be available for all ELSA members3. Therefore, it is of high importance, especially for future delegates, to submit the report to ELSA International on time, no later than a month after the session. Academic Coordinators of ELSA delegations provide delegates with the Guidelines on Writing Reports. Letter Of Confirmation After their appointment, Delegates may request a Confirmation Letter from ELSA International confirming their appointment as ELSA Delegate for fundraising purpose. Names of all delegates and their national ELSA groups will be mentioned in the Letter. Certificate Of Participation After the report is submitted to the Academic Coordinator(s), checked and accepted by ELSA International, the Delegates may request a Certificate of Participation from ELSA International. The Certificate of Participation confirms that the Delegate fulfilled his/her duties related to the participation in the delegation and wrote report. The Certificate is individual and contains only the name of the requesting Delegate. 3http://elsa.org/page/uncitral/

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

VII. Vienna

ELSA Vienna Taubstummengasse 7-9; A - 1040 Wien, Austria; Telephone: +43 (1) 310 88 80-43; E-Mail: vorstand@wien.elsa-austria.org; Webpage: http://vienna.elsa-austria.org/.

General Information4 Vienna is the capital and the largest city of Austria, and one of the nine states of Austria. Vienna is Austria's primary city, with a population of about 1.731 million (2.4 million within the metropolitan area, more than 25% of Austria's population), and is by far the largest city in Austria, as well as its cultural, economic, and political centre. It is the 9th-largest city by population in the European Union. Until the beginning of the 20th century it was the largest German-speaking city in the world, and before the splitting of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in World War I the city had 2 million inhabitants. Vienna is host to many major international organizations, including the United Nations and OPEC. The city lies in the east of Austria and is close to the borders of the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary. These regions work together in a European Centrope border region. Along with nearby Bratislava, Vienna forms a metropolitan region with 3 million inhabitants.

Official Websites: Wien.gv.at; Wien.info; aboutvienna.org. 4Information

from Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vienna) 12


Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

Accommodation: www.hostelbookers.com www.hostels.com www.hostelworld.com www.hostelscentral.com It is worth a try to contact ELSA Vienna and ask them for a help with accommodation. Some of the past delegates found assistance from ELSA Vienna members very useful. Airport and Flights Vienna International Airport (Flughafen Wien-Schwechat; code VIE)5 is located just outside the city limits of Vienna on the far side of the City of Schwechat. Most European airlines and a significant number of intercontinental airlines have direct connections to Vienna. From the airport you can take S-Bahn suburban train, which run on the S7 line to Vienna and provide cheapest (€4.00 each way) and most convenient connection to the city centre. Direct buses drive frequently between Vienna International Airport and assorted points in Vienna. Operated by Postbus. Tickets can be purchased with cash from the operator. All routes: One way €8, Round-trip €13. Overadvertised City Airport Train (CAT) runs non-stop to Wien-Mitte Station (Landstraße) in 16 minutes (One way €12, return trip €19). If your delegation arrives together, you could consider also hiring a taxi. Cab fare is not set, so agree before getting in; to anywhere for €25-€30. Alternatively, the cheaper option may be to fly to Bratislava Airport (BTS)6 which is located ca. 54 km from Vienna International Airport across the Slovak border. The budget airline Ryanair has the most flights from/to there. There are a lot of regular bus services to Vienna and it takes between one and two hours to get there- Blaguss (€10 each way), Postbus/Slovak Lines (€7.70, €14.30 return). You can also take the public transport (bus no. 61) to Bratislava city centre and from there a train to Vienna (takes about 1 hour, €11). Please note there may be a limited connection to Vienna for very early/late flights. As abovementioned may change quite quickly, always be sure you have updated information! Public Transportation7 Vienna has a well-developed public transport network. Buses, trains, trams and underground lines will take you almost anywhere in the city. Vienna public transport Wiener Linien operates five underground lines, 28 tram and 85 bus lines, of which 24 are night lines. Night lines only operate between 0.30 am and 5 am. On weekends and public holidays the Vienna underground remains at the service of its passengers all night. A single ticket is valid for travelling one way in one zone. You may change to different lines in the course, but you may not interrupt your journey. Single tickets can be purchased at a price of EUR 2. Validated tickets can be used for all public transport in the core zone. Tickets are available at ticket machines at most underground stations or at points of advance sale. Tobacconists also sell tickets. You may also purchase a ticket on board the bus or tram at an increased rate of EUR 2.20 per ticket. http://www.viennaairport.com; http://www.airportbratislava.sk; 7 http://www.wien.gv.at/english/transportation-urbanplanning/public-transport/; 5 6

