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INDIAN RIVER County HOMETOWN NEWS

HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

Friday, May 28, 2010


Friday, May 28, 2010

HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

INDIAN RIVER County HOMETOWN NEWS

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Message from the director of the Red Cross North Treasure Coast Chapter

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ave a life. Make a difference. Empower someone to change the lives of their friends and neighbors by giving them valuable CPR, first-aid and water safety skills. Help our youth become tomorrow’s leaders. Each of these life-changing experiences is possible through the American Red Cross. Being prepared and making a difference is what this special tabloid produced by Hometown News is all about. Through the expert articles and information in this publication, we have the ability to change a life and issue a call to action to accomplish all of the items above. Many of the articles about volunteers and our response to any natural disasters will give you valuable

insight into the work of American Red Cross. We are here to provide disaster services, health and safety training, and communiSarah Ruwe cations with our servicemen executive director and women American Red Cross throughout the years, 365 days, and 24-hours-a-day. We would not be able to do our job without your valuable donation of time and dollars. Frankly, many people are unaware that the American Red Cross receives

no federal, state or local tax dollars. That is why it is critically important that each of you reading this publication ask yourself, what have I done to help the Red Cross help my community, my friends and my neighbors? Helping the Red Cross can be as simple as becoming a volunteer or as valuable as becoming a donor. How you help is your preference. We only ask that in these very trying economic times that you help in some way. The American public has been very generous in donating to Haiti relief and we have honored the intent that every dollar raised has been or will be used to help the Haitian community get back their life. Please remember that while you have already assisted the American Red Cross, this chapter fully depends

upon your donations to our local chapter. This allows us to provide assistance to our community, provide preparedness presentations to the community and train our volunteers to respond community disasters. We also urge you to help yourself and your family be better prepared for hurricane season or any emergency by following some very simple steps to be Red Cross ready: • Make a kit. Purchase or make an emergency-preparedness kit, with at least three days’ worth of essential items needed by each household member. Essential items include water (1 gallon per person, per day), nonperishable food, a flashlight, a battery- or crank-operated radio, See MESSAGE, 19


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INDIAN RIVER County HOMETOWN NEWS

HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

Friday, May 28, 2010

The American Red Cross says be prepared Important hurricane season words to know For Hometown News News@hometownnewsol.com With hurricane season 2010 upon us, the broadcasting airwaves and neighborhood talk might be filled with hurricane terms you should know to make the best plans and decisions for you and your family. Your American Red Cross stresses preparation is key to surviving and recovering from a tropical storm or hurricane. A tropical storm is an organized cyclone with low pressures and strong thunderstorms. Wind speeds are between 39-73 miles per hour. When winds increase past 74 mph, the tropical storm turns into a hurricane. A hurricane watch means a hurricane may pose a threat to your area. During a hurricane watch make any last-minute preparations, such as filling gas tanks, obtaining cash and making sure your storm shutters are secure. If a hurricane watch turns into a hurricane warning, a hurricane is expected to impact your area. Do not venture onto roads when winds become strong. Remember, cars cannot be operated safely in high winds and water. Also, debris, fallen trees and live electric lines

may block roadways. Hurricanes are categorized by their wind speed on a scale of 1 to 5. The scale gives an estimate of how much damage and flooding can be expected after the hurricane makes landfall. A Category 1 hurricane is a minimal hurricane with winds between 74-95 mph. No real damage is expected to structurally safe buildings. However, there may be damage to mobile homes and shrubbery. A hurricane with winds between 96110 mph is a Category 2 hurricane. There can be some damage to roofing material, doors and windows. There can be considerable damage to shrubbery and trees might be blown down. Mobile homes can also suffer considerable damage, as well as signs and piers. Category 3 hurricanes are extensive hurricanes with winds between 111-130 mph. There is expected damage to residential buildings. Foliage can blow off shrubbery and trees, and trees may even be blown down. Mobile homes are expected to be destroyed. A Category 4 hurricane has winds between 131-155 mph. This is an extreme hurricane where there can be roof structure failures on residences and serious damage to doors and windows. Shrubs, trees and signs are blown down. Mobile See PREPARED, 15

HometownNewsOL.com Published weekly by Hometown News, L.C., 1102 South U.S. 1, Fort Pierce, FL 34950 Copyright © 2010, Hometown News , L.C.

Phone (772) 465-5656 • Fax (772) 465-5301 Classified (800) 823-0466 • Rants & Raves (866) 465-5504 Circulation Inquiries: 1-866-913-6397 or circulation@hometownnewsol.com Steven E. Erlanger Publisher and C.O.O.

