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North BREVARD HOMETOWN NEWS

HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

Friday, May 28, 2010

Letter from the American Red Cross Mid-Florida

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s we have seen around the world, and in our own backyards, the potential for a devastating disaster lingers at every turn. What if such an emergency affected your home or business? How would you handle a crisis? Preparedness and prevention is the key to answering these questions and it should be at the forefront of all of our minds as we enter another hurricane season. And this year, the American Red Cross wants you to be calm before the storm. Being prepared is what this special edition of Hometown News is all about. With the information you find here, you can learn what steps to take before a storm approaches to ensure you, your family, and your business are ready for hurricane season and any other disaster. As you flip through these pages, pay attention to the valuable insights of our Red Cross volunteers, our disaster and shelter plans, and the detailed description of the supplies you’ll need. It is the goal of the American Red Cross Mid-Florida Region, as a leader in response and preparedness with more than 90 years in Central Florida, to

provide services in the wake of a disaster. But the Red Cross offers so much more. We are also here to provide health and safety training and communications for our servicemen and women every Joel Hass single day of the year. The work of the Red Cross is carried out by the more than 1,500 volunteers within the MidFlorida Region who work together to serve not just Brevard County but Citrus, Flagler, Hernando, Highlands, Lake, Marion, Orange, Osceola, Polk, Seminole, Sumter, and Volusia. It’s a network of neighbors helping neighbors whether it’s down the street, across the country or around the world. The American Red Cross works to change lives in our communities – and this wouldn’t be possible without you. Disaster victims are able to sleep in a safe environment and feed themselves, and

their children, because of your valuable donations. Members of our armed forces and their families are able to reach each other while experiencing a loss or celebrating a birth because of you. And a good Samaritan is able to give life-saving CPR to someone who suddenly experiences cardiac arrest or other emergency because of the community’s support. It still comes as a surprise to many people but the American Red Cross receives no federal, state or local tax dollars. That’s why it’s critically important for each of you reading this publication to ask yourself, “How can I help the Red Cross, my neighbors and my community?” The answer is simple. You can become a volunteer. How you help is your choice. You can donate your time or your money. No gift is too small. Even one dollar from each member of your family helps. Imagine if everyone in this community gave that? You can also help yourself by better preparing for hurricane season or any emergency. Just follow some simple steps: Get a Kit. The American Red Cross

recommends everyone stock up with an emergency-preparedness kit that contains at least three days worth of essential items. It should include water (one gallon per person, per day), nonperishable food, a flashlight, a battery or crank powered radio, extra batteries, a manual can opener, cash and important medications. Store items in a sturdy, sealable, easy-to-carry container. Make a plan. The American Red Cross recommends creating and practicing an evacuation and communications plan. Each person in your household should know how to reach other members and where to meet if you can’t go home. As part of your communications plan, choose an out-of-area relative or friend as an emergency contact and make sure all your household members know how to contact this person. Choose two meeting places: one right outside your home in case you need to escape in a hurry, and one outside your neighborhood in case you can’t return home. Be informed. Being informed means See LETTER, 3


HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

Friday, May 28, 2010

Letter From page 2

finding out what types of disasters are likely to occur where you live, work and play, and how you would receive information from local officials in the event of a disaster. Part of being informed is learning first aid, CPR and how to use an AED, so you have the skills to respond to an emer-

gency when help is delayed. To learn more about CPR/AED and first-aid, contact your local Red Cross Chapter. You can also register for a class at www.midfloridaredcross.org Sincerely, Joel W. Hass Chief Executive Officer American Red Cross Mid-Florida Region

HometownNewsOL.com Published weekly by Hometown News, L.C., 380 N. Wickham Road, Melbourne, FL 32935 Copyright © 2010, Hometown News , L.C.

Phone (321) 242-1013 • Fax (321) 242-1281 Classified (800) 823-0466 • Rants & Raves (866) 242-1276 Circulation Inquiries: 1-866-913-6397 or circulation@hometownnewsol.com Steven E. Erlanger Publisher and C.O.O.

Vernon D. Smith Managing Partner

Voted Number 1 Community Newspaper in America by the Association of Free Community Papers.

Tammy Raits Managing Editor

North BREVARD HOMETOWN NEWS

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North BREVARD HOMETOWN NEWS

HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

Friday, May 28, 2010

EVACUATION ROUTES

IF YOU HAVE TO LEAVE If you live near the coast or in a manufactured home or recreational vehicle, you will almost certainly be ordered to evacuate when a storm threatens. Listen to local news reports and have your emergency supplies and important papers packed and ready to go. When the time comes, make sure your home is locked and shuttered, and leave!


