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Hopkins School 986 Forest Road New Haven, CT

Vol LXV, no. 8

www.therazoronline.com

June 7, 2018

Donna Fasano Moves on from The Hill After 42 Years Helena Lyng-Olsen '18 Editor-in-Chief Emeritus When Donna Fasano retires from Hopkins this June, she will end an era that has spanned her forty-two years teaching English at Hopkins. While many students know Fasano from her friendly presence, her care for her students, and her writing assignments that turn mere children into scholars, she has also witnessed and played a part in nearly the entire development of the coeducational Hopkins School, from its first years as a merged school to its present state. She is the last faculty member remaining who was a part of Day Prospect Hill (DPH). Fasano grew up in New Haven, CT, and in 1964 entered DPH, a girls school on Prospect Street that merged with Hopkins Grammar School in 1972, eventually becoming Hopkins School. Entering the ninth grade from her public middle school, where she had been both class president and valedictorian, Fasano was initially surprised, and then greatly influenced by her rigorous high school filled with academic girls and inspirational women teachers at a time when many fewer opportunities were available for women. She thrived at DPH and then went on to Wheaton College, where she majored in English after nearly majoring in math; Betty Benedict, her math teacher at DPH, had been her idol and was her mentor in later years. After graduating from Wheaton College, Fasano spent a year working in Wheaton’s campus library while her husband finished law school. The pair then spent a year living in New London while she had a fellowship in English at Connecticut College. Afterwards, the Fasanos moved to New Haven,

where she worked as a substitute teacher in New Haven and Hamden public schools because, “I wanted to see what the environment in all the schools was like before choosing to settle down in one.” In March, 1976, she decided to check out Hopkins on a whim. Initially, she had not wanted to teach in a private school because she had learned in college to love the open classroom style, with students from multiple grades coexisting in one room. Her visit to Hopkins changed her mind: “When all my old teachers saw me, they tried to persuade me to come back. There were no job openings at the time, but they created a job just for me. I taught English and worked in the library in order to be full time. Eventually, it took about two years for a fulltime position to open in the English Department.” Fasano described her initial experiences: “My first few years as a new, young, female teacher at Hopkins were difficult because it was a male-centric environment. I was essentially the first young woman on the faculty, and many of the older teachers had never worked with women before.” The merged girls and boys schools were still trying to conjoin their separate identities at the time of Fasano’s arrival. Fasano remembered being both humbled and in awe of older teachers in her department: “Veterans teachers like Peter Wells, Charlie Welles, Toni Giamatti, Heidi Dawidoff, and Sue Feinberg were very outspoken in faculty meetings. I hardly said a word. These were amazing, amazing teachers. I had nothing to add or to say, except to venerate them. I was soaking in every word they said.” (Continued on page 2...)

Jemma Williams Fasano shows the results of her annual "cake test," based on The Hours, with her American Literature class.

Hop Legend Eric Mueller Retires Lilly Tipton '18 Managing Editor Emeritus When Eric Mueller first walked onto the Hopkins campus, he had no idea that it would be his home for the next forty years. Since then, Mueller has done it all; from Dean of Students to Head Varsity Girls Lacrosse Coach to chairing the Art Department, the number of lives he touched is immeasurable. In the words of long-time friend and

colleague Peter Ziou, “His [Mueller’s] retirement this spring will create a real void for me and surely for the Hopkins Community.” Mueller grew up in Rye, New York, attended Kenyon College for his Bachelor’s Degree, and went on to Washington University in St. Louis for his Master of Fine Arts, never expected to land at Hopkins. Mueller reflected, “I wrote a whole stack of letters and printed out my resume and sent it off to prep schools

Jemma Williams Mueller presents his work at the Eric Mueller Retrospective in the Keator Art Gallery on February 23. The community attended a reception in his honor.

Hopkins Science Olympiad Takes Nationals Zoe Kim '20 Julia Kosinski '21 Assistant News Editors

and really had the sense I would end up at a boarding school. I interviewed with Louise Reed, the Head of the Art Department and told her that I bake my own bread. That sealed the deal.” During his first year on The Hill, Mueller coached Boys JV Soccer, Girls Lacrosse and taught Fine Arts Ten, which no longer exists, to seventh graders. “The seventh graders almost killed me! I had never done any teaching and I had no real education courses, so I was really making it up as I went along,” commented Mueller. In the next years, Mueller continued to take on more responsibility, adding Girls Varsity Volleyball and Boys Varsity Soccer to the list. He quickly fell in love with life on The Hill and kept coming back for more each year. Over the years, Mueller’s passion for art and his creativity have inspired both his students and his colleagues. Ziou commented, “Eric would tell me that he goes into the woods and looks for broken trees and limbs, as well as metal waste, that he turns into objects of beauty and art. He could take wood from the forest and find a use for it in a way that's lyrical, artistic and beautiful.”

On the weekend of May 18, the Hopkins Science Olympiad Team travelled to Colorado State University to compete against sixty schools from around the country at the National Science Olympiad Tournament. This marks the ninth year the Hopkins team has qualified for Nationals since the program began in 2009. With an impressive record of winning the state competition nine out of ten years, Hopkins “SciOly” members have continuously shown their dedication and ability to engage in the fields of Science and Engineering. The Science Olympiad is a nationwide competition in which students compete in twenty-three events that are rotated to reflect a wide spectrum of scientific fields, including genetics, anatomy, mechanical engineering, geology and others. Priscilla Encarnação, one of the three Science Department coaches, noted that, “By combining events from all disciplines, the Science Olympiad encourages a wide cross-section of students to get involved.” Math teacher Michael Gold ’10, a SciOly coach, was a member of the inaugural Hopkins SciOly in 2009. Returning to Hopkins as both a teacher and SciOly mentor, Gold remarked on how the team has changed: “Now the program is much bigger… this year and every year since coming back as a teacher, it has been a really big program with multiple teams… The size and the scope of the program has changed for the better.” He added that, “the level of competition has also changed; it’s much more competitive now that more and more schools are interested in competing in the program.”

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CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 2018! See SENIORS Page 12


The Razor: News

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Fasano Moves on from The Hill (Continued from page 1) Fasano’s earlier years were also difficult because, as she was the first female faculty member on campus to have a child, there was no maternity leave policy in place. When she had her first son, Michael ’98, in 1980, she recalled, “I was grading papers while I was in labor!” She had three more sons - Matthew ’01 in 1983, Timmy ’06 in 1987, and Christopher in 1992. “Those were difficult years, when I was trying to be the best at both of my jobs, as a teacher and as a mother. It was important to me to be a complete professional; I never wanted my personal life to interfere with my teaching. Every day I would get up at four A.M., grade papers from four to six, then get my kids ready for school or daycare. In the evenings, I went to graduate school, working on my M.A.L.S. at Wesleyan. I became extremely disciplined - laser-focused - because of it.” Meanwhile, Fasano established herself as a strong teacher and member of the English Department, helping to set standards that affect Hopkins English students to this day. She was one of the co-designers of the eleventh-grade Writing Semester course: Fasano also later founded the popular Current American Fiction. She described it as a “class for students to rediscover their love of reading.” Fasano’s said that her favorite part of Hopkins has been teaching the seventh grade. “All these kids are new, and I get to bring them into the Hopkins standards and life. She popularized Oliver Twist’s “Please sir, may I have some more,” and had students memorize a long list of prepositions that they had to recite in record time to receive unlimited access to her drawer of lollipops. These projects were paired

with writing assignments, typi- the best out of them.” cally a short essay every night. “By her abiding gift Students noted that ac- for reading and writing, Donna cess to Fasano’s candy drawer sustained my enthusiasm; by served as both a reward for her abiding concern for her stuenduring her class and an op- dents, she reminded me to care portunity to reconnect with for what matters,” said Chris her on a regular basis. “I am Jacox, a fellow English teacher. thankful for the small conver“When I taught in her sations I have with Ms. Fasano old classroom, I would bump my while I got my access,” wrote head on all the memorabilia danLauren Sklarz ’22. gling from the ceiling. But you Maisie Billison ’22 have to respect the care,” said recalled one tranquil moment Ian Melchinger ’88, Fasano’s from seventh grade: “Ms. Fa- colleague in the English Departsano once gestured out the ment and former student of hers. window, saying, “I always like Kai Bynum, Head of to read The Secret Garden at School, noted: “Her passion for this time of year because the teaching our kids, her appreciachanges in the book reflect the tion for hard work, and her sagechanges outside. Look.” We all ly stewardship of writing have looked outside. We were per- made Hopkins a better place.” fectly quiet then; she’d made Fasano has worked us stop, look around, appre- with thousands of students and ciate the little things in life.” colleagues: “Work life was al“I have never felt so ways soothing to me. I loved the at home in a classroom, so at work, the rhythm of each day peace, so content. We came at school. I have never wanted into her class as students; we to do anything other than be a leave as writers,” said Katrina teacher at Hopkins, not an adTiktinsky ‘18, currently in her ministrator, or a department Current American Fiction class. chair, or a head advisor; the one “I’ll never forget the part of being in school that I warmness and enthusiasm Ms. have loved the most is the teachFasano brought to our classes ing. I have loved teaching. I when I was just a little J-school- have loved writing comments, er coming into a new challeng- because I love to write the stoing environment,” said Javier ries of kids that I taught, to tell Muleiro ‘20. “Not only did them what I’ve seen in the classshe develop me as a writer im- room. I have loved the kids most measurably, but she made me of all; they bring me such joy.” develop so much as Jody Rosenthal a person, and I can’t thank her enough” Several of Fasano’s colleagues praised her presence and ideals inside and outside the classroom: Art Department teacher Peter Ziou said, “What she loves is sharing her knowledge of writing and books and having the students find a creative Fasano and former classmate Dorothy Robinpower. She expects son ’68 at the DPH Reunion last year.