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

Apart from single tickets there are passes for longer periods of time. For the purpose of delegations, passes are available for 24 hours (€6.70), 48 hours (€11.70) and 72 hours (€14.50), or as weekly (€15), monthly or annual passes. The Vienna International Centre can be reached with the U-Bahn by taking the line U1 (marked in red on city maps) towards Leopoldau and getting off at the station Kaisermühlen-Vienna International Centre. Meals In general, Vienna is quite an expensive city. When you are visiting UNCITRAL, the best places to have ordinary lunch for a reasonable price is the canteen at the VIC building, which is relatively cheap in comparison with restaurants in Vienna. Additionally, you can also enjoy more informal chat with the distinguished delegates during a common lunch. Please note it is possible to pay only with cash in the canteens. There are also vending machines with snacks and drinks inside of the VIC. Opening times for shopping Shops are usually open Mon - Fri from 9.00 am - 6.30 pm, Sat until 5.00 pm or 6.00 pm; some shopping centers are open until 8.00 pm or 9.00 from Mon-Fri. Shopping is available on Sundays and holidays at the large railway stations, at the airport and in the museum shops. Currency Exchange The euro is the currency of Austria. You can also pay for your purchases without problem by card. The most popular credits are usually accepted in Vienna, although sometimes their use is subject to a minimum purchase amount. If you need to exchange money, you are best doing this at a bank. Foreign exchange booths sometimes charge high fees, so please check before you change your money. Most banks in Vienna are open from Monday to Friday from 8.00 am to 12.30 pm and from 1.30 pm to 3.00 pm, and until 5.30 pm on Thursdays. In the city centre (1st district), almost all banks are open over lunchtime. Emergency Phone Numbers    

Europe Wide Emergency Number – 112; Fire – 122; Police – 133; Ambulance – 144.

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

VIII. New York

General Information8 New York City, with a population of over 8.1 million, is the most populous city in the United States. Alone, it makes up over 40 percent of the population of New York state. It is known for its status as a center for finance and culture and for its status as the largest gateway for immigration to the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, New York City is also a destination of choice for many foreign visitors. Both the state and city were named for the 17th century Duke of York, James Stuart, future James II and VII of England and Scotland.

The headquarters of the United Nations is a complex in New York City. The complex has served as the official headquarters of the United Nations since its completion in 1952. It is located in the Turtle Bay neighbourhood of the borough of Manhattan, on spacious grounds overlooking the East River. Its borders are First Avenue on the west, East 42nd Street to the south, East 48th Street on the north and the East River to the east. Official Websites: www.nyc.gov/portal/site/nycgov www.ny.gov www.nycvisit.com In the UN canteen you can choose from a huge variety of food for a good price. There are no taxes to pay in the UN premises around the world, thus there is no added tax for food as well. The breakfast is amazing and the view over the river is not too bad either. We recommend Mee Chinese Restaurant, East 48th Street/2nd Avenue with excellent food from 5$. For an American style meal go to Comfort Diner, East 45th Street/ 2nd or 3rd Avenue (Huge Burgers and delicious Carrot Cake) However, as with any American city there are tons of cheap eats around, particularly around Central Station. 8

For details see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_york

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

Accommodation Most of the delegates used the website https://de.airbnb.com/, in order to find a convenient accommodation offer. However, there were some delegates that could stay for free at the Permanent Mission of the Country of their Citizenship, to the United Nations, New York9. Opening hours for shopping Shops are generally open Monday - Saturday from 10.00 to 18.00. Department stores are usually open every day from 10.00 to 21.00/22.00. One of the nicknames for New York is “the city that never sleeps”, therefore you will be able to find a lot of nonstop places where you can do some smaller shopping. Currency Exchange ATMs are widespread and credit cards and travellers cheques are widely accepted. In fact, you will find it difficult to perform certain transactions without a card. Prepare your Visa, MasterCard or American Express before you leave your home country. Places that accept Visa and MasterCard also accept debit cards, which deduct payments directly from your account. Be sure to check with your bank to confirm that your debit card will be accepted in other states or countries – debit cards from large commercial banks can often be used worldwide. For example, Currency Exchange International (CXI) at Grand Central on 122 East 42nd St. and Lexington Ave, Inside Apple Bank, have very good rates. Please note that restaurants and some shops do not include the sales tax in their prices, which is 8.875%, so beware of ordering the $4.99 lunch especially when you only have $5 in your pocket. Emergency Phone Numbers  General Emergencies: 911;  General Information: 311;  Police Headquarters: 212-374-5000;  Crime Victims Line: 800-771-7755;  Poison Control Center: 212-764-7667;  Dental Emergencies: 212-573-9502;  Doctors on Call: 212-737-2333.