Vernon D. Smith Managing Partner

Voted Number 1 Community Newspaper in America by the Association of Free Community Papers.

Tammy Raits Managing Editor


Friday, May 28, 2010

HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

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First pet, human emergency shelter in county By Jessica Tuggle jtuggle@hometownnewsol.com

INDIAN RIVER COUNTY — Hunkering down with your pet during hurricaneforce winds and rain can be done a little closer to home now. Liberty Magnet School was recently named the first pet-friendly hurricane and emergency shelter in Indian River County. The designation came as a result of a See SHELTER, 6

File photo

Samantha Blume, 14, of Vero Beach, sits and works with Travis during her Care Cadet training at the Humane Society of Vero Beach and Indian River County last June. Pet owners will be relieved to hear Liberty Magnet School is now an Indian River County pet-friendly hurricane shelter.


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INDIAN RIVER County

HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

HOMETOWN NEWS

Friday, May 28, 2010

Drivers meet needs during critical hours By Jessica Tuggle jtuggle@hometownnewsol.com

TREASURE COAST — When disaster strikes, he’s one of the most eagerly anticipated Red Cross volunteers to arrive on scene. No, he’s not Superman or Batman, but he does come bringing much needed food in his red and white truck called an ERV. Ken Chapin of Vero Beach is one of the many disaster response volunteers with the American Red Cross, whose job it is to provide disaster survivors with food, water and cleaning supplies by driving into the affected areas in an emergency response vehicle, or ERV for short. “ERV drivers are the face of the Red Cross for a lot of people, a lot of times we’re the most visual part of the Red Cross,” said Mr. Chapin. “I really like that about being a driver because I’m in direct contact with the people that need me the most,” he said. This past year, Mr. Chapin and other Red Cross volunteers responded to cries for help in flooded areas of Georgia and in

Shelter From page 5

collaborative effort from the local Humane Society, the American Red Cross North Treasure Coast Chapter, Indian River Animal Control, Indian River County Emergency Management and the School District of Indian River County, said Ilka Daniel, director of outreach services for the Humane Society. “There are over 60,000 companion animals in Indian River County,” Ms. Daniel said. The amount of space available to care for companion animals during a disaster such as a hurricane however, is drastically smaller, she said. “Counting veterinarians, there are from 1,000 to 2,000 places available. The onus is on the owners to do their prior planning,” Ms. Daniel said.

Florida from Haitian refugees. As Haitian-Americans poured into the airports in Fort Pierce and Sanford, Red Cross teams greeted them and passed out “comfort kits” full of hygiene supplies. Many of the refugees who flew into Sanford were on their way to another location, so they responded with great gratitude for the small gift of deodorant, toothpaste and other items to help them freshen up after a stressful experience, Mr. Chapin said. So far, Florida teams have not been called up to help with disaster relief in Nashville, Tenn., and surrounding areas, but they are standing by. “We’ve let our chapter know that we are ready to go if needed,” Mr. Chapin said. The ERVs are usually mobile feeding units that go into a central location in an affected neighborhood until enough power is restored and people can figure out other ways to feed themselves. “People are really happy that we are there because most of the

Photo courtesy of the American Red Cross

See CRITICAL, 8

A volunteer from the disaster relief team delivers supplies to a resident in need.

The safest place for a pet to be during an emergency is with family, so planning ahead for a hurricane evacuation with a pet is essential. “What we saw with (Hurricane) Katrina, with the people and their animals being separated, it was heart wrenching. If you plan ahead, you can take your pet with you,” Ms. Daniel said. The new shelter can house about 180 people and about 150 pets. It is designed for people who do not have a place to be with family or friends. Qualifying applicants staying in the shelter would be families from a mandatory evacuation area, such as barrier islands, manufactured homes and flood zones. Space is limited at the shelter, so preregistration is necessary, Ms. Daniel said. Applications are available on the Humane Society website. “We are just so happy to have this resource,” Ms. Daniel said.

“What we saw with (Hurricane) Katrina with the people and thier animals being separated, it was heart wrenching.” Ilka Daniel Director, outreach services Indian River County Humane Society Also this summer, the Humane Society will offer disaster animal response training for anyone from an animal care professional to a concerned animal lover. The training will be held June 11-13 onsite at the Humane Society. Topics include animal care and handling, animal rescue and transport, team animal disaster response, field safety, community animal needs, damage assessment, setting up emergency shelters and coordinating with governmental agencies.

