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Key Stage 4 Course Options 2013-2015

Honley High School

Options Fair Thursday 31 January 2013 7.00 pm


CONTENTS

CONTENTS This booklet contains all the information you need to make your choices for Year 10. We hope you will find it useful. It is divided into eight sections which will lead you through the main decisions ahead.

A. Introduction B. Option Subject C. How to decide - who will help you? D. Careers Education Information, Advice and Guidance E. Options Choices Form

F. Frequently Asked Questions G. Key dates H. Course Outlines

At the end of the booklet is the Option Choices Form which must be completed and returned to Student Services by Thursday 14th February 2013.


INTRODUCTION

A. The Curriculum at Key Stage 4 The National Curriculum states that all students must follow a core curriculum of: • GCSE English (Double Award) • GCSE Mathematics • GCSE Science (Dual Award) • GCSE Religious Education • PE (Physical Education) • PSHCE (Personal Social Health and Citizenship Education) Core Physical Education is taken by all students in Years 10 and 11, but does NOT lead to a GCSE. If you wish to take GCSE PE you must select it as one of your options.

What are your choices? In Key Stage 4, students must follow some subjects as part of the National Curriculum but can also choose subjects that they enjoy or may find useful in their future careers. It is important that students take great care in the selection of their option choices and consider the full range of subjects available. In addition to the core subjects, the vast majority of students will take four optional subjects at GCSE. This is a very important time for all Year 9 students when some difficult decisions have to be made. This booklet describes the different courses which may be chosen in Year 10 along with information about the core subjects that all students will study during the next two years as part of the National Curriculum. Even though the National Curriculum is less rigid than it was, we still recommend that students do not specialise too early and so hope that students choose a range of courses across subject areas. It is important for many students to have the opportunity to take a language and a humanities (history or geography) subject at GCSE. This is because higher education establishments, and increasingly employers, look for a broader, more academic core of subjects. Achievement of the English Baccalaureate is a reflection of this academic core of subjects which comprises English, mathematics, two sciences, a language and a humanities subject. Whilst the English Baccalaureate is not compulsory for any students at Honley High School, it is a combination of subjects that should be seriously considered by those thinking of higher education in the future. Further information and useful websites are given in Section C of this booklet.


INTRODUCTION (continued)

In order to help you make the right choices and for the right reasons, read the information in this booklet carefully. Once option courses have been allocated it is very difficult to make changes and your preferred subject may no longer be available due to timetable and group size restrictions. DO  Read all the information about the choices available  Attend the Options Fair on 31 January to discuss possible options and hear about the options choice procedure  Try to gain variety in your courses by looking carefully at the different skills and controlled assessment demands involved in each of the 5 lists of subject choices  Choose subjects which you enjoy, you are good at and which may be useful to you in your future career DO NOT  Choose a subject because you like the teacher (they may not teach GCSE next year)  Choose a subject because your friend is choosing it. They may well have different plans for the future

B. Option Subjects GCSE subjects – each subject counts as one option You will need to take four of these subjects in addition to the core subjects Art and Design Computing Food Graphic Products Media Studies Resistant Materials Systems & Control

Business Studies Dance French History Music Sociology Textiles

Child Development Drama Geography ICT PE Spanish Triple Science


ADDITIONAL QUALIFICATIONS Additional qualifications In addition to the subjects offered at Honley High School a small number of students may be able to study an additional learning course through our links with other schools and colleges. Places on these courses will be strictly limited and students will be required to go through a selection process.

You must choose one extra option if wanting a place on an additional learning course as these courses are taken in addition to the 4 option subjects in school. Taking an additional learning course places extra demands upon the learner’s time and commitment and this must be considered carefully when looking to take any of these courses. Students will be expected to travel independently to and from the providing school or college and therefore there may be additional costs associated with studying the course. At the time of publishing this booklet we have not received details about the courses that will be available from September 2013 but may include the following subjects: Photography GCSE Hairdressing & Beauty NVQ

Animal Care BTEC Catering NVQ / BTEC

Engineering NVQ Construction BTEC

Please indicate on the options form if you wish to be informed about any of the additional learning courses when details are made available to the school.


HOW TO DECIDE – WHO WILL HELP YOU? C. How to decide – who will help you? Do you remember the practical hints given at the beginning of this booklet and in your “Directions” book from Calderdale and Kirklees Careers? If not, look at them again. Think carefully about the effect that your choices now will have on your future plans.

At your Guidance Interview you will have reflected on your strengths and have thought about the kind of subjects and qualifications that would affect future possible career ideas. Don’t worry - help is at hand. There are many people waiting to answer your questions or give you advice. You have already got an Action Plan in your Individual Learning Plan which shows small steps you need to take to ensure you make an informed choice. Your subject teachers – the experts who know most about the courses and your ability Your form tutor – who knows most about you and can point you in the right direction for advice

PSHCE – careers programme using “Directions” booklet Careers Advisers – give advice about career opportunities and decision making Employers – who can give you advice about training and employment Your parents/carers – who know you best as a person Library resources – useful information in the careers library Computer resources – programs such as “Kudos” and “Careerscape” on www.cascaid.co.uk Calderdale and Kirklees Careers Service – www.workabout.org.uk where you can order free career ideas/job information leaflets. University websites – some students already have a very clear idea about what university and / or degree course they may wish to study in the future. In addition to individual university websites we recommend that you look at the following for information on helpful subject combinations at GCSE and A level: www.russellgroup.ac.uk/ - The Russell Group represents 24 leading UK universities and has advice about ‘facilitating’ subjects at GCSE which will be needed for entry into the top UK universities. www.ucas.ac.uk/ - Central organisation through which applications are processed for entry to both sixth form education and universities.


CAREERs INFORMATION and INDIVIDUAL CHOICES FORM D. Careers Education and Guidance During the autumn term of Year 9, you will have followed a planned programme of Careers Education and Guidance. Within form groups, during personal, social health and citizenship education, you will have some lessons in which to study a variety of topics that relate to subject choice, these are as follows:    

Making choices and decisions Self-awareness Subject options Qualifications awareness

During these sessions, you were given a copy of “Directions” which contains some useful information on choices, subjects, decisions, courses, exams and qualifications. You will also have had ICT sessions during which you were introduced to Careers software such as Kudos and Careerscape; this software can be accessed in school and on-line and will enable you to further develop ideas and plans for possible career pathways. You may have made an Action Plan on Kudos to help you make an informed choice. You will have had a 1:1 Guidance Interview with a member of staff who has offered you impartial information/advice on qualifications, and who has assisted in completing an action plan for you to try to ensure you make an informed choice. Remember, choosing the right career option can be difficult, now is a good time to start to consider what opportunities are available.

E. Options Choices Form At the back of this booklet is a Year 10 Choices Form clearly showing the choices available to you in Year 10. Please read the instructions on the form very carefully before you complete it. When you have filled in your form please return it to Student Services by Thursday 14 February at the latest. Once the option choices forms are collected the Year 9 choices are analysed and every effort is made to meet your requests. Occasionally problems may arise because of the numbers of students choosing particular subjects. It is not possible to run some subjects when only a small number of students opt to take them; other subjects can only accommodate limited numbers with existing facilities. In the event of such problems the reserve choices will be considered as a possible option for individual students. Once these decisions are made it can be difficult to change them which is why it is so important that you think carefully before you choose. If you have any queries about the options process or the completion of the form please contact Mrs H Rogers, Deputy Headteacher at the school.


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS F. Frequently Asked Questions Can I do the same subjects as my friends? Answer: This is not a good basis for making your decision. Your friends will have different ideas to you and may enjoy different types of subjects. Choose subjects for yourself and try not to be influenced by your friends. In any case you may choose the same subject as your friends and then find that you have been put into another group. I like my teacher. Can I be in his/her group next year? Answer: The teacher that you will be given will depend upon the choices you have made. It is not possible to choose a teacher. Choose a subject because you like the subject and think you can do well in it. Will I get the subjects that I have chosen? Answer: We try our very best to give students the subject choices that they have requested. Unfortunately, in a small minority of cases, it is not possible to give all choices due to the combination of subjects that you are wishing to do. Please bear this in mind when choosing your reserve options.

Can I change my mind when I start the course in Year 10? Answer: The short answer to this question is no. We have spent a lot of time looking at the subjects we have offered you, and provided you with guidance based on prior attainment and your own future aspirations. Please make sure that you look carefully at the options that you are choosing and seek further advice now if you are in doubt.


OPTIONS CALENDAR 2012 - 2013 G. YEAR 9 OPTIONS CALENDAR 2012-2013 Autumn Term 2012 Citizenship lessons on making choices & careers Individual 1:1 guidance interviews with a key member of staff

Monday 28 January 2013 Assembly Mrs Rogers to talk to Year 9 students about the option choices and procedures

Thursday 31 January 2013 Year 9 Options Fair Parents and students are invited to attend from 7pm to 8.30pm for a presentation about the Options process and short presentations from subjects about the courses available at GCSE. In addition there will be the opportunity to meet key staff.

