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December 2012

A GUIDE TO CRIME PREVENTION

www.BrevardSheriff.com


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Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

A fond farewell from your sheriff

T

his will be my last guest column as your sheriff.

While campaigning for Brevard County Sheriff in 2004, I promised the citizens that I would only serve two consecutive four-year terms. I kept my promise, and Jan. 7 will be my last day as your sheriff. I would like to use this opportunity to thank the many people who made my time as your sheriff very rewarding and helped us succeed as a Sheriff’s Office. I am deeply indebted to the citizens of Brevard County for allowing me to have this honor. Our citizens care deeply about our community and have been very supportive of their Sheriff’s Office. Although we have had some very challenging financial times, our citizens have stepped up to support us, time and time again. Operating one of the largest Sheriff’s Offices in the nation can be a tough job, but it has been made much easier because of our citizens’ trust and support. As an example, the outpouring of love and compassion from our citizens following the murder of our beloved Deputy Barbara Pill is something that will stay with me and the 1,400 members of the Sheriff’s Office forever. We have also been blessed to have had a board of county commissioners and county manager that continuously place a high priority on protecting our citizens. While they have worked hard behind the scenes to ensure there was no wasted or unnecessary spending in the Sheriff’s Office, they did not blindly cut public safety funding. There are many examples of law enforcement agencies across our state and nation that have been negatively impacted by poorly thought-out budget cuts, which greatly diminished public safety resulting in higher crime

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF JACK PARKER

rates. Our commissioners have continued to state that their highest priority was to protect our citizens, and their actions have backed up their words. While there are many reasons Brevard County is safe and enjoys a low crime rate, the fact that our commissioners give law enforcement the tools to do the job is a critical factor in our success. I will never be able to adequately thank the men and women of our Sheriff’s Office. Working with these courageous individuals is the part of the job that I will miss more than anything else. To see the level of caring these people demonstrate on a daily basis is truly inspiring. I have been so fortunate to be part of a team of people who always puts the needs of others before their own. I am also grateful for a command staff that is second to none. These leaders are far from “yes men,” and each of them have been outstanding leaders in their own right. There is no sheriff who could fail, who was surrounded by these incredible individuals. On a personal note, I would like to thank two people in my life who have had the greatest impact on me as a person. First, my wife, Yvette, constantly reminds me about what is important. As one example of many, about 10 years ago, I was driving with my wife to my very first political debate. I was unusually quiet and she asked me “Are you nervous?” I said,

“Yes.” Then, she said, “That’s because you are more worried about yourself than the people you are supposed to serve. It isn’t about you.” I was never nervous about a public speaking engagement again. Second, my pastor, Dr. Larry Linkous of New Life Christian Fellowship in Titusville, has had a profound effect on my life. I could not imagine having to face the challenges of being sheriff without him. He has brought me closer to God than I would have ever thought possible and improved my ability to pray for God’s wisdom and guidance. It would be my hope that anyone in search of a truly anointed pastor would consider spending some time listening to Dr. Linkous. It will change their lives, as it has mine. While looking back, we have had great success in our Sheriff’s Office. From correcting jail overcrowding to targeting sex offenders to ridding our communities of violent criminals and reducing the crime rate, we have had a strong run. But when you consider the support we have had from our citizens and our commissioners, and couple that with the abilities of our extremely capable and caring law enforcement and corrections personnel, it is hard to imagine having anything but success. I will be proudly turning the reins of this Sheriff’s Office over to Sheriff Wayne Ivey. I have every confidence that he will be a wonderful sheriff, who will enjoy many successes and will lift our agency to even greater heights. Thank you for the trust you placed in me to be your sheriff.

On the Cover:

Dalton Woody, 8, of Merritt Island and Brevard County Sheriff’s Deputy David Orr of Malabar look at some toys at Walmart in Merritt Island during the annual Brevard County Sheriff’s ‘Shop with a Cop’ program Saturday, Dec. 15.

www.BrevardSheriff.com

December 2012

Table of Contents Sheriff’s Column . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 A Lasting Impression . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Communications Center / Records . 4 Dometic Violence Unit . . . . . . . . . . 5 Citizen Defense Firearms Course . . 5 Computer COP / Community Alerts . . . 6 Homicide Unit / Cold Cases . . . . . . 7 Crime Scene Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 GAMEOVER / Graffiti Busters . . . . 9 Aviation Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Ag / Marine Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Methamphetamine Labs . . . . . . . 12 Teen Driving / STOPPED . . . . . . . . 13 Nana’s House / Serene Harbor

. . 14

Holiday Safety Tips . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Jail Improvements . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Paws and Stripes . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Sexual Absconders . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Most Wanted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Sexual Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 S.O.R.T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Unsolved Homicides . . . . . . . . . . 27 Shop With A Cop . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28


December 2012

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

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A lasting impression During his time as leader of the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office, Sheriff Parker has had the honor of working alongside some of the most wonderful organizations and individuals in the state. He has left a lasting impression on many throughout the county during his tenure, and his achievements and dedication has not gone unnoticed. Here are some kind words from a few of Sheriff Parker’s staff members, colleagues and friends. “Sheriff Parker has left his mark on this agency and the citizens of Brevard County. He initiated so many improvements at the jail, making it a better and safer environment for everyone. He truly made a difference for us all and will be Susan Jeter missed. His tenure as a sheriff reminds of a quote by Dr. Martin Luther King: ‘The ultimate measure of a leader is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.’” Susan Jeter Jail Commander Brevard County Sheriff’s Office

“As a 24.5-year deputy with the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office, I have worked for three administrations, with Sheriff Jack Parker as sheriff, for the past eight years. Undoubtedly, in my opinion and many Sgt. Mike Brown others, he has exceeded our expectations as the sheriff. His integrity, fairness, leadership and friendship have been felt by many citizens and employees of the Sheriff’s Office. He will be missed by many, with his lasting impression imprinted as a true leader ,who cared about his county and employees.” Sgt. Mike Brown Brevard County Sheriff’s Office

“Sheriff Parker has been in a major leadership position on the Crosswinds Governing Board of Directors for 20 years. From Christmas of 1992, when he gave a party for 12 children in crisis, with nowhere to go, Jack’s Jan Lokay impact on the lives of thousands of Brevard County’s children has been immeasurable. He is a truly amazing man, with a giant heart.”

Jan Lokay President/CEO of Crosswinds Youth Services

www.BrevardSheriff.com

“Sheriff Parker has done so much to elevate the critical link between reducing crime and strengthening families, with having access to a strong base of prevention and early intervention programs like those our United Way is involved Susan McGrath with. He has worked tremendously hard to bring those programs to as many families possible. His compassion and commitment to the people of this community is humbling. Our entire team is inspired by his servant leadership.” Susan McGrath VP of Resource Development for United Way of Brevard County


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Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

December 2012

Communications Center: the proof is in the numbers The Communications Center is the central dispatch facility serving all of the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office field personnel, investigators and specialty units. Additionally, communications personnel provide 911 call and dispatch services for three contracted cities within the county. With a staff of 43 specially qualified personnel, communications is the nerve center of calls for emergency law enforcement response and community assistance. Divided into two major functions – call intake and dispatch, these 911 operators are cross- trained in all areas of the emergency communications functions, first aid and crisis intervention. Between Jan 1 and Oct. 31, 2012, the Communications Center answered a total of 97,517 emergency calls on the 911system. Additionally, the

staff answered 243,747 nonemergency calls for service. During that same time period, Sheriff’s Communications dispatched more than 341,861 calls to Sheriff’s Office units and an additional 30,209 calls for the municipalities of West Melbourne, Melbourne Village and Melbourne Beach. During the 2010 legislative session, the state of Florida passed and implemented new requirements for all emergency telecommunicators, including those working in the Sheriff’s Office Communications Center. These new requirements mandate that all 911 emergency dispatchers are to be certified, according to a set of standards developed by the state, in conjunction with several public safety communications organizations. Presently, all of the Sheriff’s 911 communicators are

certified within this program and have undergone the required training and passed the state certification test. These new standards recognize the communications function as the vital first link in the emergency response chain and ensure the public is receiving the highest level of professional service. Within the past several years, BCSO Communications has striven for continuous improvement in the call intake and dispatch arena. The nationally recognized standard of excellence for answering 911 calls is that 90 percent should be answered in five seconds or less. The Sheriff’s Communication Center has routinely exceeded this standard and now averages an outstanding rating of more than 94 percent.

Brevard County Sheriff’s Office Communications Center Officer Angie Velten answers an incoming 911 call.

Records and Data Unit: the hub of the Sheriff’s Office The Records and Data Unit is the central repository for incident/case reports, arrest records, traffic crash reports and completion of Uniform Crime Reporting for the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office. In addition, the Records Unit routinely responds to public record requests, performs background checks and registers felons. The Records Unit currently has a staff of 16 civilian support personnel. At the end of 2012, the Unit will have processed more than 20,000 public record requests, processed more than 15,800 background checks; processed more than 42,500 traffic and warning citations; received more than 42,500 phone calls and assisted more than 4,000 walk-in customers. Criminal Registration: With the exception of sexual offender and sexual predator registrations, all

other persons required to register with the Sheriff’s Office must report to the Records Unit. Registration hours are Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Registrants are asked to bring photo identification. Background Checks: Background checks are $2 per name, payable by cash, money order, credit card or business check. The information needed to complete a background is the subject’s full name, date of birth, race and sex. Backgrounds can be obtained in person at any one of the Sheriff’s Office precincts or by sending a self-addressed, stamped envelope with the required fee to: Brevard County Sheriff’s Office, Attn: Records, 700 Park Ave., Titusville, Fla., 32780. Incident/Case/Arrest/Crash Reports: Copies of reports can be obtained from the Records Unit and are released according to Florida Statute 119, Public

Records. Requests can be made by one of the following methods: • Telephone: (321) 264-5214 • Mail: Brevard County Sheriff’s Office, Attn: Records, 700 Park Ave., Titusville, Fla., 32780 • Fax: (321) 264-5314 • Email: Records@bcso.us • In Person: Records Unit, 700 Park Ave., Building J, Titusville If the total number of pages exceeds 10, there will be a 15cents per page charge for the request. There may be an additional charge for the employee’s labor cost per hour if the request requires more than 30 minutes to complete and requires extensive use of information technology resources or extensive research time. The Records Unit is located at 700 Park Ave., Building J, Titusville and is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Unit is closed on recognized holidays.