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The Romanian delegates always stayed for free at the Permanent Mission of Romania to the United Nations.

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

IX. Fundraising Since a participation in a delegation can be pricey, the delegates may consider to get fundraised. Where? 1) Foundations (consult your local ELSA officers); 2) Government – Public administration; 3) NGOs; 4) Law firms; 5) Universities; 6) IGOs (CoE, EuCom); 7) ELSA Network (your own group and the LG of the location for accommodation). What to offer? a) As a certificate being accepted to the delegation, you will receive a Letter of Confirmation; b) upon request from ELSA International; c) Cooperation with LG – long term/wider scope; d) Direct/exclusive information; e) Distribute university materials; f) Appearance in the Report; g) Personal report – summary; h) Promotion; i) Contacts – speakers; j) Materials. Important: Remember to consult your local ELSA group before approaching law firms – remember the fundraising regulations of ELSA! If you manage to get a sponsor, remember to thank them afterwards and send a professional report with pictures.

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

X. Experiences and Tips of Former Delegates

General Preparation Remember, in any conference you will attend as an ELSA delegate there is lots of other delegates from other NGOs. Ensure you know ELSA´s stand on the issue, whether it has any particular focus on this issue, and whether it has sent previous delegations to the institution. It would be very embarrassing if delegates have prior knowledge about ELSA and it contradicts what you say. One such point would be the IFP (International Focus Programme), and the EMC² (ELSA Moot Court Competition: www.elsamootcourt.org). Do not underestimate, many people have been judges before, so at least understand where the previous EMC²s were held, and what the problem question was about. Understand the whole context of your session, what came before, and what are the targets for the future sessions. Go to the UNCITRAL’s webpage, and search for the session to which you are going (they are presented on the right side of the page). It is strongly recommended to take a camera with you in order to take photos with other delegates, officials or near signboards of important institutions in order to use them later in your Report and to share your experiences via Facebook group for ELSA delegations: https://www.facebook.com/elsa.delegations (please, visit and join us). Registration on the First Day Registration might be taking some time depending on the number of delegates. Plan at least 30 minutes to register. Fill in the registration form carefully. In the field in which you are asked to write your official position, write ‘delegate’ or ‘head of delegation’. Registration last until the lunch time. If you are late and there is no one at the registry be confident and explain the purpose of your visit to security. Usually, they treat with understanding and you will be allowed to enter the UNCITRAL premises. Remember to bring a valid ID card or a passport! Plenaries Usually plenaries start around 10 a.m. and end by 6 p.m. Make sure you are on time. Nevertheless, the last working day can be much longer. Leave yourself time. It might be your first plenary. Especially in plenaries with a lot of delegates, people might have incredible accents. It could take you some hours to get used to it, so try to stay tuned and understand. Be careful with the earplugs, they might be quite uncomfortable, in case they do not fit your ear perfectly. You can also bring your own headset. There should be no problem to leave plenary for relieving yourself, however do it discreetly. Ensure your cell phone is silent, and never play