Thursday 14 February 2013 Deadline for return of individual choices forms.

March 2013 – July 2013 Year 9 choices are analysed and every effort is made to meet your requests. Occasionally the reserve choices will need to be considered as a possible option for individual students.

Summer 2013 The school timetable for 2013-2014 is written.


H. Course Outlines

CORE GCSE SUBJECTS


For more information about studying English at GCSE see Mr Shaw

ENGLISH GCSE CORE EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “GCSE English requires a lot of creativity and effort, but don’t let this put you off, because the course is actually quite enjoyable and interesting. It’s not just about reading books and writing essays – you will do orals, which can be quite easy, (especially if you’re a drama student). You will also do work on spoken English and the media. By the end of the course you will be able to understand poems that at first seemed to make no sense, understand Shakespearean language and generally feel a lot cleverer!"

WHY STUDY ENGLISH? Whether you continue your education after Year 11 or leave to seek employment, English is the vital qualification which every employer requires, and every institute of further or higher education demands. Students with good grades in the subject have gone on to become doctors, journalists, scientists, lawyers and even writers themselves. The skills of appreciation learned in an English lesson aren’t, however, just limited to helping you obtain a good job. Hopefully the enjoyment of a good play or book will stay with you and enhance the quality of the rest of your life.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? You will follow an integrated programme of English involving Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening leading to GCSE certification at Key Stage 4 of the National Curriculum. The course involves the creation of a file of work produced under controlled conditions and work completed under examination conditions. Entry is available at Higher (Grades A* to D) or Foundation (Grades C to G) Level. For English Language you will produce three controlled conditions assignments: an extended reading task based on a text you have read in class, two pieces of creative writing and a spoken language study. You will also be assessed in three Speaking and Listening activities: a presentation, taking part in a discussion and playing a role. In addition you will sit an external examination lasting two hours fifteen minutes where you will complete a Reading section based on non fiction and a Writing section with two short writing tasks. Most students will also be entered for English Literature which will assess your ability to respond to additional prose and poetry studied on the course. You will produce one controlled conditions assignment comparing a play by Shakespeare with another text. In addition you will sit two external examinations which will examine your response to other texts, some of which will have already been studied on the English course.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN You will learn through a variety of learning and teaching styles familiar from Key Stage 3; including individual, pair, group and whole class discussion. You will learn by developing the skills of note-making and preparing work under rigorous time constraints. You will learn by using ICT and the media to support your own research.

PROGRESSION Good GCSE grades in English could lead to the study of English Language or English Literature at Advanced level. A minimum grade C is required in order to progress on to any form of further education.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT ENGLISH LANGUAGE – AQA: 40% examination, 40% written coursework - teacher assessed, 20% oral coursework teacher assessed ENGLISH LITERATURE – AQA: 75% examination, 25% written coursework -teacher assessed

See the full English Language specification at http://store.aqa.org.uk/resourceZone/pdf/english/AQAENGLANGA-W-TRB-SPG.PDF English Literature: http://store.aqa.org.uk/resourceZone/pdf/english/AQA-ENGLIT-W-TRB-SPG.PDF


For more information about studying Mathematics at GCSE see Mr Clarke

MATHS GCSE CORE EXAM BOARD: OCR

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “Many people think maths is a subject for ‘Geeks’, however many celebrities have a degree in maths, including Brian May of Queen, Virginia Wade, Michael Jordan and Teri Hatcher. Many people use maths without even noticing it, and in industry maths is used on a daily basis – it’s the most important subject by a mile. Maths is challenging, satisfying and sometimes even fun!”

WHY STUDY MATHS?      

Mathematical problems occur in daily life. A reasonable level of mathematical ability is required for many jobs. Mathematics is essential for science, engineering, and research. Mathematically informed people will be able to make better economic and political decisions in many areas including budget allocation. Studying mathematics teaches patterns of problem-solving and insight that transfer to other subjects. Mathematical proof teaches skills in rigor, argumentation and persuasion that also transfer to other subjects.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? Mathematics is a core subject which means it is compulsory to continue studying it at Key Stage 4. The subject continues to be broken down across four broad programmes of study; Number, Algebra, Geometry and Measures and Statistics. Learners are assessed against their ability to;  Recall and use their knowledge of the prescribed content (45-55%)  Select and apply mathematical methods in a range of contexts (25-35%)  Interpret and analyse problems and generate strategies to solve them (15-25%) Additionally from September 2012 all higher tier pupils will study GCSE Statistics within their maths class, sitting this exam at the end of Year 10.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN? The National curriculum recognises that learners will be working at different levels and consequently the Mathematics Department continues with its policy of setting learners according to their ability. The advantage of this is that you will not be expected to undertake work which is beyond your capability, and provided you show the necessary commitment, you will continue to progress to a good GCSE result.

PROGRESSION Mathematics and numeracy form an essential part of everyday life. Pupils’ may progress to study maths and/or further maths at AS level however a grade C in the subject is considered essential to access most college and degree courses.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Unit Paper 1 – non calculator Paper 2 – calculator allowed

% 50 50

GCSE STATISTICS Unit 1 – Written exam 75 Unit 2 – Statistics in practice – investigation 12.5 Unit 2 – Statistics in practice – assessment 12.5

Type 1h 30 (Foundation) 1h 45 (Higher) 1h 30 (Foundation) 1h 45 (Higher) 2h (all pupils will do higher tier) Untiered 45 minutes (un-tiered)

See the full GCSE specification Maths at http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/type/gcse_2010/maths/b/ Statistics - http://store.aqa.org.uk/qual/newgcse/pdf/AQA-4310-W-SP.PDF


For more information about studying Dual Science at GCSE see Mr Maniyar

DUAL SCIENCE GCSE CORE EXAM BOARD: OCR

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “Doing Dual Science has allowed me to leave my options open. I don’t know what I want to do in the future, so it gives me the most choice.”

WHY STUDY DUAL SCIENCE? Science is one of the core subjects and therefore students will have to complete this course, as a minimum. It provides the basic knowledge and skills needed to ensure that they can become a better, more employable individual.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? All students, whatever their ambitions, need a science education to prepare them for their lives ahead. From the knowledge they gain in science they have a better understanding about themselves, their environment and the universe. Some young people aspire to be scientists or to work in fields where knowledge of science is essential. Students studying this suite of courses will;  Gain an appreciation of how science impacts upon our lives.  Develop the understanding needed to make informed judgements about scientific issues that affect us all.  Be very well prepared for studying science related courses at a higher level.  Develop many skills including team work, independent enquiry and effective participation. The course is essentially split into two separate GCSEs, Core and Additional Science. In Year 10 you will learn about the core elements of science based around how science works, these are key theories and skills. During Year 11 there is a greater emphasis on knowledge and application of theoretical science.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN Students will learn through a variety of teaching styles: practical based work, paired activities, group work, class discussions and individual tasks. Questioning is fundamental to learning and it is crucial that students become active learners by asking lots of questions. Practical work is very important and the coursework element in each year will require the student to carry out practical work and then explain the science behind the results. Students will have access to key websites and online resources that we have purchased especially for this course, on top of the usual resources that are used. Clearly as more products become available we will try to ensure that we have the most effective resources at our disposal.

PROGRESSION A GCSE in Science will provide students with the ideal basic grounding going forward. It can be used to progress onto a number of A Levels including for individual sciences. However please be aware that currently there is a minimum B grade required to study Biology, Chemistry and Physics – this minimum grade applies to the attainment for both GCSEs (Year 10 and Year 11).

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Students will be expected to sit examinations in Science Core GCSE and Additional Science GCSE at the end of their two year study programme. 75% of each GCSE grade will come from the terminal exams; the final 25% will come from controlled assessments that will be completed throughout Key Stage 4. Students will be regularly assessed during the two years; this information will be used to inform progress and tier entry.

Either refer to the Science department for more information or find out more specific information from www.ocr.org.uk Please note that the Additional Science course is part of the Twenty First Century Science Suite of subjects.


