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ANNUAL PQI REPORT 2016

Katie Heywood, Quality Assurance Coordinator CREATED APRIL 2017 S:\GENERAL ALL STAFF USE\Annual PQI Report\2016

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 1 Summary of Key PQI Activities in 2016 ........................................................................................................................................................................ 2 BridgeSPAN Hospital Advocacy Program ..................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Court Advocacy Program .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 6 Guardian Program ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 12 Outreach Advocacy Program (Began June 2016) ....................................................................................................................................................... 15 Child and Family Advocacy ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 17 Hotline ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 20 Shelter.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 24 Transitional Housing ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 34 Clinical Services ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 36 2017 Priorities and Goals ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 47

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HOPE HOUSE, INC. – PQI REPORT SUMMARY OF KEY PQI ACTIVITIES IN 2016

The largest accomplishment regarding Performance and Quality Improvement (PQI) in 2016 for Hope House was developing an agency wide PQI Plan. Hope House’s PQI Plan utilizes both qualitative and quantitative methods and will be integrated into every task the agency performs. At its foundation, the PQI Plan upholds the agency’s mission and values, and exists to build organizational excellence, deliver quality services, and provide improved client outcomes. The PQI Plan describes the agency-wide processes that are used to regularly evaluate interventions, to ensure a high level of quality in all tasks, and to provide services that are evidence-informed and aligned with Hope House’s mission. One facet of the PQI Plan is the development of a PQI Team. The PQI Team is responsible for reviewing, assessing, and monitoring data to look for trends, problems, improvements, and potential action steps to address identified issues. Performance measures, indicators, and benchmarks are assessed and approved by the PQI Team. Information from PQI Team meetings is shared with the senior management team, the Board of Directors, and program managers. Staff is also updated as to any decisions or changes which might be implemented through the PQI Team through program-level staff meetings, agency-wide staff meetings, or emails. Members of the PQI Team include the Chief Operating Officer, Chief Quality Officer, Director of Clinical Services, Director of Outreach Programs, Director of Shelter Services, the Shelter Managers, Quality Assurance Coordinator (QAC), and any other staff member, board member, client, or volunteer who wishes to join the committee Other PQI projects that have been completed include: • • • •

Logic Models: Logic Models are reviewed at least annually by the Program Director/Manager, the QAC, and/or the PQI Team. Meeting Minute Templets: Minutes are maintained for all individual supervision meetings, program meetings, manager’s meetings, and full-staff meetings. Agenda items include PQI and Risk Management topics. Monthly Program Reports: Each Program Manager/Director is responsible for completing the report to include both quantitative and qualitative information about the program. Risk Prevention Management Plan (RPM Plan): RPM Plan addresses issues such as critical incidents, accidents, and/or grievances that are brought to the attention of Program Directors and /or Senior Management. Risk management information is included as part of the quarterly PQI Reports.

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BRIDGESPAN HOSPITAL ADVOCACY PROGRAM Outcome and Client Survey Results As shown in the chart below, by year end the BridgSPAN Program had met all program outcome targets, with the exception of the training outcome, for which no outcomes were collected. At the end of formal trainings sessions with medical personnel and students, Hope House requests attendees fill out a voluntary training evaluation. Hope House did not provide any formal training sessions. Although no formal trainings occurred, Hope House did provide informal trainings to medical personnel during their scheduled department meetings and/or shift changes. Due to the informal nature of the trainings and the limited time allowed for the trainings, training evaluations were not distributed. Hope House staff provided ten informal trainings to a total of 165 medical personnel discussing topics such as BridgeSPAN services and proper screening procedures, Hope House services, and the Lethality Assessment Program. Additionally, Hope House hosted table displays at five health fairs, making contact with 291 attendees.

Outcome Statements At least 95% of clients will develop a safety plan.

At least 25% of clients will complete one of the following steps: file an order of protection; enter into shelter; or press charges against their batterer. At least 85% of clients receiving follow-up services will report they received helpful resource information from the advocate. At least 75% of clients receiving follow-up services will report they engaged in at least one safety behavior. (FVPSA) - At least 65% or more of domestic violence survivors will have strategies for enhancing their safety.