June 7, 2018

Hop Legend Eric Mueller Retires (Continued from page 1)

Mueller’s art student Melody Parker ‘19 agreed: “He’s such a knowledgeable, eccentric teacher. The amount of expertise he has in so many areas of art is astounding, and I admire his passion for all things art.” Moreover Muller’s compassionate spirit and vibrant attitude have impacted all those who have had the pleasure of knowing him. Colleague Jacqueline LaBelle commented, “Watching how he goes about his day has taught me so much about how to treat people, how to juggle my day, and how to laugh at life. He’s a solid, positive presence who has an answer for everything - and not in a know-it-all kind of way - pragmatic, super creative, and caring.” Head of School Kai Bynum agreed, “Eric is, without a doubt, one of the most genuine people I have ever met. He doesn’t take himself too seriously and, by doing Jody Rosenthal so, he helps me relax. Eric is also an example of how a single person can have a profound impact on many facets of school life. He has had pretty much every role on campus, and this experience gives him both the perspective and connection to Peter Ziou joins Eric Mueller at Mueller’s use his voice wisely.” retirement party. Fine Arts Student Naomi Tomlin ‘19 agreed: “Mr. Mueller impacts me in the simplest but best way possible: every morning he lets me create, and he’s there for words of encouragement (or criticism) if I need them. He describes it as a Tim Gunn teaching style.” On the athletic fields, Mueller’s impact has been equally significant. He coached Girls Varsity Lacrosse for over thirty-five years, as well as boys soccer for many years on both on the Varsity and JV levels. Varsity Soccer player Bruno Moscarini ’19 remembered, “At his [Mueller’s] last game coaching after thirty-five years, the whole team circled around him to thank him for all that he had done, and Mr. Mueller started crying. It was a bittersweet moment but an appropriate testament to Mr. Mueller’s dedication, both to the school and to the hundreds of players he had coached.” Moscarini ’19 continued, “I run into Mr. Mueller often, and have never seen him without a radiant smile on his face. He always inspires joy and forces a chuckle out of you, even through painful injuries and tough days. He has taught me the importance of approaching life in a positive manner and to try to find fun anywhere possible. Nonetheless, Mr. Mueller has also helped me to mature, treating me as an equal in a team full of seniors and calling me out when my attitude was flawed. I will miss him incorporating an element of fun into everything. I will miss seeing him around school every day.” Though Mueller will miss “the energy of teenagers and warm social life at Hopkins,” he sees it as an opportunity to dive deeper into his own art. “We are really looking forward to this next phase. We already bought our house and are moving to Cape Cod. I’m going to get my clamming licence, I’m going to go sailing, and maybe do some boat building. I’ll have time now to really do some art work. I haven’t done a whole lot of stuff in the past few years. I dabble now and then, but I’m excited to try other art forms and find a new challenges. “Yeah, forty years. I guess that’s long enough, so go out at your peak!”

Hopkins Science Olympiad Competes at Colorado Nationals (Continued from page 1) What has enabled the success of the Hopkins SciOly team? Burton Lyng-Olsen ’20, who competed in Experimental Design, Game On, and Hovercraft portions of this year’s competitions explained, “The secret to Hopkins’ success in the past and present is simply that the team is made up of smart kids who are willing to work diligently, even late at night.” Ryan Viores ’18, an active member of the Hop SciOly program for the past two years stated, “In my opinion, the reason we do so well is because we are committed to winning and everyone feels that if they slack off and don’t do well in their events, they are letting the team down.” Both Gold and Encarnação emphasized the “strength, motivation, and excitement of the students” that feed the team’s ability to achieve success in projects and events. Gold considered what made the team capable to compete at a national level year after year attributing the team’s success to the “wealth of the experience that we have and older team members helping newer team members.” Encarnação discussed how the “carry over from the previous team” plays a large role in ingraining the hard work mentality. “There is always a previous group of kids that have gone to Nationals and wants to go back, and that’s the biggest motivator,” she explained. With around six seniors leaving every year, nine members of the national competition team are left to carry over the science spirit onto the incoming kids.

With all this success, there comes a price. Leading up to competitions, students spend hours preparing for their events. Viores reflected on the team’s work ethic: “In the weeks before a competition I never Maura Foley

The Hopkins SciOly Team gathers for a team photo at Colorado State University.

have a free period that I don’t spend in that room.” Parker Connolly ‘20, described the amount of time outside of school he devoted to his preparations: “I’ll give up some B-block frees to test my mousetrap car, or I’ll spend half an hour studying cryptography, or make a quick ten-minute example code in Scratch for Game On. The test events always need more studying!” The SciOly students’ hard work paid off at this year’s state competition held at the University of Connecticut on April 7, where Hopkins brought the first place

trophy home along with thirteen other medals. Building on the momentum of this success, a team comprised of fifteen students represented all of Connecticut at Nationals in May. The SciOly team faced off against the strongest teams in the nations, schools that often have special classes devoted to Science Olympiad. Hopkins competed respectably, placing thirty-eighth. A few Hopkins students achieved noteworthy success such as the seventhplace finish in Dynamic Planet and twelfth-place finish in Remote Sensing. Viores reflected on his experience of the elite competition: “Nationals is a really great opportunity to meet similar kids from all over the country.” The hours poured into preparing for the competitions do not only pay off in material success. Hop SciOly members remarked how rewarding it is to be a part of the program. “The greatest take away that I’ve had from SciOly” Lyng-Olsen stated, “is to be persistent and flexible when things don’t always go as you plan.” SciOly helps Srivastava to “think critically on the spot during timed events.” Viores explained what he has learned from his SciOly team experience: “I think that one of the biggest lessons that SciOly has taught me is that in science, nothing works on the first try. Ever.” Whether it be late night studying and preparing for the written events, or spending countless free periods in the “build-room,” the SciOly team worked hard to earn its spot at nationals. At Hopkins SciOly, however, hard work and a good time come hand in hand as Viores reflected, “We are just looking to do our best and to have fun.”


June 7, 2018

FEATURES

Deena Mack and John Ibsen Retire Highpoint Pictures

Deena Mack joined the Alumni/ae and Development Office eighteen years ago, after extensive volunteering at Hopkins. As part of the Development team, she helped manage planned giving in the form of The Edward Hopkins Bequest Society, which recognizes the generosity of friends of the School who have chosen to remember Hopkins in their wills or through a charitable trust, gift annuity, or life insurance plan. She enjoyed and valued working closely with alumni/ae, parents, and volunteer organizations to promote community and support of the School. Mack has been involved in projects such as the 2017 Greater New Haven Alumni/ae Gathering. She spent her final year at Hopkins as the Senior Development Officer.

Hopkins Students Scream for Ice Cream! Lily Meyers ’20 Assistant Features Editor Summer vacation is here, along with all of the activities and traditions that go with it. One such ritual is going out for icecream. Many students have a favorite local ice-cream shop to visit when the temperatures get high, but if you do not know where to go, or are just looking for some new places to try, here are some recommendations from Hopkins students. Ashley’s Ice Cream is a favorite of many students. Ashley’s makes its own products and uses ingredients from local farms, such as Bishop’s Orchards in Guilford. The stores are located in New Haven, Hamden, Branford, Guilford, and Madison, convenient locations for many students. This is the case for

Mary Halvorson ’21, who frequents the franchise because “it’s very close to my house, and it’s also a fundraising place, so that’s a plus.” Phillip Delise ’20 also appreciated its location, “I like it because it’s a nice treat after whatever you’re doing in New Haven, and it’s convenient.” They suggest trying cookie dough, coffee, or cookies and cream. Another New Haven location, Bill’s Carousel Ice Cream is familiar to many students who go their with Hopkins sport teams during the fall and spring. Joseph Hutchinson ’21 explained the appeal of the destination, “they have a lot of variety, flavors, styles,” and recommends cookies and cream, his favorite flavor. (Continued on page 4...)

Wendy Parente

The Girls Junior Varsity Lacrosse team runs to Bill’s Carousel Ice Cream for a treat after a tough week of games.

Jemma Williams

John C. Ibsen has been working for Hopkins under Maintenance and will be retiring this August after twenty-six years of service. He has been a friendly and helpful face around The Hill, assisting with repairs and construction. In his “off time,” Ibsen enjoys fly fishing—he makes his own flies from unusual materials—and carpentry. Ibsen moved and rebuilt his own antique home. He says that he is going to miss his staff buddies, but will definitely enjoy settling down once the school year comes to a close.

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Changes Come to the Summer Reading Guide Connor Pignatello ‘19 Features Editor Summer Reading: the dread of every Hopkins student. This year, in the interest of making students’ summers easier, the Hopkins Summer Reading Committee has changed up the summer reading guide, making it shorter, sleeker, and more compact. The Summer Reading Committee wanted to eliminate unnecessary books, while keeping the guide useful. Member Noah Slager ’19 commented, “We wanted [the guide] to be something people could actually go to for book recommendations, we thought that as it was, it was a little too long, a little too messy: it was all over the place. We figured that if we took out some of the older titles that didn’t really need to be there, and put in some newer ones that people would

like, it could be more of a resource for people.” In the previous iterations of the summer reading guide, hundreds of books lined the numerous pages, making it very difficult and time consuming to find the right book. This year’s guide is much leaner than previous versions, as committee members removed hundreds of books that were being left unread. The newer guide should also help more kids enjoy their summer reading, echoed Slager: “You can go to it for recommendations more easily and it doesn’t feel as overwhelming. It’s easy to read, and hopefully the book you’re looking for will be easy to find.” Although most students regard summer reading as a chore, the new guide should make it easier for students to find great literature to pass the summer hours.