For more information about studying RE at GCSE see Mr Lake

RELIGIOUS STUDIES GCSE CORE EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “I like RE because you can ask questions and talk about what you think” “You get to share your opinion and have discussions about real life topics” “I like RE because it is interesting to learn about different topics”

WHY STUDY RELIGIOUS EDUCATION? Although a compulsory subject, Religious Studies is an important subject for everybody. People have always asked questions about life; what is right and wrong? Is it right to abort life? Why should we care for the poor? Is it ever right to go to war? No sphere of life is untouched by religion and religious issues frequently top the news agenda. Religious Studies provides you with the opportunity to think about moral and ethical problems and to evaluate and make choices related to them. Skills that you will develop studying RE include the transferable skills of: clear and logical thinking, critical evaluation, literacy, research skills and organisational skills. Jobs where RE is useful include: civil service administrator, advice counsellor, housing adviser, journalist, librarian, social worker, teacher, and youth & community worker.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? We will look at the main ideas, key issues, attitudes and religious views on a number of moral and controversial topics: animal rights, use and abuse of our planet, prejudice and discrimination, human life and abortion, war and peace, matters of life (a study of fertility treatment, transplant surgery, genetic engineering, cloning and experimentation on humans), euthanasia, crime and punishment, drug abuse, rich and poor in Britain and world poverty. You don’t have to be religious to be successful in Religious Studies; you just need to be interested in finding out more about other people’s views and in developing your own view of life.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN Students will learn using a variety of styles. They will work independently, in pairs, small groups and participate in discussions. They will use textbooks, video clips, etc. and produce notes, PowerPoint presentations and short essays.

PROGRESSION A GCSE in Religious Studies will provide you with a good foundation for progression to many AS and A level courses including Sociology, Psychology and Philosophy.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT 2 TERMINAL EXAM PAPERS Unit

%

Type

Religion & Morality

50

1 hr 30 paper

6 Topics Religion & Life Issues 6 Topics

Answer questions on 4 topics 50

1 hr 30 paper Answer questions on 4 topics

See the full GCSE specification at http://store.aqa.org.uk/qual/newgcse/pdf/AQA-4055-W-SP.PDF


For more information about Physical Education see Mr O’Connor and for further information about PSHE and Citizenship see Mr Wilcock

PHYSICAL EDUCATION and PSHE / CITIZENSHIP

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PE) Physical Education (PE) promotes an active and healthy lifestyle. All students take part in PE for four hours per fortnight. In Year 10, students choose their pathways option in either individual or team PE. Individual sports include personal fitness, trampolining and golf, and group sports include football and hockey. In Year 11, students choose from numerous activities on or off site. These include squash and fitness at the sports centre, golf at the Galpharm Stadium and indoor football at the Zone. We also offer Sports Leaders and Duke of Edinburgh training. Students can choose to work towards their GCSE qualification in PE, as well as taking part in core sessions. Please see the PE GCSE Option page of this booklet for further information.

PERSONAL, SOCIAL, AND HEALTH EDUCATION (PSHE) AND CITIZENSHIP This is a compulsory part of the Key Stage 4 curriculum. The course aims to bring together key issues facing young people today. The subject includes health, relationships, careers, enterprise, work related learning, and work experience and money management. You will be given guidance on the topics, and have an opportunity to discuss the choices which may affect your life. It will also help you to understand and take an active role in society. Themes include: human rights, the European Union, discrimination, law & society and parenting skills.


OPTION GCSE SUBJECTS


For more information about studying Art and Design at GCSE see Mrs Shepherd

ART AND DESIGN GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “The lessons are relaxed but you have to be organised to make sure you get everything done. I enjoy working with image manipulation software and trying out different combinations of materials.” (Ellie, Y10) “It is a practical subject and you need to have a creative side. I have learned to find inspiration in other artists’ work.” (Lucy Y11)

WHY STUDY ART AND DESIGN? If you like to learn through direct experience and experimentation, love to express yourself creatively and are prepared to commit time to producing great quality work then art and design is a good option for you. The creative sector is currently one of the strongest areas in the employment market, and the UK has an impressive track record in producing some of the world’s top designers. Potential employers will be recognise that you can use your initiative, think creatively and work independently, which are vital transferrable skills.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN?  How to research other artists whose work is relevant to the theme you are studying.  How to record your own observations through drawing and photography.  A range of processes, such as different types of printmaking, image manipulation, textiles and 3D, and how to use materials skillfully.  How to develop your ideas through to a final outcome. HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN Most of the work will be practical and you will use a wide range of materials to explore ideas, keeping sketchbooks to help with this. You will work from observation and imagination and you will do some independent research. Wherever possible, we offer gallery visits for our students, and this year we have teamed up with modern foreign languages to organise a trip to Barcelona.

PROGRESSION A GCSE in Art and Design is the ideal stepping stone to AS and A level, or vocational qualifications in Art and Design and related subjects such as Photography and Textiles.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Unit

%

Type

Portfolio

60

2 themed projects carried out in Y10 and Y11. All work displayed in your personal exhibition

Externally Set Task

40

10-hour (total) practical exam completed in class after 6-8 weeks preparation

See the full GCSE specification at http://www.aqa.org.uk/qual/newgcses/art


For more information about studying Business Studies at GCSE see Mrs Johnston / Mr Patel

BUSINESS STUDIES GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “Business Studies is both an interesting and useful subject to study at GCSE incorporating both theory and application of that theory into coursework. Perhaps the biggest attraction is that it continuously links with current affairs – I now have a greater understanding and interest in these matters thanks to the subject.”

WHY STUDY BUSINESS STUDIES? Business Studies is a good option if: 

You are interested in how businesses operate

You are interested in the world around you

You should opt for this subject if: 

You would like to take a business course at college

You would like to set up a business one day, or

You would like to know more about business organisations

Business studies courses give you a broad overview of how the commercial world operates. Business issues are often addressed at a European and international level.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? Areas of study include business ownership, external environment, internal organisation, business aims and objectives, production, marketing and finance. Students develop their understanding of business studies through applying their knowledge of theory to given situations. Class discussion is important, and students are encouraged to share their own perspectives and ideas. Keeping up to date with what’s going on in the world is also beneficial.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN In Year 10, pupils learn what is important to consider when setting up a new business, including finance, objectives, marketing, customer focus and liability. In Year 11, pupils study the growth of business organisations. Assessment is through 75% examination and 25% controlled assessment (investigating businesses). The qualification is particularly suited to pupils who may be interested in further academic study of the world of business (e.g. A level)

PROGRESSION A GCSE in Business Studies will provide you with the ideal foundation for progression to AS and A level courses in Business Studies or a related subject.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Unit

%

Type

Investigating Business

25

Controlled assessment

Unit 1 (Introduction to small Business) and Unit 3 (Building a Business)

75

Exam

See the full GCSE specification at http://www.edexcel.com/quals/gcse/gcse09/Business/Business/Pages/default.aspx


For more information about studying Child Development at GCSE see Mrs Pinder

CHILD DEVELOPMENT GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: WJEC

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “It is great to listen to outside visitors—midwives and health visitors.” “It is useful because you learn about pregnancy, birth and caring for the baby—it will help us in later life when we become parents.” “It is demanding, but interesting, as it is about life.”

WHY STUDY CHILD DEVELOPMENT? The area of Child Development offers opportunities that can lead to employment in a number of career sector: Midwife - A nurse especially trained in the care pregnancy and childbirth. Paediatrician - A doctor who specialises in the care of children from the time they are born. Obstetrician - A doctor who specialises in pregnancy and childbirth. Nursery nurse - Works with young children in a nursery or crèche and provides care and education for pre-school children. Primary School Teacher - A qualified teacher of young children who provides education for children in a school nursery, infant or junior school. Speech therapist - Gives advice and help to children and their parents in cases of delayed language development and speech defects.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? Child Development is about the development of babies and young children aged 0-5 years. It is a study of pregnancy, birth, care of the newborn, the four areas of human development and how these can be encouraged. It is also about the professionals involved in childcare and the roles of parents, family and social influences. You will learn about: the family, parenthood, pre-conceptual care, pregnancy , antenatal care, birth, caring for new-born babies, physical development, postnatal Care, social development, intellectual development, the importance of play, managing behaviour, children with special needs, childhood dietary needs, health and safety in the home, garden and road, fostering and adoption and the roles of professionals involved in child care.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN You will complete a range of written tasks, class discussions and practical activities. For example: Design a lunchtime meal suitable for a pregnant woman, analyse the nutritional value of the food using the ‘Food in Focus’ software on a PC. Watch a video series called ‘Baby It’s You’ which show how the four main areas of development can be encouraged and when certain stages of development are achieved. Produce a leaflet for parents outlining the stages of labour, methods of pain relief and possible complications. Carry out a class debate about the advantages and disadvantages of bottle and breast-feeding. You will also do two tasks for the controlled assessment which includes studying a child aged between 0-5 years, to observe their development over nine months. You can support your learning in Child Development by finding out about children by spending time with friends or family when babies or young children are around. Read information about children e.g. Child Development books and Psychology books. Watch television programmes about the development of children. Use computers and the internet to help you with your work. Collect leaflets, magazines and brochures about babies and children. Look at existing products e.g. toys and equipment for babies and children in the shops and in catalogues.

