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Vol. 13/Number 24

www.myryesoundshore.com

June 21, 2013

We’re RyeDone Class of 2013 says goodbye For coverage, see pages 8-9 Photo/Bobby Begun


2 • THE RYE SOUND SHORE REVIEW • June 21, 2013


June 21, 2013 • THE RYE SOUND SHORE REVIEW • 3

Time running out for Rye Democrats By LIZ BUTTON and ASHLEY HELMS SOUND SHORE REVIEW STAFF liz@hometwn.com ashley@hometwn.com

With time and the number of potential candidates diminishing, Rye Democrats have come up with an unusual way to fill out their election slate. While Republicans selected Councilman Joe Sack to run for mayor at their June 6 caucus along with three City Council candidates, Democrats are left searching for nominees with less than three weeks to submit nominating petitions to the county Board of Elections. In the meantime, Democratic leaders have decided to circulate petitions with “placeholder” names of district leaders, which will be replaced with actual candidates in July. According to Rye Democratic Party Chairman Rod Brown, the move to run placeholders was done on a statutory basis, as allowed by state election law. These fill-in candidates will be used as a means of extending the time normally allotted for the nominating process, so that the committee may come up with and vet the best candidates possible for the job, according to Brown. While a party will sometimes gather signatures for a candidate who ends up declining the nomination, planning to switch outright upon nomination in local races is very rare. “It would be nice if we didn’t have to do that, but that is the situation we find ourselves in this year,” Brown said. He affirmed it is likely the extra time will be sufficient for the committee to fill out a full slate. Finding candidates in Rye has become a more difficult process than it used to be, Brown said, as people have become leery of participating in a political environment where they see an alarming lack of civility—a buzzword today in Rye politics. “People are not exactly flocking to the public arena in Rye and there is a reason for that,” Brown said, referencing the city government turmoil and City Council infighting over the last two years. State Sen. George Latimer, a Rye Democrat and former city councilman, said that parties using “placeholders” happened a number of times when he was running for state Assembly in 2004. In Rye, the senator said, it’s difficult to find people to run for City Council, with the lack of pay, the Democrat minority in the city and an overall contentious political atmosphere acting as major contributing factors. “[The placeholder] is legal, it’s appropriate; it’s not desirable,” Latimer said. With the way council members have been treating each other over the last four years, and considering the vitriol of periodic political attacks from certain citizens, Brown said that even people who have held office in Rye before have commented that the political arena has never been so brutal. “Clearly, people considering [running] have frankly been turned off by what they have seen and what they read,” the party chair said. Rye Republican Party Chairman Tony Piscionere said he finds the idea of a full

slate of placeholders astonishing. He said the people of Rye deserve better; to know that they are not writing their party leaders a blank check. “It is kind of unusual,” Piscionere said of the Democrats’ play. “I’m not saying it hasn’t been done, but it’s kind of unusual to have your entire slate placeholders.” Piscionere also said that the idea that the political arena in Rye has become too charged is a convenient excuse from Democrats to explain away a lack of interested candidates, “but we’re running people who want to change that.” Each seat on the City Council is unpaid-Rye is one of a few local municipalities that does not offer its council members or mayor a salary or benefits. A criticism of serving in an elected position as a volunteer is that the service does not merit time served toward state pensions. Former Democratic Mayor John Carey served 14 years as an elected official in Rye government. However, that time does not count alongside his service as a state supreme court judge, leaving him short of the required 20 years of service necessary to file for the pension to which he would have otherwise been entitled if he was paid just $1 per year for his Rye duties. And since a council member is a volunteer position, it is hard to convince people to willingly sign on for a position like that without pay, Brown said. In Rye, council members have become guaranteed to face fervent public scrutiny and infighting simply for the privilege of serving the city. While Brown does not know if paying council people would solve the problem of finding interested candidates, compensation would certainly lend an attractive aspect to it and might be worth a discussion down the road. Carey, a contributor to The Rye Sound Shore Review, suggested as much in a recent column. Mayor and three City Council seats are up for grabs this November. Councilman Sack will headline the GOP ticket along with Councilwoman Julie Killian and newcomers Kirstin Bucci, a registered Democrat, and Terry McCartney. Republican Mayor Douglas French is not running for a second term in office, and two other Republicans on the council, Richard Filippi and Peter Jovanovich, do not plan to seek re-election. And there may be one or two more City Council seats available later on if Sack is elected mayor and Councilwoman Catherine Parker, the only Democrat on the current City Council, wins in her run for county legislator. With the chance for a clean slate and potential for significant turnover on the board this year, Piscionere said, “I certainly would hope that going forward, the new City Council will instill a lot more confidence in city government.” The Democrats’ slate will be determined by July 8, the last day to file petitions, Party Chair Brown said. Phone calls to John Conklin, a representative with the state Board of Elections, and Councilwoman Parker were not returned as of press time.


4 • THE RYE SOUND SHORE REVIEW • June 21, 2013

C ommunity Briefs

Rye Library events Dig into Chinese history The Chinese Language School of Connecticut will present four Saturday morning programs for children age three and a half and up at the Rye Free Reading Room during June. “The Dragon Boat Festival” on June 22, and “Chinese Lanterns: Symbols of Celebration for All Occasions” on June 29. For more information about these programs, call 914-231-3162 or visit www.ryelibrary.org. Summer reading and writing program For parents concerned their children will lose academic ground over the summer, The Center for Literacy Enrichment-Pace University has a solution–The Summer Reading & Writing Program. From pre-schoolers to middle schoolers, the program provides children with an opportunity to not only maintain their reading, writing and comprehensive skills, but also to make gains academically in fun and informative ways. The program, which runs from July 1 to 31, offers full-day and half-day sessions. Certified teachers provide small-group instruction complemented by theme-based indoor and outdoor activities, including science experiments, crafts and games in a noncompetitive setting.