A Field Study of Veganism on The Hill Veronica Yarovinsky ’20 Assistant Features Editor A general reaction to learning that someone is vegan is “Why? How?” but the vegans at Hopkins are used to these questions. Veganism is a lifestyle which excludes all forms of exploitation of and cruelty to animals for food, clothing or any other purpose. Madeleine Walker ’19 was inspired when “I visited a place called Farm Sanctuary, which rehabilitates animals that have been abused in factory farms and puts them up for adoption. It was super informative and I have always loved animals (I live on a small farm) so I thought it was just the next step in my life.” She eased into it, starting off by being a pescatarian, then vegetarian, then vegan, which she has been for the last five years. Eva Brander Blackhawk ’20 adopted veganism for similar reasons: “Personally I am vegan mostly for environmental reasons. Meat uses a lot of resources whereas just plants do not. For example the water to raise an animal as well as the food they must consume uses a lot of resources and the transportation of those resources creates lots of greenhouse gases. I don’t find an inherent problem with eggs or dairy, but the industrialization of the dairy and egg industries has made a lot of violence for the animals, which I do not like.” Eliza Barker ’21 explained the broadness of vegan beliefs: “I think the purpose of veganism is to respect the rights and welfare of animals. Along with eliminating animals products in food, veganism also incorporates consciousness in buying clothing and cosmetics. Becoming vegan really opened my eyes to the “behind-the-scenes” treatment of animals in factory farms.” Veganism presents its own set of challenges. Walker explained how hard it is to be the only vegan in her family: “I wanted to be vegetarian for years, but my parents never let me because it’s a hassle to make different meals for people. But once my mom started working again, I made my own meals anyway, so they

didn’t have much to complain about.” Outsiders may wonder how it is possible to stay healthy and get enough nutrients without many of the normal foods. Walker said, “My iron levels have always been fine and I get a lot of protein, but I do still take cheap vitamins to supplement B12 and calcium.” She continued to explain that the food is not that much different: “I haven’t had real meats in so long that fake meats (not-dogs, tofu, soy nuggets, etc.) taste real to me. Plus, vegan baked goods are surprisingly easy to make.

don’t find it any more expensive that not being vegan. If I eat primarily beans and rice and frozen vegetables and order cheap side dishes, it can be cheaper than being non-vegan. I do buy fake butter, which is slightly more expensive than normal butter, and different fake meats can get expensive. As a whole veganism is just what you make of it and can fit your lifestyle however you see fit.” Barker added that even though it takes more willpower to be vegan, it can be less expensive. “I personally find that vegan food is less ex-

Arnold Gold Sophie Sonnenfeld ‘21 and Jack Kealey ‘21 encourage fellow students to take the “Meatless Monday” pledge. Just substitute applesauce or a smashed banana for eggs and it will taste the same.” Brander Blackhawk added that “I eat pretty much the same thing I used to eat. I eat a lot of pasta and bread based foods. I like soup a lot. I also eat fruits and vegetables obviously. With all the fake meat, cheese, cream cheese, whipped cream, milk, you name it, it is very easy to replicate any dish I want to eat. At restaurants it can be more difficult but fries are almost always an option. I tend to eat sides or rice/pasta based dishes at restaurants.” Even though the foods can be very different from normal and sometimes hard to find, Brander Blackhawk said: “I

pensive than meat, and it really depends on the vegan products you decide to buy. I eat lots of legumes, grains, fruit and vegetables, and I get my protein from tofu and nuts. I think it’s important to supplement on a vegan diet, so I take vitamin B12.” Veganism can be joked about, sometimes even negatively, but Walker explained that this comes from stereotypes. “I think the people who hate vegans the most just think vegans force their beliefs on other people, but I don’t really do that. (Continued on page 4...)


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June 7, 2018

The Razor: Features

Seniors Present Work at Project Fair

Veronica Yarovinsky ’20 Assistant Features Editor Connor Pignatello ’18 Features Editor Every spring, seniors at Hopkins embark on Senior Projects in areas that interest them. Here is what some seniors have created this year.

Georgia Doolittle ’18 “My Senior Project is using traditional British baking as a lens to examine industrialism, slavery and European colonialism. I’ve been doing this by baking desserts from different time periods, and then researching specific ingredients. To be honest, I was initially inspired by binge-watching all of ‘The Great British Baking Show’ on Netflix, but the project has grown a lot since then. I’ve learned a lot of really interesting facts about food, like how the banana industry has been responsible for the overthrow of governments around the world, or how cacao beans used to be used as currency.”

Georgia Doolittle ’18 learned about history through British baking. Jenn Horkovich ’18 “My Senior Project is titled Filling in the Blanks: What Happened Other than the Trail of Tears. The main goal is to provide information to both students and history teachers regarding the past and present of Native American tribes that we frankly have never been taught but we need to learn. My initial thought was to make an entire history course with the information, but I found it more accessible and relevant to create a series of powerpoints and lesson plans that can fit into the required history courses. For my AC3 term paper last year, I wrote about the Termination Era, a period of history where, under the

guise of helping Natives, the US government destroyed the lives of thousands of people. It fascinated me because we talked about it briefly but I wanted to know why it happened and why we weren’t taught it in great detail. Right before I turned the paper in, I met with Mr. DeNaples, my AC3 teacher, and asked him, “Hey, want to do this with me as a history course for a Senior Project?” His immediate reaction was ‘Yes’ and that’s how it started. Surprisingly enough, my biggest challenge was having too much information which was surprising. I had roughly 60 pages of notes on three tribes and I realized that a course wasn’t as beneficial as it should be. Also, in researching, especially modern Native people, I was struck by the horrors of it all and it was extremely difficult to read. The big thing was realizing that the Iroquois have the oldest democracy and constitution in existence and our Constitution and democracy are based off of theirs except minus women in power. In addition, sexual assault and trafficking are horrendous on reservations - there’s no database for trafficked Native women and their twice as likely to be sexually assaulted as any other race. Also the poverty rates and death rates by diseases people don’t really die from here such as 500% more likely to die from tuberculosis. It’s honestly crazy. I do recommend looking up Adam Ruins Everything Season 2 Episode 18 “The First Factsgiving.” It covers some very common societal misconceptions and American mythology. It’s online. I also plan to go to a Hopkins History Department meeting to try and add my project into the Hopkins curriculum.” Zander Blitzer ’18 “For my Senior Project, I am writing two episodes of a TV show I have entitled Taking Back the House. Taking Back the House is a reimagining of ‘The West Wing’, a political TV show from the early 2000s that I greatly admire, if the West Wing occurred in 2018. Blending characters from the original as well as characters of my own creation, I have taken on hot button issues such as gun control, abortion, and national security through the lens of TV drama. My goal was to expand what I learned last year in Writing for Stage and Screen (a class I would highly recommend!) and apply it to a genre that interests me personally. I also wanted to find a space to advance political debate, and really listen to and understand arguments from different perspectives. The really challenging thing about a writing-based project is how much time you have to set aside for it. Writing can’t necessary fit into a neat block of time, so I always had to schedule myself

Ice Cream Options (Continued from page 3) Their extensive ice-cream list includes both hard ice-cream and soft serve. The carousel horse in front gives the shop its name and is a popular spot for taking pictures. Higgy’s, in Haddam, is another roadside stop, carrying both food and ice-cream. CC Rocco ’20 loves it because “it’s super close to my house, so we go there all the time every summer, and … it’s really cute.” It also makes her “think of when I was younger, and we would go there a lot.

one in Fairfield and one in Westport, on the Saugatuck River. Isabel Vlahakis ’19 said, “They’ve got a lot of different ice-creams, and you can also get candy… so, [there is] lots of sugar.” Ice-cream is not the only cold treat. Frozen yogurt and gelato are also satisfying summer sweets. Kate Collier ’21 recommends Gelatissimo Artisan Gelato in New Canaan for those in the mood for gelato. She explained, “They give you the most gelato possible in the smallest cup. It’s perfect.” Their gelato is handmade in the store in small batches. Collier recommends the creme brulee flavor. These locations are only a few of the many ice-cream shops in Connecticut for hot sumKatherine Takoudes mer days and any Hopkins fundraisers enjoy a tasty treat outside of Ashley’s Ice other time Cream in New Haven of the year. My mom’s friend used to own it, so The accessible shops are rarely more one time I got to go in the back and use than a short drive away and are the soft-serve machine.” To those vis- pleasant summer afternoon destinaiting Higgy’s, she recommends Oreo. tions to visit alone, with family, or For sweet-seekers in Fair- with friends you have not seen since field County, Saugatuck Sweets is a the end of school. Each one has a popular option. Similar to Ashley’s Ice unique flare, but all will provide a Cream, they have multiple locations- satisfying ice-cream experience.

hours and hours to just sit down and let the words flow. The hardest thing for me is allowing people to read my work, especially out loud. To me, hearing my work out loud is always weird and embarrassing, but it’s necessary for screenwriting because you have to test out the ease with which someone can read the lines. There’s something very personal about creative writing, so it does take a lot of courage to share it with an audience.” Libby Gardner ’18 “Annie Banks and I did our Senior Project together and it was to create a tie-dye business ‘Tie Dye for Treatment’ to better understand how small businesses function. Annie and I both have a love for tie dye as well as an interest in business so deciding on the project was easy. Finding a payment method for our customers was probably the biggest challenge we had to overcome because we didn’t have a PayPal account and the website platform fined us for any transactions made on the website. When we dyed the shirts, we took extra precautions to ensure the dye wouldn’t get on our clothes or skin but Annie accidentally dipped her hand in the bucket too far and the dye filled up her rubber glove. Annie’s hand was dyed blue for a week.”

Jemma Williams

Jonathan De Leon ’18 and Owen Rahr ’18 built an arcade cabinet for their senior project.