PROGRESSION Students can along with other GCSE’s (5 A*-C) go on to take A levels or consider vocational courses such as:  Award/Certificate in Caring for children L1  Diploma in Children & Education L2  Extended Diploma in Childcare & Education L3  Students could also consider Advanced or Foundation Apprenticeships in childcare.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT On-going assessment combined with terminal assessment. Please note that you will need to asses a child who is not yet 5 on or before January 2014.

See the full GCSE specification at http://www.wjec.co.uk/


For more information about studying Computing at GCSE see Mr Patel

COMPUTING GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: OCR

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “This is an excellent opportunity for me. I already know how to use programs like Word and Excel. I am more interested in learning how computers work and to learn how to write computer programs. I want to be a games developer and think this GCSE will help me. I can’t wait.”

WHY STUDY COMPUTING? The course provides excellent preparation for higher study and employment in the field of Computer Science. The increasing importance of information technologies means there will be a growing demand for professionals who are qualified in this area. Learners who’ve taken a GCSE in Computing and who then progress to study the subject at A Level or university will have an advantage over their colleagues who are picking up the subject at these levels. The course will develop critical thinking, analysis and problem-solving skills through the study of computer programming. For many learners, it will be a fun and interesting way to develop these skills, which can be transferred to other subjects and even applied in day-to-day life. In this respect, the course will make an excellent preparation for learners who want to study or work in areas that rely on these skills, especially where they are applied to technical problems.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? The course will give learners an in-depth understanding of how computer technology works. Learners will no doubt be familiar with the use of computers and other related technology from their other subjects and elsewhere. However, the course will give them an insight into what goes on ‘behind the scenes’, including computer programming, which many learners find absorbing. The course will develop critical thinking, analysis and problem-solving skills through the study of computer programming. You will learn about the technological components of a computer and how they come together to provide the computing power that we now all take for granted. You will learn the basics of at least three computer programming languages and apply these to develop bespoke solutions to given problems.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN Students will develop a range of programming skills through a structured, problem-solving based, teaching package. The emphasis will be on supported independent discovery. Developed skills will be regularly assessed through the development of mini programming projects throughout the course. This is a highly practical course with a large proportion of the teaching time being given over to the practical development and practice of programming skills. Students will be encouraged to develop a portfolio of skills in a number of areas which will help them develop a major program to solve a given problem in Year 11. Independent research will be used extensively to support the development of core understanding of the more theoretical parts of the course.

PROGRESSION A GCSE in Computing will provide you with the ideal foundation for progression to AS and A level courses in Computing or a related subject.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Unit

%

Type

Computer systems and programming

40

1 hr 30 paper

Practical investigation

30

Controlled assessment

Programming project

30

Controlled assessment

See the full GCSE specification at http://www.ocr.org.uk/download/kd/ocr_31053_kd_gcse_2010_spec.pdf


For more information about studying Dance at GCSE see Mrs Manning

DANCE GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “Dance is a great option because although it is a structured lesson, you are still able to be creative and use your own ideas.

I enjoy it, because it keeps you active and helps to build your confidence when performing. It is my favourite subject! ”

WHY STUDY DANCE?     

If you wish to take dance further or are considering it as a career. Because the study of Dance contributes to students’ aesthetic and social development. Dance supports learning across a range of subjects, because it enables students to develop confidence and selfesteem. You should choose Dance if you enjoy it, want to develop your skills, enjoy performing and working with others. You need some sense of rhythm and basic ability at least to be successful on the course, as it is quite demanding practically

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN?          

How to dance safely, to avoid injury, to warm up and cool down in a safe environment. How to be a healthy dancer. E.g. keeping fit hydrated, having a good diet, no smoking. How to develop your dance vocabulary. How to develop performance, choreographic and appreciation skills. To learn a set solo for the practical exam. To perform a group dance piece. To choreograph a solo and a group piece. How to analyse professional dance works. How to prepare for a written examination How to use movement to express yourself.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN You will learn by working with others, building up your dance vocabulary through practical and written work. You will visit the theatre to attend live dance productions and watch other recorded dance works and analyse these. You will work with professional dance companies, such as SugaBrown, Rambert and Phoenix dance companies.

PROGRESSION GCSE Dance provides a route to further study, at A level, in higher education in Dance or Performing Arts, as well as vocational courses, professional training or community activities.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Unit

%

Type

Unit 1

20

Performance

Unit 2

40

Choreography

Unit 3

20

Set Solo

Unit 4

20

Written Exam

See the full GCSE specification at http://web.aqa.org.uk/qual/newgcses/art_dan_dra_mus/new/dance_materials


DRAMA

For more information about studying Drama at GCSE see Mrs Manning

GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: EDEXCEL

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “Every lesson is completely different to the previous one. The environment is supportive and everyone works as a team. You get to learn more about your class. Drama is fun, interesting and hard work, but enjoyable. During the two years my confidence has grown considerably. I have always enjoyed Drama, but Drama at GCSE level has given me lots of confidence and I feel that my skills in Drama are improving by the week”.

WHY STUDY DRAMA? You should opt for this course if:  you enjoy drama and want to work with others;  you like to work imaginatively and creatively, generating and communicating ideas;  you want to develop a basis for your future role as an active citizen in employment and society in general;  you want to actively engage in the process of study in order to develop as an effective, independent learner and as a critical and reflective thinker.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? 

  

How to use various explorative strategies to create Drama. E.g. tableau, thought-tracking, hotseating, marking the moment, mime, narration and cross-cutting. How to work with others, co-operating in a group, negotiating, expressing ideas and listening. Performance skills - developing vocal and physical techniques, e.g. vocal projection and building confidence. How to devise plays and how to act out scripted plays.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN You will learn by doing; by being involved in practical work, individually, in pairs, in small groups and as a class; exploring themes, issues and ideas. You will develop your Drama vocabulary, go to see plays at the theatre, analyse the work of others, evaluate your own work, set yourself targets, take on numerous challenges and keep a written record of your work.

PROGRESSION A GCSE in Drama will provide you with the ideal foundation for progression to AS and A level courses in Theatre Studies, Performing Arts or a related subject.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Unit

%

Type

1. Devised workshop.

30

Controlled Test

2. Scripted play

30

Controlled Test

3. Practical Exam

40

Practical Examination

See the full GCSE specification at: http://www.edexcel.com/quals/gcse/gcse09/drama/Pages


For more information about studying Home Economics: Food at GCSE see Mrs Pinder

FOOD GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: WJEC

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “Home Economics is a good subject as it allows you to explore your creative side, and also helps you to learn about health and nutrition. The course also has a lot of practical work and you will find you are cooking at least once a week, which is great! There is also some theory work that is done during lessons. The subject is good for organised people and helps to develop organisational skills, because of the amount of cooking done. The teachers are helpful, kind, friendly and encouraging as they want to help you to expand your practical skills. Overall, I feel that the subject is inspiring, the teachers are understanding and the environment is welcoming”.

WHY STUDY HOME ECONOMICS: FOOD? Home Economics is a good option if you are well organised, good at multi-tasking, have enjoyed your Food lessons at Key Stage 3 and have an interest in learning more about Food and Nutrition and extending your practical skills. You should opt for this subject if you are interested in a career as any of the following: Dietician (give advice on diet and nutrition to both sick and healthy people), Chef (preparing foods in a restaurant, canteen or café for the public to enjoy), Recipe Developer (for a food manufacturer), Home Economist (promoting foods or writing for a food publisher e.g. Meat Marketing Board, Dairy Council or a magazine such as ‘Good Food’), Further Study (this GCSE course provides a suitable basis for A/AS Home Economics) or simply want to learn more about nutrition, healthy eating and developing your practical skills.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? Nutrition, diet and health throughout life: dietary guidelines and food choice, nutrients, terminology, energy balance, nutritional needs of individuals, food commodities. Factors affecting consumer choice: current food developments, packaging, food labeling Nutritional, physical, chemical and sensory properties of food in storage, preparation and cooking: analysing food functions, food and the senses, cooking methods, preservation, additives, menu planning, developing and modifying recipes Food hygiene and safety: food spoilage, health, safety and hygiene, rrisk assessment, process, manufacture and storage

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN In addition to theory lessons, you will be given the opportunity to carry out a number of practical tasks to develop your food preparation and cooking skills. You will watch relevant demonstrations, videos, use ICT to support your work and do both group and independent tasks. Tasting and testing will be done and you will carry out a variety of practical food investigations.

PROGRESSION A GCSE in Home Economics: Food will provide you with the ideal foundation for progression to AS and A level courses in Home Economics. Other possible progression from Home Economics GCSE (with additional GCSE’s): VRQ (Vocational Related Qualification) Diploma in Professional Cookery with Food and Beverage Service or BTEC Extended Diploma in Hospitality and Events Students could also consider Advanced or Foundation Apprenticeships in catering industry

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT On-going assessment combined with terminal assessment.