Jan 2016 – March 2016

April 2016 – June 2016

July 2016Sept 2016

Oct 2016 – Dec 2061

CY 2016

CY 2015 Comparison

10/11 91%

22/25 88%

22/22 100%

22/22 100%

76/80 95%

69/71 97%

7/11 64%

8/25 32%

14/22 64%

7/22 32%

36/80 45%

29/71 41%

1/1 100%

4/4 100%

6/6 100%

9/9 100%

20/20 100%

23/23 100%

1/1 100%

4/4 100%

6/6 100%

9/9 100%

20/20 100%

24/26 92%

11/11 100%

22/23 96%

22/22 100%

18/18 100%

73/74 97%

60/63 95%

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(FVPSA) - At least 65% or more of domestic violence survivors will have knowledge of available community resources. (STOP) At least 65% or more of domestic violence survivors will report having received support to improve their ability to cope with the aftermath of domestic violence.

11/11 100%

23/23 100%

22/22 100%

18/18 100%

74/74 100%

60/63 95%

11/11 100%

23/23 100%

22/22 100%

18/18 100%

74/74 100%

60/63 95%

0

0

0

61/62 98%

BridgeSPAN Training At least 85% of medical personnel and students attending BridgeSPAN training sessions will increase their knowledge of domestic violence.

Did You Feel Supported/Respected by the Advocate? No, 1 1%

0

0

Referring Hospital (80)

31%

35%

Centerpoint, 28 Lee's Summit, 2 St. Luke's, 15 St. Mary's, 10

13% Yes, 74 99%

Truman, 25 19%

2%

4


Patient Feels Safe Going Home

Lethality Assessment Indicated High Danger

25% 45% 55%

No, 54 Yes, 55

Yes, 26

No, 18 75%

Comments on Successes and Challenges In 2016 the Hospital Advocate was a part-time position, meaning providing effective and efficient services directly to survivors was prioritized over providing training to hospital staff. The part-time nature of the position left little to no time to provide formal training opportunities for area hospital staff. Compounding this challenge was area hospitals’ choice to move from formal in-person trainings to an online system of training for their personnel. To overcome this challenge, Hope House continued to meet with hospital personnel in more informal ways to ensure consistent communication and training opportunities. Although Hope House maintained a presence within area hospitals through department meetings, shift changes, and health fairs, the lack of formal training was evident. Hope House learned some hospital personnel were screening patients for domestic violence with other family members, possibly their abusive partner, in the room. This practice not only compromises patient safety, but does not provide the opportunity for a patient to confidentially disclose the abuse they may be experiencing with their healthcare provider. In response BridgeSPAN personnel attended multiple meetings with the hospital leadership reminding them Hope House is always available for trainings and tours. Additionally they are regularly attending hospital task force meetings. With grant funding from the Healthcare Foundation, in September Hope House was able to reinstate the Hospital Advocate as full-time to help combat the training and screening challenges mentioned above. 5


COURT ADVOCACY PROGRAM Outcome and Client Survey Results As shown in the chart below, the Court Advocacy Program met all program outcome targets in CY 2016.

Outcome Statements (FVPSA) At least 65% or more of domestic violence survivors will have strategies for enhancing their safety (FVPSA) At least 65% or more of domestic violence survivors will have knowledge of available community resources. (STOP) At least 65% or more of domestic violence survivors will report having received support to improve their ability to cope with the aftermath of domestic violence. (SSVF & VOCA) At least 80% of clients going through the court process will understand their role in the court procedure.