The Summer Reading & Writing Program is held on the campus of Pace University Law School, 78 North Broadway, White Plains. Early bird registration, prior to June 14, qualifies for a 5 percent discount on tuition. For more information, or to register your child, contact Center Director Sister St. John Delany, PhD at 914-422-4135. Peruvian food tasting Local Chefs, Peruvian artists and hundreds of people from Westchester County, Connecticut and New York City will join the Tasting at Peru Food Festival and Expo, the first Peruvian gastronomic event in the history of Westchester County, New York, with the aim of promoting Peruvian cuisine and to promote Peru, which is currently enjoying a gastronomic boom. The event will be held at Crawford Park, in Rye Brook, Sunday June 23, 2013, Noon to 7 p.m. Tasting at Peru Food Festival and Expo aims to support the Peruvian youth and adults of New York with experience in the gastronomical marvels of their country as well as enter the business professionally; offering Peruvian food services in a highly competitive market and where there is a huge window of opportunity for them. Westchester Hispano, organizer of the culinary festival, has the mission to encourage these future owners of restaurants and Peruvian local caterers with their commitment to responsibility in providing quality food that proudly represents the Incan land. At Tasting at Peru Food Festival & Expo,

Peruvian chefs will showcase dishes with influences of different cultures from the Peruvian Mosaic: From the ceviche dish, flag and king of the Peruvian coast, to the pachamanca, great representative of the Andes; the delicious juanes, in the Jungle of Peru, to the chiriuchu, traditional dish of Cusco. There will be a special presentation of quinoa by a renowned Peruvian Chef. Women of jazz Saturday, June 29 at 8 p.m. The White Plains Performing Arts Center presents Women of Jazz on Saturday, June 29 at 8 p.m. in the theatre on the third level of City Center in downtown White Plains. The program on June 29 features the music of Dinah Washington, Sarah Vaughan, Ella Fitzgerald and Billie Holiday in an evening of smooth tunes from some of the most distinctive young jazz singers performing in NYC today. Join Kat Gang, Terese Genecco and LaTanya Hall as they wrap their spine-tingling vocals around classics such as “That ‘Ol Black Magic,” “What a Difference a Day Makes,” “Mr. Wonderful” and “Strange Fruit,” accompanied by the Barry Levitt Trio. We’re chilling the martinis and turning up the sizzle. Tickets are $35 for adults; $25 for students in high school and younger. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit the WPPAC website at www.wppac. com, call the box office at 914 328-1600 or visit the box office during business hours at the third level of City Center. Classical music performance at Katonah’s Caramoor On Sunday, July 21 at 4:30 p.m. in the Venetian Theater, The Emerson String Quartet will make its American debut performance with its new cellist, Paul Watkins. Watkins, a much-lauded cellist as well as music director of the English Chamber Orchestra, replaces David Finckel. The distinguished soloist, award-winning conductor, and dedicated chamber musician joins the quartet’s Eugene Drucker, Philip Setzer and Lawrence Dutton for their 37th season. Watkins officially joined the group May 11, 2013, and will perform with his new colleagues extensively throughout North America, Europe, and Asia after the Caramoor debut. Tickets: $15, $20, $30, $40. Children under 18 are half price. To order tickets, call the box office at 914-232-1252 or visit www.caramoor.org. Summer art classes at Greenburgh Nature Center Enjoy a five-class series of art instruc-

tion. Learn, explore and create in the beautiful outdoor setting of the nature center. Students work independently and in groups, learning to use a variety of basic supplies, as well as simple sketching, painting and more. Each class focuses on a new technique, ranging from landscapes to portraits, cartoons to still-lifes. Instructor Jake Hurwitz is a fun, outgoing and experienced art teacher who relates well with young students. Session Dates: Saturdays, July 13 to Aug. 10 Sundays, July 14 to Aug. 11 Class Times: Group 1, ages 7 to 10: Saturdays 10 a.m. to noon Group 2, ages 7 to 10: Sundays 10 a.m. to noon Group 3, ages 11 to 14 plus: Saturdays 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Classes run for two hours and are held outdoors, weather permitting. In case of inclement weather, class held indoors. Pre-registration and pre-payment required online. See website to register and pay. Classes start promptly, so please arrive on time. Dress appropriately for outdoor activity. Session Fee, which covers five classes and all supplies: Members $150 Non-members $175 “Big” in Rye Town Park The Friends of Rye Town Park is presenting the family classic, “Big” starring Tom Hanks, on Thursday, July 11, beginning at approximately 8:40 p.m.. The event will be held outdoors, on the great lawn at the northeast end of Rye Town Park. Two parts of the movie were filmed in Rye: An amusement park sequence, and the “return to Zoltar” scene near the end. “Big” was nominated for Academy Awards for Best Actor in a Leading Role for Tom Hanks and Best Original Screenplay. Thanks to the generous sponsorship of Carpet Trends of Rye, admission to the movie is free. There will be a reduced parking rate of $5, $4 for season permit holders, after 4:00 p.m. People living close to the park are encouraged to walk. In the event of bad weather, the rain date will be Thursday, July 18. For further information, phone 914 967-5419. Or, people can call the park at 967-0965. Deadline for our Community Briefs section is every Friday at 12 p.m. Though space is not guaranteed, we will do our best to accommodate your listing. Please send all items to news@hometwn.com.

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June 21, 2013 • THE RYE SOUND SHORE REVIEW • 5

School district makes strides in campus safety By ASHLEY HELMS and LIZ BUTTON SOUND SHORE REVIEW STAFF ashley@hometwn.com liz@hometwn.com

Rye schools have made good on promises to improve school safety following the elementary school shooting massacre in Newtown, Conn. six months ago by looking into equipping all exits and entrances with electronic card readers. Upgrading out-of-date PA systems in some school buildings and adding outdoor PA speakers to others is also being considered. But the upgrades don’t come without a price; the district budgeted $571,000 in its 2013-2014 school budget for such security updates, and, currently, it would cost the district $595,000 to implement all of the recommendations. StoneGate Associates, an emergency management planning consulting firm, was hired in January to conduct a $20,000 audit of the district’s safety protocols. The results are now available. Over the past few months, the firm looked at the district’s security measures from a facilities perspective as well as its current protocols for lockdowns and security drills. The district is working on requests for proposals now, and Director of Buildings and Grounds Sam Carder has met with experts in various fields to review the security company’s suggestions. The district will have them all out to bid by the end of the month. Assistant Superintendent Kathleen Ryan said

that she hopes some of the equipment installation prices will go down as the district puts out the bids. While some of the suggested security measures are already being implemented, once all jobs have been bid out, many of the other upgrades will be taken care of this summer. In an update on security improvements at a June 11 Board of Education meeting, Ryan said that installing card readers is a step in the right direction because it would allow the district to more efficiently control whomever enters and exits the buildings. If a faculty member was no longer employed with the district, their card could simply be deactivated and they would no longer be able to enter the building with it, Ryan said. But not everyone seemed impressed. Michael Brennan, 56, has two children in Osborn School and said that he thinks the card readers are a little over the top. If someone really wanted to get into the school, Brennan said, they could shoot through the glass door in front. “To put in all that expense and time; I want my children to be safe, but it gets to a point where I don’t know if you’re spending this money wisely,” Brennan said. Christopher Pellegrini, 45, has four kids in the city’s public schools and said he was curious as to whether parents would receive cards to get into the building because they already have trouble getting in. “You can’t have too secure a facility,” Pellegrini said. “As long as parents have access to their children, I don’t see how it’s detrimental.”