See the full Home Economics: Food specification at http://www.wjec.co.uk/


For more information about studying French at GCSE see Ms Davis

FRENCH GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “French is a very enjoyable subject to study at GCSE, allowing you to learn all aspects of the language; speaking it, reading it, listening to it or writing it. Studying French will not only teach you what is needed to pass your exams, but also put you in an advantaged position when applying for further education. The knowledge you gain can be applied to everyday life and not just in terms of speaking the foreign language; choosing this subject also means you will have better understanding of English and improved communication in general. French is the language of our closest neighbours and is spoken by more than 125 million people around the world, particularly in Europe, Africa and Canada”.

WHY STUDY FRENCH? A Modern Foreign Language is a good option! Employability - Basic ability in languages is much in demand, as employers seek those capable of communicating with foreign customers or breaking the ice with a few phrases at visits or in a meeting. Students who opt to study languages are at a distinct advantage in the job market in many sectors. Industries which require foreign language speakers include: business services, central government, contact centres, engineering, financial services, marketing, media, technology, travel and tourism, the voluntary and charitable sector.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? Whichever language you choose, the GCSE course looks at the same four themes:  Lifestyle (health and relationships)  Leisure (free time and the media)  Home and Environment (home and local area, environmental issues)  Work and Education (school and future plans, current and future jobs) The skills of listening (20% of the final grade) and reading (20% of the final grade) are examined at the end of Year 11 at either Foundation (C-G) or Higher (A*-D) level, with two speaking assessments (30% of the final grade) taken during Year 10 and Year 11 and two written controlled assessments (two essays of up to 600 words across the two tasks - 30%) undertaken throughout Years 10 and 11.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN Students use a huge range of resources in their learning of a language, from the Internet to songs, radio clips to magazines, language assistants to grammatical mind maps, PowerPoint presentations to the text book. They work independently, in pairs and in groups and are actively involved in learning how to learn a language as well as in preparation for the exams.

PROGRESSION A GCSE in French will provide you with the ideal foundation for progression to AS and A level courses in French or another language.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Unit

%

Type

Listening paper

20

50 minute paper

Reading Paper

20

50 minute paper

2 Speaking Assessments

30

4-6 minutes each

2 Writing Assessments

30

300 words each

See the full GCSE specification at http://web.aqa.org.ukw..aqa.org.uk/qualifications/type/gcse/french index.html


GEOGRAPHY

For more information about studying Geography at GCSE see Mr Carr

GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “Geography is a good subject to take because it helps you understand much more about the wider world. It is interesting and enjoyable to investigate people’s lives in different places, but I also enjoy seeing things for myself when we do fieldwork”. “Colleges also look favourably on those having a Humanities subject”.

WHY STUDY GEOGRAPHY? “Geographers are highly employable” (The Times Careers Supplement) and are found in a variety of jobs. It is a good ‘balancing subject’ that helps you develop a broad range of skills and knowledge. Geography provides a useful background for many jobs, e.g. pilot, lorry driver, estate agent, police, courier, housing officer. It has particularly strong links with surveying, town and country planning, civil engineering, environmental scientist, meteorology, tourism and transport, cartography, geology and the oil industry. The academic skills of a geographer are also relevant to many professions, e.g. legal, financial

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? You will learn about different landscapes and the people who live in them, the way people alter their environment and the effects of such changes. The topics are varied. For example  What does it feel like to grow up in a shanty town in Brazil?  Why did 80,000 die in earthquakes in Pakistan 2005 and 70,000 in China 2008?  How can Blackpool retain its popularity as a seaside resort?  What is the worst type of natural disaster?  How are the river and valley features at Magdale typical of other rivers?  Did the US government fail the people of New Orleans before, during and after Hurricane Katrina?  Why are some houses allowed to fall into the sea in Norfolk and North Yorkshire while others are saved?

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN There will be a mixture of practical and theory-based learning, revolving around enquiries about a variety of people and places. Students will practice problem-solving and make decisions about real issues. They will develop a variety of skills including research using the internet and fieldwork (e.g. Honley, Huddersfield and North Yorkshire coast).

PROGRESSION This GCSE is an ideal foundation for progression to AS or A level courses in Geography or a related subject. It also develops skills and knowledge useful in a wide variety of subjects.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Unit

%

Type

Physical Geography

37.5%

90 minutes

Human Geography

37.5%

90 minutes

Fieldwork Report (North Yorkshire Coast)

25%

Controlled Assessment (June Year 10 – September Year 11)

See the full GCSE specification at http://web.aqa.org.uk


For more information about studying Graphics Products at GCSE see Mr Myers

GRAPHICS PRODUCTS GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “I took Graphics because: I like drawing; my Year 9 teacher said I would be good at it, it would help me with my Resistant Materials GCSE and my ultimate goal is to become a Design and Technology teacher. I enjoy the subject because: I get a lot of support from my teacher, I like the techniques that I have learnt, and I am learning and developing. I enjoy amalgamating, drawing and CAD work and developing my skills in this area, I like the fact that I got a range of briefs to choose from for my coursework and then tailored them to my own interests�.

WHY STUDY GRAPHICS PRODUCTS? Graphics is a great option choice if you like drawing and designing anything from graffiti style logos to cartoon characters. The subject provides an insight into how the things around us have been designed and made. Graphics Products is ideal if you have an interest in designing and making things, an inquiring mind or just want to learn something new.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? GCSE Graphics Products is the communication of visual information through paper based products such as packaging. The course is split into two parts: Mini Projects and Major Projects In Year 10 pupils undertake a series of mini projects to provide them with the necessary skills to complete the final year assignment. During these projects they learn or develop skills in the following areas: 2D & 3D rendering, logo design and manipulation, packaging design, font design, and computer aided design (CAD) Although emphasis is placed on the design and communication of ideas, there is a requirement to model designs three dimensionally in a variety of mediums. In Year 11 students select a major project and complete a portfolio of design work and prototype 3D products such as perfume packaging. Students can choose a brief set by the teacher or create their own to reflect an interest or hobby.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN Students will learn and gain experience through the completion of both the mini and major projects. Because of the nature of the projects, pupils see the development of ideas and products from start to finish and are constantly improving their personal designing and making skills through the repetition of skills in different mediums. Students receive Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Computer Aided Manufacture (CAM) inputs to ensure good awareness of industrial practices.

PROGRESSION A GCSE in Graphics Products will provide you with the ideal foundation for AS and A level design courses or an Art foundation course. Graphics Products is a fantastic option if you are considering any of the following career paths: graphic design, packaging design, architecture, engineering, product design, automotive design, interior design.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Pupils are assessed internally and externally in the final year of the course. Pupils sit an end of year examination which is worth 40% of their overall grade and is assessed externally. Pupils produce a design portfolio and a product which individually are worth 50%; these two elements are then combined to contribute up to 60% of the final grade and are assessed internally. The internally assessed elements are carried out under controlled assessment conditions, which is essentially where pupils work in exam conditions following teacher inputs. Students receive verbal and written feedback based on the GCSE A* to G grade boundaries. However in Year 10 these do not count towards the overall grade but provide an indication of future attainment.

See the full GCSE specification at http://store.aqa.org.uk/qual/newgcse/pdf/AQA-4550-W-SP.PDF


HISTORY

For more information about studying History at GCSE see Mr Pulsford

GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: EDEXCEL

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “History isn’t just facts and figures. We wouldn’t be the people we are today, if we hadn’t learnt from the past. I chose this subject because the topics we study are still relevant in today’s world, are interesting and are fascinating to learn about. Also, there are exciting parts of the course, as I have just been on a trip to Belgium visiting WW1 sites.”

WHY STUDY HISTORY? You should study History if you are interested in discussing and explaining why events happen. History is an extremely interesting subject and creates a lot of debate. History helps explain the world we live in and the course challenges students to think for themselves. Employers who see that you have a qualification in History immediately know certain things about you. They know that:  You are able to gather and read different types of information  You are able to form a coherent argument.  You can read maps, graphs and other diagrams  You are able to look carefully at information and check it for bias or propaganda  You are able to communicate clearly and have learned to express yourself verbally and on paper. History teaches a wide variety of skills and therefore is open to a lot of jobs, such as journalism, law, TV research, accountancy, town planning, police, conservation, archaeology, teaching and politics.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? In History students will focus on Modern World History. Students will study a range of topic such as the changing role of women and the Suffragettes, World War 1, the USA 1919-41 and the Cold War. As part of the course students will also complete a controlled assessment about the Vietnam War.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN Students will learn through a variety of teaching styles; essays, paired working, group work and class discussions. ICT also plays an important part in the History curriculum and we support our learners through subscription to History websites which make learning more interactive and exciting. On top of this, we also arrange events and trips for our students. For example, we currently run annual trips to the Theatre and we also organise a three day trip to the Battlefield sites of World War One in Belgium and France.