With the introduction of electronic recordkeeping several years ago, records technician Bonnie Ferguson processes a case-report package.

www.BrevardSheriff.com


BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

December 2012

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

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Domestic Violence Unit investigates variety of cases The Brevard County Sheriff’s Office became one of the first law enforcement agencies in the state of Florida to integrate a Domestic Violence Unit into its daily operations. The unit is comprised of four sworn deputies, who hold the title of “agent” and four civilian “victim advocates.” Each of the agents and advocates are assigned a particular jurisdictional area within the county, which is operated out of the Criminal Investigations Division. The Domestic Violence Unit’s name is deceiving, as the unit not only investigates domestic violence; it also investigates the crimes of child abuse, child neglect, elder abuse and elder neglect. Domestic violence is on the rise across the United States, and Brevard County is no exception. Unfortunately, domestic violence impacts people of every age, race, sex and economic status. Statistics show that each victim, who makes a report of domestic violence, has been abused an average seven times before making a report to law enforcement. Even more disheartening is the fact that victims of child abuse and elder abuse normally never make a report. The victims suffer in silence until the signs of their abuse can no longer be hidden. The children are either at such a young

Domestic Violence victim advocate Nancy Sley and Agent Cyndi Young assist a victim of domestic violence.

Domestic V iolence GET HELP Call (321) 633- 8499 age they cannot speak or the abuse has just become a way of life for them. The elderly are in fear of being left alone or placed in a facility with inadequate care. These victims have no voice, no hope and are filled with fear. The Domestic Violence Unit becomes the voice for each and every victim; ensuring justice is served for all victims. The Sheriff’s Office takes great pride in the commitment of the Domestic Violence Unit to each investigation, ensuring there is no stone unturned. Once the investigation is completed and submitted to the State Attorney’s Office for prosecution, the agents assigned to the case work hand-in-hand with the State Attorney’s Office to provide any and all information needed and to guide the victim and family through the process. Each agent and victim advocate keeps close contact with the victim from the beginning of the investigation, through prosecution and in many cases, after the case has been prosecuted. It is the goal of the Domestic Violence Unit to assist each victim and help them to transition their life forward.

What is Domestic V iolence? • Domestic Violence is a pattern of behaviors that adults or adolescents use against their intimate partner or former partner to establish power and control • It may include physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse and economic abuse • It may also include threats, isolation, pet abuse, using children and a variety of other behaviors used to maintain fear, intimidation and power over one’s partner • Domestic Violence knows no boundaries and occurs in intimate relationships, regardless of race, religion, culture or socioeconomic status

Sheriff’s Office teaches firearm safety The Brevard County Sheriff’s Office is happy to offer the Citizens Defense Firearms course. This eight-hour course is designed to give residents the opportunity to learn safe gun handling skills, as well as the legal aspects of gun ownership. The course will cover various shooting techniques, including marksmanship fundamentals. Upon completion of this course, participants will receive a certificate as verification of training that satisfies the state training requirement to acquire a Concealed Weapons Permit from the state of Florida. Those interested can contact the Florida Department of Agriculture

• Marksmanship fundamentals • Shooting drills

and Consumer Services Division of Licensing at (850) 488-5381 for further information about the permit process. Topics covered in the course: • General firearms safety • Proper and legal firearms storage requirements • Legal firearms carry requirements • Use of force

Requirements: • Must be 21 or older and pass a background check • Must have a serviceable unloaded handgun • Must have 100 rounds of factory ammunition (no re-loads) • Eye protection • Ear protection • A hat • Inclement weather gear (recommended) For registration information, visit www.BrevardSheriff.com or call (321) 225-3039.

www.BrevardSheriff.com

Classes • Feb. 16, 2013 • March 23, 2013 • April 20, 2013 • May 25, 2013 • June 22, 2013 • July 27, 2013 • Aug. 31, 2013 • Sept., 28, 2013

Sign up now!


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Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

December 2012

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Keeping children safe in a world of technology A word of war ning for all parents Would it surprise you to learn that one of the most dangerous threats facing parents today comes from home computers, laptops, tablets, smart phones and video game systems? There are a variety of issues that parents need to be aware of in order to be in a better position to protect their children. The following are some examples of threats to the safety of children that law enforcement is currently observing. • S exting: Teens sometimes engage in an activity known as “sexting,” where they will text or email nude photographs or videos to one other. It is not unusual for a relationship to sour and for the photographs to be posted publicly in an attempt to bully or humiliate the victim. Often, the exposed teen is too embarrassed to tell their parents and the bullying continues. This humiliation is often so unbearable for a child that it can tragically lead to severe depression, drug abuse and even suicide. • Child por nogr aphy : It is not uncommon for teenagers to share information with each other about pornographic websites, which they can easily access after lying about their age. These sites often have “video chat

rooms,” which allow the teens to video-conference with the “adult entertainer.” These adult entertainers may even coax teenagers into performing a sex act, which can be covertly recorded using the teen’s own webcam which may then be sold to child pornographers. • P edophile deception: Adult pedophiles sometimes masquerade as teenagers in an effort to gain the trust of unsuspecting teens. They use fake photos and profiles and work over weeks, even months, to build trust with the teen. Pedophiles are patient and may cultivate relationships with dozens of teens simultaneously. As the relationship progresses, the pedophile will begin requesting photos and will encourage sexually graphic conversations. Keep in mind, the teenager believes they are falling in love with someone their age. The pedophile will eventually reveal his or her real age and will demand sexual contact. The victim’s whole world is suddenly turned upside down and they don’t know where to turn. f the teen does not comply with the demands, the pedophile will threaten to ruin the teen’s life by sharing the explicit messages and photographs with their friends, their parents and school. It is not unusual for a teen in this situation to succumb to the pressure and threats or become suicidal, or both. There is nothing sadder for a law enforcement officer investigating a

teen suicide to determine the teen felt driven to suicide because they had made “a terrible mistake” and were too embarrassed to approach their parents for help. S o , what can w e do as par ents to better pr otect our childr en? • We can continue to educate ourselves about existing Internet threats. • We can talk honestly to our children about the threats and make sure they know they can come to us about anything that bothers them. • We can place our computers in a visible area of the home, which will discourage children and teens from visiting inappropriate websites. • We can create rules for Internet use, such as when and where internet access is allowed. • We can ask ourselves if providing our children portable devices such as laptops, tablets and smart phones

with Internet access is really necessary? • We can ensure we are aware of all websites our children visit and that we have full access and knowledge of all passwords our children use for access. • We can maintain awareness of all means of communication to include our children’s gaming systems (ie: PS3, Xbox, etc.) and we can learn how to navigate these systems to scan for inappropriate material or access. • There are software products on the market which can help you determine if your child has been observing inappropriate images on a computer. If you would like a copy of the Sheriff ’s Office Cyber Safety video with investigative software, please contact the Brevard County Sheriff ’s Office at (321) 264-5201 or send an email to admin@bcso.us and we will mail you a copy at no cost.

Stay informed! Sign up for ‘Community Alerts’ Community Alerts work much like the Sexual Offender alert system currently used on the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office website, in which residents can sign up to receive alerts via email and automatically receive any information released by the Sheriff’s Office. Sheriff’s personnel will help residents stay informed and stay safe by offering

important information on topics such as arrests, crime statistics, criminal activity, community program and family/community safety tips. To sign up for these alerts, visit www.BrevardSheriff.com and click on the Community Alerts link on the right side of the screen. For more information, call (321) 6338499

www.BrevardSheriff.com


December 2012

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

7

Cold Cases: never-ending investigations It is a sad fact that not all homicides will be solved. Nationally, in 2010, only 66 percent of the 15,241 homicides were solved. Time is not an ally in homicide cases. With the passing of time, evidence degrades, witnesses move or die and memories fade. But it remains law enforcement’s priority to solve all homicide investigations, whether active or “cold” cases. The Brevard County Sheriff’s Office Homicide Unit is responsible for investigating all manners of death throughout the unincorporated areas of the county, as well as seven municipalities and towns, which depend on the Sheriff’s services. Unit personnel are requested for all unattended deaths, suspicious deaths, suicides and missing persons, where foul play is suspected. The unit works closely with the Medical Examiner’s Office, which determines the cause and manner of death. The Homicide Unit works closely with support units such as the Crime Scene Unit, which uses forensic science to docu-

ment, collect, process and preserve evidence. The Sheriff’s Office also coordinates its efforts with the entire law enforcement community with innovative initiatives such as Operation S.M.A.R.T (Specialized Multi-Agency Review Team). This concept was created by FDLE (Florida Department of Law Enforcement) and is a directed effort to identify and prosecute the perpetrators of the various unresolved homicides.

A fresh look at cold cases The Brevard County Sheriff’s Office and the law enforcement community work together as a team to complete a prescreening process. The pre-screening template is a 17page process that requires intricate knowledge of the case. It forces the assigned team to completely review the cold case homicide from every possible angle. If the re-examination of the case develops new leads, the team then works together to pursue the newly developed

leads with additional resources to quickly and efficiently execute the necessary investigative steps. If the initial phase of Operation S.M.A.R.T. fails to resolve the cold case homicide, then the case is prepared for phase two. In this phase, the investigators prepare the case for presentation to a panel of experts in every discipline of investigation. The panel includes three to four veteran homicide investigators, crime scene experts, medical examiners, prosecutors, criminal profilers, statement analysis experts, criminal intelligence analysts, legal advisors, CrimeLine representatives and almost every forensic discipline available. The members of the panel are developed from all of the various agencies in the nine-county region. The members are considered by most to be experts in their respective fields. The actual presentation of the case is executed through victimology, PowerPoint presentation, physical inspection of the evidence and witness or suspect testimony presentations. Cold case investigation is a meticulous,

painstaking undertaking, where prior investigations must be combed through, looking for any piece of evidence that might have been missed or could result in investigative leads due to new advances in technology. With the Sheriff’s Office assigning a full-time investigator to pursue these cold cases, six of them have been solved.