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

with it in plenary. It is inevitable that sometimes topics might bore you because normally discussions proceed to a level which is far deeper than you would expect. Most people working for the committees are specialized in that particular field of law for decades. If you choose to relieve your boredom, such as browsing through the internet and doodling, ensure that others cannot see what you are doing, and appear like you are taking careful notes. Make sure you have all the relevant materials: all the session materials published on the UNCITRAL website are available for free on the reception desk near the entrance to the Session hall. Do not take a sit of another delegation even if it is empty. On the second day of the session ask for the list of participants at the reception. Make sure that the title of our organization and names of its delegates are spelt correctly. Later, this list will be included to the draft report of the session prepared by the Secretariat and published on the official web-page of UNCITRAL. How to Approach Other Delegates Never in a group, meaning never more than 2 people. They will feel intimidated, especially from countries as they are sceptical of all NGOs. When approaching delegates, smile and make visual contact. Just introduce yourself as part of ELSA International. Do not be afraid, ELSA has a good reputation and the overwhelming majority of people who already know ELSA responds very positively. If they do not know ELSA, you could tell them that:  ELSA stands for the European Law Students´ Association which is the biggest law students association in the world, having 35000 members all over Europe, from 42 countries.  ELSA is non aligned to any political parties. If they press on, react on the spot! You should know enough to answer their questions. Hint: read the philosophy statement of ELSA before the first day. Head of the Delegation The head of delegation is meant to represent the whole delegation in front of others. He has to be the best prepared delegate, not merely in terms of the conference matters, but in matters of history of institution you are sent to, brief history of NGOs, and who ELSA might be interested in contacting. In addition to that, solid knowledge of the current ELSA work on both international and national level is essential. Do: 1. Trust your fellow delegates. They are carefully chosen by the International Board concerning both academic and ELSA background. 2. Be the social link between delegates. They do not know each other in most of the cases and are alone in a foreign city. 3. Keep looking for the greater good. Even if there might be conflicts between single delegates ensure that this image is not projected to externals. 4. Be innovative. You might face situations you did not expect at all, so do not lose your smile and try to solve it as fast and as efficient as possible.

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

5. Confirm the delegations’ participation in the particular sessions with conference officers. 6. Think of sites to go after plenary or workshops. The delegation itself is also a great opportunity to socialize for all of the delegates. Do Not:  Don‘t be cocky about your position.  Don‘t be cocky about your position.  Don‘t be cocky about your position ... remember that.  Don‘t publish your status unless it is absolutely necessary i.e. for logistics or registry.  Don‘t circle and intervene into existing conversations unless introduced by your fellow delegate. Delegates Be motivated. Usually a lot of people apply for delegations and you have been selected to represent ELSA. So beware of your duty and responsibility. Try to get along with everyone. In the inevitable situation conflicts arise, do not make this explicit in front of externals. Always appear cohesive no matter what. Give brief summaries whenever possible on which delegates you have made contact with in order to avoid double introductions, as it would make ELSA appear extremely fractured. Do not interrupt or circle conversations which your other delegates are currently involved in. Rather enjoy your spare time. Make yourself look useful even when you are not. Carry a cell phone with you and have enough credit. Read all emails before - hand and do not leave out anything which ELSA International sends. If possible, take a laptop with you. General Behaviour Handshakes should be firm. Make visual contact and smile. Mind your body language (posture etc.) especially when something displeases you, do not make it obvious through your body language. Do not impose and keep a certain physical distance to people, at least 80cm. Appear interested in whatever other delegates are saying. When introducing yourself to a group of strangers, always shake the women’s hands first, unless the male is obviously higher in seniority. Do not yawn at all. Choose your topics carefully, avoid political issues. You never know what expert is standing in front of you. If you do not know, just nod and smile. Receiving Business Cards Take a look at it for about 10 seconds. Seem interested. Put it either in your business cards envelope or in your inner pocket of your jacket. Never put it in your trousers pocket and never ever in your back pocket of your trousers. If Asians especially Chinese or Japanese give you business cards, receive the business card with both hands and bow a little. Same further steps apply. Being Academically Well-Prepared Make sure to prepare in advance. Visit the Organisation’s homepage and find out what will be discussed at the session you are going to attend. Get an idea of the structure and work of the Organisation. Go to the recommended websites to get an overview of the general topic. The work needs to be divided between the delegates before coming to the session. In order to be sure that a session will be entirely covered by notes of delegates it is recommended to take notes by turns (for example one delegate covering the morning session, another the afternoon). Such system increases the responsibility of delegates for their part of work and, eventually, the quality of the covered material. 20


Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

Long presentations made by the authors of studies (papers) should preferably be covered by different delegates. It is recommended to have business cards with you. It is good to have them when you want to approach a delegate from a State or another NGO. The approach has to be friendly. Hold regular meetings with you colleagues to plan what you are going to attend, give them a report of what was discussed and exchange impressions. For the schedules of the session and side and parallel events refer to the handouts. Sometimes additional events or schedule changes will be posted on the notice boards. Attend the NGO briefings on the morning to update the schedule and have the possibility to ask questions concerning time table matters as well as questions on substance. Attend the linkage caucus in the evenings after the official plenaries in order to connect with other NGOs and have the possibility to ask questions in an informal environment. Insights from our delegates from the 47th session of UNCITRAL Working Group IV (Electronic Commerce), Helene Frich Hanøy, Khareem Sawwaf and Negar Hajrasouliha: “ELSA International is well known within the United Nations, regardless of where the conference is held, be it in New York, Vienna, Brussels, etc. Delegations from ELSA should be well aware of this fact and take pride in it. They are welcomed guests who contribute positively to the United Nations working groups. With that being said, though it may be difficult, do not shy away from other delegations, diplomats, or ambassadors. They are well familiarized with our group and expect us to speak with them. It is a mistake to sit back and fade away into the background due to an individual's or group's timidity. It was quickly noted in our session that the first couple of days unfortunately were less productive because we were unaware of how to approach various delegations from other countries. It also occurred to us that most may not speak English. However, it is known in the United Nations that English and French are the working languages of the Secretariat, thus is it highly likely that all members and delegations speak it. Other countries and other delegations may prefer to listen translations of the conference texts and reports but this does not negate the fact that they all do indeed speak English. As each ELSA delegation consists of four people, we found it most efficient to split up in two when speaking to other delegations and creating contacts. This allows more room for a personal conversation without bombarding any of the delegations. Furthermore, it is always useful to introduce yourself under the title of ELSA International and speak about the activities and functions of ELSA as a whole. After which, you can bring up your own opinions or comments about the conference you are attending and the overall work the United Nations. Should you have any spare time, try to research the delegations that are speaking in order to know more about them so that you may bring a valuable

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

conversation to the conversational table. This opens up many doors and possibilities that you would never have imagined. It is crucial to remember that at the United Nations everyone is just doing his or her job and everyone is friendly. Do not make the mistake and think you are not suited to speak to an ambassador or diplomat. They are all extremely friendly and enjoy speaking with other people, even if you are not part of their conference. It is always a good idea to have numerous ELSA Delegations contact cards with you because you may never know who will ask for it or when you will need it. Should the United Nations be your future career goal, this is the perfect opportunity to see how work there is conducted and figure out which parts of the work of the UN you may be interested in pursuing. The contacts you make at the United Nations will not be like any other and therefore it is a must that you provide them with enough information so that they may contact you should they be pleased with your performance or even if you have a few questions about the way in which the United Nations operates. Each ELSA delegate should be rendered a specific job or focus during the conference. This allows the maximum use of ones ability suited to their strengths. Depending on the languages you speak, use them to your advantage to speak with other countries who speak similar languages. Create those bridges from the beginning of the week in order to establish a rapport. It is a mistake to wait until the end to build up the courage to do so. You might miss out on a lot you are unaware of. As the sessions are held throughout the day, try splitting up the work on the report early so every delegate can focus on a certain task. This makes each individual responsibility easier and more organized. It further establishes an effective delegation because everyone understands their positions and remains focused on those specific tasks. Make sure to create your own business cards under the ELSA International heading, if you don’t already have one. When speaking with various delegations it is always nice to provide them with contact information and they are always receptive and provide you with similar information. ELSA International is a large network of students across the world. It is in your best interest to understand the scope of ELSA and it's affiliations and activities. By doing this you are able to discuss what ELSA does and provide other delegations that are not familiar with us, with ample amounts of information.”10 Our former delegates from the 23rd session of the Working Group VI of UNCITRAL (Security Interest), from New York, František Vinopal, Laura Matukaityte, Tommy Olayemi, Valerie Wagner: “You should book your flight tickets as soon as you have been appointed as delegate. If you do so, you will take an advantage of the preferable prices. Ticket prices rise rapidly, so do not hesitate! The New York City is very expensive place to live. 10

The Report of the Delegation at the 47th session of UNCITRAL Working Group IV (Electronic Commerce), page 15, source: http://files.elsa.org/Delegations/UNCITRAL/UNCITRAL_WG_IV_47.pdf;