Jan 2016 – March 2016 12/12 100%

April 2016 – June 2016 28/28 100%

July 2016Sept 2016 34/35 97%

Oct 2016 – Dec 2016 18/18 100%

CY 2016 92/93 99%

CY 2015 Comparison 100/100 100%

11/12 92%

28/28 100%

34/35 97%

18/18 100%

91/93 98%

100/100 100%

12/12 100%

28/28 100%

34/35 97%

18/18 100%

92/93 99%

100/100 100%

161/161 100%

94/94 100%

162/162 100%

215/215 100%

632/632 100%

Not Collected

Did You Feel Supported/Respected by the Advocate? 1% Yes 92 No 1

*Court Support Services and Advocacy Survey

99%

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Summary of Activities Provided

Police Re-Visit Information - All Cities

LAP Follow-Up Information - All Cities 70

45 42

40

64

60

35 30

30

20

27

26

25 19

19

20

20

15

46

0

5

5

6

5

2

Police Re-Visit Attempts

4

6

41

38 23

20 5

49 44

43

30

19

13 4

55

44

16

10 5

59

53

40

24

22

50

61

7

7 2

Police Revisit Contacts

10

10

18

11

22 14

16

17

17

18 10

0

Un-Successful

Successful Contacts

7


Police Call-Outs 18

20 15 10

5

4

4

3

2

2

5 0

ACT

LS

Raytown

Grandview

Ind

BS

Other

Police Call-Outs

Police Report Information - All Cities 300 261

250 213

200

205

50

84

95

68

56

199

January

February

239 189

178

165 113

65

90

103

64 87

249

217

150 100

258

246

54

75

April

May

103

85

117 76

84

53

49

68

73

68

82

June

July

August

September

October

November

49

0 March

Contacted by Phone

Letter Sent

December

Victim Impact Sheets

8


FOP Court Cases by City 1200 1000 985 800 600

# of Cases

400 200

300

263

38

68

Buckner

Grain Valley

22

180

198

Raytown

Other

123

0 Blue Springs

Grandview Independence Kansas City Lee's Summit

Order of Protection with Staff Assistance Information

100%

1 0

0

22

3

5 5

80% 60%

3 2

49

40%

6

20% 0% Emergency Order - Adult

Emergency Order - Child

Granted

Non-Emergency Order Adult Denied

Non-Emergency Order Child

Summons

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Total Cases and Talked To Victim (TTV) Information Total Cases

GV and All Other

Blue Springs

Lee's Summit

Percentage Contacted

675

2202

616

TTV

35%

309 50%

760

Independence

485

64%

2955

965

33%

*TTV Number = Court Appearances + Talk with Victim Court Calls (S:\Court Program\Monthly Stats\Court Stats\2016)

Comments on Successes and Challenges Due to limited resources, the Independence Police Department made the decision to no longer conduct domestic violence warrant sweeps. The lack of warrant sweeps has led to a significant decrease in the number of warrants being served. Additionally, a larger gap between the time an incident occurs and prosecution decreases offender accountability and victim safety. When victims must wait for their offender to be arrested, charged, and prosecuted their confidence in the criminal justice system may diminish and the likelihood of an offender continuing to harass and abuse increases. 10


The Court Program continues to facilitate the Coordinated Community Council (CCC) for both Lee’s Summit and Independence, facilitating seven meetings in 2016. The CCC brings together community partners and service providers to discuss trends, issues, and how to best solve these issues. Representatives from various agencies allow for discussion from varying view points and allows for a holistic picture of the trends and issues. The Council has led to an increase in community knowledge, coordination of services, and an increase in victim satisfaction with and knowledge of available community resources. In 2017 strategic planning to develop a CCC in Blue Springs is scheduled to begin. Due to the continued relationship between Lee’s Summit Police Department and Jackson County’s Adult Abuse Office, Lee’s Summit Police Department’s Intelligence Office is now broadcasting the name and photo of respondents on recently issued Ex-Parte and Full Order of Protection cases. The information is broadcasted on the department’s Intel television which is seen by all patrol officers during their shift briefings. This new procedure is bridging the gap between the civil and criminal legal systems and creating a safety net of services for victims while also ensuring offender accountability.

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GUARDIAN PROGRAM Outcome and Client Survey Results As show in the chart below, the Guardian Program met all outcome targets in CY 2016. Program staff observe each exchange/visit to ascertain whether the participants were safe and also whether the exchange/visit was held or terminated. If an exchange/visit is terminated, program staff complete a Termination Form to record why the exchange/visit was terminated and if participants were safe. The Guardian Program prioritizes the safety of children and custodial parents, so exchanges/visits may be terminated if program staff determine the safety of either is at risk. The desired result is a safe exchange/visit and/or a terminated exchange that maintained both the child and custodial parent’s safety.