The course shows students how to assist animals not only in hurricanes, but endangered by other events such as tornados, floods, fires, earthquakes and hazardous material spills. The three days of classes are a mixture of classroom and hands-on instruction of emergency animal relief. An $80 registration fee includes lunch. Prior registration is required as space is limited. For more information, call (772) 3883331, or visit http://hsvb.org.


Friday, May 28, 2010

HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

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INDIAN RIVER County HOMETOWN NEWS

Critical From page 6

time, there is no power and they cannot cook for themselves,” said Mr. Chapin. “(Lack of ) power really causes a lot of the problems because every economic level is affected by it. Disasters like hurricanes or floods just don’t strike at trailer parks, they’re pretty indiscriminate with who they affect,” he said. In most cases, the Red Cross volunteers distribute food prepared by the Southern Baptist disaster relief teams in their mobile kitchens. “We work together with them to do huge bulk feeding,” said Mr. Chapin. The food is then packed into the ERV in cambros, sealed and insulated containers, to hold the temperature of the food. In his most recent trip to Georgia in response to flooding, Mr. Chapin said snacks and water were what the people needed the most.

HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010 In addition to food, ERV drivers pack their vehicles with clean-up kits that include an unassembled broom, mop, scrub brushes, soap, dust masks and more. “Pretty much we pack the kits to have all the essentials to start cleaning up your house after it’s been damaged,” said Mr. Chapin. Though they often are in the middle of sad and difficult situations, Mr. Chapin looks for opportunities to be light-hearted and bring a smile to the faces of the people he helps. Stuffed animals helped bring smiles to Haitian children awaiting adoption into their new American families, Mr. Chapin said. “That was a lot of fun,” he said. He also tries to lighten the mood by cracking jokes with his driving partner, Butch Clinton. “We have to have a sense of humor when we do this and we’re just trying to make a bad situation as good as we can with our attitude,” he said.

Friday, May 28, 2010

Red Cross urges caution when using a generator For Hometown News News@hometownnewsol.com During and after Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne in 2004 and Wilma in 2005, the hum of generators created a cacophony but kept lights burning and air conditioners, fans and refrigerators running. While the generators provided muchneeded relief to so many, carbon monoxide, a by-product of generator operation, killed several people statewide and sent dozens to area hospitals. Since that time, thousands of generators were sold, placing more people in danger of CO poisoning now more than ever before. When combustion engines, such as generators, boats, lawnmowers or automobiles are run in enclosed or even partially enclosed areas without sufficient ventilation, the potential for CO poisoning increases exponentially. Care also must be taken with charcoal grilles, as charcoal gives off high quantities of CO when lit.

Places where generators and grills may be used, such as garages, porches or even outside, may present potential hazards if they are upwind of open windows. In these situations, CO gas can invade homes or buildings and affect the occupants. Carbon monoxide is a silent, odorless killer. With more people using generators to be better prepared for hurricane season, everyone needs to be aware of the dangers and proper procedures they should follow to keep their lives and those of their loved ones safe. Many people with CO poisoning mistake their symptoms for the flu or are misdiagnosed, which sometimes results in tragic deaths. Because CO replaces oxygen in the blood, it can make people feel sleepy. Or, if they are sleeping, it can prevent them from waking up. Symptoms of CO poisoning include: headache, nausea, fatigue, flu-like symptoms, impaired vision and coordiSee GENERATOR, 9


Friday, May 28, 2010

HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

Hurricane shelters in Indian River County The following are a list of hurricane shelters in Indian River County: • Fellsmere Elementary School, 50 N. Cypress St. Fellsmere. • Sebastian Elementary School, 400 County Road 512, Sebastian. • Sebastian River Middle School, 9400 County Road 512, Sebastian. • Glendale Elementary School, 4940 Eighth St., Vero Beach. • Oslo Middle School, 480 20th Ave. Southwest, Vero Beach. • Vero Beach High School Freshman Learning Center, 1507 19th St., Vero Beach. • Gifford Middle School, 4535 28th Court, Gifford • Highlands Elementary School, 500 20th St. Southwest, Vero Beach • Pelican Island Elementary School, 1355 Schumann Drive, Sebastian • Vero Beach High School, 1707 16th St., Vero Beach • Sebastian River High School, 9001 90th Avenue, Sebastian • Thompson Lifelong Learning Center, 1110 18th Street, Southwest, Vero Beach • Liberty Magnet School, 6850 81st Street, Vero Beach, pet-friendly shelter • Treasure Coast Elementary School 8955 85th St., Sebastian, special needs. Registration is required for the special needs shelters. Special needs forms are available from the Department of Emergency Services at (772) 567-2154.