PROGRESSION A GCSE in History will provide you with the ideal foundation for progression to AS and A level courses in History or a related subject.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Unit

%

Type

War & Transformation of British society c1903-1928

25

Written Paper

USA 1919-1941

25

Written Paper

Vietnam

25

Controlled assessment

International Relations 1929-1969

25

Written Paper

See the full GCSE specification at http://www.edexcel.com/quals/gcse/gcse09/ghistory/a/Pages/default.aspx


For more information about studying ICT at GCSE see the course teachers Mr Patel or Mr Rehman

ICT GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “I have always wanted to study a GCSE ICT course which allows me to learn about and use the latest digital technologies. I know that ICT is an important qualification and will help me regardless of what I decide to do. I want to get ahead of the game, so GCSE ICT here I come! ”

WHY STUDY ICT? The course provides excellent preparation for higher study and employment in the field of Information Technology. The increasing importance of information technologies means there will be a growing demand for professionals who are qualified in this area. Learners who’ve taken a GCSE in ICT and who then progress to study the subject at A Level or university will have an advantage over their colleagues who are picking up the subject at these levels. Career paths include Web Designer, Multimedia Designer, IT Support Engineer, Games designer and many more. Alternatively, learners who have studied GCSE ICT can then choose to study Computing at A Level or Degree Level. Regardless of whether learners decide to study ICT at further or higher education, the GCSE qualification will be a fun and interesting way to acquire professional skills which can be transferred to other subjects/careers and applied in dayto-day life.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? This GCSE ICT qualification is about exploring ICT in today’s world. The course will give learners the opportunity to cover the latest in digital technology and rest assured the specification that we have chosen to teach at Honley is up to date and relevant in today’s digital world. Learners will have the chance to explore how digital technology impacts on the lives of individuals, organisations and society. Students learn about current and emerging digital technologies and the issues raised by their use in a range of contexts. This qualification also allows learners to broaden and enhance their ICT and multimedia skills. They work with a range of up to date digital tools and techniques to produce effective ICT solutions in a range of contexts. The course will develop critical and logical thinking skills and allow learners to be creative.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN There are two distinct parts to the GCSE ICT course. One part of the course focuses on theoretical aspects of ICT which will require leaners to be familiar with the latest digital technologies. The course will look at how these digital technologies operate and the way in which they impact today’s world. The second part of the course is highly practical and involves learners using a wide range of digital tools to solve ICT problems. Students will have the chance to learn how to use software used in industry on a professional level.

PROGRESSION A GCSE in ICT will provide you with the ideal foundation for progression to AS and A level courses in ICT/Computing or a related subject.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Unit

%

Type

Unit 1: Systems and Applications in ICT

40

1 hr 30 paper

Unit 2: The Assignment: Applying ICT

30

Controlled Assessment

Unit 3: Practical Problem Solving in ICT

30

Controlled Assessment

See the full GCSE specification at: http://web.aqa.org.uk/qual/newgcses/ict/ict-overview.php


For more information about studying Media Studies at GCSE see Mr Train

MEDIA STUDIES GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “Media Studies has changed the way I view the world. It has taught me to be inquisitive and analytical about the world around me and not to take things at face value. I have learned to question everything – especially ‘the truth’.”

WHY STUDY MEDIA STUDIES? In addition to helping students acquire subject knowledge, this specification:  develops critical thinking and decision-making skills  develops appreciation and critical understanding of the role of the media in daily life  combines practical and theoretical knowledge and skills through opportunities for personal engagement & creativity  encourages an understanding of how to use key media concepts to analyse media products & their various contexts. Media Studies is a very important subject, ultimately combining aspects of Politics, Sociology, History and Economics. It encourages creativity, teaches analytical skills and introduces students to critical ways of thinking about the world around them. These talents are highly valued by schools and universities.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? In Media Studies, you will learn about the four key concepts which form the basis of the subject content: media language: forms and conventions, institutions, audience and representation. This knowledge will be applied to a range of media texts – magazines and newspapers, films and advertising. Students are grounded with a sound theoretical base before embarking on their coursework which combines academic rigour with creativity and manufacture.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN In Year 10, work is classroom based and throughout the course the emphasis is on analysing and creating media products. Honley High School has a successful partnership with the National Museum of Media in Bradford and in Year 11; our students undertake fieldwork in Bradford and work closely with the museum to create an advertising campaign for a specific target audience.

PROGRESSION A GCSE in Media Studies will provide you with an ideal foundation for progression to AS and A level courses in Media Studies, Film Studies and Photography. A Media Studies GCSE prepares students for study in a range of disciplines at National Qualifications Framework Level 3 and above.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Unit One – Introducing the Media. Spring Year Ten

10%

Unit Two – Cross Media Production Summer Year Ten Unit Three – Production Autumn Year Eleven

20%

Unit Four – Terminal Examination Spring Year Eleven

30%

40%

Analyse the cover pages of two popular magazines or the front pages of two popular newspapers. How do the covers/pages appeal to their audiences? 15 marks. Compare the impact and effectiveness of two promotional methods used by one film – poster; cinema, television or viral trailer; web page. 30 marks. An advertising campaign for the National Museum of Media realised as one 30-second television, one 30-second radio advertisement and one full page magazine advertisements. 45 marks. Investigating the Media. Written Paper - 1 hour 30 mins - 60 marks - 40% External Assessment - Based on a pre-released topic with guidance and stimulus. Task 1: Knowledge and Understanding. Task 2: Research, Planning and Presentation; Production and Evaluation.

See the full GCSE specification at www.aqa.org.uk/qualifications/gcse/english-and-media/media-studies


MUSIC

For more information about studying Music at GCSE see Mr Baker or Mr Richardson

GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “I have really enjoyed the start to the GCSE course. The practical and theory elements are pretty equally matched and the general ability of the class is high. The lessons are more of a challenge and I feel I am being pushed to the best of my ability. It is also a lot easier to work because of the smaller class size. I am really enjoying this course and am glad I chose it as a subject. The music GCSE course is fun and exciting. It does not matter what musical instrument you play as you could just sing if you wanted. The hardest part is the composition piece”.

WHY STUDY MUSIC? Music GCSE is ideal if you are confident on an instrument or voice and are open minded about different types of music. You will develop in confidence and get to work alongside similarly talented pupils and experience workshops with visiting musicians. Having lessons on an instrument or voice helps but is not essential; being an active musician is very important! You should not opt for this subject if you think it is an easy option. It isn’t! There is a need for pupils to develop as composers and performers and pupils must feel comfortable using keyboard/piano or guitar to help them compose.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN?  There are three strands to GCSE Music; Popular Music, World Music and Classical Music.  There are five areas of study in GCSE Music; Structure and Form, Timbre and Dynamics, Rhythm and Metre, Harmony and Tonality and Texture and Melody.  Listening (20%)-A CD based test of 1 hour  Composing (40%)-2 compositions over the 2 years (and appraising of one of them)  Composition Work is undertaken under controlled test conditions.  Composition 1 (Year 10) has a maximum of 25 hours devoted to it and this takes place in lessons.  Composition 2 (Year 11) has a maximum of 20 hours- undertaken in class. This means that although pupils can prepare at home, composition work HAS to be done at school, in lessons and cannot be done at home between lessons.  Performing (40%)-perform 2 pieces on any instrument or voice (solo piece and group piece).

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN Most lessons are practical and because group sizes are small you have very good access to equipment and space. The first term of Year 10 is spent in small groups developing confidence in performing and composing. Pupils start their own compositions in the New Year. Most weeks include a listening lesson but work is generally linked to composing or performing projects.

PROGRESSION The course is great fun and presents a different style of learning to some more academic subjects. You will also be encouraged to take part in musical groups and performances to stretch your ability. We have very good results and pupils are pushed to develop musically.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Unit

%

Type

Listening

20

Exam

Composing (Y10)

20

Controlled Time

Composing & Appraising (Y11)

20

Controlled Time

Performance

40

Exam

See the full GCSE specification at http://store.aqa.org.uk/qual/newgcse/pdf/AQA-4270-W-SP.PDF


For more information about studying PE at GCSE see Mr O’Connor

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PE) GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: EDEXCEL

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “I took GCSE PE for many reasons. I believe that it’s a fun and exciting course, but very unique. There are a lot of choices in activities you can do and a lot of variation to fit your suitable strengths in PE. It’s very healthy and good for your fitness and gives you a chance to get out of a classroom and do something different. Also, you get to understand how your body works and functions which I found very interesting and useful”. WHY STUDY PE?       

You have a keen interest in sport and recreation and always look forward to your PE lessons. You take part in sport/recreation outside of class time. You want to follow a course that develops knowledge and understanding through practical involvement. You want to know more about the benefits of sport and exercise. You want to improve your own performance in a range of sports roles. You want to study a course that is active and that you will enjoy. You are considering a sports-related career or an A Level/higher education course.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN?     