A Field Study of Veganism on The Hill (Continued from page 3) If you eat a bacon, egg, and cheese sandwich right next to me, I honestly don’t care. Live your life. I’m eating what I want to eat and you’re eating what you want to eat. It’s the American dream.” She explained that veganism has “become kind of an identifier at this point,” with her friends putting in her contact name on their phones as “a carrot emoji, or a cow emoji and an X mark, or “Carrot Tofu” because I’m a ginger and like tofu,” and Walker happily accepts that, as she put vegan jokes on her Student Council campaign posts and laughed at Deepak Gupta’s roasts during Assembly. These positive jokes have led Hopkins to be aware of veganism, and Walker is proud to be a leader of the vegan ideas. “My friends definitely bring up my veganism more than I do, which I find hilarious. I also ALWAYS have vegan snacks on me, so my friends are constantly joking about how they’re going vegan just because they ate one of my banana chips or part of a protein bar,” Walker recalled. Jack Kealy ’21 explained that he’s encouraged by the growing vegan movement. He said that he believes vegan haters come from the “stereotype that vegans find themselves morally superior to others, but I didn’t go vegan to be superior to other humans; I

went vegan because I don’t understand why humans are superior.” Although veganism can be difficult at times, Kealy does not regret going vegan: “Occasionally I’ll think of how nice an item with dairy looks and want to take a bite, but then I remember why I went vegan and I feel much better.” For aspiring vegans, Kealy advises to start little by little. “It can be hard at some restaurants, but I found it very beneficial to set a starting date one month after deciding to go vegan so I could go around to some of my favorite restaurants and find items I’d be able to order. I got used to it very quickly, and I found that I felt so much lighter and better once I went vegan. About a month in, I was eating something that I was unaware had cheese in it and I could barely finish a few bites because I had become rather intolerant to dairy. It just felt so heavy.” People find that changing their food intake completely seems like an impossible challenge, but Kealy believes that the challenge is possible to overcome. Brander Blackhawk’s advice is “I think everyone can, and likely should, reduce their consumption of meat, but I by no means expect everyone to be fully vegan. I think as long as people know the facts about what they’re eating and supporting they can and should make the decision they think is best.”

Without any drastic decisions or changes, Brander Blackhawk said that she believes that everyone can make an effort for the vegan ideals. Barker was inspired by watching documentaries: “I became vegan only for animal rights, after I watched Paul McCartney’s documentary If Slaughterhouses Had Glass Walls. It addresses the issues of animals used for meat, and also for dairy, and it makes you realize how connected the meat and dairy industries are. Another great documentary to watch is Earthlings.” Although Kealy does not like imposing his vegan beliefs on other people, he did have a fun experiment with Canny Cahn, English teacher and Razor Advisor: “One day I baked a lemon blueberry bread that had a huge hunk of tofu in it, and it was delicious. I had a fellow (non-vegan) classmate give it to Ms. Cahn [who hates tofu] as a gift, without mentioning the ingredients. We were all taking a quiz, but as Ms. Cahn took her first bite I was peering over my shoulder to see her reaction. At first, she didn’t have much of a reaction, but when my classmate asked her how it was, Ms. Cahn’s words were, “This is incredible! I have to have everyone in the class try some!” With a victory on my hands, I screamed out, “ITS MADE OUT OF TOFU!” Safe to say, I haven’t let her forget about this little story!”


June 7, 2018

Voices

Page 5

A De-pen-dably Enjoyable Tool Joseph Hutchinson '21 Writing is essential to our role as students, day in and day out. Whether we efficiently tap away on a keyboard, take the time to make deliberate letter strokes on paper, or jot down information instinctively we couldn’t do without it. Recording great quantities of content can be tiring, yet strangely enjoyable. I can’t be the only one who finds it satisfying to fill line after line of loose-leaf paper, then see the final product later on, right? Although, in special cases, the medium of our work may be important, Hopkins students generally have the freedom to take notes and fulfill assignments however we see fit. In my experience, fountain pens occupy the sweet spot of functionality/enjoyment. Completing math problems or homework sheets is a not particularly personal experience, but firsthand writing often becomes an afterthought in our busy lives. I can’t get away with slowing down from a rapid scrawl in every class, but when the opportunity arises, perfecting my work’s legibility becomes an inexplicably delightful task. As a fountain pen’s nib glides with little to no friction across the page, the lack of additional sensory

input gives a sense of control. I no longer bottle pays off when compared to repeatedhave a need to force my hand down with ly purchasing disposable ballpoints or their each stroke. Consequently, I’ve found cartridges. The initial investment for such “marathon” sessions of work to be less nib-equipped pens is not always such a tiresome and hand cramps less abundant. leap; the Platinum Preppy, starting at $3.00, A n is a marother inherent velously value of founengineered tain pens is product what they leave that writes on paper itself: just as well ink. I’m perfectas numerly happy with ous, more generic blacks, costly alblues, and reds ternatives. plastering my While there papers, but may be exthese get reorbit ant ly petitive fairly priced pens quickly. Certain out there, diagrams can’t Along with using fountain pens, Hutchinson '21 also enjoys I’d like to rowing on the Hopkins Crew Team. be accurately think that depicted with cost generala mere handful of basic color choices. I’d ly isn’t a restrictive factor. Just like any hobmuch rather choose a vibrant orange for by, it’s easy to invest much from the start. small yet important annotations, or a subChoosing and utilizing a pen of tly tinted teal that catches the light oh so your own can be personal, and enjoyable slightly. Fountain pens are refillable with by itself. Everyone has lost pens and penvirtually any ink color time and time again. cils, making the commitment (as some Fountain pens have an economic advan- may call it) to keep track of a slightly more tage: filling your pens straight from an ink precious object important. This natural

A Rocky Climb to Happiness

the greatest experience on a climbing wall is to throw Noah Slager '19 yourself at a climb tens or hundreds of times--sometimes over a period of months--and eventually make it This week I quit rock climbing competitive- to the top. That feeling of knowing that the moves are ly. It was a surprise to my coach, fellow team mem- the same, but that I’m stronger and more equipped to bers, and the few friends I told. I have a year of eligi- deal with them is one of my great accomplishments. For a long time, competitive climbing has bility left in the youth competition system and plenty felt fundamentally misaligned with my goals. Climbof potential to make a serious run next year at New ers seek to overcome immovable obstacles through England’s Sport Climbing Divisionals. But I walked perseverance, patience, and problem solving. But, in out and have not had Chris Moyle competitions, we a reservation about it are pressed to since. I want to explain perform moves, why I did it and resist often just one or the notion that quitting two times, withand failure are somein a time limit. how one and the same. If climbing is I’ve always reading a favorloved to talk about ite book, comcompetition climbing. I peting feels like realized pretty early on being quizzed on that it was something minute details most people had absofrom that book lutely no knowledge of, while a bright and I relished exposlight is shined in ing people to a niche your eyes and a sport. Countless times, large clock ticks I eagerly explained that down from four most climbing compeminutes. By the titions are not races, end, it just wasn’t but rather challenges fun anymore. I’ve Slager '21 climbs an indoor rock wall in his free time. to make it as far as posheard it said that sible, without falling, the healthiest way to run a marathon is to train for one on extremely difficult routes. Points are awarded for and never run it. The marathon itself is a step too far, and, making it the farthest within the time limit. It’s a forefor most people, gets them injured. I prefer to train all arm and upper body dominant sport, but much more season for competitions, and never go to them. So I quit. about balance and technique than most people realize At Hopkins, quitting is a dirty word. It (think gymnastics, not arm-wrestling a wall). Patience sounds like a failure to rise to the challenge, of sucand mental resistance will get you much further than cumbing to forces stronger than oneself, of giving up. adrenaline. Many climbers, including myself, have or And, for god’s sake, what will colleges think? But this have had fear of heights (it makes a good incentive refusal to stop doing things that don’t make us hapto double-check your knots). I was always happy to py doesn’t help anyone. Rather, it makes us miserable. address these questions, and of course, my favorite: Life is just too short to pack full of playing instrucan you do door frame pull-ups? I’m glad you asked... ments you don’t enjoy, sports that aren’t rewarding But hidden beneath this enthusiastic evangeanymore, and activities that look good on resumes lism were some serious misgivings about my place in but don’t make you happy. I didn’t quit competitive the sport. I’ve joked with the people on my climbing climbing because I was bad at it, or because I was sick team that climbing was invented when a caveman livof dealing with nagging injuries. I still love climbing by a cliffside got bored. And that spirit of freedom, ing as an adventure and ultimate personal challenge, exploration, and overcoming challenges was always what the sport meant to me. I’ve always found that and I have no plans to stop. I quit competing because I didn’t enjoy it anymore. It was a good decision.

attachment to objects is human nature, yet writing utensils are often overlooked. Without a lack of choice in shape, size, color, line-width, or functionality, it becomes unexpectedly easy to make a pen your own. As well as fountain pens potentially providing a positive personal experience, the online and real-world fountain pen community fosters a positive environment that’s welcoming to newcomers, and is predominantly not elitist or pretentious, contrary to general belief. The Reddit fountain pen group in particular has all the resources needed to guide novices, as well as genuinely helpful members (reddit.com/r/fountainpens). There’s little to no motivation to act as “gatekeepers” of the hobby. If anything, each one of us feels compelled to “indoctrinate” others and pass on this wholesome past-time. I encourage you to consider the means by which you write your words, whether it be via fountain pen or not. For me, fountain pens made and continue to make even the most tedious of tasks enjoyable. The joy of writing shouldn't be a necessary burden, but a gratifying experience. Don't continue to dread note taking, but strive to find one thing that changes your daily outlook. Why not make the most mundane of tasks fun in some small way or another?

Voices On The Hill Brought to you by The Voices Staff “What are you looking forward to this summer?” Tim Sullivan ‘19: Writing my Common Application!! Izzy Potash ‘18: Sleeping in. Brennan Gollaher ‘19: Eating a lot of food. Marilla Yu '20: Learning something new - maybe longboarding! Bruno Moscarini ‘19: The beach and warm weather. Owen Sherman '19: Working at the shoe store and chilling with the boys. Grace Rhatigan ‘21: Sleepaway camp.

THE ONE-PAGE RAZOR Meh List:

June Favorites:

1. Final Exams

1. Summer!

2. SAT Subject Tests

2. Prom

3. Seniors graduating

3. NBA Playoffs

4. Summer jobs

4. The beach June Tunes:

1. "Better Now" - Post Malone 2. "This Is America" - Childish Gambino 3. "Whatever It Takes" - Imagine Dragons 4. "In My Blood" - Shawn Mendes


OPINIONS/EDITORIALS

Page 6

June 7, 2018

A Needed Conversation As the year comes to a close amidst daydreams of sandy beaches, aspirations for the next year have begun to arise. The Hopkins community strives to raise awareness about the injustices of the world, but it often ignores the plight of poverty.

