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Winter 2019

INVESTING IN LEADERSHIP mindset. It is an investment in the next generation of Susan Henderson, Team Support Director; Shannon leaders that helps organizations create new ways of Pociask, Service Director; and Kim Black, Associate doing business in the world that crosses cultural and Director of Hope House Foundation participated in language boundaries. the INSEAD Program for Social Entrepreneurship. The participants agreed As one of the world’s the educational experience leading and largest was beneficial in many graduate business schools, ways. Lessons included how INSEAD offers participants to scale a business for even a global educational greater impact, developing experience, and more outside funding, decisionthan 11,000 executives making frameworks and participate in its education the importance of staying programs each year. Our true to the mission. representatives from the leadership team were able Shannon Pociask, Susan Henderson and Kim Black “The course provided us to attend through fees with the tools to continue to lead the way for services earned from Lynne Seagle’s consulting and speaking engagements. The goal of the educational program is for individuals with disabilities well into the future,” to develop value-driven business leaders with a global said Susan Henderson.

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DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT By Lynne Seagle

Direct support professionals must demonstrate a multitude of skills. They must have above-average planning skills and extreme flexibility as well as a thorough knowledge of disabilities, conditions and methods of communication. They must follow the rules, take risks and be creative, collaborative, self-directed, emotionally intelligent and of course, compassionate.

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And, they are asked to do this for a wage that falls 25%-50% below living wage standards. In the U.S., the average hourly rate for a direct support professional is $10.80 with many working needing two to three jobs to pay their bills. Nearly half are dependent on public benefits so there is little wonder that this group has an annual turnover rate of 40%50%.

are not minimum-wage positions but rather professional positions that require specialized skills, knowledge and attitudes. It is a travesty that the people who love this work and are good at it must give it up because they literally cannot afford to live while doing it.

WE NEED THE BEST AND THE BRIGHTEST TO GO INTO PUBLIC SERVICE.

Valerie Plame

Today, a national workforce shortage is clear and it continues to worsen. I know of no organization that does not see this as the most critical issue as they struggle to provide individualized and quality supports for people with intellectual or developmental disabilities. These positions

Advocacy for people with disabilities must also include advocacy for direct support professionals. The two are entwined if we are to achieve true inclusion and success.

HOGS FOR HOPE AT HANK’S FILLING STATION IN NORFOLK

At Hope House, we enjoy a turnover rate far less than the national average, and our hourly pay rate is a bit better as well. We have built a culture where all voices are heard and participation in decision making is the norm. We invest in staff retreats, bonus programs, celebrations of longevity, training, education and promotion from within. All of this helps, but more must be done.

People with disabilities and their families thrive with the best and the brightest direct service professional. It is not an option to go backwards. Those who provide direct support truly exemplify the word “professional” in all aspects but the compensation.

LYNNE SEAGLE RECEIVES TOWN AND GOWN AWARD Lynne Seagle, executive director of Hope House Foundation, was awarded the Town-N-Gown Rita M. Costello Community Service Award at Old Dominion University. The award recognizes individuals from the Hampton Roads community who have demonstrated unusual concern for and commitment to serving others. Lynne Seagle began her career at Hope House Foundation in 1978 as director of residential services and has been the executive director for more than three decades. She has been at the helm of change for her entire career and has become an international figure in the fight for equality and rights for people with disabilities. Under her leadership, Hope House has become known for its innovative, person-centered approach. One of her proudest accomplishments was guiding the organization through the transition from group homes to supporting people in their own homes in the early 1990s. Hope House is the only organization in Virginia to provide support for people with developmental disabilities exclusively in their own homes.

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AT HOPE HOUSE FOUNDATION, WE BELIEVE NEIGHBORHOODS AND COMMUNITIES ARE ENRICHED WHEN EVERYONE PARTICIPATES TO THE FULLEST EXTENT POSSIBLE. AND THAT INCLUDES PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES.

TOWNEBANK ELVES DECORATED THE TREE IN THE HOPE HOUSE ADMINISTRATION OFFICE. DELEGATE ROB BLOXOM MEETS WITH KIM ROSE, JESSE AND GREY PERSONS WITH HOPE HOUSE BEFORE BUDGET HEARINGS.

SENATOR LIONEL SPRUILL TAKES A TOUR WITH GRACE.

VEER GOLDEN TAP AWARD WINNERS! HOPE HOUSE FOUNDATION WON BEST NON-BREWERY EVENT FEATURING CRAFT BEER FOR SHAMROCKIN’ IN GHENT.


801 Boush Street Suite 302 Norfolk, VA 23510 Hope-House.org t· 757-625-6161 f· 757-625-7775 Hope House is a certified United Way of Hampton Roads agency. Designation #5070

UPCOMING EVENTS February 12 VEER Magazine’s Music Awards

| Granby Theater

March 8 Shamrockin’ in Ghent TBA Starfire Festival 3 Proud Member of the National Association of Direct Support Professionals

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