Friday, May 28, 2010

Checklist of supplies you’ll need For Hometown News Brevnews@hometownnewsol.com

Here are supplies and tips to help you endure hurricanes and other tropical storms: • Plywood boards and fasteners or hurricane shutters • Water: A gallon per person per day, with a three-day minimum supply; freeze ahead of time • A two-week supply of nonperishable food; a manual can opener • Beverages • Paper plates and cups, plastic utensils • Emergency cooking equipment • Ice chest filled with ice • Two-week supply of prescription medications

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HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

• Toiletries • Emergency cash • AM/FM weather radio • Battery-operated radio or television • Pillows, bedding, blankets • Batteries • Matches • Cell phone • Flashlights and battery-operated lanterns • Fire extinguisher • First-aid kit • Hammer (in case you need to break through debris) • Paper towels, toilet tissue, facial tissue, baby wipes, sanitary napkins • Bug spray • Resealable plastic bags • Plastic sheeting • Rope, tarpaulins, tape • Bleach or water purification

tablets • Raincoats, rain hats, umbrellas • Games, cards, puzzles, books, magazines • Baby supplies, including formula, bottles and diapers •Pet food and supplies, such as litter and pads • Written instructions on how to turn off electricity, gas and water if authorities advise you to do so • Place important papers in a watertight container • Fill bathtub and containers with water for sanitary use • Fill your vehicle’s gas tank For more information on hurricane preparation, contact the Space Coast Red Cross at (321) 8901002, e-mail information@midfloridaredcross.org or visit www.midfloridaredcross.org

HOMETOWN NEWS

IMPORTANT NUMBERS • Space Coast Chapter of the American Red Cross: (321) 890-1002 • Brevard County Emergency Management: (321) 637-6670 • National Weather Service Melbourne: (321) 255-0212 • Brevard County Animal Services and Enforcement: (321) 633-2024 . For emergencies after hours, (321) 633-9880 Non-emergency numbers • For all emergencies dial 911 Brevard County Sheriff’s Office non-emergency numbers: • South: (321) 952-6371 • South: (772) 663-6269 • North: (321) 264-5100 • Central: (321) 633-7162 • North Precinct,Titusville: (321) 264-5208 • West Precinct,Viera: (321) 633-2123 • East Precinct, Merritt Island: (321) See NUMBERS, 9

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North BREVARD HOMETOWN NEWS

HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

Friday, May 28, 2010


Friday, May 28, 2010

HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

Hurricane names for 2010 Alex Bonnie Colin Danielle Earl Fiona Gaston

Hermine Igor Julia Karl Lisa Matthew Nicole

Otto Paula Richard Shary Tomas Virginie Walter

— National Hurricane Center

North BREVARD HOMETOWN NEWS

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North BREVARD HOMETOWN NEWS

HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

Friday, May 28, 2010


Friday, May 28, 2010

Numbers From page 5

454-6652 • Canaveral Precinct: (321) 868-1113 • South Precinct, Melbourne: (321) 253-6658 Non- emergency numbers: • Palm Bay Police Department: (321) 952-3456 • Melbourne Police Department: (321) 409-2200 • West Melbourne Police Department: (321) 723-9673 • Melbourne Beach Police Department: (321) 723-4343 • Indialantic Police Department: (321) 723-7788 • Indian Harbour Beach Police Department: (321) 773-3030

HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010 • Satellite Beach Police Department: (321) 773-4400 • Cocoa Beach Police/Fire Department: (321) 868-3251 • Titusville Police Department: (321) 264-7800 • Brevard County Fire Rescue: (321) 637-5550 • Cape Canaveral Fire Department: (321) 783-4777 • Palm Bay Fire Rescue: (321) 409-6300 • Malabar Fire Department: (321) 725-1030 • Melbourne Fire Department: • Indialantic Fire Department: (321) 723-0366 • Indian Harbour Beach Fire/Police Department: (321) 773-3030 • Satellite Beach Fire Department: (321) 773-4405 • Cocoa Beach Fire/Police Department: (321) 868-3251

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HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

Primary evacuation shelters For Hometown News Brevnews@hometownnewsol.com

What do you have to do if you need to evacuate from an impending storm? Locate the evacuation route for your area and plan your evacuation destination. You are urged to shelter with family or friends, or at a hotel out of the evacuation area. Check your disaster supplies kit. Have a full tank of gas in your car. If you are ordered to evacuate, move valuables to higher points in your home; turn off gas, electricity and water. Bring in loose objects and furniture. Tie down storage sheds, boats and trailers and secure your doors and windows. Leave early, in daylight if possible, and proceed to your planned destination. Take valuables such as insurance policies, official records and your personal property inventory. Be sure to take cash with you, as ATMs, banks and stores may not cash checks or honor credit cards. Remember, you will not be asked to leave your home unless you are seriously threatened. When you are ordered to evacuate, go immediately. Monitor television and radio news broadcasts for information updates. Purchase an NOAA weather alert radio to listen for immediate severe weather information year-round. Please note: Not all shelters may be open during a storm. Please call the Brevard County Office of Emergency Management at (321) 637-6670 or (321) 637-6674 to see if the shelter nearest you is open before arriving.