The Razor’s Edge The school has sponsored assemblies on race, gender, and the LGBTQ+ community, yet socioeconomic status is rarely mentioned. This silent problem needs to be confronted. Simply awarding financial aid will not fix disparate communities nor the cultural stigmas that go along with poverty. Wealth is perhaps society’s most dividing attribute. Since the beginning of civilization, the rich and poor“How havecan always been at we justify our elevated status?”

odds. The repercussions of this timeless conflict have made their way into the Hopkins community. Many students prefer not to discuss their financial status. Their wish for privacy is perfectly acceptable. Students should have the freedom to disclose what they want about themselves; however, this silence becomes a problem when students feel as if they have to hide their lack of money. To combat this issue, the Hopkins community needs to foster more open discussion about socioeconomic status. A reflective

assembly with an open mic session could certainly be the first step to understand the effects of poverty. The more pertinent question of wealth transcends the experiences of individual student and rather is aimed at the school, itself. Over the years, Hopkins has accumulated an endowment of a hundred sixty million dollars. Imagine Hopkins as a magnet. The rich from each of its surrounding communities have invested heavily in Hopkins via tuition and donations. As a result, Hopkins has thrived, procuring a beautiful campus and a high quality classroom experience. As one looks past Hopkins, surrounding disparate communities come to view and questions begin to arise. Why do we deserve automatic water bottle fillers and a fancy turf football field when there are those around us living in poverty? How can we justify our elevated status? Sadly, there is no easy solution to this moral dilemma. Some may say that Hopkins provides an education that exceeds its competition, so therefore it deserves its success. Others might say that most people do not care enough to sacrifice everything in the name of equality. An institution’s own survival and expansion is valued more than giving. This natural selfishness does not mean Hopkins cannot be considered a charitable school. If Hopkins breeds youths who are aware of wealth disparity and committed to aiding the

downtrodden of the world, then it is actively combatting the plight of poverty. Many graduates of the senior class will attain positions of power. The alumni of this school have the ability to revolu“There needs to be a larger emphasis on teaching about systemic poverty...” tionize their communities. The far-reaching tendrils of education can impact the community much more than any Canned Food Drive, which is why the question of socioeconomic status cannot be ignored. Many students begin to learn about poverty and the historical context of this country’s poor only in the final History and English classes of their Hopkins career. These imperative lessons should not be relegated to only a small portion of a Hopkins education. There needs to be a school wide discussion. There needs to be a larger emphasis on teaching about systemic poverty, all so students can be the change of the future. This is not to say that community service events are pointless. Even if the impact of a soup kitchen shift or tutoring session might be relatively small, they allow students to interact with the unfortunate around them. Education and experience, in conjunction, provides students with an insightful blend that will hopefully influence them later in life during an opportunity for great change.

Editor-in-Chief: Theodore Tellides Managing Editor: Katie Broun News.......................................................................................Sarah Roberts, JR Stauff, Zoe Kim, Julia Kosinski Features..............................................Izzy Lopez-Kalapir, Connor Pignatello, Lily Meyers, Veronica Yarovinsky Op/Ed..........................................................................................Connor Hartigan, Saloni Jain, Simon Bazelon Sports....................................................................Audrey Braun, Alex Hughes, Teddy Glover, Anushree Vashist Arts..........................................................................................Ellie Doolittle, Katherine Takoudes, Leah Miller Voices........................................................................................Sarah Chung, Saira Munchani, George Kosinski Editor-at-Large...................................................Olivia Capasso, Elena Savas, Noah Schmeisser, Ziggy Gleason Cartoonists................................................................................................Melody Parker, Arthur Masiukiewicz Webmaster.................................................................................................Nina Barandiaran, Arushi Srivastava Business Managers...........................................................................................Caitlyn Chow, Sophia Fitzsimonds Faculty Advisors.......................................................................Canny Cahn, Elizabeth Gleason, Jenny Nicolelli The Razor’s Edge reflects the opinion of 4/5 of the editorial board and will not be signed. The Razor welcomes letters to the editor but reserves the right to decide which letters to publish, and to edit letters for space reasons. Unsigned letters will not be published, but names may be withheld on request. Letters are subject to the same libel laws as articles. The views expressed in letters are not necessarily those of the editorial board.

The Razor, an open forum publication, is published monthly during the school year by students of Hopkins School, 986 Forest Road, New Haven, CT 06515. Phone (203) 397-1001 ext. 252 • Email: CCahn@hopkins.edu

Making Time for Yourself Katie Broun ‘19 Managing Editor Balance is difficult to come by. I look up from my book to see the clock reading 1:15 am. Although my mind is tired, I know that I must plug along and stay awake in order to finish everything that has to be completed in the last weeks of the term. The final projects and a multitude of assessments all flood my mind, creating a spiral of worry about my grades and impending summer endeavors. Instead of being outside, enjoying the sunshine and

The Aftershave playing Frisbee with friends, I have dedicated myself to my AP review books and the library. Nothing is wrong with either of those options; many, instead, want to have both at once. While it is impossible to be completely on one side or another, I found out, while annotating my English book in the early hours of the morning, that I need to find balance in my life. On the outside, balance may seem easy to achieve, but in actuality, additional pressure to succeed and be a part of everything makes it nearly impossible. During May and early June, the academic pressure is immense, making many students cast out friends and spend time away from family in order to finish the work that ‘must’ get done. The usage of ‘must’ instead of ‘should’ differentiates the types of students working in the last few months of the term. People often have to figure out how to spend a free period by deciding between cramming for a test in two periods or having a meaningful conversation with friends about fun spring events or what each person liked about a speaker from Assembly. As individuals, we may want to enjoy the final spring moments, but in reality, we prioritize going through the vocabulary quizlet one more time instead. While there is nothing wrong with either option, the mere fact that we choose our studies, even though

time has already been devoted to studying for hours before in the evening, showcases our lack of balance as individuals. Making time to for ourselves is a key part of finding said balance. Laurie Santos, a psychology professor at Yale, agrees and created a class at the university across the way on what The Washington Post describes as the “psychology of living a joyful, meaningful life.” As a teacher, she challenged her students to make changes in their own lives, whether big or small. Santos cancelled class one day, asking students to stop worrying about their grades and all of the work that was piling on, just for one hour. During the last few weeks, I took on Santos’ challenge. The springtime is filled with amazing things outside of the walls of Malone or Baldwin. The flowers are in full bloom and most days, the sun is shining and one can chat on the Quad or just read a book in daylight, instead of at one in the morning. Each final exam is just one and a half or two hours of life. AP exams are a mere memory. The grades from these exams should not be the defining factor of your high school career. Ask seniors about their favorite part of their Hopkins experience. They almost never talk about a grade they received on a Math test or how well they made their argument during English class. They describe the relationships they had with their friends, and the fun experiences that they had with them. It is difficult to find balance in our lives. Between intense coursework, extracurricular activities and trying to find enough hours in a day to sleep, many Hopkins students, myself included, are tired and ready for the long awaited summer vacation. Take time this summer to read enjoy to get lost in a world completely separate from their own. Enjoy family vacations to refuel for whatever your next step may be, whether that is another year on The Hill, a year starting a brand new school, or a year of personal activities. Continue to take the time to shape your own life, rather than let life shape you. Arthur Masiukiewicz ’20


ARTS

June 7, 2018

Senior Artists Create Annual Class Banner sponsible for finding an idea for the ally try to stay out of it,” said member Katherine Takoudes ’20 banner that embodied the energy and of the Arts Department and past banArts Editor talent of the Class of 2018 while rec- ner advisor Eric Mueller. Ziou agreed: Every year, graduating art- ognizing their own time and resource “I buy their supplies and ask them if ists in Fine Arts III complete one fi- constraints. Malin noted that their de- they have an idea. That’s about it.” After gathering the materinal project: to design and paint their sign was a result of collaboration and class banner, to be unfurled to the deliberation: “We came up with an als and solidifying their design, the Hopkins Community at Prize Day. idea based on the fact that we knew students began to work on the banner This tradition of creating a banner it was going to be a small group of using gesso as the base on the canto represent the legacy of the gradu- people taking on a huge project so vas and acrylic paints. The process ating class began in 1941 and it has it couldn’t be too complex. We then of sketching, gessoing, and painting Jody Rosenthal took weeks of work continued to this day. inside and outside These banners span the classroom. “We almost eight decades worked together as and each is photooften as we could, but, graphed, framed, and given our schedules, placed throughout it was inevitable that buildings on campus. we would all have to A pattern work individually at runs through the artsome point,” said Mawork. While each of lin. The students had the banners is unique to find time to comto the graduating plete the banner, while class, school archivist also participating in Thom Peters noted, the senior service tra“They all seem to dition on the week contain the names of before graduation. each of the graduatEven after pouring seniors of the The past class banners hang over the graduating class on Commencement. class and the class numerals. Some bounced ideas and sketches off each ing dozens of hours of collaborative indicate the valedictorian (“V”). other until we came up with some- work into the banner, there is alAfter that, they are quite diverse.” thing that everyone liked, but that ways room for mistakes, especially More than a month before also seemed reasonable given the concerning the last names of all 134 the reveal at Prize Day, the students time frame and resources available.” of students in the graduating class. Because the Senior Banner Mueller, who oversaw the Senior in instructor Peter Ziou’s Fine Arts III began brainstorming ideas and represents the students in the class of Banner creation for years, recalled designs for their banner. The senior 2018, the Arts faculty made sure that past projects when he had to add artists Kyle Burton ’18, Bella Feder the students controlled as much of the accidentally left-out last names ’18, Owen Rahr ’18, Julia Silbert process of making the banner as possi- to the banner at the last moment. (Continued on page 8) ’18, and Chantel Malin ’18 were re- ble. “Beyond material support, we re-