Some recent success stories Recently, the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office Criminal Investigations Division closed three cold case homicides: • John John Gavin Gavin The first related to a 2005 death investigation, where skeletal remains were located by teenagers partially buried in a remote area. Great effort had been made by the murderer to prevent the identification of the body if discovered. It took a year to positively identify the victim, John Gavin. Victimology, which is See COLD, 8

Homicide Clearance Rates Brevard County Sheriff’s Office

1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Homicides

11

10

4

8

11

6

15

8

17

6

5

10

9

15

Solved

10

9

4

8

10

6

15

7

13

6

4

10

8

15

Unsolved

1

1

0

0

1

0

0

1

4

0

1

0

1

0

Clearance Rate

90% 90%

100% 100%

90.9% 100% 100%

88% 76.5% 100% 80%

100% 88.9% 100%

National Data

1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Homicides Clearance Rate

15,522 15,586 16,037 16,229 16,528 16,148 16,740 17,030 16,929 16,272 13,242 12,760 7,314 69%

63%

62%

64%

62%

62.6% 62.1% 60.7% 61.2% 63.6% 66.6%

www.BrevardSheriff.com

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BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

December 2012

Crime Scene Unit moves forward, thrives Within the past eight years, the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office Crime Scene Unit has grown in both size and capabilities. In 2004, the Crime Scene Unit consisted of five personnel, including one sergeant and four crime scene investigators/agents. The caseload placed upon the personnel was overwhelming. Today, the Crime Scene Unit consists of 11 personnel, including one sergeant, nine crime scene investigators and one office assistant. With the addition of personnel, the caseload assignment has been reduced to a manageable level. The equipment used by the Crime Scene Unit for laboratory and fieldwork now consists of filtered drying chambers for drying wet or blood-tainted evidence; a filtered, humidity-controlled and timed fingerprint chamber; state-of-the-art alternate light sources assigned to each crime scene investigator; a self-contained filtered chemical chamber;

Cold From page 7

a thorough study of the victim to include their lifestyle, took even longer, but it paid off. The victim was identified as a 67-year-old man from Polk County, who was murdered in September 2005. Once identified, investigators were able to identify potential suspects and the actual location the homicide occurred. A forensic search of the location positively identified the suspects, and led to the successful arrest of the suspects. • Natalie Natalie Br Br adbur y In September 1987, the partially clothed body of Natalie Bradbury was found in a canal in Cocoa. A former honor student, Natalie lived transiently, accepting rides from strangers and truckers. She was an easy target for a criminal with evil intentions. All leads at the time were exhausted and regular review of the case within the next two decades brought nothing new. But with fresh eyes came the thought of testing old evidence with new technology in hopes it might yield some new results and leads in the case. And yield, it did. Investigators were able to determine the suspect, Robert Yokel. Yokel was a man with a violent criminal past, including murder. He died in a Florida correctional facility, while serving a life sentence for a different crime. • Warren arren Logue During 2010, the Brevard County Sheriff’s

and a robotic Sokkia Total Station for precise measuring/diagramming of scenes, along with other improved equipment. Through the use of a federal grant, a state-of-the-art, innovative mobile crime lab was added to the fleet. This vehicle provides a large platform from which to work extensive or large-scale crime scenes. It also has the capacity to carry all equipment necessary for virtually any crime scene response. The comprehensive vision for this important unit has provided a wellequipped and highly skilled Crime Scene Unit, whose members are in a much better position to serve the residents of Brevard County.

Office received information from a witness, who provided substantial facts relating to the 2007 death of 56-year-old Warren Logue. The witness stated that Mr. Logue received his fatal injuries when he attempted to stop a burglary that was being committed on his property. As the suspect attempted to flee, Mr. Logue was run over by the suspect’s vehicle. As the result of that information, agents located additional witnesses and eventually the truck believed to have been used as the murder weapon in Illinois. Homicide agents conducted interviews in several parts of the United States, with the final witnesses and suspect in this case. As a direct result, an arrest warrant was issued in Brevard County and served on the suspect in Pennsylvania. The suspect, Steven Barton, is currently in the Brevard County Jail. • Ramona e Ramona Lee Moor Moore On the morning of July 14, 1988, construction workers paving a northern extension of Washingtonia Drive, west of Melbourne, discovered the body of a woman later identified as Ramona Lee Moore. The victim was found nude, beaten and left in a retention area which had filled with water during a recent rain. The Medical Examiner determined the cause of death to be drowning and classified the death as a homicide. Twenty-three years later, the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office received a CODIS hit in reference to a DNA profile match from evidence recovered at the murder scene. The DNA matched the profile of Robert Edward Peek to an item of evidence located in the area of

This multi-faceted vehicle provides the Sheriff’s Office Crime Scene Unit with a large platform from which to work extensive or largescale crime scenes.

Moore’s body. During 2012, Peek was interviewed by investigators in reference to the murder. Peek denied any involvement in the death of Moore and provided a DNA sample for comparison to any evidence from the case. Lab comparisons between this sample and evidence from the murder confirmed the previous DNA results. Homicide agents interviewed Peek, who had been detained at the Brevard County Jail on unrelated cases. As a direct result of this interview, coupled with the DNA findings, an arrest warrant was obtained and Peek was charged with the murder of Ramona Moore. These are some of the recent examples of how cold cases are being solved with new technologies and highly skilled investigators. These successes should serve as a strong deterrent to criminals that the days of unsolved homicides are coming to an end. At the 2012 Annual Award’s Ceremony, Sheriff Jack Parker recognized those involved with solving these cases for their determination and expertise. Sheriff Parker said, “It is a very good feeling when we can meet with these families and tell them that the individual responsible for their loss is being brought to justice. The law enforcement personnel involved are absolutely determined to solve every case. Our citizens would be amazed to watch them work; they are a very dedicated group of people.” For more information about Brevard County’s current cold cases, visit www.BrevardSheriff.com or call the Homicide Unit at (321) 6338413. Call Crimeline with anonymous tips.

www.BrevardSheriff.com


BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

December 2012

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

9

It’s ‘GAMEOVER’ for Brevard’s criminals In March of 2008, The Sheriff’s Office worked with the Brevard County law enforcement community and created an innovative new program to target gangrelated violence and other violent criminal activity. The Brevard County Sheriff’s Office, along with the police departments of Cocoa, Melbourne, Palm Bay, Rockledge and Titusville, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement and the Brevard/Seminole State Attorney’s Office partnered in Operation “GAME OVER” (Gangs and Major Epidemic of Violence Enforcement Response). GAME OVER is a proactive approach to targeting violent criminals and stopping violent activity that is committed throughout Brevard County. The concept of the operation is a multi-pronged approach that is inclusive of intelligence collection, investigative techniques and technology. The GAMEOVER Task Force utilizes resources from various participating agencies to identify and subsequently apprehend those violent offenders. The unit works alongside the State Attorney’s Office and United States Attorney’s Office to prosecute the various individuals for all criminal offenses, including violent crimes, probation violations, weapons charges, narcotics violations and other associated crimes. As one of the most visible law enforcement efforts, the GAMEOVER Task Force is making a huge impact in the community, with 800 arrests since its incep-

tion. Among these offenders were Brevard’s most dangerous, which included homicide suspects, career criminals, sex offenders, home invasion and robbery suspects, fugitives from justice, as well as individuals considered to be the “most wanted” throughout the county. As an added bonus, many illegally possessed firearms and weapons To date, the Sheriff’s Office Graffiti Busters program has removed more than have been removed from 3,000 incidents of graffiti throughout the county. the streets. In addition to the sucThe Sheriff’s Office was honored as the 2010 recipcessful arrest and removal of violent offenders from ient of the prestigious “Davis Productivity Notable our community, other innovative programs have Team Award of Distinction,” sponsored each year by been established, such as “Graffiti-Busters,” which Prudential Insurance and the Florida Tax Watch for uses jail inmates to reduce graffiti in the community. innovative and cost-effective ways to reduce gang In many cases, graffiti is more than unsightly and violence. is used by gang members to establish territories and The statewide award recognizes and rewards recruit new members. To this point, the program has excellence in state government through partnerremoved more than 3,000 incidents of graffiti. ships and cost-saving measures.

BCSO supports 2012 United Way Campaign BY COMMANDER MIKE DEMORAT CHAIRMAN OF BCSO UNITED WAY CAMPAIGN

A

s a result of the generosity of the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office members and our community sponsors, our BCSO 2012 United Way campaign was able to break BCSO’s all-time record in giving and raised

more than $224,000! What makes this total even more special is that more members of the Sheriff’s Office participated than ever before. The majority of BCSO members personally participated, contributing more than $82,000! Last year, the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office was recognized as the topperforming sheriff’s office in the state, raising more than $137,000 for the United Way. We have every confidence that this year’s campaign will place us once again firmly in the top spot for the state. On behalf of Sheriff Jack Parker, I

would like to express my gratitude to all the members of our Sheriff’s Office, as well as our community sponsors for their generosity. BCSO Chief Deputy Paul Drinkwater also did an outstanding job above last year in helping us reach this record by organizing two special event golf tournaments. In addition, I’d like to personally thank this year’s Brevard County Sheriff’s Office United Way co-chairman Maj. John Mellick, as well as the following BCSO Campaign team leaders: Maj. Vic DeSantis, Lt. Brandon Lanza, Lt. Mike Scully, Lt. Alex Herrera, Lt. Joseph Jenkins, Lt. Robert Cullen. Sgt. Steve Fernez, Sgt. Michelle Patrick,

www.BrevardSheriff.com

Agent Brandon Gish, Jail Records manager Jessica Vanatta and administrative assistant Mary Maddox. Due to generosity of our Sheriff’s Office employees and community MAJ. JOHN MELLICK partners, our VICE-CHAIRMAN OF BCSO United Way of UNITED WAY CAMPAIGN Brevard will continue to provide the critical services needed to people across our community.


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BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

December 2012

Aviation Unit reaches new heights The Brevard County Sheriff’s Office Aviation Unit has made great strides since 2005. Firstly, the unit acquired a set of fixed floats that attached to the training aircraft, allowing the aircraft to “land” on water. The need for this type of aircraft was necessary due to the increased number of water-related calls that the Sheriff’s helicopters were responding to. When needed, Brevard County Fire Rescue paramedics stand ready to ride with the deputy sheriff piloting the chopper. The attached floats allow the aircraft, which is named “Star Fish” to provide the ability to rescue people in places not accessible by other means. This helicopter has saved many lives since it was placed into operation. Due to the extreme dangers of performing water rescues from the air, the Aviation Unit seized an opportunity to train on-crew deployment into water with Patrick Air Force Base’s 920th Rescue Squadron. The Aviation Unit is also trained in basic water life saving techniques with Brevard County Fire Rescue’s Ocean Rescue Unit. Within three months of the floats being installed, “Star Fish” had its first water rescue. The Sheriffs Aviation Unit received a call of a boating accident at the entrance to the St. Johns River on Lake Washington. The call indicated two airboats had collided, partially submerging both boats.