Below is a list of primary evacuation shelters in Brevard County: • Mims Elementary School: 2582 U.S. 1, Mims • Apollo Elementary School: 3085 Knox McRae Drive, Titusville • Imperial Estates Elementary: 5525 Kathy Drive, Titusville • Walter Butler Community Center: 4201 U.S. 1, Cocoa • Brevard Community College: Cocoa campus, Building 3, 1519 Clearlake Road, Cocoa • Manatee Elementary School: 3425 Viera Blvd., Viera • Sherwood Elementary School: 2541 Post Road, Melbourne • Eau Gallie High School: 1400 Commodore Blvd., Melbourne • Melbourne High School: 74 Bulldog Blvd., Melbourne • Meadowlane Intermediate Elementary School: 2700 Wingate Blvd., West Melbourne • Heritage High School: 2351 Malabar Road, Palm Bay • Bayside High School: 1901 DeGroodt Road S.W., Palm Bay • Barefoot Bay Community Center: Building A, Barefoot Boulevard (Not a shelter; meet at community center for transportation to a shelter) • South Mainland Community Center: 3700 Allen Ave., Micco Source: Brevard County Office of Emergency Management

Friday, May 28, 2010

What to bring For Hometown News Brevnews@hometownnewsol.com

Brevard County strongly urges that a public shelter be used only as a last resort. You will be more comfortable sheltering with family, friends or in commercial lodging. If you require public sheltering, please be familiar with your designated primary evacuation shelter location and your planned route to that shelter. Shelter route signs have been posted to assist you. Below is a list of necessities to bring with you if you must stay at an emergency public shelter: • Be sure to take enough food and supplies to last several days, including special diet foods, as food may not be readily available at the shelter. • Bring bottled water (2 quarts per person per day) and other beverages, such as juices and soft drinks. See ITEMS, 11


Friday, May 28, 2010

Ships in Port may be danger in a hurricane By Jenet Krol Krol@hometownnewsol.com Just as homeowners must prepare for a hurricane to protect themselves and their neighbors, tenants of Port Canaveral must do the same to protect the port. When the severe weather of a hurricane threatens, the safest place for large ships is out at sea. Those left in Port could potentially cause damage to themselves and port infrastructure. Currently, four un-manned Sun Cruz Casino ships occupy dock space in Port Canaveral, after their parent company filed bankruptcy in December 2009. While the ships are in auction, there is no one to move them. The United States Coast Guard sets the guidelines for when ships need to be moved out of port. Seventy-two hours before the onset of gale force winds, all ships are required to prepare to get underway within 24 hours. “Dead” ship or vessels unable to put to sea must make written application to the Captain of the Port to remain in Port. According to the United States Coast Guard’s 2009 Severe Weather Season

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HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

guide, “there are no safe havens in the Port of Canaveral area, including the Barge Canal, and the Port is safest when the inventory of vessels is at a minimum. For planning purposes, all vessels and barges less than 500 gross tons are required to put to sea if Hurricane Condition Yankee (a hurricane is forecasted to hit within 72 hours) is set.” Andy Stefanek/staff photographer Rosalind PostellHarvey, director of The SunCruz Casino boat waits at the dock in Port communications for Canaveral behind a locked fence. Dec. 13 was the last Port Canaveral, said date that the ship sailed with customers. though the decision for when ships must “The consequence for noncompliance, leave port is up to the Coast Guard, the putting the rest of the Port at risk, could Port has similar jurisdiction over the be severe,” she said. leaseholders providing berths for the Ships in noncompliance could also ships. could also face fines from the Coast Guard, she added.

HOMETOWN NEWS

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Items From page 10

• Bring a manual can opener, eating utensils, paper plates, cups and napkins or paper towels. • Infant formula, food and diapers. • Have a two-week supply of medications and a first-aid kit. • Cash or traveler’s checks. • Sleeping bags, blankets, pillows, folding chairs. Bedding is not provided in public shelters. • Personal hygiene items and changes of clothing. • Flashlight, battery-powered radio or television and spare batteries, cards, games, books and toys. • DO NOT take pets (except guide dogs), alcoholic beverages or weapons of any kind to public shelters. Source: Brevard County Office of Emergency Management


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HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

Friday, May 28, 2010

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