Outcome Statements 100% of children and custodial parents will remain safe during monitored exchanges of custody. 100% of children and custodial parents will remain safe during on-site supervised visits.

Jan 2016 – March 2016

April 2016 – June 2016

July 2016Sept 2016

Oct 216 – Dec 2016

CY 2016

CY 2015 Comparison

154/154 100%

107/107 100%

137/137 100%

114/114 100%

512/512 100%

100%

734/734 100%

677/677 100%

690/690 100%

721/721 100%

2822/2822 100%

100%

Summary of Activities Provided

New Clients Families

Monitored Exchanges Supervised Visits

3

Children

5 31

48

12


All Activities Total Activities: Total Clients:

5152 256

Total Duration In Hours: Total Grouped Activities:

3876.75 2907

3000 2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0

Custodial Parent Contact Contacts 1331 Hours

337.25

Program Intake 102

Monitored Exchange 601

NC Parent Contact 172

Supervised Visitation-Group 2694

Supervised Visitation-1 on 1 252

44

155

43.75

2987

309.75

13


Program Departure Reason Other, 3 16%

Found Alternate, 3 16%

Order Change, 4 21% NC Parent Suspended, 9 47%

Uncompleted Visit/Exchange 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

69

64 41

20

41 8

4

14

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OUTREACH ADVOCACY PROGRAM (BEGAN JUNE 2016) Outcome and Client Survey Results The Outreach Advocacy Program began in June of 2016. Because it was not in operation for a full year, robust outcomes are not available at this time. However, the program is collecting the following outcomes and results will be report in 2017: • 90% of clients will complete a safety plan. • 90% of clients will receive adequate resources and referrals to meet their immediate needs. • 90% of clients will have strategies for enhancing their safety. • 90% of clients will have knowledge of available community resources. • 90% of clients will report having received support to improve their ability to cope with the aftermath of domestic violence. • 70% of clients will make progress toward or complete goals identified during their interactions with the advocate. Summary of Activities Provided Total Activities: Total Clients: Total Duration In Hours:

338 59 269.25

Service Crisis Intervention General Support Group Advocacy Weekly Meeting

11 295 1 31

15


Referral Source

Basic Needs

33

41 36 31 20 14

13 8

3

4

3

Other

Bridge

Furniture Therapy

Court

Legal

Hotline

Food Baskets

Hygiene Kits Clothing Closet Car Ministry Referral

Comments on Successes and Challenges Hope House created the Outreach Advocacy Program to fill a gap in services for victims who are not residing in shelter but may need similar case management services as those offered to shelter residents. Clients are referred by other agency staff who come into contact with survivors (through court or therapy for example), and the Outreach Advocate meets with them to identify their needs and goals. The Outreach Advocate can provide crisis intervention, safety planning, case management, and service linkage and resource referrals.

16


CHILD AND FAMILY ADVOCACY Outcome and Client Survey Results As show in the chart below, by year end the Child and Family Advocacy Program had met all program outcome targets, with the exception of the outcome that pertains to the clients’ confidence in their ability to address needs. Hope House clients often report that they have been told for some time that they are bad moms, that they are uncaring, don't do the right things for their children, etc. Because of this, Hope House realizes that improving clients’ confidence in their own skills may take quite a long time to accomplish, and that this outcome is a difficult one to reach with the shelter population who do not remain in services for long periods of time. Also of note, the Child and Family Advocacy program modified the outcomes it collected in 2016, so comparison data is not available for most measures.

Outcomes At least 90% of children will feel safe. At least 70% of children residing in shelter for at least 2 weeks will utilize the youth resource center. At least 80% of survivors will have increased knowledge about community resources. (SSVF) At least 50% of survivors will increase their confidence in their ability to address the needs of their children. At least 70% of survivors will make progress toward or complete child/family-related goals identified during their stay in shelter.