Several people were reported hangar not only kept the aircraft and injured, one critically. “Star Fish” was parts safer; it saved more than $1 milcalled to respond, as the scene was lion in rental payments of the term of unreachable by land. the previous lease. With a Brevard County Fire Rescue The Brevard County Sheriff’s Aviaparamedic on board, the most critical tion Unit has been nationally recogpatient received immediate advanced nized perhaps more than any other law medical care and was transported from enforcement aviation unit in the counthe scene to an air ambulance and try. flown to the trauma center. The “FLIR Vision Awards” honors the Because of the increase in these finest aviation operations out of huntypes of calls, the Aviation Unit has dreds of submissions each year. begun training paramedics with BreTo be recognized once with this presvard County Fire Rescue Station No. 43, tigious award is rarity for even the best also located at the Merritt Island Air- aviation units. Brevard’s unit has been port. The paramedics are versed on recognized in the top three on four difhow to respond, provide in-flight serv- ferent occasions in the past seven ices and safely operate around and in years: in 2006, 2007, 2009 and 2012. the float aircraft. This training ensures This unit is truly a cut above the rest the future success of the aircraft and and its members are fortunate to be will result in the saving of many more serving Brevard County. lives. In April 2005, the Aviation Unit purchased a 10,000gallon double-wall fuel tank. This made fueling much safer for the Aviation Unit personnel. Prior to this, the unit was purchasing fuel, storing it in a used 8,000-gallon trailer, transferring it to a 600-gallon fuel truck and then fueling the Sheriff’s aircraft. A new hangar was built for the Aviation Unit at the Merritt Island Airport, which replaced a hanger Within three months of its new fixed floats being that was falling apart. The installed, “Star Fish” had its first water rescue. construction of the new

Project LifeSaver: rapid-response rescues The Brevard County Sheriff’s Office has equipped its helicopters with specialized tracking equipment, designed to locate missing persons who wear a personalized wristband that emits a unique radio signal. When caregivers or city police agencies notify the Sheriff’s Office that the person with a Project Life-

saver wristband is missing, a Sheriff’s helicopter and search-and-rescue team respond to the wanderer’s area and start searching with the mobile locator tracking system. Search times have been reduced from hours and days to minutes. In more than 1,000 searches with this program, there have been no report-

ed serious injuries or deaths. Recovery times average less than 30 minutes. The wristbands can be used for people with Alzheimer’s disease, Down syndrome, autism, etc. A special thank you goes to the members of Brevard County TRIAD who helped to implement and market the program, the reliable rapid-

www.BrevardSheriff.com

response partnership with law enforcement aiding victims and families suffering from Alzheimer’s disease, Down syndrome and autism. For further information about this program, visit Brevard County TRIAD’s website www.BrevardTRIAD.org


December 2012

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

11

Marine Unit makes waves, saves in Brevard With multiple hurricanes impacting Brevard County in 2004, Sheriff’s personnel worked to improve its ability to rescue victims, especially in instances of n high water and high wind. As a result, the Sheriff’s Office acquired from the military, four large six-wheel drive vehicles. They were purchased at a very low cost and were completely refurbished at the Sheriff’s Fleet Maintenance facility. Two of the four have been fabricated with a protective steel enclosure on the back and outfitted with wheelchair ramps, allowing for easier loading of victims with special needs. The other two trucks have an open air bed, with bench seating and were used extensively for relief efforts to provide ice, water and food to victims in flooded areas, following the flooding from Tropical Storm “Fay” in August 2008. “These trucks are a very valuable resource when needed, and I very much appreciate Mike Wimberly and his team at Fleet Services for ensuring we have the vehicles we need to help our citizens in when we need them,” said Sheriff Jack Parker. In 2007, in an effort to reduce drowning deaths in Brevard County, the Sheriff’s Office Agricultural and Marine Unit initiated a new boating and water safety program that has been presented in many schools throughout the county, as well as numerous civic functions and other public events. This program includes the use of an interactive robotic boat, which captures the attention of children known as “Bobby the Boat.” The program, funded by a grant through the state of Florida, allows deputy sheriffs to relay the importance of life jacket use, while on a boat, as well as talk to children and parents about water safety. So far, the program has been presented at more than 160 events to more than 14,000 children and adults in Brevard County. In addition to increased emergency situations, the hurricanes of 2004 resulted in the sinking or partially submerging of hundreds of boats in Florida’s lakes and rivers. Many of these boats were aban-

doned by their owners and laid just under the water’s surface, becoming a dangerous hazard for unsuspecting boaters. Prior to 2006, only the Florida Wildlife Commission had the authority to classify vessels derelict, which, due to its limited resources, could not keep up with the massive number of boats impacted by the 2004 storms. As a result, the law expanded to also allow counties and municipalities to classify vessels as derelict, so that they could be legally removed from waterways in the state of Florida. Brevard County asked the Sheriff’s Office for help. As a result, the Sheriff’s Agricultural and Marine Unit partnered with FWC and worked together to identify and remove the vessels. To this point, more than 70 derelict vessels have been identified and removed from Brevard’s waterways, as a result of this partnership.

“Bobby the Boat” is an interactive robotic boat that teaches children about water safety.

The hurricanes of 2004 resulted in the sinking or partially submerging of hundreds of boats throughout Florida’s waterways.

Following the 2004 hurricanes, BCSO acquired from the military, four large sixwheel drive vehicles to enhance Search & Rescue efforts.

www.BrevardSheriff.com


12

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

December 2012

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Methamphetamine labs put children at risk The Brevard County Sheriff’s Office is committed to combating the illicit manufacturing of methamphetamine in its communities. Agents focus on detection, enforcement and citizen awareness and actively conduct awareness presentations with community businesses and Brevard County Waste Management to inform them regarding various items that may indicate the presence of a lab. Agents also partner with local, state and federal law enforcement to streamline lab processing and cleanup. To date, these efforts have proved extremely successful and have greatly minimized the impact and cost to the residents of Brevard County.

ed precursors are common household solvents, cleaners and fuels, a clandestine lab can be suspected when large volumes of these chemicals are present and extreme caution should be exercised. If you have any concern that a methamphetamine operation may be present, contact your local law enforcement office for immediate assistance. Exposure to the chemicals or associated precursors may be potentially harmful or possibly lethal.

Brevard County Sheriff’s Office led the state in meth lab busts

Brevard County led the entire state of Florida for 2005, 2006, The Facts: and 2007 in meth lab seizures. Because of the safety and pro• Clandestine labs are found tective equipment necessary to in many areas, including residismantle a meth lab and clean dences, barns, garages, busiup the toxic chemicals, the Brenesses, apartments, hotel vard County Sheriff’s Office rooms and vehicles. partnered with Brevard County • Approximately 30 to 35 perFire Rescue during these operacent of methamphetamine labs tions. seized are in places where chilAgents are proud to report dren live that their efforts have been suc• Children may have cessful, and the number of methamphetamine exposure Top Left: Hazardous material found inside a meth lab; Top Right: Drug paraphernalia found in a meth meth labs in Brevard County is simply because they live in or lab; Bottom Left: Materials used in the manufacturing of methamphetamine; Bottom Right: Some declining. However, Sheriff’s near this toxic environment agents continue to be vigilant commonly used materials for the manufacturing of methamphetamine. and on the lookout for new labs, The hazards to children living especially as previously incarin these environments cerated meth “cooks” are numerous. They are released from are at risk of: prison following their • Inhalation of toxic three-year minimum ★ ★ ★ fumes mandatory sentences. • Chemical waste in Brevard County play areas Brevard County Sheriff’s Office methamphetamine lab busts to date. Sheriff’s Office drug • Exposure to drugs agents review the and drug users Department of Coring manufacture • Parent is awake for days at a time, fol• Exposure to needles and smoking rections’ monthly prison release list in an lowed by periods of sleeping for days, pipes, razor blades and other parapherThe effects on the parent’s behavior often leaving children poorly clothed, effort to monitor any potential for the nalia reappearance of labs. due to the drug use are: unfed, un-bathed and unsupervised • Weapons left in accessible places and For more specific information concern• Parent or caregiver frequently has • Parent often associates with persons booby traps, meant to protect the operaing methamphetamine, contact the Breexplosive temper leading to physical of questionable character tion vard County Sheriff’s Office Special Invesabuse due to irrational and brutal pun• Possibility of fire and explosion durishment Although many chemicals or associat- tigations Unit at (321) 633-1216.

www.BrevardSheriff.com


December 2012

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

13

Teen driver safety is right on course in Brevard Following years of continued success, the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office is continuing its teen driver safety programs, know as Teen Driver Challenge and Brevard S.T.O.P.P.E.D. Teen Driver Challenge is a Statewide Florida Sheriff’s Association program and is certified by the Department of Highway Safety Motor Vehicles. The Teen Driver Challenge is for Brevard County students, who have a restricted permit or driver’s license and is taught by Sheriff’s deputies. Each class consists of two training days. The first is a four-hour block of classroom instruction, and the next day, an eight-hour day of vehicle operations at the Brevard Community College Palm Bay Driving Range, using their own vehicles. It is recommended that students use the vehicle they will most likely be driving. Upon successful completion of the course, students graduate with a certificate of completion. Certificates may be presented to auto insurance companies for a possible reduction in premium. During this course, students learn techniques on vehicle control and crash avoidance.

Topics include:

Hundreds of teens from throughout the county have completed the Teen Driver Challenge program, which is a Statewide Florida Sheriff’s Association program and is certified by the Department of Highway Safety Motor Vehicles.

• Knowing your vehicle • Using your senses • Vehicle dynamics • Safe-driving habits • Alcohol and driving • Aggressive driving The Brevard County Sheriff’s Office is dedicated to reducing the number of injuries and deaths among our young drivers. Their safety is its priority. The office believe this hands-on course will improve skills, vehicle knowledge, create good driving habits and provide valuable tools for all of their driving years. To date, The Sheriff’s Office has graduated more than 1,383 students from the program, with 112 classes held. Feedback from parents and students has been extremely positive, and classes are scheduled on a continuous basis. Visit www.BrevardSheriff.com for class dates and registration information. Car Crashes are the leading cause of death for teenagers. In 2005, 18 Brevard families lost a teenager in an automobile accident. After those startling statistics in an effort to help parents keep their young drivers safe, the Sheriff’s Office introduced “Brevard S.T.O.P.P.E.D.,” which stands for “Brevard Start Telling Our Parents and Promoting Educated Drivers. The Brevard S.T.O.P.P.E.D. program is a partnership between the Sheriff’s Office, local police departments, Florida Highway Patrol, State Farm Insurance, and par-

ents of teenage drivers. Brevard S.T.O.P.P.E.D. is a voluntary parental notification program, designed to reduce the number of youthful drivers involved in auto accidents. It provides young drivers with the constant awareness of watchful eyes and a visible reminder of parental supervision and gives parents peace of mind that they will be made aware if their teen is stopped. As of 2012, there are 807 vehicles registered in the program.

“ As a parent of a teen driver, the Brevard S.T.O.P.P.E.D. program offers peace of mind, while if our teen is stopped, myself, as a parent, is notified. Realizing that statistically, traffic crashes are the No. 1 cause of teen deaths, I appreciate being notified if my teen is contacted by law enforcement. I fully support and am thankful for the efforts of the Brevard law enforcement agencies in helping to keep our teen drivers safe. “ — Charlie Brevard resident and parent of a teen driver

How it works:

Parents register and receive a decal to be placed on the outside of the rear window on the driver’s side. Once displayed, if your vehicle is stopped by a law enforcement officer in Brevard County, while being operated by a driver younger than 21, parents will receive notification via email or regular mail, which includes the following information: • Time and date of stop

www.BrevardSheriff.com

Driver’s name and number of passengers • Reason for the stop • Whether any traffic tickets were issued

How to register:

Parents can register at www.BrevardSheriff.com, by clicking on the BREVARD S.T.O.P.P.E.D. button on the right side of the homepage, or by contacting program coordinator Lori Chabot at (321) 403-2619.