Electronic card readers may replace keypad locks in the district, like the one seen here at Osborn School, following suggestions put forth by StoneGate Associates, an emergency management planning consulting firm hired by the school district in January. The safety improvements are a direct result of the elementary school shooting in Newtown, Conn. Photo/Corey Baumer

According to Ryan, the district is still discussing how students and parents would get into the building, but it is likely that visitors would still have to sign in through the main office. Another safety measure that was proposed

is upgrading the PA system in Osborn School, which, at its current estimated cost, will be the most expensive of all the security upgrades; about $100,000 at most. The system currently SAFETY continued on page 12


6 • THE RYE SOUND SHORE REVIEW • June 21, 2013

Holy Child Class of 2013 Victoria Leigh Almeida—White Plains Brianna Elizabeth Alonso—Riverdale Shakira Marcinette Annosier —Stamford, Conn. Julie Anne Barnard—Armonk Hunter Lawrence Brady—Stamford, Conn. Alison Mary Breitenbach—Rye Molly Ann Cacase—Harrison Quinn Catherine Cambria—New Rochelle Amanda Carlson—Harrison Carolyn Redefer Caruso—Bronxville Elizabeth Ann Chapey—Mamaroneck Jessica Suzanne Ciaccia—White Plains Francesca Rose Cicileo—Greenwich, Conn. Gianna Ciminello—Scarsdale Alexandra Corbi—Eastchester Regan Elizabeth Curran—Rye Tayla Louise Daniel—Riverside, Conn. Jacqueline Marie DeMarco—Eastchester Tiffany Ernestina Diaz—Bronx Maria Dombrov—Yonkers Kathleen Elizabeth Driscoll—Harrison Chellzea Khristena Edgar—Mount Vernon Margaret Lee Evans—Old Greenwich, Conn. Mikaela Mary Fitzwilliam—Stamford, Conn. Danielle J. Gerken—New Rochelle Julia Eddy Giordano—Rye Julia Mary Gonfiantini—Katonah Alena Grace Gormally—Harrison Abigail Marie Griffin—Mohegan Lake Eleanor Deming Grinnell—Stamford, Conn. Erika Rosa Hantho—Greenwich, Conn. Mary Eileen Henderson—White Plains Caitlin Anne Hogan—Chappaqua Stephanie Joyce Hogan—Chappaqua Claire Marie Holleran—Rye Brook Alixandra Eve Jerome—Hartsdale Jennifer Ivette Jimenez—Bronx Grace Ada Mae Jordan—Riverside, Conn. Emma Sofia Kvaale—Port Chester Alexandra Emily Lacek—Scarsdale Alexis Catherine Lange—Crestwood Ellen Margaret Lautenbach —Old Greenwich, Conn. Margot Elise Lemone—Greenwich, Conn. Ana Manet May Ling Lo—Stamford, Conn. Alexandra Isabella Magnani—Bronxville Isabella Triglia Mazzola—Greenwich, Conn.

Erin Rose McAward—Harrison Elizabeth Mary McCooey—Rye Laura Nicole McLaughlin—New Canaan, Conn. Susanna Lee McNatt—Bronxville Maghan Patricia Meyers—Mount Vernon Esmeralda A. Michaca—Port Chester Christine Millard—Rye Katie Taylor Muniz—Riverdale Mary Elizabeth Murphy—Cos Cob Shannon A. O’Connor—Rye Morgan Anne O’Donnell—Rye Brook Caylene Marie Parrish—Crestwood Melanie Ann Patapis—Scarsdale Alexandra Marie Pepe—Rye Samantha Ann Pepe—Rye Maggie Elizabeth Perkal—Rye Katherine Mary Rogan—Port Chester Ellen McLoughlin Rote—Larchmont Paige Dionne Yaphockun Señal—Yonkers Clare Elizabeth Smith—Pelham Anne L. Tutrone—Bronxville Sarafiena Watkins—Cos Cob Lilian Joyce Wittwer—Rye

City approves police social media policy By LIZ BUTTON STAFF REPORTER liz@hometwn.com

The Rye City Police Department realized three years ago that Facebook, Twitter and other social media outlets could serve as tools for law enforcement, but it was not until the City Council’s June 12 meeting that the department’s new social media policy was finally realized. But the policy has also triggered concerns over communication with the city’s largest labor union. The City Council approved the police department’s Police and city officials have seen social media policy at its June 12 meeting. File photo how social media can provide for community communication and notification was not explicitly made aware that the item as well as act as a public relations vehicle, was to be discussed by the City Council on and, in some situations, for crime tips fa- June 12 leaving the police union with no opcilitated by two-way communication between portunity to comment on the policy proposal residents and police. that was approved that night. “This will be a living document as technolHowever, Councilwoman Laura Brett, a ogy develops, so we will have to periodically Republican, said she did not feel comfortable amend it and review it,” Police Commissioner adopting a policy without the input of the William Connors said. PBA. According to Connors, the new policy The fluidity of the six-page policy would be and subsequent revisions were provided to the comparable to that of the department’s Taser local police union on Dec. 18, 2011; March policy, which has been revised six times over 19, 2011, April 27, 2012, and April 30, 2013. the years, Connors said. The latest version was only sent to the PBA Last week, Commissioner Connors also as- after the City Council received a letter on April sured the City Council that the city’s Police 29 from PBA President Franco Compagnone Benevolent Association was provided with a following the police commissioner’s presentacopy of the most recent version of the pro- tion to the council earlier that month. Connors posed policy on April 30, but said the PBA POLICE continued on page 11

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June 21, 2013 • THE RYE SOUND SHORE REVIEW • 7