Jan 16– March 16

April 16 – June 16

July 2016- Sept 2016

Oct 2016 – Dec 2016

CY 2016

CY 2015 Comparison

49/49 100%

15/15 100%

58/62 94%

37/39 95%

142/148 96%

52/52 100%

41/47 87%

26/33 79%

74/100 74%

56/67 84%

198/224 88%

Not Collected

6/7 86%

12/12 100%

13/13 100%

13/14 93%

49/51 96%

Not Collected

14/29 48%

26/61 43%

22/44 50%

22/45 49%

84/179 47%

Not Collected

11/11 100%

11/11 100%

18/19 95%

17/20 85%

57/61 93%

Not Collected 17


18


Summary of Activities Provided

The Great Plains SPCA has regularly visited the youth resource center in Independence with foster dogs. Studies have shown that time spent with animals, specifically dogs, is beneficial to health and lowers stress. This is not only fun for the children who reside in shelter, but also therapeutic, and the dogs seem to enjoy it as well.

An often overlooked aspect of providing a therapeutic place for survivors and their children is fun. Children from violent homes have too often had few opportunities to have fun and build social skills. Hope House partners with a Boy Scout leader who comes on a regular basis to provide some of the young men in shelter with wilderness skills, team and self-esteem building, and a positive male role model.

19


HOTLINE Outcome and Client Survey Results As shown in the chart below, the Hotline program met all target outcome percentages in CY2016.

Outcomes

Jan 16– March 16

April 16 – June 16

July 2016- Sept 2016

Oct 2016 – Dec 2016

CY 2016

CY 2015 Comparison

75% of callers accepted into shelter will receive support and understanding from the hotline operator.

68/72 94%

131/132 99%

129/142 91%

126/130 97%

454/476 95%

349/365 96%

70/72 97%

133/136 98%

131/141 93%

128/130 98%

462/476 97%

351/370 95%

75% of callers accepted into shelter will have an increased understanding of domestic or sexual violence and on ways to remain safe. Summary of Activities Provided

20


Total Calls: Total Duration (hrs): Number of Calls with Women Turned Away: Number of Calls with Children Turned Away: Number of Calls with Men Turned Away:

4,501 1,080.51 1,292 939 68

Average Hotline Calls Per Day: 12.3

21


22


23


SHELTER Outcome and Client Survey Results As shown in the chart below, the Emergency Shelter program did not meet all target outcome percentages in CY2016. While it measures perceptions of safety after entering shelter, Hope House understands that some clients may not feel safe no matter how many interventions are available to them, and they may feel as if they are in increased danger after leaving their abuser. Additionally, outcome measures that look at confidence did not meet the target percentage. There are several factors that need to be considered, including clients leaving shelter services without enough direct knowledge of domestic violence and the fact that the majority of clients are dealing with acute trauma. There is a difficulty in gauging effectiveness of intervention due to short-term stays, and a more pressing need to address PTSD symptoms.

Emergency Shelter Outcomes At least 70% of clients will report an increased sense of safety in first 24 hours in shelter. At least 70% of clients will report an increased sense of safety in first week in shelter. At least 85% of clients will have basic needs met for themselves and their children in first 24 hours in shelter. At least 85% of clients will have basic needs met for themselves and their children in first week in shelter. At least 85% of clients will complete a safety plan at initial advocacy. (United Way) At least 65% or more of domestic violence survivors will have strategies for enhancing their safety(FVPSA & United Way) (exit)

Jan 16– March 16 51/79 65% 25/38 66%

April 16 – June 16 75/117 64% 45/71 63%

July 2016Sept 2016 92/143 64% 60/89 67%

Oct 2016 – Dec 2016 98/133 74% 65/87 75%

CY 2016 316/472 67% 195/285 68%

CY 2015 Comparison 351/468 75% 223/302 74%

53/65 82%

108/126 86%

117/145 81%

105/129 81%

383/465 82%

357/466 77%

33/39 85%

68/76 89%

83/94 88%

68/84 81%

252/293 86%

243/296 82%

106/108 98%

147/150 98%

149/149 100%

140/142 98%

542/548 99%

506/624 81%

32/35 91%

42/47 89%

38/46 83%

34/38 89%

146/166 88%

149/170 88%

24


At least 65% or more of domestic violence survivors will have knowledge of available community resources. (FVPSA) (exit) At least 65% of victims will report having received support to improve their ability to cope with the aftermath of domestic violence. (STOP) (exit) 65% of clients have increased knowledge of and access to community resources. (UNITED WAY) (3 week) 85% of clients demonstrate increased understanding about: the types of domestic and/or sexual abuse; power and control tactics; and that domestic violence is not the victim’s fault (UNITED WAY) 70% of clients report feeling safer two weeks or more after entering shelter. (UNITED WAY)