14

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

December 2012

Nana’s House: helping children in need Nana’s House is a private 501(c)3 organization that is accredited by the Florida Association of Christian Child Caring Agencies (FACCCA). Open nearly three years ago, Nana’s House provides a safe, secure and Christian home for neglected, abused, needy or abandoned children. As a private organization, Nana’s House receives no state funding and is funded entirely by generous businesses and caring individuals in the community. Likewise, the home is staffed by volunteers, with absolutely no paid employees. Nana’s house receives legal guardianship of its children on a yearto-year basis, as needed, while parents work on getting back in their feet. All donations to the organization are tax deductible. In April of last year the organization added the Nana’s House Thrift Cottage at 2540 Malabar Road in Malabar, as a way to raise additional

funds for the nonprofit. The cottage assists the organization in raising funds used directly toward housing expenses, clothing, food and childcare needs. The thrift cottage hours are Wednesday through Friday, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and on Saturdays, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The cottage is closed on Sundays and Tuesdays. In exciting news, cottage operations are expected to expand to a second location in the Malabar area in January 2013. Nana’s House has recently acquired a second residence and will soon be providing living accommodations for an additional five at-need children. The organization is currently taking applications for house parents to staff the second location and is always in need of additional volunteers. Interested individuals are encouraged to contact Kim at (321) 724-5111 (option 1).

Mark your calendar for these upcoming fundraising events: • Feb. 9, 2013: Sixth-Annual Valentine’s Dinner Dance and Silent Auction at the Crowne Plaza. Sponsor and silent auction items are needed. The contact for this event is Donna DiBongrazio at

(609) 510-3947 or (321) 724-5111 (option 3). • April 11, 2013: Building Fund Banquet at the Hilton Rialto. Table hosts are needed and all funds raised from this event will go directly toward building the proposed gated community for the Nana’s House facilities. For more information about this organization visit, www.nanaschildrenshome.com or call (321) 724-5111.

Serene Harbor, BCSO join forces for holiday food drive In February 1992, Serene Harbor became incorporated and began providing emergency shelter services to the victims of domestic violence. In 1995, a residence was purchased and converted into a 16-bed facility, which would provide shelter for the victims and their children. In 2008, the 16-bed facility was replaced with a 24-bed facility, which was funded by the Department of Children and Families. Serene Harbor has expanded its role in Brevard County by providing shelter, emergency room intervention, transitional housing, counseling programs, a helpline, case management, educational programs and safety planning. Serene Harbor attempts to reduce the number of incidents of domestic violence through intervention, prevention, social change, education and community involvement. Additionally, a Legal Advocacy Program

was designed to assist those who seek legal services or police intervention in regard to domestic violence. These legal rights include providing information about domestic Joe Martin violence, repeat violence, dating violence, civil court proceedings, criminal court proceedings, injunction for protection orders and emergency hotline numbers. It is for these reasons that the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office strongly supports the efforts of Serene Harbor and its mission to assist the victims of violent crime. The need for emergency services has never been greater, but during a time of economic difficulty, the resources needed to assist have diminished. Throughout the holiday season, the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office is conducting a food drive to assist the women and chil-

Additional Items Needed: Women’s & children’s underclothes

Serene Harbor is collecting items for its holiday food drive through Jan. 5. dren being housed by Serene Harbor. Hundreds of pounds of food will be delivered to those in need as a result. To assist, call Serene Harbor executive director Melody Keith at (321) 953-5389 or Homicide Agent Joe Martin at (321) 6338400. Food can also be dropped off at any of the six Sheriff’s Office locations: North Precinct: 700 Park Ave., Titusville

www.BrevardSheriff.com

(321) 264-5208 East Precinct: 2575 N. Courtenay Parkway, Merritt Island (321) 454-6652 Criminal Investigations: 340 Gus Hipp Blvd. Rockledge (321) 633-8499 South Precinct: 1515 Sarno Road, Melbourne (321) 253-6658 West Precinct: 2725 Judge Fran Jamieson Way, Building E, Viera (321) 633-2123 Canaveral Precinct: 111 Polk Ave., Cape Canaveral (321) 868-1113


BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

December 2012

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

15

Staying safe aganist identity theft and fraud Identity theft is the fastest-growing crime in the world and has the ability to impact each and every one of us. Ten years ago, during “Crime Prevention” discussions, we informed citizens that identity theft was the fastest-growing crime in the state. Several years later, we would inform our citizens that identity theft had become the fastest-growing crime in the country. Today, unfortunately, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Federal Trade Commission have named identity theft the fastest-growing crime in the world. In fact, a recent study by the Federal Trade Commission revealed that identity theft is the No. 1 crime that concerns consumers. Of equal concern, far too many of our citizens are either unaware that identity theft can target them or are not sure what to do to protect themselves. One of the most alarming statistics related to identity theft is that only one in 700 identity thieves is actually identified and punished for his or her crime. While identity thieves primarily target our seniors, stealing their life savings and retirement funds, they can also target anyone of any age. Throughout our lives, we are taught to be protective of our “good names,” and credit and identity-thieves target both. While technology plays a major role in the increased number of cases of identity theft, it is not the sole driving force behind the epidemic that is occurring. The economy, as well as other factors, has given rise to new methods of not only stealing a person’s identity, but has also creating new methods of using the stolen information to commit a crime. Today’s identity thieves not only use our information to target our credit, but also to commit employment fraud, government benefits fraud, insurance fraud, mortgage fraud and even tax-return fraud. While today’s criminals continue to utilize traditional measures to steal our biographical information, technology has unintentionally created new abilities to target victims and steal their identities.

Protecting your identity is just as important as protecting your home, automobile and other personal belongings.

The more common and traditional methods of stealing your identity can be characterized as: • Garbage Collection • Mail Theft • Burglary • Scams Technology has also created theft methods such as credit card-skimming, data breeches and computer intrusions, making it almost impossible to completely protect our selves from the various methods used by high-tech criminals. We can no longer afford to believe that shredding our garbage and not giving our social security number to everyone is enough to protect us against identity theft. Today’s criminals take our personal

information from our homes, computers, bank accounts and social media to steal our identities. In today’s fastpaced world, we have to worry about “peer-to-peer” intrusions of our computers and those that target our Wi-Fi locations. While we can all agree that there is not a “silver bullet” that guarantees we don’t become the victim of identity theft, there are certain steps you can take to protect you and your family from exposure. In law enforcement, we wear a bulletproof vest that helps to protect us from harm. By following the below steps you can put on your protection against identity thieves: • Request an annual credit report (www.annualcreditreport.com) • Shred everything (envelopes, documents, magazine covers, etc.) • Only mail from locked mailbox locations • Protect your home from burglary (bolting your safe to the floor) • Never allow anyone to walk away

www.BrevardSheriff.com

Shredding your mail, documents, magazine covers and even envelopes can save you from becoming a victim of ifentity theft. with your credit card • Only utilize password-protected Wi-Fi spots (including in your home) • Never respond to requests for your personal information • Remove “File Sharing” from your computers • Do not place personal information on Facebook • “Just Ask” why a business needs your social security number • Utilize a “uni-gel” ball pen when writing checks The last layer of your protection is to be as vigilant of your personal information as you are over your homes and automobiles. To protect our homes, we use alarms, special lighting, and ask our neighbors to keep watch over our residences when we go on vacation. Our cars are protected by alarms and locks; yet, we leave our identities unprotected. We must be very proactive and re-active in our approach to protecting our identities by aggressively watching over our information and being quick to recognize if we have become the target of identity theft.


16

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

December 2012

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Jail Complex enhancements continue to improve

A

s a result of the vision and guidance of Sheriff Jack Parker, coupled with the support of the Brevard County Board of County Commissioners, we are now able to reflect on many accomplishments improving jail operations and safety in the past eight years. In 2004, the jail had bed space for 1,041 inmates, but was seriously overcrowded with hundreds of additional inmates. The jail had been struggling with overcrowding for many years, but in 2004, it received a lot of attention and became one of the county’s big news stories when there were five jail suicides. As a result of the Board of County Commissioners’ concerns, its members enlisted the services of a consultant to review the needs of the jail and suggest corrective actions. The consultant recommended a twophase plan, which was expected to cost approximately $143 million. While the plan was well thought out, the prevailing thought at the time was that it was not possible to acquire adequate funding for phase one ($43 million), much less phase two ($100 million), without a successful referendum passed by the voters. This presented a problem, as it would not be the Board’s first attempt at trying to address the long-standing overcrowding jail issue, with a voter referendum. The Board had attempted four previous

BY SUSAN JETER BCSO JAIL COMMANDER

jail referendums to alleviate the overcrowding issue, all of which failed. There was little reason to believe a fifth attempt would be successful. Although, failure of the fifth referendum was all but certain, it seemed County Commissioners had little choice but to start preparing for another referendum. From our perspective, failure would mean additional delays to any real, tangible improvements to the jail. The jail was in such dire straights; we were concerned any further delays would prove disastrous. Morale at the jail was at an all-time low, and staff was losing hope that it would see real changes in its lifetime. When Sheriff Jack Parker won the election in 2004, everything changed. Immediately, Sheriff Parker presented a plan to the Board, where it could make substantial and real improvements to the jail at a fraction of the cost, preventing the need to go to referendum. His recommendations included space for approximately 700 inmates, including safer housing for those with mental health and medical issues, low-

The Brevard Jail Complex has undergone major renovations in recent years, featuring many of Sheriff Jack Parker’s recommendations, which includes space for approximately 700 inmates, including safer housing for those with mental health and medical issues, low-cost tents for minimum-security inmates, as well as expanded laundry, food preparation and booking areas. cost tents for minimum-security inmates, expanded laundry, food preparation and booking areas and other important improvements. Sheriff Parker’s cost-effective plan was well-received by the Board and approved. The concept was well thought out and allowed work to com-

mence immediately. All of the work has been completed, and the jail is a very different and much safer facility today because of the changes. There is no doubt Sheriff Parker will be leaving the Brevard County Jail in a much better position than the way he found it. We will miss him.

Sheriff’s bike program pedals forward The Sheriff’s Office bike program was established in 2006 at the Sheriff’s Work Farm and utilizes inmate labor to refurbish donated, abandoned or unclaimed bicycles. Bicycles are donated to all Brevard County Sharing Centers for parents who cannot afford to provide a bicycle to their child for Christmas, birthday or other

A representative from the Brevard Sharing Center takes a refurbished bike from an inmate at the Sheriff’s Office Work Farm.

special events. Adult bicycles are also given to adults without transportation and to veteran organizations for homeless veterans. The refurbished bicycles are provided to those that need them at no charge. Since the program began, more than 4,500 bicycles have been donated and given away to those in need.

www.BrevardSheriff.com


December 2012

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

17

Observing jail court safely from home All of the courtrooms in Brevard County are open to the public, with the exception of the courtroom in the Brevard County Jail Complex. In an effort to improve access to the public to view jail court proceedings, the Sheriff’s Office implemented a web video streaming capability that residents can watch from their homes and businesses via their computers. Residents can now observe and listen to the defendant, the defense attorney, the prosecutor and the judge. They can watch jail court live, as it happens. The jail courtroom is typically used for initial proceedings for those who were arrested in the county within the previous 24 hours and for plea proceedings, etc.