What now in Syria, Mr. President and members of Congress? Something of an ultimatum was General Wesley Clark, in The New laid down by President Obama York Times, argued that the show of when he declared that proof of use force that helped solve problems in of chemical weapons by Syrian Kosovo should work in Syria. But government forces would change history does not necessarily repeat the equation. When such proof be- itself. The stakes in Syria, and the came evident, his hand was forced. involvement of foreign powers there, Ultimatums are exceed anything tricky, since they faced in Kosovo. limit future action. I submit that any In 1914, Serbia U.S. action strong A RYE was given an ulenough to dislodge OLDTIMER timatum on terms the Assad regime Judge John Carey it could hardly would require force consider. So when of a scale amountits time to respond was up, the re- ing to war against that regime. Does sulting World War I was essentially our president have authority to cominevitable. Similarly, in 1939, when mit forces of that magnitude against the U.K. and France gave Germany an existing government? Here we an ultimatum to get out of Poland, need to consult our Constitution. its refusal to do so forced the U.K. Article I, Section 8, provides that and France to go to war against “The Congress shall have power… Germany. How well I remember To declare War…To raise and supthose frightening times. port armies, but no appropriation of Now it is President Obama who Money to that Use shall be for a lonhas tied his hands by drawing a line ger Term than two Years; To provide in the sand on Syrian government and maintain a Navy.” use of chemical weapons against its Congress has limited presidential opposition. Since he now says such introduction of U.S. armed forces use is proven, he must take action. into hostilities to where there is a Some political leaders have urged declaration of war, specific statutory use of force, if only by supplying authorization, or a national emerarms to the rebels. gency created by an attack against

the United States. These limits seem not to apply, since the president is not talking about introducing U.S. armed forces into hostilities. He has spoken publicly only of supplying arms to Syrian opposition forces. But can warlike action, once begun, be so precisely limited to weaponry and not escalate into boots on the ground? I suggest, with all due respect to those who bear the responsibility of making these momentous decisions, that no one person or government department should alone decide whether to commit military support. Let the president, if he wants to supply arms to the opposition, put the question to Congress. That way, the decision will be by the American people through their elected representatives-and not by any one person-that commits our country and its future in so hazardous a situation. After the horrendous costs in lives and treasure we have incurred in Iraq and Afghanistan, we would be prudent to secure the backing of at least two of our main branches of the federal government before embarking on what could be another such experience. Reach John Carey at j_pcarey@verizon.net

What’s Your Beef? What’s bothering you today?

Collected on Mamaroneck Avenue in Mamaroneck “At Stepinac High school in White Plains, there needs to be a slower speed limit, especially with the elementary school around the corner.”

“That I have to go to work and can’t get lunch with my husband.” Shana Ginipro, 36, Astoria

Bernice Spina, 75, Mamaronek

“I’ve been smoking and trying to quit, but it has been a real pain.” Ron Andresen, 66, California

-Photos and reporting by J.C. SITES

“I wish I could find a part-time job to keep busy.” Robert Plenty, 79, White Plains


8 • THE RYE SOUND SHORE REVIEW • June 21, 2013

Class of 2013 bids farewell to Rye High

Kelly Barnhart

By LIZ BUTTON STAFF REPORTER liz@hometwn.com

Rye High School’s Class of 2013 said goodbye to their alma mater after four years of instruction at the school’s 82nd commencement ceremony on Saturday, June 15. On a balmy morning at Nugent Stadium, family and friends applauded as they listened to students, teachers and administrators share words of encouragement with the graduating class. In U.S. News and World Report’s recently released rankings, Rye High School was ranked ninth best in the state and 61st best in the country of all public high schools analyzed. When charter and magnet schools were not included in the count, it ranked first on the publication’s list of New York state public high schools. At Saturday’s ceremony, RHS Principal Patricia Taylor, Schools Superintendent Dr. Frank Alvarez and Board of Education President Laura Slack delivered congratulatory addresses and helped hand

out degrees to 219 students, while valedictorian Melissa Fulenwider and salutatorian Richard Hardis addressed their fellow classmates, and graduates Bradley Krapes and Kathleen Nicholas sang Simon & Garfunkel’s “Bridge Over Troubled Water.” Hardis, described his fellow students as a class of “risk-takers” whose bravery will take them far. “From those involved in the a capella group singing at regionals, the Parsons Street Players putting on stunning shows, the Model U.N. Club engaging in tough debates, seniors starting their own charities from scratch, or any one of our sports teams making a run in the playoffs,” these students’ future success will be a direct result of their willingness to take chances, Hardis said. In Taylor’s speech, the principal referenced some impressive student statistics of the class with whom she spent her first two years as a high school principal. This year’s graduating class includes four National Merit

The Class of 2013 marks their last day as Rye High School seniors.

Finalists, nine Commended Students in the National Merit Competition, two National Hispanic Scholars, a National Achievement Scholar, 110 new National Honor Society

inductees, 38 members of the National Music Honor Society, and 1 recipient of the Con Edison Award for athletics and community service. Ninety-seven percent of

Valedictorian Melisaa Fulenwider with her high school diploma.

seniors will attend colleges in 25 different states. Three students will pursue careers in the military. As a whole, members of the Class of 2013 donated a total of 35,210

hours of community service, an average of 161 hours per senior, Taylor said. For Superintendent Alvarez, Saturday marked the graduCONTINUED on next page

Salutatorian Richard Hardis


June 21, 2013 • THE RYE SOUND SHORE REVIEW • 9

The musical interlude: “Layla” performed by Miles Clyatt, drums, Henry Pearson, guitar, Phil Pignato, alto sax, Charles Rimmer, bass, and James Tobin, guitar and piano.

Mary-Bailey Frank delivers the Senior Oration.

ation of his first Rye High School class. The first-year superintendent thanked students for all they had demonstrated to him, referencing their seriousness about scholarship, their grit on and off

the field, and their creative abilities. “We need your intellect, your youthful vitality, and, above all, your compassion to keep our great nation righteous and strong,” he said.

Diplomas were handed out to 219 seniors at the June 15 commencement ceremony.

Schools Superintendent Dr. Frank Alvarez

Board of Education President Laura Slack advised graduating seniors to cherish the valuable support they have received over the years from their parents and the caring and creative teach-

ers of the Rye City School District. Starting from the first day they hopped on the bus to kindergarten at Osborn, Midland or Milton schools, Rye students have learned to make great friends, challenge

Members of the Class of 2013 head onto Nugent Stadium for the school’s commencement ceremony.

Rye dignitaries were on hand including Mayor Douglas French.

themselves and accumulate strengths and skills, she said. “This community supports each other through thick and thin. It can be a very caring place and that has been demonstrated over and over

again. You have witnessed that from the time you were very young. Include those qualities-caring for one another and compassion-in the place you create for yourself,” Slack said.