30/35 86%

41/47 87%

36/46 78%

35/38 92%

142/166 86%

149/185 81%

30/35 86%

41/47 87%

42/47 89%

34/38 89%

147/167 88%

137/168 82%

22/27 81%

38/44 86%

38/49 78%

45/57 79%

144/178 81%

149/170 88%

111/111 100%

144/144 100%

149/149 100%

133/168 79%

537/659 81%

506/625 81%

26/27 96%

39/44 89%

48/51 94%

56/58 97%

170/181 94%

180/190 95%

Advocacy Specialties Outcomes

Jan 16– March 16

April 16 – June 16

July 2016Sept 2016

Oct 2016 – Dec 2016

CY 2016

CY 2015 Comparison

At least 50% of clients will increase their confidence in their ability to address their health needs and those of their children.

18/43 42%

30/77 39%

33/71 46%

34/73 43%

115/264 44%

158/293 54%

26/35 74%

41/49 84%

31/44 70%

32/36 89%

133/134 81%

137/170 81%

122/134 91%

161/170 95%

155/171 91%

145/157 92%

583/632 92%

176/206 85%

19/42 45%

34/77 44%

39/71 55%

36/72 50%

128/262 49%

147/280 53%

At least 70% of clients will receive adequate resources and referrals to meet their health needs At least 70% of clients will make progress toward or complete health goals identified during her stay in shelter. At least 50% of clients will increase their confidence in their ability to address their housing needs.

25


At least 70% of clients will receive adequate resources and referrals to meet their housing needs. At least 70% of clients will make progress toward or complete housing goals identified during her stay in shelter. At least 50% of clients will increase their confidence in their ability to address their selfsufficiency needs and those of their children.

27/36 75%

36/48 75%

32/43 74%

27/34 79%

122/161 76%

127/168 76%

31/43 72%

36/44 82%

45/61 74%

55/63 87%

167/211 79%

155/213 73%

17/41 41%

32/77 42%

35/71 49%

45/73 62%

129/262 49%

151/280 54%

At least 70% of clients will receive adequate resources and referrals to meet their selfsufficiency needs.

27/37 73%

36/48 75%

28/43 65%

26/34 76%

117/162 72%

116/165 70%

At least 70% of clients will make progress toward or complete self-sufficiency goals identified during her stay in shelter

33/45 73%

68/74 92%

71/85 84%

53/64 83%

225/268 84%

277/311 89%

26


27


28


29


Summary of Activities Provided

30


Destination Reported at Exit (Adult) 400 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0

354

131 20

25

5

1

10

5

1

8

59

3

10

1

2

2

15

4

14

31


Adult Advocacy Goals Goal Set

Goal Complete

501 465

469

378 323 249 173 52

263 180

34

105 76

46

72

40

32


Comments on Successes and Challenges Health continues to be a concern for many survivors accessing Hope House services. In response to this need Hope House created a partnership with Swope Health services. This has resulted in the Swope Mobile Health Unit coming to both shelter locations once per month. The mobile health unit provides basic primary medicine and chronic illness care, as well as Flu Shots and a TB clinic. Clients can also get prescriptions that will fit into the $4 program at Walmart. This program allows many survivors to access basic healthcare that has been denied them by their abusive partners. Also, providing this service on site eliminates another barrier to healthcare experienced by many survivors: lack of transportation.

33


TRANSITIONAL HOUSING Outcome and Client Survey Results As shown in the chart below, the Transitional Housing Program met some but not all of its target outcome percentages. It may be likely that those clients who did not exit to permanent housing also did not feel they received enough resources and referrals to meet their needs.