A Capella Groups End Year With Spam Jam ing without the seniors next year. I just hope that I can be as good of a leader as they were.” McKinley Within the graduPalmieri ’20 commented ation tent on the evening on the tight-knit nature of Thursday, June 7, Hopof Spirens, “This year we kins a capella will rock the are only losing one senior, stage with their annual but it feels like we’re Spam Jam celebration. losing so many. Erin Spam Jam is their fi[Knox ’18] is our fearnal performance of the less leader and has defi2017-2018 school year, nitely contributed to featuring performances how close we all are.” from Harmonaires, For the HopTriple Trio, and Spikins community, . rens, all in a year-end .Spam Jam is a chance culmination of blood, to kick back, relax, and sweat, and tears. enjoy good music with With set lists friends or family. For a highlighting all singers capella groups, it acts of all ages, freshman as something of a reto senior, the singing union for current and Jody Rosenthal past Hopkins a capella groups have displayed immense passion and The Harmonaires perform at the Celebrate Hopkins! Auction in May. singers. Alumni of the intensity their perforSpirens, Triple Trio mances. “It’s kind of the The excitement I have already experienced and Harmonaires started end-all-be-all for us. Ever surrounding Spam Jam has the pride and exertion we dropping by The Hill as since September, we’ve increased over time. When put into making this great, early as mid-May to watch been talking about how it began, Spam Jam was a and I feel proud to be a their old a capella groups this will be good for Spam smaller gathering that oc- part of the enhancing of prepare for the big event. Jam, or that needs to be cut, curred in Heath, but has a capella over the years.” Liza Kottler ’17, a previetc.,” stated Spiren Maddie grown into one of the most For the a capella ous head of Triple Trio Mulligan ’19. Graley Turn- highly anticipated events of groups, it is of the utmost said, “There is nothing like er ’20 of Triple Trio dis- the year. “It has definitely importance to “go out with coming back to campus played similar sentiments, ramped up from when I was a bang,” said Doolittle. Fu- and listening to your old describing the event as an a freshman,” said current ture head of Harmonaires a capella pals. It fills me “ode to the hard work ev- Triple Trio co-head Geor- Sam Jenkins ’19 said; with pride to see how they eryone has been putting in gia Doolittle ’18. “As a se- “It’s heartbreaking when I have grown.. I cannot wait all year.” She highlighted nior, it fills me with pride to have to think about sing- to see them kill it in June!” Leah Miller ’20 Assistant Arts Editor

the higher stakes of Spam Jam: “This is my first year in a capella at Hopkins and I have enjoyed every minute of it. I want to do a great job with my solo at Spam Jam to celebrate a successful first year!”

see how Hopkins a capella has changed and how Caitlin [Gilroy ’18] and I have left our mark on the group.” Joey Rebeschi ’21, a newly initiated Harmonaire, said that “even though it is my first year in Harmonaires,

Page 7

Chalk Poetry Envelops the Hopkins Campus Saira Munshani’20 Voices Editor

As a tribute to National Poetry Month this past April, English 10 students have brought poems from inside the classroom to pathways on The Hill. From Langston Hughes to Li-Young Lee, poems written in bright sidewalk chalk have popped up around Hopkins on stairs, walkways, and the quad. English Teacher Brad Ridky described the origin of this project: “I’ve been doing it for years. The idea was that poetry should be public, and April is poetry month so it seemed to lend itself nicely to being outside, and to putting poetry where it is unexpected: the ground.” Along with being a fun activity, chalk poems have impacted the students and furthered their understanding of poetry. English Teacher Benjamin Johnson is also participating in chalk poetry with his English 10 class. “Poetry is both a sonic and visual art form. Sidewalk poetry places an emphasis on the visual aspect that often gets lost or overlooked in class discussion. Never mind what it means or may mean; let’s start with how it looks and sounds,” said Johnson. He also emphasized the physical aspect of writing the poetry outside and added, “there’s value in the action of getting down on your hands and knees and chalking out the words

Katherine Takoudes ’20

Sophomore Casey Goldberg ’20 chalks “Easter-Wings” by George Herbert outside of the Kneisel Squash Center. and lines. This isn’t how we normally approach poetry.” Although only sophomores were writing out the chalk poems, these students and their teachers hope that the words impacted the greater Hopkins community. Casey Goldberg ’20, a student in Johnson’s class, said, “The goal was that at least one person would stop to see our poems and think about something else other than a difficult math test for a few moments.” Ridky and Johnson highlighted that with the school year coming to a close, it can be a stressful time for both students and faculty: “We all spend a lot of time up in our heads, thinking about what we have to do next. It’s like, next, next, next. Sidewalk poetry forces people out of the headspace that the school day forces them into,” said Johnson. With the use of chalk scattered around campus, poetry was able to leave the classroom setting and have a greater impact on those at Hopkins. Johnson and Ridky pointed out that this creative poetry project has done its job if even only a few students notice it. “Most people just walk over it. That’s okay. All it takes is one,” said Johnson. Ridky said, “I think you can catch people a little off guard with it, and I like the notion of the sporadic barrage of poetry when they’re maybe thinking about something else.” Other students noticed the poems around campus. Ellen Ren ’19 said, “It’s something I wouldn’t expect around campus and I like to stop and read the inspirational words.” Henry Fisher ’20, a student in Ridky’s class, added, “I liked seeing people stop to read my poem because I felt like I was personally informing them.” Julia An ’21 noted the hard work that the sophomores put into the poems: “The chalk poems are nice if you’re just walking to your next class, but then you see a bit of chalk at your feet. By paying a bit more attention to them, you see that they grow into this poem that students willingly wrote and spent time on,” An said. Besides encouraging people to slow down and think about poetry, chalk poems also honor an underappreciated aspect of Hopkins: sidewalks. Johnson said, “Like parking garages, sidewalks are transitional spaces that we don’t normally pay much attention to. We literally walk over them. (Continued on page 8)


The Razor: Arts

Page 8

June 7, 2018

Artist of the Issue: Skyler Sugar Aaron Gruen ’21 Highpoint Pictures

At Hopkins, students are given a wide array of art classes to choose from, ranging from Orchestra to Web Design. However, for Skyler Sugar ’18, the clear choice was videography. Since tenth grade, Sugar has been writing, producing, and directing videos with

the goal of entertaining people Work.’ It’s about an art forger in ter and joy. “I like to make my even made a video about anthrax and putting smiles on their faces. Kansas in the 1930s,” said Sugar. friends and family watch my vid- for his friend’s science class. Sugar, now a senior at Hopkins, Sugar uses videography eos. We share laughs,” said Sugar. Sugar and his friends bond over has a passion for screenwriting as a way to bond with friends, Sugar has made a diverse assort- videography, often getting tothat he shares with his friends and family, and his community by ment of videos for both clients gether and filming videos in the Hopkins community. Skyler Sugar his basement for fun and for After his interest school. “Sometimes they come in videography sparked, over to my house and we’ll Sugar decided to take spend a couple hours in my Video Production I and II basement filming,” said Sugar along with American Film, on making music videos with at Hopkins, while at the friends for his Chinese class. same time teaching himSugar enjoys making videos self how to edit and film that have a positive impact videos at home. Sugar’s on his classes and his friends. passion for videography Sugar, who will be athas carried into his final tending New York Univeryear at Hopkins: he chose sity’s Tisch School of the to write a screenplay for Arts in the fall, said the main his senior project. Sugar’s reason he enjoys making inspiration for the screenvideos is because he likes Sugar dances in the youtube video that he created, entitled “Halfway Zen,” that can be play came from his love of “watching people laugh and found on his channel under “Skyler Sugar.” writing comedic films. “I say ‘Oh man, Sugar!’” Sugar wrote the first act and treatment of making them smile. His favor- and friends, such as a video about plans to continue screenwritan absurdist, period drama, called ite kind of screenplay to write is an art gallery in Hudson, New ing in the future, but also noted ‘Tragic Prelude: The Plainsman absurd comedy, as he likes to see York, and a short video for Hop- that “directing and producing or A Short Break From Pasture his friends’ reactions of laugh- kins Varsity Field Hockey. He is more of a casual, fun thing.”

Senior Banner Unveiled at Prize Day Concert Choir Tours Spain & Portugal (Continued from page 7) “The one thing I always told my students and that I was very careful of was to double, triple, and quadruple check the names. On several occasions, I’ve had to go in either right before Prize Day or over the summer and add in the names,” Mueller recalled. The banner is not only one of the highly anticipated traditions of Prize Day, but also part of the Class of 2018’s impact on The Hill. Each year, Ziou tells his Fine Arts III class about the importance of their banner: “When the banner is unfurled in front of the school at Prize Day, it is a showpiece that should be optimistic and promote the major notion that the artists are not only representing Hopkins, but representing the good and humanity of the world.” Senior Class President Deepak Gupta ’18 said, “The Class Banner showcased all the incredible talents and uniqueness that could be found within our grade.” Senior Student Council Representative Andrew Roberge ’18 agreed that the banner depicted the best quali-

ties of the Class of 2018 and said, “I feel like our class has brought forth a lot of positive social change and I hope our banner commemorates us as that.” The Class of 2018’s senior banner joined more almost eight decades worth of banners displayed all around campus, each example illustrating the legacy of that class and the history of that year. Ziou mentioned the history of the banners, saying, “It is nearly impossible to forget about the banner from 2002 composed of individual portraits of each student in the grade. Even recently, the 2010 banner from the 350th celebration is full of vibrant colors and fireworks, while the idea for the 2012 banner was centered around global warming.” In order to keep track of the years of banners, Peters proposed a “‘key’ that would enable us to locate the photos of the banners easily on campus so that when an alum from the Class of [1999] wants to see their banner, we can tell them exactly where it is.” Anticipation was high on Prize Day when the Senior Banner was revealed to the entire Hopkins Community.

Eleanor Doolittle ’20 Arts Editor

This summer, Hopkins Concert Choir departs for a European tour of Spain and Portugal, visiting Lisbon, Madrid, Lagos, Seville, Toledo, and Granada. The choir will explore different cities throughout Spain and Portugal and perform at various venues, all whilst being immersed in the culture. CC Rocco ’20, a soprano in Concert Choir, said, “I am so excited to experience

‘Stars’ or ‘Cornerstone.’ Both pieces I have a lot of fun singing, and it is super hard to decide which one I like better.” Erika Schroth, the director of the trip and conductor of the choir said, “In addition to developing our sense of ensemble, we have a few new pieces which we will perform at various venues in Lisbon, Seville, Granada and Madrid with our host choirs.” There will be a concert on the day before departure where the choir, consist-

Jacqueline LaBelle-Young

Soloist and Concert Choir President Emeritus Kieran Anderson ’18 and Tour Choir members perform”Cornerstone” in their annual Spring concert at Church of the Redeemer.