Develop your knowledge and practical skills in a range of physical activities. Examine the effects of exercise and how training can improve performance. Find ways to improve your own performances in a variety of roles. Identify ways to develop and maintain a healthy and active lifestyle through participation in physical activity. Appreciate the benefits of promoting “sport for all”.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN The course builds on the knowledge, understanding skills established in Key Stage 3 Physical Education. It will give you exciting opportunities to be involved in a number of different physical activities, promoting an active and healthy lifestyle. You can perform in one or all of the following roles: player/participant, leader of official. You should have an interest in PE and sport, enjoy being active and appreciate the benefits of keeping fit and healthy.

PROGRESSION As well as being the ideal preparation for the A Level Physical Education course, GCSE PE allows for progression to related vocational qualifications, such as BTEC Firsts and Nationals in Sport or Sport and Exercise Sciences. The course develops the transferable skills and key skills that employers are looking for and can lead to a wide variety of employment opportunities. This can include training in such areas as recreational management, leisure activities, coaching, officiating, the fitness industry, the armed forces and the Civil Service.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Unit 1 – Examination 40%

Unit 2 – Controlled Assessment 60%

Unit 1 is externally assessed through a written examination paper of 1 hour and 30 minutes. This will contribute a maximum of 40% towards your total marks

Unit 2 is assessed in two sections. Section 1 – four practical performances in the role of either player/participant, leader or official. You can achieve 48% of the marks from your four performances, two of which may be in the role of a leader or official. Section 2 – analysis of performance in one of the chosen activities. This will be worth 12% of the marks and should include planning, performing and evaluating a Personal Exercise Programme.

See the full GCSE specification at http://www.edexcel.com


For more information about studying Resistant Materials at GCSE see Mr Myers

RESISTANT MATERIALS GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “I took Resistant Materials at GCSE because I really enjoyed it at Key Stage 3 and I like to design and make things. I have found from doing the course at Key Stage 4 that I enjoy it even more than before, now we are doing more advanced projects. I want to become a designer for a job career and intend on doing product design at A – level. Resistant Materials is my favourite GCSE I have taken, it is practical, fun and you learn lots of different useful life skills.”

WHY STUDY RESISTANT MATERIALS? Resistant materials is a fantastic option choice for almost everyone, it offers an insight into how the things around us have been designed and made, provides practical skills and knowledge and it gives pupils life skills. Resistant Materials is ideal if you have an interest in designing and making things, an inquiring mind, or just want to learn something new.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? During the course pupils will learn a wide range of skills including shaping, forming and manufacturing techniques through design and make assignments in wood metal and plastic. They will experience all stages of the design process in preparation for the final assignment, which can contribute up to 60% of the final grade.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN Students will learn and gain experience through practical activities and design orientated tasks. In Year 10 students work on a range of projects that provide them with a solid understanding of the subject to successfully undertake the final year project. Projects undertaken in Year 10 are as follows:  Picture frame design and make  Manufacture of a copper storage container  Timber bending and shaping  Planning and manufacture of a marking gauge  Manufacture of a bird box Pupils receive Computer Aided Design (CAD) and computer aided manufacture (CAM) inputs to ensure good awareness of industrial practices. In Year 11 students select a major project and complete a portfolio of design work and produce a manufactured product. Students can choose a brief set by the teacher or create their own to reflect an interest or hobby.

PROGRESSION A GCSE in Resistant Materials will provide you with the ideal foundation for AS and A level design courses or an Art foundation course. Career choices: Resistant Materials is a fantastic option if you are considering any of the following career paths: joiner / carpenter, electrician, plumber, motor vehicle maintenance, engineering, product design, automotive design and interior design.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Pupils are assessed internally and externally in the final year of the course. Pupils sit an end of year examination which is worth 40% of their overall grade and is assessed externally. Pupils produce a design portfolio and a product which individually are worth 50%; these two elements are then combined to contribute up to 60% of the final grade and are assessed internally. The internally assessed elements are carried out under controlled assessment conditions, which is essentially where pupils work in exam conditions following teacher inputs. Students receive verbal and written feedback based on the GCSE A* to G grade boundaries. However in Year 10 these do not count towards the overall grade but provide an indication of future attainment.

See the full GCSE specification at http://store.aqa.org.uk/qual/newgcse/pdf/AQA-4560-W-SP.PDF


For more information about studying Sociology at GCSE see Ms Raw

SOCIOLOGY GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “I like learning about culture and families”. “I like the topic of media and the trip to the media museum”. “I enjoy the group work, debates and posters“. “I like finding out other people’s views”. “I’m looking forward to studying crime and power”.

WHY STUDY SOCIOLOGY? Sociology provides a valuable foundation for many jobs, including a police officer, therapist, social worker, counsellor, researcher, journalist, nurse, teacher and jobs related to working with children and people from all different backgrounds.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN?  Sociology is the study of people and how they behave in society. Students will carry out surveys, such as questionnaires and interviews and then interpret the data gathered.  Sociology explores how the media, such as television, impacts on a person’s self-image and behaviour, and bias in the news.  It looks at how far education can transform a person’s life chances.  Sociology considers the differences in people’s backgrounds, their gender, cultural background and their families. It also explains society within its historical context.  It investigates crime in all areas of society from street crime to crime in big businesses. It looks at the unequal nature of power and wealth in the hands of the few to the relative poverty of many.  The views of theorists such as Karl Marx are applied to the topics.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN Students will carry out surveys, such as questionnaires and interviews and interpret the data gathered. Students will be encouraged as independent learners when they develop their skills for exam essays. With all topics, group activities, debates and discussions and group presentations to the class will develop the student’s self-confidence and skills. Students will also be taught about how to interpret and understand statistics.

PROGRESSION Sociology GCSE will make an excellent foundation for A’ level Sociology and vocational subjects. It has many links with Psychology, Media Studies, History, Economics and Law.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Two external exams –both at the end of Year 11.

See the full GCSE specification at http://www.aqa.org.uk/qual/newgcse/soc_sci/new/soc_materials


For more information about studying Spanish at GCSE see Ms Davis

SPANISH GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “Spanish is the third most widely spoken global language after Chinese and English with more than 500 million speakers”. “Learning Spanish is fun. You learn to speak the language as well as learning about traditions and culture in Spain”. “People with language skills have better job prospects”. You should opt for a language if… “You have an inquisitive mind, are keen to improve your skills base, confidence and your understanding of not only a new language but of different cultures. Learning another language improves listening and reading skills, increases your ability to solve problems, think creatively and improves your knowledge of English words. It also helps to develop your mind as you work a part of your brain that would otherwise be un-used. Language learning builds up your brain like exercising builds up your muscles”.

WHY STUDY SPANISH? A Modern Foreign Language is a good option! Employability - Basic ability in languages is much in demand, as employers seek those capable of communicating with foreign customers or breaking the ice with a few phrases at visits or in a meeting. Students who opt to study languages are at a distinct advantage in the job market in many sectors. Industries which require foreign language speakers include: business services, central government, contact centres, engineering, financial services, marketing, media, technology, travel and tourism, the voluntary and charitable sector.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? The GCSE course looks at four themes: Lifestyle (health and relationships), Leisure (free time and the media), Home and Environment (home and local area, environmental issues) and Work and Education (school and future plans, current and future jobs) The skills of listening (20% of the final grade) and reading (20% of the final grade) are examined at the end of Year 11 at either Foundation (C-G) or Higher (A*-D) level, with 2 speaking assessments (30% of the final grade) taken during Year 10 and Year 11 and 2 written controlled assessments (two essays of up to 600 words across the two tasks - 30%) undertaken throughout Years 10 and 11.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN Students use a huge range of resources in their learning of a language, from the Internet to songs, radio clips to magazines, Language Assistants to grammatical mind maps, PowerPoint presentations to the text book. They work independently, in pairs and in groups and are actively involved in learning how to learn a language as well as in preparation for the exams.

PROGRESSION A GCSE in Spanish will provide you with the ideal foundation for progression to AS and A level courses in Spanish or another language.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Unit

%

Type

Listening paper

20

50 minute paper

Reading Paper

20

50 minute paper

2 Speaking Assessments

30

4-6 minutes each

2 Writing Assessment s

30

300 words each

See the full GCSE specification at http://web.aqa.org.uk


For more information about studying Systems and Control at GCSE see Mr Myers

SYSTEMS AND CONTROL GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “Basic electronics and what components do and how they work and mechanisms like gears, pulleys, cams and cranks and how circuits link to mechanisms”. “It’s a good option if you like practical stuff and want to learn how stuff works. You make models and circuits and it’s not just theory, but we do learn the theory as well”.

WHY STUDY SYSTEMS AND CONTROL? Systems and Control is a fantastic option choice for almost everyone, it offers an insight into how the things around us have been designed and made, provides practical skills and knowledge and it gives pupils life skills. Systems and control is ideal if you are that person who took apart their toys and asked the question ‘how does it work and how can I get it back together?’