Outcomes

Jan 16– March 16

April 16 – June 16

July 2016Sept 2016

Oct 2016 – Dec 2016

CY 2016

CY2015 Comparison

At least 70% of clients will receive adequate resources and referrals to meet their housing needs.

0/1 0%

0/1 0%

1/1 100%

2/2 100%

3/5 60%

4/7 57%

At least 70% of clients will make progress toward or complete housing goals identified during their stay in the Transitional Housing Program.

2/2 100%

1/1 100%

2/2 100%

2/2 100%

7/7 100%

8/10 80%

At least 50% of clients will increase their confidence in their ability to address their housing needs.

0/2 0%

1/1 100%

1/2 50%

1/2 50%

3/7 73%

6/10 60%

At least 70% of clients will exit to permanent housing.

0/2 0%

0/1 0%

1/2 50%

1/2 50%

2/7 29%

6/10 60%

At least 25% of clients will increase their income (from all sources) while participating in the on-site or scattered-site Transitional Housing Program.

2/2 100%

1/1 100%

2/2 100%

2/3 67%

7/8 88%

8/10 80%

At least 25% of clients ages 18-61 will increase their employment income while participating in the on-site or scattered-site Transitional Housing Program.

1/2 50%

1/1 100%

1/2 50%

2/3 67%

5/8 63%

4/10 40%

No Follow-Up Surveys 34


Summary of Activities Provided

35


CLINICAL SERVICES Outcome and Client Survey Results As shown in the chart below, the clinical programs met some but not all of their target outcome percentages. However, Hope House has learned that the way we have been collecting and reporting on outcome data may not be telling the full story of our successes with our clientele. For example, clients are considered to have reduced their levels of trauma-related anxiety, stress, and depression only if they move from one scoring category to another (for example, if they move from “severe” to “moderate”). However, this type of measurement does not take into account the amount of movement within categories or the overall reduction of symptoms; it is simply a “yes” or “no” measurement rather than one that measures amount of change overall. During 2016, Hope House met with Joah Williams, a researcher with Williams Behavioral Health Services, LLC. Hope House provided Mr. Williams with pre- and post-test scores from outreach clients who engaged in individual and group therapy services. Mr. Williams’ analysis of the data showed that when looking at the overall change in score, regardless of movement between categories, clients in treatment experienced a statistically significant reduction in anxiety, depression, and stress levels. Hope House is examining ways to measure these outcomes differently in 2017.

Adult Therapy Jan 16– March 16

April 16 – June 16

July 2016Sept 2016

Oct 2016Dec 2016

CY 16

CY 2015 Comparison

70% of clients will increase their knowledge of domestic violence and its impact on functioning.

15/21 71%

27/38 71%

19/36 53%

48/90 53%

109/185 59%

142/214 66%

70% of clients will reduce their level of traumarelated anxiety. (DASS)

8/19 42%

11/26 42%

9/32 28%

27/84 32%

55/172 32%

108/246 44%

70% of clients will reduce their level of traumarelated stress.

2/9 22%

6/19 32%

3/6 50%

26/54 48%

37/88 42%

48/109 44%

70% of clients will reduce their level of traumarelated depression.

1/9 11%

8/19 42%

2/6 33%

23/31 42%

34/88 39%

49/109 45%

Outcomes

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65% or more of domestic violence survivors will have strategies for enhancing their safety. (FVPSA)

41/44 93%

72/82 88%

60/69 87%

110/124 89%

283/320 88%

429/469 91%

65% or more of domestic violence survivors will have knowledge of available community resources. (FVPSA)

37/45 82%

69/82 84%

60/69 87%

109/124 88%

275/320 88%

419/466 90%

65% of clients have increased knowledge of and access to community resources (UNITED WAY)

13/15 87%

23/26 88%

11/12 92%

66/70 94%

113/123 92%

143/148 97%

85% of clients demonstrate increased understanding about: the types of domestic and/or sexual abuse; power and control tactics; and that domestic violence is not the victim’s fault. (UNITED WAY )

14/21 67%

24/38 63%

20/36 56%

45/90 50%

103/185 56%

162/254 64%

65% of clients report that they know more ways to plan for their safety than before their involvement with the program. (UNITED WAY)

41/44 93%

72/82 88%

60/69 87%

110/124 89%

283/320 88%

429/469 91%

11/15 73%

23/26 88%

7/12 58%

57/70 81%

98/123 80%

127/138 92%

85% of clients develop a safety plan. (UNITED WAY)

Children’s Therapy Outcomes

Jan 16– March 16

April 16 – June 16

July 2016Sept 2016

Oct 2016Dec 2016

CY 16

CY 2015 Comparison

80% of children will improve their knowledge and/or ability to plan for their safety.

