Issuu on Google+

CANDY’S IN NEW YORK

THE CHARD LIFE AT THE TOP

LONDONAGENT NEWS, ADVICE AND INSPIRATION FOR PROPERTY PROFESSIONALS

LONDON TOWNHOUSE BRIXTON

Brixton Sizzles As London Prices Soar Regeneration schemes have transformed the south London suburb, with prices up 30 per cent in five years

When the south London suburb of Brixton was developed during a Victorian property boom, it was resolutely middle class. Later, around the turn of the century, and again following the Blitz, a demographic shift took place when the large and expensive homes near Acre Lane and Electric Avenue built for doctors, accountants and business owners were converted

into boarding houses. Brixton became, at various turns, bohemian, impoverished, and known for ethnic tension. In 1981, the first of several riots with which the neighbourhood became synonymous broke out. Twelve years ago, a policeman called the Brixton market space “a 24hour crack supermarket”. Today, the doctors and accountants are back, joined by bankers

and a very different type of market. Last month, a bar named Champagne + Fromage opened in Brixton Village (the covered market formerly known as the Granville Arcade), a bistro serving £12 glasses of Brut, artisanal cheeses and exotic foods such as snail raclette.It is the latest and most extreme example of the rise. CONTINUED ON PAGE 7

londonagent.co.uk

ROUGUE TENANTS OWE £282 MILLION

Landlords are owed £282 million in lost rent and property damage, a BBC programme reveals tonight. While many have been labelled “rogue” for their ruthless treatment of tenants, the TV documentary shows that landlords can be victims too. Property expert Paul Shamplina, of Landlord Action, has been helping landlords with problem tenants for more than 25 years and helped criminalise squatting in private homes. He said: “Over the years, our experience of professional bad tenants has been plentiful, often evicting the same tenant from more than one property. Although in the minority, this type of tenant has the intention of preying on vulnerable landlords in order to live for free. And, as many tenants rely on housing benefit to pay the rent while the Government is looking to cut the £26 billion housing benefit bill, more and more tenants will not be able to cover the rent, and both them and their landlords will be the losers.” Ana Rabrenovic let her three-bedroom house in Catford to raise income. Her agent went bust taking her deposit and when the tenant stopped paying rent, she was desperate. CONTINUED ON PAGE 7


Londonagentmagazine1