Chantel Malin ’18, Bella Feder ’18, Julia Silbert ’18, Kyle Burton ’18, (L-R) and Owen Rahr ’18 (not pictured) are the menbers of the Fine Arts III class who created the Class of 2018 Banner, which was revealed to the entire Hopkins Community on Prize Day.

Chalk Poetry Continued

(Continued from page 7) So in a weird way, the sidewalk poetry also honors the sidewalks. They are part of our campus, too.” Some teachers are hoping to expand poetry beyond the sidewalks in other busy but unexpected places on campus. In order to unify this idea and National Poetry Month, Ridky said, “We’re working on selecting poems that could be installed a little more permanently in places other than sidewalks, like the salad bar line or the locker room, where students could experience poetry in a different way.” Johnson advised that all students should get involved with poetry even in small ways. To keep it simple, Johnson emphasized, “Everyone should read a poem. No, really!”

such an amazing trip. It will be so fun!” The repertoire for the trip includes pieces from the choir’s winter and spring concerts: “Indodana” by Michael Barrett and Ralf Schmitt, “Stars” by Sara Teasdale, “Woke Up This Morning” by Jeffrey Douma, “Gambaya” by Paul John Rudoi, “Waiting on the World to Change” by John Mayer, “La Seis Cuerdas” by Matthew Harris, This Land and Passage by Javier Busto, “O Magnum Mysterium” by Morten Lauridsen, “Cornerstone” by Shawn Kirchner, and “Run to You” arranged by Kirby Shaw. Soprano Casey Dies ’20 said, “Personally, my favorite song that concert choir performs is Pentatonix’s ‘Run to You.’ I’ve always been a fan of Pentatonix and it’s a beautiful five-part piece that I know will be a fan favorite.” Lauren Gillespie ’20, an alto, added, “I have to say my [favorite song] would be

ing of students in concert choir year round and students who learned the music outside of the class to perform on tour, will perform many of the pieces that will be showcased on tour. Schroth said that the concert will take place on Sunday, June 10, at 4:30 in the Yale Glee Club Room in Henrie Hall. Students not only will get the chance to perform internationally, but also will explore a new culture. Gillespie said “I’m most looking forward to singing in gorgeous cathedrals and churches and getting to collaborate with choirs from different countries! As far as culture, I’m really excited for Spanish food and getting to see the streets and people there!” Colin Flaumenhaft ’18 said, “I think I am most excited to explore such a new environment while still getting to do something I love: singing.” Viajes Seguros to the Concert Choir this summer!


SPORTS

June 7, 2018

Page 9

Athletes of the Issue Jake Rizzuti: Outstanding Outfielder Ethan Pritchard ’19 Jake Rizzuti ’18 first set foot on a baseball diamond in kindergarten. Almost immediately, he knew it was his sport. Like many of his family members, he was drawn to the game. Twelve years later, that passion for baseball is still very much a part of Rizzuti: “Baseball has always been my favorite sport,” said Rizzuti, “ever since I first stepped on a field.” After three years on the Varsity roster, Rizzuti was voted Boys’ Varsity Baseball captain for the 2018 season by his teammates. “Rizz leads by example,” said Jack Dove ’19, “he brings unparalleled energy and passion to the game and works incredibly hard in practice. He keeps the team accountable and pushes us everyday to get better and succeed.” Dylan Matchett ’21 added, “[Rizzuti] is the hardest worker and is always looking for extra reps.” Rizzuti’s leadership propelled the Hilltoppers to a winning record and to the finals of the Fairchester Athletic Association (FAA) tournament. In addition to his off-field impact, Rizzuti has a lot of responsibility on the diamond. “[Rizzuti] plays a versatile role on our team playing almost every defensive position on the field” said Head Coach Rocco DeMaio. Rizzuti’s comfort

anywhere on the field has in the FAA playoffs. “We allowed DeMaio to shuffle definitely have a chance in players and keep others the FAA this year,” Rizzuti in their ideal positions. stated. “If we can get more On the offensive consistency on offense side, Rizzuti bats in the we’ll be a tough out. We’re heart of Peter Mahakian the order and is among the most consistent contributors. The resilience, versatility, and w o r k ethic Rizzuti has gained through years of baseball have not gone unnoticed by his coaches. DeMaio said of Rizzuti: “His flex- Rizzuti stands at shortstop in a game against ibility and Greens Farms Academy. hustling style of play make him a a really energetic team. valuable team member. We feed off of each other.” Playing multiple sports Rizzuti is confihas helped Jake compete dent in the future of Hopand balance his time with kins baseball: “We only school and athletics.” Riz- have four seniors and zuti has demonstrated the most of the other teams results of his hard work in the FAA are graduaton the field all season. ing a lot of players,” he Hopkins lost in the said. Rizzuti hopes to conregular season to King, Rye tinue his baseball career Country Day, and Bruns- by walking on to the team wick, but Rizzuti is eager at Fordham University. to get another shot at them

Aislinn O’Brien: Killer Keeper challenging, and scary jobs one can have. It requires a level of commitment, dediAislinn O’Brien ’18 cation, and bravery that no is one of the co-captains of field player can match. Aisthe Girls Lacrosse Team linn stepped into the startPeter Mahakian ing Varsity goalie position as a ninth grader with only minimal training in the Junior School and she has been the heart and soul of our defense ever since.” O’Brien understood and accepted the challenges of being a goalie, as demonstrated by her extra training sessions. O’Brien defending the goal in a game against She exHamden Hall Country Day School. plained, “I started this spring. O’Brien played training with Eric Mueller lacrosse for a local team in in the spring of 8th grade so fourth grade, but unsatis- that I would be somewhat fied with her skill, she quit ready to start on Varsity my shortly after. At Hopkins, freshman year.” O’Brien decided to try laMueller also notcrosse in the Junior School. ed O’Brien’s dedication O’Brien has and leadership skills: “She played the position of goal- has played more minutes ie ever since seventh grade. over the past four years Girls Lacrosse Coach Eric than anyone else on the Mueller said, “[p]laying team and has never missed lacrosse goalie is one of a game because of illness or the most difficult, lonely, injury. In addition to tendAnu Vashist ’21 Assistant Sports Editor

ing the goal, Aislinn has been an outstanding team leader as one of this year’s captains. She is really going to be missed next year.” O’Brien’s teammates confirm Mueller’s words. Co-captain Annie Banks ’18, who has been playing lacrosse with O’Brien since seventh grade, recognized O’Brien’s perseverance: “My favorite thing about her as a teammate is she is always looking to improve. Even after a big win she likes to sit down and talk about what we did wrong and how we can fix it in the future. This striving for greatness makes her a great athlete.” Maeve Stauff ’21 noted how O’Brien was able to demonstrate her leadership by protecting the team: “Aislinn is really important to the team because she’s the goalie so we always want to protect her, but she ends up protecting us.” O’Brien mentioned that goal-setting helps her get through difficult games. She stated, “Our team goal this year was to make it to the FAA playoffs, and we did! My individual goal is obviously to make as many saves as I can, and I feel like I did my best to maintain a positive mindset even when we weren’t doing so well in games.” O’Brien hopes to play club lacrosse next year in college.

Russia 2018: The World Cup Without the United States Teddy Glover ’21 Assistant Sports Editor As the world waits with bated breath for the 2018 World Cup, many Americans will be left with a sense of disappointment as they watch the most viewed sporting event on Earth begin, without the presence of the United States Men’s National Team. Occurring every four years, the World Cup is a soccer tournament consisting of the best thirty-two teams from around the world. This summer, for the first time since 1990, the competition will kick off without the United States. This failure has left many players and fans alike frustrated. Lucio Moscarini ’19, this year’s Boys Varsity Soccer captain, said, “As an avid soccer fan and player, seeing the lack of growth in the USMNT program is quite frustrating. I think a major part of the issue is the academy system for club soccer, which is just a pay-for-play system. Many skilled players who cannot afford to pay thousands of dollars every year to play soccer are cut off from the system, which leaves mostly wealthy people in the potential player pool that will actually draw attention from scouts,” says Moscarini. While America certainly does not lack talent, misuse of available resources and an emphasis on money deplete the system of talent, lowering the success of the USMNT. Ella Zuse ’21 of Girls Varsity Soccer added, “It’s frustrating to witness the constant turnover of coaches, with no significant change evident in the program.” Not only do players notice this clear defect in the train-

ing of young players, but coaches also observe the failures of the U.S. soccer programs. Joe Addison, Head Coach of Boys Varsity Soccer, believes that “the failure of the US men’s team to qualify

U.S. soccer program led to the USMNT not qualifying for the World Cup “in one of the weakest qualifying conferences in the world,” causing coaches and players to take note, said Moscarini. While frustration is prevalent among those involved with the sport, shock and humiliation also ran deep through the hearts of Americans as they watched the U.S. lose to Trinidad and Tobago, a country with a population of slightly over a million. Ella Fujimori ’21 of Girls Varsity Soccer, recalled: “I watched the game that eliminated the USMNT from being in the world cup with my brother; it was heartbreaking and humiliating watching them lose to Trinidad and Tobago.” Jack Dove ’19, another varsity soccer player, added, “As a soccer player, it’s disappointing and embarrassing to not see my nation take the field on the biggest stage.” To many who play the sport and to many who do not, watching the World Cup without the USMNT will be immeasurably mortifying. Although clear issues reside in the way U.S. youth soccer programs are run, Dove, sharing a popular opinion, “hope[s] [that] this shock creates change Christian Pulisic of the USMNT holds his head in disbelief after a shocking in U.S. soccer culture and development.” However, loss to Trinidad and Tobago. Addison deems “there are massive organizational and philosophical shifts that need to happen if we are gofor the World Cup is a clear indictment of youth soccer in this ing to produce a team capable of winning a World Cup, much country.” A former player, Addison states, “it’s clear that the best less capable of qualifying for one.” While it may not be apparent players - technical players with tremendous vision - have not during this year’s World Cup, the program does have the capabilbeen given a fair shot in this country.” This deficiency in the ity to change. Moscarini said, “I have faith in American players.”