Board of Education President Laura Slack congratulates her son Kevin. Photos/Bobby Begun


10 • THE RYE SOUND SHORE REVIEW • June 21, 2013

School district finds new superintendents BY LIZ BUTTON STAFF REPORTER liz@hometwn.com

The Rye City School District will welcome two new superintendents this summer. The district’s current assistant business manager, Gabriella O’Connor, will take the place of Assistant Superintendent of Business Kathleen Ryan. The replacement for outgoing Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment Dr. Mary Anne Evangelist, who is retiring from teaching after holding the superintendent position on an interim basis for the last two years, is Dr. Betty Ann Wyks, who last worked as superintendent of the Riverdale School District in New Jersey for eight years. Dr. Evangelist started her career teaching high school science and worked as a guidance counselor. Over the next 30 years, she worked a variety of jobs, from a middle school administrator to elementary school principal to an assistant superintendent in the Nyack school system. The outgoing superintendent said she has reneged before on the decision to retire for good, so her children didn’t believe her when she said this year would be her final departure from public education. Since she retired from her job in Nyack 12 years ago, she has taken a number of interim positions and went back to being an elementary principal in several districts. With plans to travel and perhaps to start a

consulting business, Dr. Evangelist said she may continue to work, or she may just sit back and watch construction on the new Tappan Zee Bridge from her porch. To her successor, Dr. Evangelist said she would advise Wyks to spend time learning about the district. “I think Rye has many talented, committed, hardworking people, and I’d spend some time being an observer and then working with the team to help [Superintendent Dr. Frank Alvarez] implement the district’s strategic plan,” she said. Wyks, who began her educational career in 1978, has worked in the New Jersey school system for more than 20 years, getting the chance to guide her district through the shift to the Common Core Learning Standards. Prior to her work in Riverdale, Dr. Wyks was superintendent of North Caldwell Public Schools in New Jersey for eight years, principal of Grandview School in North Caldwell for eight years, and administrative assistant for curriculum and instruction at Fieldstone Middle School in Montvale for three years. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in elementary education from Rider University, a Master of Business Administration degree from Fairleigh Dickinson University, a Master of Arts degree in education from William Paterson University, and a Doctor of Education degree from Columbia University Teachers College. Outgoing Assistant Superintendent for Business Kathleen Ryan will be complet-

The Rye City School District will welcome two new superintendents for the start of the 2013-14 school year. The district’s current Assistant Business Manager Gabriella O’Connor, left, will take the place of Assistant Superintendent of Business Kathleen Ryan. Dr. Betty Ann Wyks, who last worked as superintendent of Riverdale School District in New Jersey, will step in for Dr. Mary Anne Evangelist, interim assistant superintendent of curriculum, instruction and assessment. Photos courtesy Rye City School District

ing six years in the district when she steps down at the end of July. Ryan said she has enjoyed working in public school finance and may look for some consulting work after she leaves her position. Ryan’s work has been instrumental in the annual budget process and in furthering the district’s capital projects, like Rye High School’s construction of a new science wing. When it comes to the new wing, Ryan was involved in the project on the management, financial and planning levels from the start. Now, she said the district has “a really wonderful team in place,” which includes her successor, current Assistant Business Manager Gabby O’Connor. Ryan, who has twin sons graduating from college, said she and O’Connor worked in the Croton Harmon school district’s business office together for a few years. O’Connor started at Croton Harmon in 2006, where she worked as an administrative assistant at the district’s business office. Ryan

brought O’Connor to the Rye district a year and half ago, starting at the beginning of the 2011-12 school year. “I was very excited to hire her at the last school district I worked. She really has a lot of potential and she’s a very dedicated employee. She became certified to become a New York State education business official recently and I hoped she would have a chance,” Ryan said. O’Connor received a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Pace University as well as two masters degrees from Pace: one in public administration and the other in education. “Right now, what I am involved in is really the day-to-day business office operations in the district, and I suspect the transition will be to more of a global over view of maintaining the finances not only for the day-to-day, but in the future,” said O’Connor. Like any district dealing with the state-mandated 2 percent tax cap, O’Connor agrees this economic straitjacket is the district’s biggest challenge for the future.

Correcting the record In the May 31 edition of The Rye Sound Shore Review, the article “Parents worry as anniversary of hazing scandal approaches” stated that outside of the three students that were caught, administrators believed that 26 other students participated in the ritual. Administrators have not publicly stated how many students they believe were involved.

HAVE A NEWS TIP? CONTACT YOUR LOCAL REPORTERS

ASHLEY HELMS ashley@hometwn.com

LIZ BUTTON

liz@hometwn.com


June 21, 2013 • THE RYE SOUND SHORE REVIEW • 11

City Council news THE RYE Perspective Mayor Doug French

City’s “Triple A” rating reaffirmed The city received more good news about its financial position last week, which again reflects the hard work of the staff, mayor, council and Finance Committee to be fiscally conservative during the period of the great recession and municipal fiscal stress. Moody’s Investors Service has assigned a AAA rating to the City of Rye’s public improvement bonds and its previously issued general obligation debt. “The application of Moody’s highest-quality rating reflects the city’s affluent residential tax base, low debt burden, and healthy financial position with sound reserve levels,” the report read. Strengths noted in the report include the sizable tax base with strong socioeconomic demographics, strong financial reserves with formal policies, and low debt and pension liabilities. Challenges include increasing pension costs and open union contracts. What could make the rating move down? Significant reductions in fund balance reserves and material increases in the debt burden. The 4-year financial plan The Citizens Finance Committee assisted the city in producing a four-year financial plan that outlined revenue and expenditure trends and assumptions over the upcoming four-year planning period. With all assumptions being equal in terms of staying within the tax levy cap, flat variable revenues and fees, modest increases in state aid, and modest increases in expenses and capital–the city could be facing an annual operating loss of $1.9 million in 2016. The Finance Committee, city staff and council will explore long-range options. Rye High School construction project The city will hold a special work session on June 24 with the school board to discuss a plan for alternate drop-offs and traffic patterns around the school as part of the major school expansion project in order to be prepared prior to school opening in the fall. MTA parking lot The city is beginning to look at options to upgrade the deteriorated condition of the train station parking lot through small increases in commuter parking fees over the next two years, along with potential bonding, grant money, and money from Metro North in order to do a significant project at the railroad. Sluice gate ribbon cutting The city, along with the Village of Rye Brook and Westchester County, was pleased to hold a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the

Bowman Avenue Sluice gate, which will help regulate water flow from upstream. The sluice gate is an important part of the city’s mitigation plan, which also includes potential additional detention at Westchester County Airport, downstream preparation and safety measures, and identifying additional locations for regional upstream detention. Rye Golf Club work sessions The city kicked off a series of workshops with the Rye Golf Club Commission and the Rye Golf Club Strategic Committee formed by the mayor and council late last year to assess strategic models for the golf club. Options range from keeping a general manager to run all operations, leasing out the restaurant/catering operations, or reorganizing all of the operations. Municipal procedures make it difficult for the city to operate the restaurant and catering operation. Questions posed by the committee: Should the roles and responsibilities of the golf commission be clarified further and/or expanded? Should there be a modification to the composition of the commission? Should governance be passed to a Board of Directors, or should governance and management be passed to an external organization? Questions raised regarding management were: Should club operations continue to report directly to the city manager, to another department, or directly to the City Council? Should the club outsource the food and beverage operations and consider reporting changes for the golf/pool operation? Should all operations be outsourced and be managed by a third party. Additional sessions will be held prior to or during the regularly scheduled council meetings in July and August. Boat basin dredging project The city successfully completed a muchneeded dredging project in the boat basin, removing roughly 20,000 cubic yards this past month and will determine if permits can be obtained to remove an additional 20,000 cubic yards in the fall cycle. IT Committee Future investments need to be directed in information technology, and the city’s newly formed body is up and running to assist and advise the city. Their work will include recommendations on the following: IT standards to enable data integration, procurement processes, staff onboarding and training procedures, effective and transparent financial management, improved resource management, effective management of outsourced IT suppliers, and strengthen risk management of our city services. For more information, please contact me, the city manager, a Rye City Council member or visit the City of Rye website. Office hours of the mayor by appointment by e-mailing dfrench@ryeny.gov.