1/1 100%

15/15 100%

32/40 80%

14/16 88%

62/72 86%

82/82 100%

75% of child clients will increase healthy functioning in terms of recovery from trauma.

1/1 100%

12/15 80%

26/39 67%

14/16 88%

53/71 75%

70/81 86%

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70% of clients will reduce their level of traumarelated anxiety.

0/0 n/a

8/8 100%

0/1 0%

1/1 100%

9/10 90%

62/77 81%

Family Therapy Outcomes

Jan 16– March 16

April 16 – June 16

July 2016Sept 2016

Oct 2016Dec 2016

CY 16

CY 2015 Comparison

75% of women and children engaged in family therapy will improve the parent-child relationship – custom rating.

0/0

2/2 100%

0/0

4/6 67%

6/8 75%

Data not Available

75% of women and children engaged in family therapy will improve the parent-child relationship – PRQ rating.

0/0

2/2 80%

0/0

4/6 67%

6/8 75%

Data Not Available

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39


40


From 8 Week Shelter Survey Has individual therapy helped you deal with your immediate emotional needs? 1 - Yes 2 - No

56 (86%) 9 (14%)

Has your therapist been supportive? 1 - Yes 2 - No

31 (91%) 3 (9%)

Do you have control over the goals set by your individual therapist? 1 - Yes 2 - No

59 (94%) 4 (6%)

Please rate the groups conducted by Therapists (for example, empowerment, mind-body-spirit, theraplay, etc.) regarding their relevance and helpfulness. 1 – Not Helpful at All 2 – Not Helpful 3 - Neutral 4 - Helpful 5 - Very Helpful

00 (0%) 00 (0%) 07 (14%) 20 (41%) 22 (45%)

41


42


43


44


45


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2017 PRIORITIES AND GOALS Beginning in 2017, program outcome measures have been changed for the Therapy Program. These changes were based on several factors, including clients leaving shelter services without enough direct knowledge of domestic violence, standardized test literacy levels possibly too high for clients within this program who have experienced acute trauma, difficulty in gauging effectiveness of intervention due to short-term stays, and a more pressing need to measure PTSD symptoms. To address these issues, the therapy department will no longer require shelter clients to complete the standardized DASS and outreach clients will complete the shortened version (DASS-21). In 2017, clinical staff will begin using the PTSD Check List (PCL5) for both shelter and outreach clients in order to measure their reduction of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder symptoms. Additionally, the department will discontinue use of Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID) and St. Louis University Mental Status (SLUMS) in an effort to shorten assessment time for clients who have just recently entered shelter and are often in a state of acute trauma. Guardian Program personnel are going to implement the following changes to meet data collection standards: • • • •

A Refusal of Services form will be kept by Guardian Program Manager to document any referrals for visits/exchanges that are denied. Referral source will be added to the participants list kept by Guardian Program Manager to document all referrals to the program. Incident reports documenting termination of visits/exchanges, safety concerns, contact b/t custodial and noncustodial parents, etc. will now be entered into the database for tracking purposes. The Guardian Program Manager will begin assigning a funder to activities in the database to each custodial and noncustodial parent so Grant Coordinators will be able to pull stats specific to custodial and noncustodial parents

Additional minor changes to data collection methods and tools were incorporated in order to adhere to the shared outcomes developed by the United Way. The Quality Assurance Coordinator will meet quarterly with each department in 2017 in order to monitor progress toward outcomes and target outputs. Results will also be discussed quarterly with the PQI Team.

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2016 annual report  

2016 Annual Report

2016 annual report  

2016 Annual Report

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