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? During the course pupils will learn the theory of how electronic components work and are controlled through a series of mini projects. The course will cover the programming of microchips basic robotic control with Lego Mindstorm and the different types of motion and how they can be linked to create complex mechanisms. They will experience all stages of the design process in preparation for the final assignment, which can contribute up to 60% of the final grade.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN Students will learn and gain experience through practical activities and design orientated tasks. In Year 10 students work on a range of projects that provide them with a solid understanding of the subject to successfully undertake the final year project. Some of the areas covered are shown below:  Making working Circuits, through Software Simulation.  Making the PCB and soldering all the components needed.  Software simulation of mechanisms, constructing mechanisms.  Interfacing electronics with mechanisms. Pupils receive Computer Aided Design (CAD) and computer aided manufacture (CAM) inputs to ensure good awareness of industrial practices. In Year 11 students select a major project and complete a portfolio of design work and produce a manufactured product. Students can choose a brief set by the teacher or create their own to reflect an interest or hobby.

PROGRESSION A GCSE in Systems and Control will provide you with the ideal foundation for AS and A level design courses. Career choices - Systems & Control is a fantastic option if you are considering any of the following career paths: electronics, architecture, engineering, product design, and automotive design.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Pupils are assessed internally and externally in the final year of the course. Pupils sit an end of year examination which is worth 40% of their overall grade and is assessed externally. Pupils produce a design portfolio and a product which individually are worth 50%; these two elements are then combined to contribute up to 60% of the final grade and are assessed internally. The internally assessed elements are carried out under controlled assessment conditions, which is essentially where pupils work in exam conditions following teacher inputs. Students receive verbal and written feedback based on the GCSE A* to G grade boundaries. However in Year 10 these do not count towards the overall grade but provide an indication of future attainment.

See the full GCSE specification at http://web.aqa.org.uk/qual/newgcses/dandt/systems_index.php?id=07&prev=07


For more information about studying Home Economics Textiles at GCSE see Mrs Pinder

TEXTILES GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “GCSE Textiles is good because you do a lot of practical and design work. In Year 10 you go on a trip based on the work you’re doing and it’s a very good start to the course. If you enjoy fashion and design then this is a very good course to take”.

WHY STUDY TEXTILES? This is a great choice if you are creative, artistic and have an interest in fashion and/or interior designing, also if you are interested in taking creative subjects beyond GCSE level. You should opt for this subject if you would be interested in taking the following career paths: fashion/clothing design, interior design, pattern making, fashion drawing, marketing , buying and merchandiser for textile products from fabrics to fashion clothing ,fashion and product photography, fabric designer weave, knit and print , automotive design, textile technologist developing new products, production engineering working developing new machinery within the textile industry or colourist and fabric printer.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN?          

  

Research Methods Designing Techniques: fashion drawing and presentation techniques Fibres and Fabrics: Properties and characteristics and combination, construction and uses of textiles fibres and fabrics Finishing Processes: dying and printing, decoration and enhancement and fabric finishes to improve their properties Components used on Fabrics and how they are produced Product Analysis: analysis of designs and products, image, lifestyle, co-ordination, ambience and harmony reflected in past and present textile designs and analysis of own designs and products Evaluation Techniques Social, Cultural, and Moral issues Health and safety Techniques and Processes: using commercial patterns and making their own to produce textile products, using tools, equipment and machines accurately, processes used for one-offs, batch and mass production and selecting appropriate processes for own products Systems and Control ICT: CAD/CAM in industry and usage of CAD/CAM in designing and making of own products Industrial processes

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN You will be given a range of interesting projects to complete covering fashion design to technical textiles products. Within these projects you cover both designing and making skills. You will be given the opportunity to improve on your creative and practical skills from Key Stage 3 and will make a range of textile products in Year 10. Examples of activities are: A visit to see Vivienne Westwood’s exhibition on her fashion designs in Sheffield. This was linked to a fashion recycling project at the beginning of Year 10, vvisiting the local Textile Centre of Excellence to see industrial processes and designers at work, fashion and textile competitions held within and outside school, using software that is used within the fashion and textile industries, vvisits to final exhibitions of pupils work at AS and A2 levels in both art and textiles and links with local further education establishments.

PROGRESSION Possible progression from Textiles GCSE (with additional GCSE’s). A levels in Textiles or Art & Design (general or Fashion & Textile Pathway) or BTEC Diploma L2 /Extended Diploma L3 in Art & Design Students could also consider Advanced or Foundation Apprenticeships in textiles.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT On-going assessment combined with terminal assessment.

See the full Home Economics: Textiles specification at http://www.aqa.org.uk


For more information about studying Science at GCSE see Mr Maniyar

TRIPLE SCIENCE GCSE OPTION EXAM BOARD: OCR

WHAT THE STUDENTS SAY “I chose Triple Science because it’s what I need for my future studies. I enjoy Science and this allows me to learn more about the stuff I’m really interested in”. “When I first chose the subject I thought it would be really hard, but I’ve found it is very similar to what the other students do, except we will do one extra module. Also before picking my options I found out that the local colleges prefer people who have done Triple Science. This made my choice a little easier.”

WHY STUDY TRIPLE SCIENCE? Local colleges prefer Triple Science to the Dual Science Option, due to greater depth of understanding that students develop during the course. The key skills developed in the subject are entirely transferrable and therefore viewed very favourably by many colleges and universities. As a core subject, Science is viewed as essential by many employers and the government. Schools minister Nick Gibb has stated that "educating the next generation of scientists is crucial if we are to compete with the best in the world.” Clearly students with good sciences have an advantage going forward.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? Triple Science splits the sciences of Biology, Chemistry and Physics into individual subjects, so it is worth three GCSEs. Students studying this course will:  Gain a broad and deep understanding of many interesting scientific concepts.  Be very well prepared for further study at A-level.  Have the time to explore practical science at a more advanced level.  Develop many key skills including team work, independent enquiry, effective participation and creative thinking. Year 10 learning will mainly be about the core elements of science based around how science works, these are key theories and skills. Year 11 builds on the previous year and will focus on developing knowledge and understanding.

HOW STUDENTS WILL LEARN Students will learn through a variety of teaching styles: practical based work, paired activities, group work, class discussions and individual tasks. Questioning is fundamental to learning and it is crucial that students become active learners by asking lots of questions. Practical work is very important and the coursework element of each subject will require the student to carry out practical work and then explain the science behind the results. Students will have access to key websites and online resources that we have purchased especially for this course, on top of the usual resources that are used. Clearly as more products become available we will try to ensure that we have the most effective resources at our disposal.

PROGRESSION Triple science is really important for students wishing to study A-Level sciences or related subjects. As a core subject it is required for a large number of courses and careers, it is crucial that students carefully research their own requirements, based on their choices.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT Students will be expected to sit examinations in all three Science subjects at the end of their two year study programme. 75% of each GCSE grade will come from the terminal exams; the final 25% will come from controlled assessments that will be completed throughout Key Stage 4. Students will be regularly assessed during the two years; this information will be used to inform progress and tier entry.

Either refer to the Science department for more information or find out more specific information from www.ocr.org.uk. Please note that the Triple Science course is part of the OCR Twenty First Century Science Suite.


Options Choices Form (overleaf) Please complete and return to Student th Services by Thursday 14 February


HONLEY HIGH SCHOOL OPTIONS CHOICES FORM 2013 Name:

Form:

All students will follow courses in English, Mathematics, Science, RE, PE and PSHCE. Below you need to select the extra optional subjects you wish to take by filling in sections 1 to 3 below: 1 GCSE Options You must select four subjects and two reserves. Number you main choices 1,2,3,4 (in order of preference) and your reserve choices R1 and R2. Art and Design

Business Studies

Child Development

Computing

Dance

Drama

Food

French

Geography

Graphic Products

History

ICT

Media Studies

Music

PE

Resistant Materials

Sociology

Spanish

Systems & Control

Textiles

Triple Science

2 Additional Qualifications If you wish to be considered for any of the following courses please tick the appropriate box. Please note that:  these courses are in addition to the four GCSE choices above  the list below is provisional as, at the time of printing we have not had confirmation of which courses will be available from September 2013  these courses will take place at other schools / colleges and students are expected to travel to and from the course independently  places on these courses are strictly limited and will require some form of application process to be selected for a place Photography GCSE Engineering NVQ

Hairdressing & Beauty NVQ Catering NVQ / BTEC

Animal Care BTEC Construction BTEC

3 Parental approval Please sign to show that you agree with these options choices and have discussed them with your son / daughter Parent / Carer’s Signature

NEW_OPTIONS_BOOKLET_2013_a4_website  

http://www.honleyhigh.co.uk/docs/NEW_OPTIONS_BOOKLET_2013_a4_website.pdf

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