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POLICE from page 6

said the PBA president’s letter was the only comment the city or the department received from the group, and did not include any substantive comments on the actual policy. Compagnone, in his letter, derided what he sees as a lack of communication between the PBA and the local governing body, and said that being forced to submit a grievance to bring up violations of the union’s collective bargaining agreement, CBA, with the city has led to the use of stalling tactics and misinformation by the city, adding that the cost to file grievances and go to litigation over CBA violations is of great and prohibitive cost to the PBA. “For representatives of the PBA to have to find out about ‘policy changes’ and or anything related to the membership in the local paper unfortunately speaks volumes about the lack of communication between the City and the PBA,” the letter states. The police department’s social media policy, like many across the country, is based on a model policy published by the International Association of Chiefs of Police, and addresses prohibitions against releasing information that could compromise a criminal investigation, including statements of guilt or innocence, as well as sensitive photos or video. Currently, the department’s only foray into the world of social media has been its Nixle system, an online alert program that lets residents register for emails from police. When it comes to officers’ personal social media pages, the department’s policy aims to

preserve officers’ rights to free speech while making sure the city and the department is represented properly. According to the policy, officers will face disciplinary action for any obscene or sexually explicit language on their personal pages, as well as statements that malign people on the basis of race, sexual orientation or religion. Police also have the opportunity to vet potential job candidates by reviewing their online presence. City Manager Scott Pickup said the city plans on coming up with its own version based on the police’s policy. While the city has considered creating official Twitter and Facebook pages in years past, communication issues during Tropical Storm Irene and Hurricane Sandy were the impetus for city officials to more seriously consider the issue. Pickup said that the widespread and innovative use of social media during the bombings in Boston by citizens and law enforcement officials showed how social media can impact police work in real time. “We need a policy,” Pickup said. “We can always add changes to it and incorporate some of the feedback from the council.” For the last five years, the city and the Rye PBA have been in negotiations over a new labor agreement, which has led to binding arbitration. The last collective bargaining agreement between the city and the PBA expired on Dec. 31, 2008. Phone calls to PBA President Compagnone were not returned as of press time.


12 • THE RYE SOUND SHORE REVIEW • June 21, 2013

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SAFETY from page 5

in place was built in the 1970s, Ryan said, and it might be time to make improvements on a larger scale. Rewiring the PA speakers is one of the more costly aspects of the upgrade. “We’re doing an analysis to see how much wiring of the speakers will really need to be replaced. It is just a very old system,” Ryan said. Milton School is the newest school facility with the newest equipment. Midland School’s burglar and alarm systems are functioning correctly, but need to be updated, Ryan said. Despite an uptick in security measures, some parents think the schools have already gone above and beyond to keep kids safe. Lauren Connelly, 34, has two kids in Osborn School and said that, while she thinks school security is necessary, she doesn’t know what else the district can do on top

of having a security guard at the front door. “I don’t know how much farther they can go,” Connelly said. “I’m glad the school’s locked during the day.” In particular, the middle school/ high school will be a campus full of activity over the next year as construction on a new science wing is set to get underway. The construction is said to be ongoing until September 2014. Some members of the community have expressed concern about increased security risks during construction of the new high school wing project. The project, which began earlier this month and will continue during the school year, has engendered some worry among parents, but Board of Education President Laura Slack said the district has hired a construction contractor with very strict behavioral

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policies, including the prohibition of smoking, swearing or music on the job site. Calls to Superintendent Dr. Frank

Alvarez and President Slack were not returned as of press time. -With reporting by COREY BAUMER


June 21, 2013 • THE RYE SOUND SHORE REVIEW • 13

Native Goods: Doing it right in Port Chester Two twenty-somethings in Port Costillo put on an event they called Chester are turning the concept of a “The Connect Show” at St. Peters retail store upside down and inside Church across from their store. The out. And they may just be on to purpose of the event was to raise something. funds for a skate park they want to Walk by Native build in Port ChesGoods, adjacent to ter’s Rec Park. the Capital The“We got the WESTCHESTER idea ater on Westchesto build a WANDERER ter Avenue, and you skate park from might think its our customers. We Lisa Jardine just another men’s thought that if fashion retail store catering to a Port Chester could build a dog park, young, urban population. they could build a skate park, too,” But you would be dead wrong. Mendoza said. These two young men, who grew Mendoza and Costillo applied up in Port Chester, are doing things for a grant from the Tony Hawk that very few retail storeowners are Skate Park Foundation and the Rob doing; they are listening to their Dyrdeck Foundation, named after customers. In fact, their customers the aforemetioned skate kings, but actually drive their business. haven’t heard back yet. In the meanWith the use of social media time, they are raising their own funds (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, web- and working with the local governsite, blog) Native Goods customers ment to see what can be done. are directly dictating what they buy “We wanted to build it in Columbus and when they buy it. Park underneath [Interstate] 95, “Because we are very close in just like the FDR skate park in age to our customers; I’m young, Philadelphia, but we were told that only 21, we can relate to them and the [Village] of Port Chester doesn’t them to us. They use Instagram and own that park,” Mendoza said. Twitter to tell us what they want Though the pair’s park plans are to see in our store. We listen,” co- yet to be resolved, their Connect owner Luis Mendoza said. Show was a huge success, with more Native Goods is a mecca in than 500 people in attendance. Westchester for the sneaker culture, “Father Albert at St. Peters was a a trend started decades ago by rap- huge supporter. Before I even got to pers and basketball players that fully explain what we wanted to do led to a California event called the at the church he said ‘yes.’ He feels Dunkxchange in 2005 that gave the Port Chester community is not “sneakerheads” the opportunity to buy, always supportive of their youth sell and trade sneakers and apparel. and he wanted to help in anyway he According to the website dunkx- could,” Mendoza said. change.com, there are now more than And if the drove of teenagers 200 Dunkxchange events all over leaving the churchyard carrying the United States. And it’s not only cardboard sneaker boxes was any about the sneakers—there’s a trifecta indication, there was heavy buying of fun stuff that goes right along with and selling inside. Mac Killian, a it; music, art and fashion. 14-year-old student at Rye Middle On June 9, Mendoza and fellow School, attended the event. Native Goods co-owner Jormar “I’m friends with the owners and I

An impressive collection of sneakers can be found at the Native Goods menswear boutique located in Port Chester near the Capital Theater.