From any computer, visit: www.livestream.com/brevardsheriffcourt

The Brevard County Sheriff’s Office appreciates the efforts of Brevard Community College’s WBCC-TV for assisting the Sheriff’s Office with this project.

Jail inmates beautify county In 2005, male and female inmates were assigned to separate work crews, with a direct responsibility to clean up Brevard County. Under the supervision of Sheriff’s Crew supervisors, inmates have removed more than 2 million pounds of trash from Brevard County’s roadways. Keep Brevard Beautiful, a nonprofit agency, dedicated to the beautification of our roadways and public spaces and the eradication of nonnative plant species has awarded the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office its annual Beautification Award two times since 2006 for the great work performed by its jail staff and inmates. Jail Inmate work crews have also accomplished hundreds of landscaping and grounds maintenance projects since 2005. Inmates have been put to work, clearing out tons of overgrowth and invasive species from large areas in multiple cities, beautifying problem areas and reducing criminal activity.

Initial Proceedings: Monday through Friday: 1:15 p.m. Saturday, Sunday and holidays: 9:30 a.m. Plea Court: Wednesdays at 10 a.m.

Hydroponics system thrives The first harvest of aquaponics lettuce was performed in May 2012 at the Brevard County Jail Complex, resulting in 50 pounds of lettuce produced.

BCSO enlists jail inmates to perform a variety of landscape and roadway improvement projects.

In February 2010, the Sheriff’s Office implemented a Hydroponic Growing System designed to grow vegetables without soil by utilizing a system of piping that provides nutrient solution to the roots of plants that are placed in a growing channel. Hydroponics is not only protective of the environment; it conserves both land and water. So far, 6,200 pounds of lettuce have been grown hydroponically. Jail staff is making efforts to continously grow more than 4,000 heads of lettuce, which will reduce jail food costs. Additionally, the Sheriff’s Office has implemented a small-scale aquapon-

www.BrevardSheriff.com

ics system, in which a 600-gallon tank is used to raise tilapia. The nitrogenrich water from the fish tank is channeled through piping, which is used to fertilize more than 100 heads of lettuce. The first harvest of aquaponics lettuce was performed in May 2012, resulting in 50 pounds of lettuce produced. Plans are in place to expand the aquaponics system, with the ultimate goal of increasing the production of lettuce, while also producing approximately 1,000 fish fillets per month for consumption at the Jail Complex – further reducing jail food costs.


18

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

December 2012

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

New medical mental health unit increases jail safety

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heriff Jack Parker’s tenure has featured a “tough on crime” approach to his law enforcement mandate, balanced by a pragmatic and appropriately compassionate perspective of individuals with special mental health needs. Many of his initiatives successfully manage offenders who, without proper monitoring and intervention, might experience adverse effects such as suicides, staff and inmate injury. Sheriff Parker’s concepts have been innovative, creative and successful. In addition to creating a safer jail environment, many of his mental health initiatives have also resulted in significant cost-savings as a result of their implementation. An important component of his jail expansion plan was the creation of a new medical/mental health facility, which was designed primarily as a dormitory housing unit with on-site corrections deputies, which dramatically reduced the typical operational costs that would have been required by more

ORVILLE CLAYTON BCSO MENTAL HEALTH DIRECTOR

traditional jail designs. The architectural design not only resulted in significant cost-savings, but created a safer corrections environment that increased inmate visibility and reduced the likelihood of adverse inmate incomes, such as suicides. In the four years since its construction, no suicides have been experienced in this housing unit, although it houses individuals with the most serious mental illnesses and highest potential suicidal risk. We are very proud to have been a part of the many improvements made to the jail facilities and mental health programs, resulting in a safer environment for jail inmates, with mental health and medical issues and the staff responsible for their care.

Mental health facility provides evaluation and treatment of inmates with emotional and mental health problems.

Inmates make own uniforms, save tax dollars In May 2007, the Sheriff’s Office initiated an Inmate Sewing Program. The inmates are now responsible for making all inmate uniforms, sheets, mattresses and laundry bags. Repairs are made to any ripped uniforms or mattresses to further extend their use. The inmates work with several different types of industrial sewing

machines, while learning all the basics of commercial sewing. The skills they learn, coupled with the improvement in their work ethic, place them in a better position to gain employment upon their release. The success of this program saves Brevard County taxpayers approximately $45,000 a year.

The Inmate Sewing Program saves Brevard County taxpayers approximately $45,000 a year.

Sheriff’s work farm produces results The Brevard County Sheriff’s Office Work Farm provides supervision, structure and guidance for offenders sentenced by Brevard judges. Inmate work crew labor is used to complete various projects for the betterment and beautification of Brevard County.

In many cases, judges sentence offenders to work their sentence off on their days off from their normal employment. That way, the individual can serve his sentence, but still maintain employment, reducing their chances of getting arrested again. The program saves dollars over traditional confinement, in which tax-

payers must pay for meals, housing and medical services. Since 2004, the teamwork and direction of the Sheriff’s Inmate Work Crew supervisors over those sentenced to the Work Farm have led to the harvesting of approximately 42,000 pounds of potatoes, onions, collard greens, okra, corn, squash, zucchini,

www.BrevardSheriff.com

snow peas, carrots, turnips and cucumbers from the fields, which were used by the jail complex and local food banks throughout Brevard County. Field vegetable production has steadily increased each year since 2004, and a 30,000square-foot area has been tilled for additional crop production.


December 2012

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

Paws and Stripes program: a ‘paws’able solution

Adopted!

Pippen

A big thanks to everyone involved in the Paws and Stripes Programs! We have successfully found 200 dogs forever homes. The most recent class of dogs has all been adopted, and a new class will begin training in a few weeks. Visit

Adopted!

Domi

Adopted!

Darby

Adopted!

Simon

Adopted!

Cason

Adopted!

Ebony

Adopted!

Chewbacca

Adopted!

Ellie Mae

www.BrevardSheriff.com for additional information, or contact Maj. Greg Robertson at (321) 690-1504.

In September 2006, the Sheriff’s Office implemented an innovative program that matched unadoptable dogs with specially trained jail inmates. Using inmates to give obedience training to dogs to make them more adoptable and reducing the number of dogs being euthanized in Brevard County was a positive outcome for all, and the program has proven to be a great success. Since the inception of the Paws and Stripes program, 208 dogs have successfully completed the program and have been adopted into loving homes. The affect the dogs have had on the inmate population has been remarkable and has created a calming affect among the inmate pop-

Adopted!

Goldie

ulation. In many cases, inmates have said their time working in the program was lifechanging and gave them purpose during a tough time in their lives. The Paws and Stripes program is operated without tax dollars, thanks to a special group of residents, known as the Paws and Stripes Guild, who work hard to raise donations for the care and feeding of the dogs. During the program, inmates are taught how to properly train the dogs and care for them. Upon completion, inmates are validated as recognized pet care technicians by the American Boarding Kennels Association and receive a certificate for completing the American Red Cross Pet First Aid course, making the inmates more employable.

Adopted!

Lucy

Adopted!

Rowdee

Adopted!

Barkley

Paws and Stripes Guild Members Ruthann Genoni Amy Robinson Germaine Ludwig Laura Soto Angie Twigg Dawn DelDuca Valerie Bruel Suzan Kundrat Alice Kundrat Martha Kirby Theresa Clifton Larry and Susan Cinco Bud and Betty Chaney Gary and Celine Lang Jack and Joanna O’Keefe

www.BrevardSheriff.com

19


20

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

December 2012

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Sexual Absconders IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER The Brevard County Sheriff ’s Office does not warrant that the information or data contained in this publication is accurate or correct, as the information and addresses can change at any time. This information is a synopsis of the available information and is not intended to represent all the information available under Florida Statute 119, Florida’s Public Record Law.

Rodell Clarke Antrobus

Steven Strack

Richard McClure

Date of Birth: 8/9/64

Date of Birth: 5/19/60

Height: 5’9’’ Weight: 175

Height: 5’11’’ Weight: 185

Jose GarciaRuiz

Date of Birth: 4/24/69

Date of Birth: 3/17/55

Date of Birth: 12/21/81

Date of Birth: 6/17/65

Height: 5’7’’ Weight: 216

Height: 5’11’’ Weight: 185

Height: 6’3’’ Weight: 180

Height: 5’6’’ Weight: 120

Jose Antonio Cruz

Phillip Mcclellan

Timothy Frazier

Date of Birth: 3/19/86

Date of Birth: 6/6/61

Date of Birth: 6/29/80

Date of Birth: 2/24/54

Height: 5’11’’ Weight: 215

Height: 6’1’’ Weight: 224

Height: 6’2’’ Weight: 230

Height: 5’1’’ Weight: 145

Wayne Goodwin

Justin Brant Phillips

David Sanchez Martinez

A sexual absconder is a sex offender, who ceases to make herself/himself available for supervision and whose whereabouts is unknown. This can also refer to an offender, who is no longer living at the last reported address given to the Florida Sexual Offender Registry. If you have information, call (321) 633-8407.

www.BrevardSheriff.com


December 2012

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

21

Most Wanted If you have information about any of these subjects, DO NOT TRY TO APPREHEND! Call CRIMELINE anonymously at (800) 423-TIPS or the Brevard County Sheriff’s Judicial Process Unit at (321) 264-5217. This is only a partial listing of subjects on the wanted list.

To view, visit:

www.BrevardSheriff.com

Height: 6’2”

Height: 5’7’’ Weight: 122

Marshall Allen Johnson

Kyle William Rich

Antwan L. Bell

Date of Birth: 9/23/41 Height: 5’9’’ Weight: 180

Franklin Bowman

Wanted For: Failure to appear, aggravated assault with a firearm, carrying a concealed firearm

Wanted For: Violation of probation: domestic battery by strangulation

Shannon M. Sharbuno

Bench warrant FTA, Early Resolution: possession of controlled substance, contempt of court, violation of community supervision

Date of Birth: 3/15/82 Height: 195 Weight: 190 Wanted For:

DOB : 3/7/86 Height: 6’ Weight: 210 Wanted For: Fleeing, resisting officer obstruct without violence, no driver’s license or operating a motor vehicle without a valid license, as a fugitive from justice, violation of probation: trafficking marijuana and a controlled substance.

Date of Birth: 1/10/88 Height: 5’7’’ Weight: 115 Wanted For:

ARRESTED

Weight: 190

Terry O’Conner Spruill

The Brevard County Sheriff ’s Office does not warrant that the information or data contained in this publication is accurate or correct, as the information and addresses can change at any time. This information is a synopsis of the available information and is not intended to represent all the information available under Florida Statue 119, Florida’s Public Record Law.