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

Thus, it is strictly recommended to arrange your accommodation in considerable advance. If you start looking for your apartment late, then it is almost impossible to find reasonable place to stay. The YMCA Vanderbilt (224 East 47th), Wanderer’s Inn (179 East 94th) or Manhattan Inn (632 Manhattan Avenue) seem to be good and recommended place to stay. In case that you are late and all favourable hostels are booked, you can try to find some accommodation through airbnb.com. The best way how to get around the New York City is to take the Subway. It is 24/7 service, so that is available regardless of time or day. The cost of a SingleRide ticket is 2.75 US, 7- Day Unlimited costs 30 US. When you arriving to the UN, first of all, you have to visit the Identification Office to get their identification pass. The Identification Office is situated across the street from the visitors’ entrance (44th Street / 1st Avenue). It opens at 9am, but it is recommended to be there in advance. ELSA delegates have to use the visitors’ entrance, not the gate allocated for representatives of member states. The vast majority of sessions of the Working Groups take a place in conference rooms situated in the first level of the United Nations Complex. There are information boards which will provide you useful information about side-events. There is also free WIFI throughout the whole complex, so you can bring your laptop or tablet. If you are looking for some form of refreshment within the United Nations Complex, you should have a lunch in the UN Cafeteria or have a cup of coffee in the UN Delegates Lounge. During the session, informal meetings are usually held. Especially on time of coffee breaks, lunches or receptions, delegates have got an opportunity to arrangement some meetings and establish initial contacts. Do not forget your business cards and other marketing material!”11 Our former delegates from the 27th session of the Working Group III of UNCITRAL (Online Dispute Resolution), from New York, Dena Dervanović, Corinna Mückenheim, Nadja Maria Brachwitz, Julia Constanze Elser, Laura Lassila: “Before attending the first session, delegates are advised to arrive to the UN Plaza earlier, preferably at 9a.m. when the Registration Office opens. There is always a queue, so come as early as possible. The Registration Office is located across the road from the United Nations. The Head of Delegation shall have a letter from ELSA printed out, and all delegates must have their passports with them. 11

The Report of the Delegation atthe 23rd session of the Working Group VI of UNCITRAL (Security Interest), from New York, pages 7-8, source: http://files.elsa.org/Delegations/UNCITRAL/UNCITRAL_WG_VI_23.pdf;

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

Address: 804, 1st Avenue. After the registration is completed, delegates enter the visitors’ tent in the lane of NGOs for a security scan. This procedure of security checks will continue every day. Delegates can get confused about carrying liquids being forbidden – this rule is only applicable to visitors. Holders of the UN Pass, such as ELSA Delegates, are allowed to bring food/drinks on the premises of the UN. The premises of the UN have Wi-Fi throughout. The UN pass allows delegates to enter MoMA (Museum of Modern Art) for free. Meals at the UN Cafeteria are slightly overpriced and the quality is not equal to the price. Delegates are advised to eat in the neighbourhood since there are many options nearby. Delegates are advised to look for accommodation in the proximity of the UN HQ.”12 For further details on their experience, please read the reports published on ELSA’s website.

XI. ELSA Groups & ELSA Delegations

Promotion Local ELSA groups have different options to promote the delegations announced by ELSA International. First of all they have the general marketing material like flyers, which can handed out to interested students, or posters which can be placed at the faculty. The possibility of participating in one of the UN-delegations could be included in the general presentations (i.e. for freshers). This even is a chance for local groups to reach even more students as future ELSA members. As special promotion campaign the ELSA group could cooperate with the professors of law and give a special presentation about delegations during lectures. Especially suitable would be a cooperation with Professors of international law, because usually the students interested in international law and UN law participate in these lessons.

A guide created by the VP S&C Romania to promote ELSA's Delegations

Moreover, the local group can offer special fundraising support, in case there is a member participating in a delegation. In this area it would be possible to give tips or help actively in fundraising, or use the contacts of the group for the benefit of the delegate (for example, including the participation in a sponsorship offered by a law firm).

Finally, the group usually can use the promotion of delegations as occasion for other UN-law-related 12

The Report of the Delegation at the 27th session of the Working Group III, UNCITRAL (Online Dispute Resolution), from New York, page 4, source: http://files.elsa.org/Delegations/UNCITRAL/UNCITRAL_WG_III_27.pdf;

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Guidelines for ELSA Delegations to UNCITRAL

events, like a seminar, a “Lawyers at work� event or a Legal Research Group. Even an institutional visit to Vienna seems to be possible to inspire the participants for application. Benefits The promotion of delegations means at the same time promotion for the ELSA local group. So the delegations can help the local group to find more interested members. Moreover, the local group can benefit from the contacts, which they have built up to Professors in presenting delegations during the lessons. If a member of the local group was chosen for the delegation and participated successfully, the local group can request for a presentation or a report afterwards. The student can report what he experienced and be open to questions by interested persons. This is automatically a good promotion again for the next delegation announcements. In addition, the groups can ask for advice from the previous delegates in building the academic programme for their events.

All this information should be enough for a successful delegation. For any other questions do not hesitate to contact the academic coordinators who can assist you and give you the additional information needed. This is it.

May you enjoy your status as delegates!

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Elsa delegations uncitral guidlines (final version)