The co-owners of Native Goods recently held a skate-off event called “The Connect Show” to raise money for a skate park the duo is hoping to build in Port Chester.

The store also carries gear to satisfy the skateboarding culture.

like to buy clothes from Native Goods,” Killian said. “This event was great because I was able to meet new people in the community who are interested in sneakers, clothes and music.” Costillo and Mendoza welcome anyone with an interest or curiosity in the sneaker culture to stop by. On any given weekday afternoon, there could be up to 30 kids just hanging out, the same on weekends. Their typical customer is a male between the ages of 15 and 20 but sometimes

girls come in, too. “These kids are so smart and so clued-in to social networking–we learn so much from them. We want them to feel at home here,” Mendoza said. “Port Chester has a significant Hispanic population, but we draw kids from all of the surrounding communities. It doesn’t matter what color your skin is, we come together for the love of the culture. Why hate on each other?” Mendoza said. Why indeed?

To contact Lisa, you can email her at lisa@hometwn.com and follow her on Twitter @westchesterwand. Native Goods 166 Westchester Ave., Port Chester, N.Y. Facebook: nativegoodsco Instagram: nativegoods Twitter: @nativegoods Website: lyfestylegoods.com As of July 1, they will be relocating to 145 Irving Ave. in Port Chester.

Native Goods Co. co-owners Jormar Costillo, left, and Luis Mendoza. Photos/Lisa Jardine


14 • THE RYE SOUND SHORE REVIEW • June 21, 2013

Chamber luncheon brings out the “Best of Rye” The “Best of Rye” 2013 Winners: Clothing & Shoes - Rye Running Specialty Stores - The Open House Fine Dining - Ruby’s Casual Dining - Poppy’s (Special Mention: Longford’s) Real Estate - Coldwell Banker Financial - TD Bank Services - Core Pilates/Health Thru Massage (Special Mention: Rye Beach Pharmacy) Schools - Rye Country Day School Professional Mem. - Boot Camp by the Beach Non-Profits - Rye YMCA

Specialty Store Winner: Barbara Sperling, The Open House.

Financial Award: TD Bank Manager Joe Siciliano.

On Thursday, June 6, the Rye Chamber of Commerce held its annual awards luncheon highlighting the Best of Rye. Held this year at Wainwright house, located on Stuyvesant Avenue, the luncheon was well attended by many in Rye’s business community. The chamber of commerce holds the luncheon every year to bring together the business community in Rye, elect new officers and strategize for the upcoming year ahead. This year state Sen. George Latimer, also a Rye resident, was

honored for his consistent advocacy on behalf of the small business community. “Rye’s business district has always been a standout amongst Westchester communities because of the amount of locally owned and managed small businesses in a relatively concentrated area,’ said Latimer. ‘The success of the business district in Rye is largely due to the level of dedication that the business owners and employees have to making this a better community.” The Chamber’s President Sally Wright stated, “We honor George today because he has been our ‘go-to’ guy for Rye. George has always represented all of his constituents. He sees no barriers.”

Service Winners: Michele Cappellano, Health Thru Massage, and Tamara Slupchynskj, Core Pilates.

Rye TV show tackles world issues Kent Iarocci discuss two interesting issues. Take your time you will learn something. The two issues Iarocci discusses are “War on Islam? No.” and “Euro versus stability.” You can watch Iarocci’s show at www.ryetv.org The name of the show is “Persevere.” It is on Fridays. (Submitted) Kent Iarocci

Empire City Summer Concert winners Director of Programming at Wainwright House Diane Negvesky, Interim Executive Director Peggy Hill, and President of Wainwright House Carol Craig at the chamber’s annual luncheon on June 6. Photos/Bobby Begun

Audrey Markantonis Mrs. A. Majdak Neil Wasserman Patty George David Reinhold Selected winners get a chance to see Travis Tritt at Empire City Casino on June 23. Every week five pairs of tickets will be awarded by random drawing. To be eligible, send your email address to empire@hometwn.com with “summer concert” in the subject line.

Handing out “Best of Rye” awards are representatives of the Rye Chamber of Commerce: Margaret Ricketts, Carpet Trends, Sally Wright, Rye YMCA, and Lisa McKieran, Morgan’s.


SPORTS The beat goes on In many respects, the end of any scholastic year is bittersweet. While graduations are celebrations of the academic achievements of our local high school students, they are tinged with melancholy—a reminder that a distinct part of the lives of the young men and women clad in caps and gowns is at an end and that new challenges lie ahead. But it also serves as a reminder that the cycle will continue. Our departing seniors will leave to go into the world while new classes rise up to take their place—both in the halls of our high schools and on our athletic fields. Local seniors certainly left their mark on the Section I landscape, as they seem to do every year. There was no shortage of great moments this year, indelible sporting moments that will forever live on in the minds of those seniors who will move on to bigger things. Of course there was ‘the shot’—Khalil Edney’s game-winning buzzer-beater to give New Rochelle its first section title since 2006 and made Edney and the Huguenots national heroes on ESPN. Moments such as that one, and Edney hoisting the state football title back in November will be long remembered. But

while those are undeniable in their greatness, there have been a handful of other moments, other stories that are just as meaningful, though not as broad in scope. Stories like New Rochelle baseball, led by senior hurler John Valente, earning its first victory over rival Mamaroneck in six years; a game that Huguenot coach Pete Annunziata admitted meant so much to his ace. Other streaks fell this LIVE MIKE year, including Rye’s eightgame winning streak over Mike Smith Harrison in ‘The Game.’ Watching senior quarterback Vinnie Nicita and his teammates celebrate the end of a drought was certainly a moment I will remember for a long time. I will also remember talking to lineman Joe Bellantoni after Tuckahoe punched its ticket to states. In 2010, when the Tigers won a state title, Bellantoni was an undersized lineman, a sophomore scrapper who—despite his starting role—was like the team’s younger brother. I remember when his father died, just prior to that state title game, and how Bellantoni still went out and played, knowing that the rest of the Tuckahoe community was behind him. In 2012, Bellantoni was the undeniable leader and anchor of that Tiger line, someone