Date of Birth: 3/31/84

Date of Birth: 11/21/87

Wanted For: Armed robbery with a firearm and possession of a firearm by convicted felon

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER

Curtis Edward Evans

VOB: possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell/deliver, possession of cocaine, possession of cannabis with intent to sell/deliver

Date of Birth: 12/24/83

Jeffrey Lewis Patterson

Date of Birth: 6/29/80

Date of Birth: 7/2/85

Height: 6’2” Weight: 230

Justin B. Phillips

Wanted For: Violation of community control, tampering with an electronic monitoring device

Height: 5’4’’ Weight: 147 Wanted For: Violation of drug offender probation: possession of less than 28 grams of cocaine, possession of Oxycontin

Height: 5’8’’ Weight: 170

Krishna Anthony Badaloo

Wanted For: Attempted murder

Date of Birth: 1/31/45

Date of Birth: 1/25/81

Date of Birth: 12/21/81

Wanted For:

Height: 5’5’’

Height: 6’3”

Weight: 150

Weight: 180

FTA, Forcing a child to commit lewd, lascivious or indecent acts; promoting sexual performance of a child and computer solicitation of a child.

Oscar Martinez

Wanted For: FTA, false imprisonment, battery, grand theft of motor vehicle

www.BrevardSheriff.com

Phillip McClellan

Wanted For: violation of probation: lewd and lascivious battery


22

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

December 2012

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Sexual Predators

Kenneth Leroy Adams

Lewis R. Bevis

Race: Caucasian

DOB: 8/15/73 Race: Caucasian

DOB: 2/11/79 Race: Afr Amer

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

DOB: 12/10/1961

DOB: 1/17/39

Race: Caucasian Sex: Male Height: 6’ Weight: 220

Frederick Hudson Applegate

Height: 6’1” Weight: 192

James E. Armacost

Height: 5’ 6” Weight: 185

DOB: 3/27/63

DOB: 1/24/53

DOB: 12/9/76

Race: Caucasian

Race: AfrAmer

Race: Caucasian

Race: Afr Amer

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Height: 5’11” Weight: 146

Hosea Taft Blackwell

Race: Afr Amer Sex: Male

Height: 6’ Weight: 222

Weight: 176

Weight: 240

Jevon Cornelia Capers

Height: 5’ 3” Weight: 176

DOB: 10/15/66

DOB: 3/27/79

Race: AfrAmer

Race: Caucasian

Race: Caucasian

Weight: 260

DOB: 3/11/39

Race: Caucasian

Race: Caucasian

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Height: 5’ 8”

Height: 5’ 11”

Thomas Cox

Lionell Devon Brown

DOB: 11/6/83

DOB: 10/7/49

Weight: 160

Height: 5’11”

Gerald Joseph Borchardt

Height: 5’4”

Height: 6’ 2”

Alfred Eugene Conway

Weight: 185

Teryn D. Betts

DOB: 1/17/53

DOB: 2/14/41

Theodore Roosevelt Campbell

Height: 5’ 11”

Weight: 145

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Monte Scott Casteel

Height: 5’ 6” Weight: 165

David W. Cochran Jr.

www.BrevardSheriff.com

Weight: 140

DOB: 5/27/67

DOB: 6/17/78

Race: Caucasian

Race: Caucasian

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Height: 6’

Nathan A. Cranston

Height: 5’ 7”

Weight: 165

Sean Culbertson

Height: 5’ 7” Weight: 180


December 2012

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

23

Sexual Predators

Randall Davis

DOB: 9/01/57

DOB: 09/8/1951

Race: Caucasian

Race: Caucasian

Sex: Male Height: 5’ 10” Weight: 195

Vernon Dean Davis

Height: 5’ 10”

Sex: Male

Height: 6’

Weight: 195

Richard Debartolo

Height: 6’

Sex: Male

Antonio Dias

Weight: 246

Weight: 200 DOB: 2/2/77

DOB: 1/6/80

Race: Caucasian

Race: Caucasian Sex: Male

Race: Caucasian Sex: Male

Race: Caucasian

Height: 5’8”

Height: 5’7”

Weight: 165

Robert I. Dowell Jr.

Weight: 175

DOB: 3/28/67

DOB: 7/7/58

Race: Caucasian

Race: Afr Amer

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Height: 6’ 2”

Height: 5’ 8”

Weight: 340

Leon Goodwin

Weight: 125

Judah U. Weight: 150 Drummond

Daniel Harrison

Sex: Female Height: 5’ 4”

Melissa Anne Dutton

Weight: 215

DOB: 3/8/75

DOB: 4/11/88

Race: Caucasian

Race: Caucasian

Sex: Male

Sex: Male Height: 6’3”

Height: 6’ 1” Weight: 261

Michael Thomas Hartford

Weight: 266

DOB: 2/19/73

DOB: 6/17/73

Race: Caucasian

DOB: 4/13/71 Race: Caucasian

Race: Afr Amer

Race: Caucasian

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

DOB: 12/17/63

Height: 5’ 5”

Paul Hassinger

Race: Caucasian

Sex: Male

Race: Caucasian

DOB: 8/30/64

Height: 5’ 4”

Jeffrey Gilliland

DOB: 6/25/81

DOB: 4/4/79

Sex: Male

Eric Anthony Douglas

DOB: 12/3/63

Weight: 135

David Russell Holland

Height: 5’ 7” Weight: 174

Kevin Johnson

www.BrevardSheriff.com

Height: 6’ 1” Weight: 200

Joseph W. Kearns

Height: 6’ Weight: 222


24

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

December 2012

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Sexual Predators

Russell S. Rowe

DOB: 10/11/75

DOB: 3/31/56

Race: Caucasian

Race: Caucasian

DOB: 2/16/61 Race: Caucasian

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Height: 5’11”

Height: 5’ 5”

Height: 6’2” Weight: 228

Lawrence W. Kilbourn

DOB: 12/22/72 Race: Caucasian

Weight: 190

Sex: Male Height: 5’ 8”

Thomas Donald Larrow

Weight: 160

DOB: 12/5/77

DOB: 12/5/57

Race: Caucasian

Race: Caucasian

Scott Lovall

Weight: 230

Robert A. Madden

Daniel Stephen Perdue

Weight: 200

Steve A. Muncey

Height: 5’ 9” Weight: 140

DOB: 4/30/52

DOB: 2/24/69

Race: Caucasian

Race: Afr Amer

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Height: 5’ 7”

Height: 5’ 7”

Weight: 145

Weight: 205

Patrick A. Powell

Weight: 128

Sex: Male Height: 6’ 1”

Michael Allen Miller

Weight: 240

DOB: 12/21/45 Race: Caucasian Race: Caucasian Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Race: Caucasian

DOB: 8/24/45

Race: Caucasian

Race: Caucasian

Douglas Paul Monroe

Weight: 192

Grady Paul McLain

Weight: 140

DOB: 5/1/66

Height: 6’ 1”

DOB: 06/02/61

DOB: 2/7/41

Height: 6’ 2”

Height: 5’1”

Rontaveous K. Lewis

Sex: Male

Sex: Male Sex: Male Height: 5’ 8”

DOB: 2/18/83 Race: Afr Amer

Sex: Male Height: 5’ 6” Height: 6’

Charles Munsey Jr.

Weight: 190

Louis Palmieri Jr.

Weight: 160

DOB: 8/31/69

DOB: 11/27/59

Race: Caucasian

Race: Afr Amer

Sex: Male

Steven C. Ramos

www.BrevardSheriff.com

Height: 5’8” Weight: 155

Sex: Male

Amin A. Rasheed

Height: 6’ 1” Weight: 255


December 2012

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

Sexual Predators

Thomas J. Richards Jr.

William Keith Roberts

DOB: 4/22/79

DOB: 6/27/47

DOB: 3/15/47

DOB: 9/11/64

Race: Caucasian

Race: Caucasian

Race: Caucasian

Race: Caucasian

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Height: 5’ 8”

Height: 5’ 6”

Weight: 200

Sex: Female

Ronald Ray Rife

DOB: 9/6/78

DOB: 9/2/70

Race: Caucasian

Race: Caucasian

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Height: 5’ 8” Weight: 210

Robert N. Roma

Weight: 185

DOB:12/22/79

Race: Caucasian

Race: Caucasian

Height: 6’ Weight: 210

Michael Dale Thomas

Height: 5’11” Weight: 214

Height: 5’ 2” Weight: 125

DOB: 8/4/39

DOB: 1/14/57

Race: Caucasian

Race: Caucasian

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Height: 5’ 9”

Height: 5’ 7”

Clifford W. Sutton

Weight: 188

Vincent J. Taggart Jr.

Weight: 145

DOB: 12/20/52

DOB: 5/28/60

Race: Caucasian

Race: Caucasian

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Height: 5’ 11”

Mark Brian Ulrey

Weight: 200

Height: 5’ 11”

James Leo Vermilye

Weight: 185

DOB: 10/3/70

DOB: 5/11/45

Race: Caucasian

Race: Afr Amer

Race: Caucasian

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

DOB: 10/19/64

DOB: 5/9/72

Race: Caucasian Sex: Male

Weight: 191

Weight: 204

Karen Lee Roberts

Sex: Male

Sex: Male

Height: 5’ 5”

Paul M. Weinfurtner

Height: 5’8”

DOB: 9/6/75

Sex: Male

James Leonard Tew

Weight: 180

Height: 5’ 6”

Henry Eugene Rink

Height: 5’ 9”