Page 10

The Razor: Sports

Spring Sports Wrap-Up

Boys Varsity Track Captains: Jonah Norwitt ’18, Kyle Burton ’18

June 7, 2018

Boys Varsity Tennis Captains: Phil Schmitt ’18, Alex Kane ’18 Record: 9-6

Girls Varsity Lacrosse Captains: Annie Banks ’18, Libby Gardner ’18, Aislinn O’Brien ’18 Record: 3-10

Boys Varsity Baseball Captains: Jake Rizutti ’18, Chris Borter ’19 Record: 10-8

Boys Varsity Lacrosse Captains: Chris Sherk ’18, Mitchell Delfini ’18 Record: 4-9

Girls Varsity Tennis Captains: Marion Conklin ’18, Catherine duBoulay ’18, Sam Phelan ’18 Record: 16-0 FAA Champions New England Champions

Varsity Crew Captains: Sam Dies ’18 and Declan Goulding ’18 Record: 3-2

Girls Varsity Water Polo Captains: Karyn Bartosic ’18, Georgia Doolittle ’18 Record: 10-8

Varsity Golf Captains: Abir Singh ’18, Olly Zane ’18 Record: 4-9

Girls Varsity Track Captains: Grace El-Fishawy ’18, Lilly Tipton ’18, Rachel Hagani ’18

Varsity Softball Captains: Gigi Speer ’18, Jess D’Errico ’18 Record: 10-3

Varsity Golf photo courtesy of Hopkins Golf Team. All other photos courtesy of Peter Mahakian.


COMMENDATIONS June 7, 2018

GRADE 12

Mary Brewster Thompson Scholar.........................................................................Clara Everett Norman L. Stone Award......................................................................................Genevieve Speer Donald Ferguson Award..........................................................................................Nia Simmons Donald Ferguson Award............................................................................................Lillian Tipton F. Allen Sherk Award...............................................................................................Donasia Gray John A. Wilkinson Award.................................................................................Georgia Doolittle Michael J. Theobald Prize...................................................................Erin Knox, Mike Lazarre The Gerald F. Stevens Memorial Scholarship..................................Jake Rizzuti, Lionel Louis Comcast Leaders and Achievers Scholarship....................................................Genevieve Speer NewHavenSpotlight..................................................MikeLazarre,GraceBarket, Neal Sarin, Bryan Gu, Unique Parker, Sophia Vranos

GRADE 11 Mary Brewster Thompson Scholar.................................................................Adwith Mukherjee George Blakeman Lovell Award..........................................................................Doug Guilford Andrew Rossetti Prize....................................................................................................JR Stauff Mount Holyoke Book Prize..........................................................................Catherine Lasersohn Harvard Book Prize..............................................................................................Clare Chemery Kenyon College Presidential Book Prize................................................................Melody Parker Smith Book Award..................................................................................................Naomi Tomlin Yale Book Award............................................................................................Alexander Hughes Wellesley College Book Prize........................................................................Fi Schroth-Douma Ellen Patterson Brown ‘62 Award..................................................................Madeleine Walker The University of Chicago Book Award.......................................................Benjamin Goldstein St. Lawrence University Book Award.........................................................................Siraj Patwa Princeton Alumni Association of Eastern Connecticut Book Award..................Theodore Tellides William and Mary Leadership Award...................................................................Samuel Jenkins George Washington Book Award..................................................................................Jack Dove

GRADE 10 Mary Brewster Thompson Scholar.......................................................................Parker Connelly Stanley Daggett Award...................................................................................Lizabeth Bamgboye

GRADE 9 Mary Brewster Thompson Scholar...........................................................................Suraj Kalaria Stanley Daggett Award.........................................................................................Ranease Brown

GRADE 8 Lydia von Wettberg Award.........................................................................................Nati Tesfaye Simeon E. Baldwin Leadership Award...................................................................Tyler Eveland Kristin Ridinger Taurchini Award...............................................................................Pearl Miller

GRADE 7 Lydia von Wettberg Award.........................................................................Harini Thiruvengadam Simeon E. Baldwin Leadership Award....................................................................Miko Coakley

THE ARTS Paul W. Schueler Prize for the Visual Arts.......................................................Isabella Feder (12) Drama Award...............................................................................................Kayleigh Mellilo (12) The Charles Ives Instrumental Music Prize..............................................................Mark Xu (12) Choral Music Award....................................................................................Kieran Anderson (12)

THE CLASSICS Clare McNamee Latin Prize................................................................................Abby Miller (12) Junior School Latin Prize..................................................................................Haniya Farooq (8) Jeremiah Peck Greek Prize...........................................................................Will Rosenbluth (12)

ENGLISH

Page 11

Major James Dudley Dewell Letter Writing Prize........................................Elliot Calderone (8) Baldwin Prize Essay, Middle School.................................................................Abby Fossati (9) Baldwin Prize Essay, Senior School....................................................................Emily Ruan (12) John B. Smith Prize for Excellence in English in Grade 8.......................................Maisie Bilston Brown University Book Award...........................................................................Maliya Ellis (11) Elizabeth Tate Prize for Excellence in English in Grade 11....................................Emma DeNaples Elsie Church Award for English and Dramatics............................................Georgia Doolittle (12) Elizabeth Lewis Day Prize for Excellence in Imaginative Writing............Clay Wackerman (12) The Susan E. Feinberg Prize for Excellence in Critical Thinking Through the Written Word...................................................................................Jeffrey Gu (12) George Gillespie Prize for Excellence in Literary Scholarship...................Madison Howard (12) Helen Hope Barton Prize for Excellence in English in Grade 12....................Emilia Cottignoli The Karen Lee Pritzker Prize for Creative Writing..................................................Eli Sabin (12)

MODERN LANGUAGES Edward R. DeNoyon French Prize....................................................................Jonah Norwitt (12) Denise M. Katz French Prize...........................................................................Olivier Kibbey (12) The Spanish Literature Prize.....................................................................Sasha Starovoitov(12) The Hispanic Letters Prize.........................................................................Lucio Moscarini (12) The Chinese Letters Prize...................................................................................Dylan Sloan (12) The Italian Letters Prize.................................................................................Marion Conklin (12) Alliance Francaise of New Haven Book Award.............................................Michelle Medina (12)

HISTORY Kenneth Hopkins Rood History Prize..............................................................Robert Lawler (8) Julia B. Thomas History Prize..................................................................................Ella Zuse (9) DeLaney Kiphuth Prize in History..............................................................Noah Schmeisser (11) Gerald F. Stevens Award..................................................................................Zander Blitzer (12)

MATHEMATICS Edgar M. Babbitt Junior School Mathematics Prize.........................................Ingrid Slattery (7) Edgar M. Babbitt Middle School Mathematics Prize......................................David Metrick (10) Edgar M. Babbitt Senior School Mathematics Prize.........................................David Darrow (12) John M. Heath Mathematics Prize...............................................................Samantha Phelan (12)

SCIENCE Aracy Belcher Biology Prize............................................................................Evan Alfandre (9) Harold Shelton Kirby Science Prize....................................................Burton Lyng-Olsen (10) Rensselaer Medal.................................................................................................Ethan Silver (11) Josiah Willard Gibbs Prize......................................................................................Ajay Mitra (12) Fairfield University Excellence in Science and Math Award..................Benjamin Goldstein (11)

ATHLETICS Dorrance Award...........................................................................................John Blumenthal (12) The Hopkins Award................................................................................... Genevieve Speer (12) Robert Wyant Memorial Award...................................................................Mitchell Delfini (12) Jerri Trulock DPH Sportsmanship Award....................................................Jessica D’Errico (12) William DeGennaro Outstanding Male Athlete Award......................................Dylan Sloan (12) Outstanding Female Athlete Award.....................................................................Annie Banks 12) Walter Camp Award (Junior School)....................................................................Liam Spellacy (8) DPH Sportsmanship Award (Junior School).........................................................Orly Baum (8) The Jordan William Sebastian Award...............................Erin Knox (12), Spencer Lockhart (12)


Page 12

June 7, 2018

Congratulations Hopkins Class of 2018! From the Razor Staff

Peter Mahakian American University

Dickinson College

Saint Mary’s College

Bard College (2)

Drew University

University of Southern California

Barnard College (2)

Drexel University

Stanford University (2)

Bates College

Emory University

The University of Texas, Austin

Bentley University

Fordham University (3)

University of Toronto

Berklee College of Music

Franklin & Marshall College

Tufts University (6)

Boston College (2)

Georgetown University (6)

Tulane University

Boston University

Harvard University (4)

Union College - NY (2)

Bowdoin College (3)

Johns Hopkins University (2)

Universidad de las AmĂŠricas Puebla

Brandeis University

Kenyon College

University of St. Andrews

Brown University (4)

Lafayette College

Vassar College

Bryn Mawr College (2)

Lehigh University

Villanova University

Bucknell University

Loyola Marymount University

Wake Forest University

University of California, Los Angeles

University of Maryland, College Park (2)

Washington University, St. Louis (3)

Carleton College

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Wellesley College

Carnegie Mellon University

University of Michigan

Wheaton College - MA (2)

Champlain College

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Williams College

University of Chicago (9)

New York University (4)

Yale University (13)

Colby College

Northeastern University (2)

Colgate University

Northwestern University (2)

Columbia University (3)

Pennsylvania State University

University of Connecticut (2)

University of Pennsylvania (2)

Cornell University (2)

University of Pittsburgh

Dartmouth College

University of Richmond (2)

University of Denver

Rollins College

Numbers listed after colleges indicate that multiple Hopkins students will be attending those institutions next year.

The Razor - June 2018  
The Razor - June 2018