June 21, 2013 • THE RYE SOUND SHORE REVIEW • 15

Khalil Edney goes up for a shot against Mount Vernon in the Section I title game on March 3. In the final seconds of that game, Edney hit a buzzerbeater game-winning shot that gained national attention and was the best sports moment of the 2012-13 season. Photo/Bobby Begun

whose tireless work and time in the trenches made him a teammate to look up to in times of need. These moments, these players, will be missed. But the great thing about high school sports is there is always someone waiting in the wings, someone ready to step up, take the big shot and write their own history. Rye golfer Alexis Hios—who placed second in the state this year—might very well bring Rye another piece of hardware for their trophy case in her senior year. Young football stars, like Mamaroneck’s Marquez JacksonAllen and Rye Neck’s Jakob Calvini, will have another chance-two in Jackson-Allen’s case-to find glory on the gridiron. Tuckahoe’s Cassie McGrath, Mamaroneck’s Kimi Chiapparelli, and Rye Neck’s Diana King are all-stars already, but will only get better as the years go on. So farewell seniors. Your time here will not be forgotten, by you, your teammates or your friends and family. But one word of advice before you go— don’t be strangers. Come back when you can, cheer on your old teammates, the kids you mentored, the JV players who looked up to you as role models. Although your time might be done, there’s no saying what magic the future might hold for our up-and-coming stars.

PCRA shines at national meet By MIKE SMITH SPORTS EDITOR sports@hometwn.com

On June 9, the Pelham Community Rowing Association finished up another go-around at the U.S. Youth Nationals in Oak Ridge Tennessee. Over the past decade, the New Rochellebased organization has become one of the more prominent–and successful–teams in the nation, and this year was no different as the PCRA finished third, thanks to some terrific performances. The PCRA, which recently celebrated it’s 10th reunion at its home on Glen Island, has been sending boats to nationals for the past five years and has been turning heads on the national scene, especially given their 2011 performance in which they unseated the sixtime defending champions and broke a regatta record in the process. Though they weren’t able to quite repeat last year’s success, they did not come away empty-handed. In one of the more surprising finishes of the regatta, the girls’ quad–featuring Harrison’s Liliane Lindsay and Mamaroneck’s Ellie Sawyer, as well as Pelham native Lauren Veith and Riverdale Country School junior Julia Sesler–took third place in the Class A final, eeking out a medal with a late race burst and a finishing just .01 of a second ahead of the fourth-place boat. According to Lindsay, who was making her third trip to nationals, the finish far ex-

From left: Liliane Lindsay, Lauren Veith, Julia Sesler and Ellie Sawyer pose with PCRA coach Guy Monseair after taking third at nationals on June 9. Contributed photo

ceeded the team’s expectations heading into the season. “Even though we have been to nationals in the past, this year, it was pretty much a whole different boat,” said the Harrison senior. “Three girls from the quad graduated last year, so coming in, we didn’t know what to expect from ourselves. When we did start thinking of nationals, we didn’t know how we would do.” With the graduation of her more experienced crewmembers, Lindsay said that she took it upon herself to become more of a

leader as the season wore on. “I went from being the youngest girl in the boat to being one of the more experienced ones,” she said. “With two of the girls being newer, they looked to me and Ellie for support and advice.” With a terrific performance at nationals behind her, however, Lindsay has no plans to rest. On June 22, she headed up to New London, Conn. to spend the summer training at the United States Coast Guard Academy with 34 other elite high school rowers. Over

the course of the summer, Lindsay and her fellow rowers will be under the tutelage of some of the top instructors in the United States as they train and compete for a spot to represent the U.S. Youth National Team at the Junior World Rowing Championships, which will be held in Lithuania this August. “This is going to be a new level of challenge,” said Lindsay. “It’s going to be a high level of competition, and a lot of girls there are going to be incredibly fast. It’s going to be great to row and train with girls at that level.”


SPORTS Rye golfers capture silver at states

16 • THE RYE SOUND SHORE REVIEW • June 21, 2013

Junior Alexis Hios hits a shot during the 2013 season. Hios finished in second place overall at the state championships on June 9.

From left to right: Alexis Hios, coach Rich Savage, and Frida Henningson pose for a picture during the state championships at Delhi University on June 9. The Garnets would finish a bestever second.

By MIKE SMITH SPORTS EDITOR sports@hometwn.com

“I’ve been playing since I was two, and I was always told to do whatever I could

Rye junior Alexis Hios just capped off one of the best seasons in the program’s history, finishing second at the state championships and leading the Garnets to a second-place finish in the tournament as well. Hios shot a 149 at the College Course at Delhi University on June 9, putting her just six strokes behind Section 5’s Christine Schmidt for the tournament. Teammate Frida Henningson shot a 172 to help Rye nearly unseat Section 5’s team and finish in second place—a best-ever finish for the Garnets. According to head coach Rich Savage, although he knew he was in possession of a talented team, he didn’t know just how good his squad could be this year. “We lost a lot of seniors last year,” said Savage. “And even though we lost two matches

during the year, when you look at this, we definitely did better than we expected this year.” Of course, Hios, the junior, was an instrumental part of that improvement. Last year, Hios finished 12th in the state, but showed tremendous resolve this year as she stormed towards the top of the leaderboard. “I’m a goal-oriented person so, before each season, I make a list of goals,” said Hios. “My first goal was to win the section. My second was to finish in the top 10 at states.” According to Savage, Hios—though only a junior-has established a leadership role on this team, which is more important than one might think in a solitary sport like golf. “I think, when you have someone like her shooting the way she does up at the top, it takes the pressure off the rest of the team,” said Savage. “It

makes it easier for that fifth, sixth golfer.” Hios, however, believes

that being a leader on the golf team goes beyond what happens on the course.

Frida Henningson takes a hack at the state championships. She and Hios will form the nucleus of what looks to be another strong Garnet team next spring. Contributed photos.

to be an advocate for the game to younger girls,” she said. “And when we started this year, we had younger girls on the team who may not have picked up a club before, but everyone has improved so much by the end of the year.” In terms of youth, Rye looks to be well-stocked for coming years. With Hios and Henningson both coming back for their senior years, as well as sophomore Cristiana Villani, who placed 14th at sectionals, the Garnets have a core of experienced players who may have a chance to vie for a state title next year. “I’m absolutely excited,” said Savage. “But this is where the real challenge in golf comes in, playing in the summer. For soccer, you practice to get ready for the field when you can get on a field, but it’s different in the summer for golf. So the girls have to do their best to get out there and get better.”


Rye Sound Shore Review 6-21-13