Hal Forrest White

Weight: 230

Terrance S. Williams

Height: 6’ 1” Weight: 218

www.BrevardSheriff.com

Gerald C. Youells

Height: 5’ 7” Weight: 197

25


26

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

December 2012

Sex Offender Unit: Committed to child safety In response to the issues relating to sexual offenders, the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office unveiled an innovative approach of monitoring, registering and tracking sexual offenders, with the implementation of the Sexual Offender Registration and Tracking Unit (S.O.R.T.) in December 2005. This all-encompassing unit became responsible for the registration of all sex offenders in Brevard County, as well as verifying their addresses, monitoring their movements and enforcing the statutes of the state of Florida. With more than 600 offenders and predators in Brevard County at that time, this was a major undertaking. Additionally, this list was expanded to investigate sexual exploitation against children via the Internet. A multi-faceted approach was outlined for the S.O.R.T. Unit at its inception. In order to meet the public needs of notification, the unit searched for the most effective service available to facilitate a time-sensitive notification system. The BCSO then became the first Sheriff’s Office in the state of Florida to partner with Offender Watch Systems to develop a webbased notification program, along with a mail-out system, to reach as many citizens as possible. Today, Offender Watch has partnered with law enforcement agencies across the country, to include the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. This service is provided throughout the entire county, for every jurisdiction and generates a mailing using postcards to notify citizens in the immediate area affected by the movement of the offender. Since inception, hundreds of thousands of notifications have been directed to the citizens in Brevard County. The program also offers the public the ability to sign up for free electronic notifications of sex offenders in the community by visiting the BCSO website. This will link users to a searchable sex offender database and safety tips for community awareness. The service provides immediate email alerts to citizens when a known sex offender moves into an area of concern. Thousands of Brevard’s citizens have taken advantage of this service at no charge. Making sure sex offenders are where they say they are and are abiding by the rules of their release is a challenging, but important task. As a result, law enforcement agencies work in partnership with the Sheriff’s S.O.R.T. Unit

and probation and parole units to ensure offenders are in compliance. The S.O.R.T. Unit relies heavily upon prevention and awareness. The unit members provide community-based training, regarding child safety tips on using the Internet. The training encourages parents, teachers and guardians to be vigilant in their childcare efforts and teaches them how sex offenders access children using the Internet and other means. The Sheriff’s Office is also proud to be a part of a multi-jurisdictional task force, composed of members of the Sheriff’s Office and the U.S. Marshal that targets sex offenders, who are wanted on either sexual exploitation charges or those who have absconded from probation or registration conditions, originating from Brevard County. This partnership continues to provide successful results, as evidenced by the arrest of Harvey Wayne Taylor, who was to appear on an upcoming episode of America’s Most Wanted, due to the serious nature of his original conviction, coupled with the lengthy efforts by the Sheriff’s Office to locate and arrest him. Taylor, who had been wanted since 2004 for violation of probation, was an absconded sexual predator, who had been non-compliant with his court-ordered conditions. Taylor’s probation related to aggravated sexual child abuse, involving multiple counts of sexual battery on children younger than 12. Taylor, along with an adult son, was arrested at a residence in Newtonville, New Jersey, on March 9, 2012. A variety of operations have been conducted to keep sex offenders in check. One such operation, “Operation Safeguard,” has been conducted for the past four years, in which multiple law enforcement agencies throughout Brevard County have joined with Probation and Parole to check hundreds of sex offender residences on Halloween to ensure there were no unsupervised contacts with children. Because of the worldwide capability of the Internet, an immediate partnership was forged with the International Crimes Against Children Task Force (ICAC) and the Department of Homeland Security formerly known as (ICE). Locally, DHS and S.O.R.T. have also formed a Child Exploitation Task Force. These partnerships have continued to increase as the S.O.R.T. Unit now also partners with the F.B.I. as part of the Innocent Images Task Force.

The efforts of the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office have been credited by the U.S. Attorney’s Office as enabling the Middle District of Florida to prosecute the highest number of cases in the nation. During 2011, 114 offenders were charged, as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative of the Department of Justice designed to protect children from sexual exploitation and abuse. The ICE/BCSO Task Force significantly contributed to this effort in terms of the number and quality of cases presented for prosecution. This task force identified and rescued eight children, who were suffering from sexual abuse and exploitation. They investigated and arrested more than 60 defendants for the production/distribution and possession of child pornography and for sexually exploiting children online. Two of the defendants were registered sex offenders, and four cases involved the use of a facility in interstate commerce to arrange for sex with a child.

Awards and recognition

The Guardian Brevard, Protect Our Children Inc., selected Sheriff’s Agent Dan Ogden for the 2010 “Junny Award.” The annual award recognizes the Floridian who has done the most to advance the cause of child protection. Agent Dan Ogden was the recipient of the prestigious 2010 Child Abuse Prevention Law Enforcement Award, presented by the Child Abuse and Prevention Task Force of Brevard County and the Brevard Family Partnership. Agent Dan Ogden and Agent Michael Spadafora were the recipients of the U.S. Attorney’s Office Law Enforcement Officers of the Year in 2008 for their investigative efforts related to child pornography and exploitation. In 2011, the entire unit received the award again for its investigative and forensic efforts involving these cases. Lt. Tod Goodyear of the Sheriff’s Office received the 2012 Child Abuse Prevention Law Enforcement Award for his creation and development of an Internet Safety/Anti-Bullying program that has been presented to more than 10,000 students throughout Brevard County in both public and private schools. For additional information concerning the SORT Unit or Community Awareness Programs, contact SORT at www.BrevardSheriff.com or Lt. Tod Goodyear at (321) 633-8407.

www.BrevardSheriff.com

Central Florida CRIMELINE is a completely anonymous tip line for the community to provide information to law inforcement, CRIMELINE never asks for your name. There is no caller ID and calls are not traced or recorded. Tipsters or callers are given a unique number for their call. They are asked to call back with updated information, to check the statis of a tipor to determine if they are elligible for a reward. CRIMELINE offers a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to a felony arrest. A reward of up to $5,000 for information leading to an arrest in a homicide case. The bord of directors for CRIMELINE determines the reward amount for each case. Tipsters/callers are paid their cash reward via an anonymous system. No signiture or identification is required to collect the reward. Call CRIMELINE, 1800-423-tips (8477), with your information or submit your tip online through CRIMELINE’s website w w w.crimeline.com 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.


December 2012

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

Unsolved Homicides Unsolved Homicide of Mark Stewart During the early morning hours of May 19, 2006, Mark Anthony Stewart was shot and killed, while riding his bicycle home from a friend’s residence. He was found by a passing motorist lying by the roadway on Old Dixie Highway in Titusville. Mark Stewart Any persons providing information in reference to this case may be eligible for a reward up to $5,000.

Unsolved Homicide of Charlotte “Amy” Gellert On the evening of Sunday, March 20, 1994, Charlotte “Amy” Gellert was attacked by an intruder outside her residence in Cocoa Beach. She died as a result of her injuries. The intruder was Amy Gellert described as a white male, early 20s, 5’7” to 5’10” in height, weighing between 165 to 185 pounds. Any persons providing information in reference to this case may be eligible for a reward up to $5,000.

Unsolved Homicide of Michael Capponi On July 9, 1993, at approximately 11:55 p.m., the victim was located in the bathroom at the Starvin Marvin’s convenience store, located at 4455 W. King Street, Cocoa. Witnesses observed Michael at least two black

Capponi

males running from the scene after the shots were heard. The black male shown in the composite was seen leaving the bathroom in the company of another black male after the shooting occurred. He was Capponi described as 18 years of age at the time of homicide the incident, 6-feet suspect tall, 130-140 pounds, wearing a dark colored tank top and red knee-length shorts. The second male was shorter and heavy-set. Both were last seen on foot eastbound from the store. Any persons providing information in reference to this case may be eligible for a reward up to $5,000.

Unsolved Homicide of Thaddeus Houston On March 12, 1990, at approximately 8:24 a.m., gun shots were reported to have been heard coming from Bay 38, 1520 W. Peachtree Street, Cocoa. Upon investigation, the body of Thaddeus Houston Thaddeus was found lying on Houston the floor of his scrap metal business. Any persons providing information in reference to this case may be eligible for a reward up to $5,000.

Unsolved Homicide of Julie Ann Backstrom On Feb. 11, 1987, Julie Ann Backstrom was discovered lying in a canal located on the south side of the eastbound lanes of S.R. 528, approximately 1,000 yards east of Interstate-95. The victim’s vehicle, a 1982 Plymouth Champ, blue in color, was

found parked in a business parking lot in Mims on Feb. 13, 1987. Any persons providing information in reference to this case may be eligible for a reward up to $5,000.

Julie Backstrom Julie Backstrom’s vehicle

Unsolved Homicide of Brenda Riley Brenda Riley was reported missing on May 24, 1971. On May 27, 1971, a lawn maintenance worker discovered the body of Brenda Riley in an overgrown field several blocks from her residence off Catalina Isle Drive on Merritt Island. Brenda Riley Any persons providing information in reference to this case may be eligible for a reward up to $5,000.

Unsolved Homicide of John Clifton Jr, On Sept. 1, 2007, John Clifton Jr. was shot during a scuffle with unknown suspects outside of his mother’s home in Rockledge. Any persons providing information in reference to this case may be eligible for a reward up to $5,000.

www.BrevardSheriff.com

John Clifton Jr.

27


28

Brevard County HOMETOWN NEWS

BREVARD COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

December 2012

‘Shop with a Cop’ provides holiday hope for local children On behalf of the entire staff, the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office would like to give a very special thank you to all of the deputy sheriffs and employees, who volunteered their time to participate in the sixth annual “Shop with a Cop” Program. The Sheriff’s Office would also like to thank its sponsors, as the event would not be possible without their generosity. • Brevard County Police Athletic League • Merritt Island Walmart • Merritt Island Target • Bluepoints Marina at Port Canaveral • Hooters Merritt Island • Beyel Brothers Inc. • Premium Marine Inc. • Qablawi Auto Sales • Coastal Steel Inc. • Cocoa Hyundai • Defense Technologies Inc. • Defense Suppliers of Electronic Components • RSC Corporation • Diamondback Manufacturing LLC • Smooth Sailing of Brevard Inc. • O’Leary Enterprises Inc. • Inland Plywood Company • Cocoa Auto Dealers Exchange • Kel-Tec CNC Industries • Toppertown Inc. • Braden Kitchens Inc. • B&H Police Supply Inc. • Ken Sawczyn • Mark Thompson • Harry and Wendy Brandon • Ken Whittaker • Bruce & Raffy Nelson • Bjornar Hermansen (Ocean Partners) • Raj Rawal, B.D.S., P.A. • Craftmaster Auto Body (Klenck) • Joan Nassar • Brian Fisher, C.P.A • Steve Kreuzkamp • Nash & Kromash • Randy & Linda May • IGO Family Foundation (Myra Haley) • Deputy Agent Robert “Bob” Wagner • Deputy Randy Davis

“Shop with a Cop”

is an outreach program designed to assist at-risk children and children who are abused, abandoned or neglected. The holidays are especially difficult for these children. “Shop with a Cop” provides these children with a chance to

interact with deputy sheriffs and other Sheriff’s employees, who care about them and are able to experience a positive and lasting memory. With donations from Walmart, Target and many other businesses and individuals in the community, more than 100 Sheriff’s Office employees volun-

For more information about how to help with next year’s program, contact the Sheriff ’s Office Youth Programs Office at (321) 454-6643.

Brevard County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Casey Bratsch of Titusville and Michael Johnson, 6, of Cocoa arrive at the checkout line to purchases Michael’s gifts he selected.

Port Canaveral Police Cpl. Clifford Torres and Brevard County Sgt. Stephen Fernez try on some superhero masks with Dakota Allen, 4, of Cocoa.

Brevard County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Tabbitha Gamble of Titusville heads to the check-out line with Christopher Kuhns, 5, of Cocoa and a cart full of gifts.

teered at the event, allowing the Office to serve 100 children from throughout community.

Kaden Hampton, 7, of Titusville and Brevard County Sheriff’s Office Sgt. Byron Keck of Melbourne try to decide which gifts to buy. Photos by Andy Stefanek Hometown News staff photographer

www.BrevardSheriff.com

Dereon Walker, 8, of Cocoa tries out a new bike with the help of Brevard County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Robert Brown of Palm Bay.


Brevard County Sheriff's Office - Crime Watch - December 2012