INDIAN RIVER County HOMETOWN NEWS

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County emergency contact numbers In Indian River County, here are the emergency numbers you need to have on hand in case of a disaster: • Emergency Operations Center (772) 567-2154 • North Treasure Coast Chapter of the Red Cross, Vero Beach office, (772) 562-2549 • Sheriff (772) 569-6700 • Building Department (772) 567-8000 • Animal Control (772) 226-3485 • Coast Guard (772) 464-6100 • Police/Fire 911

Generator From page 8

nation, confusion and a pink tone to the skin. Did you know that most people, in the early stages of CO poisoning, are incapable of rescuing themselves or even recognizing the problem due to the confusion it causes? Ultimately, brain damage or death may occur. Don’t be a statistic. Simple precautions

could save your family from illness or death. Only use generators and grills in wellventilated locations. Do not operate your car in a garage to charge the battery or even the batteries of cell phones. Keep your family and friends safe. For more information, the American Red Cross has fact sheets available on carbon monoxide poisoning prevention and using a generator when disaster strikes. Contact your local American Red Cross to obtain free copies.


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HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

Friday, May 28, 2010


Friday, May 28, 2010

HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

Hurricane names for 2010 Alex Bonnie Colin Danielle Earl Fiona Gaston

Hermine Igor Julia Karl Lisa Matthew Nicole

Otto Paula Richard Shary Tomas Virginie Walter

— National Hurricane Center

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HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

Friday, May 28, 2010


Friday, May 28, 2010

IF YOU HAVE TO LEAVE If you live near the coast or in a manufactured home or recreational vehicle, you will almost certainly be ordered to evacuate when a storm threatens. Listen to local news reports and have your emergency supplies and important papers packed and ready to go. When the time comes, make sure your home is locked and shuttered, and leave!

HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

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RIVER County 14 INDIAN HOMETOWN NEWS

Disaster team training in June

HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

Friday, May 28, 2010

Getting prepared to help

For Hometown News News@hometownnewsol.com INDIAN RIVER COUNTY — The Humane Society of Vero Beach and Indian River County will host a disaster animal response team workshop at its Adoption and Education Center June 11-13. Taught by the Humane Society, DART training covers helping pets, farm animals and wildlife during a disaster. Individuals with limited animal handling experience, as well as animal welfare professionals, may attend. “This introductory course is meant for anyone who wants to help aniSee TRAINING, 15

File photo

The American Red Cross volunteers play a vital role in helping the community during a natural disaster.


Friday, May 28, 2010

Training From page 14

mals. Attendees will receive the basic knowledge they’ll need to assist with animal disaster response,” said Janet Winikoff, HSVB and Indian River County director of education. The workshop provides both classroom and hands-on instruction. Topics include: animal care and handling, animal rescue and transport, team animal disaster response, field safety, community animal needs, damage assessment, setting up emergency shelters and coordinating with governmental agencies. Although Indian River County residents are most familiar with hurricanes, the course shows students how they can

INDIAN RIVER County

HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010 assist animals endangered by other events such as tornados, floods, fires, earthquakes and hazardous material spills. The training comes just as the county announced the opening of its first petfriendly shelter this year, which may need the help of volunteers with either handson animal experience or other skills. “There are many roles responders can play that don’t necessarily require intensive animal handling,” said Ilka Daniel, HSVB and IRC director of animal protection services. The cost for the DART workshop is $80 and includes instruction, materials and lunch. Students who complete the class will receive a certificate of DART training completion. For more information, call (772) 3883331, Ext. 18.

HOMETOWN NEWS

Donation mail-in form I am making a gift of $____________

Fill in your name and address to ensure correct preparation of your receipt for tax puposes. Name _____________________________________________________ Employer __________________________________________________ Address ___________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________________ State _____________________________________________________

Prepared From page 4

homes may be completely destroyed. A catastrophic hurricane is a Category 5 hurricane, which has winds greater than 155 mph. There is complete roof failure on many residences and industrial buildings and severe damage to win-

dows and doors. Some buildings can even be blown over or away. Shrubs, trees and signs blow down. Your local chapter of the American Red Cross will issue specific information, precautions and actions to take for tropical storms and hurricanes. For more information, contact your local American Red Cross chapter or visit www.redcross.org.

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ZIP or postal code _____________ Country _____________________ E-mail address _____________________________________________ Telephone number __________________________________________

Please make checks payable to: American Red Cross, 2506 17th Ave., Vero Beach, FL 32960 Thank you!


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HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

Suggested supply list to prepare for storm Here’s what you’ll need to weather a hurricane: • Plywood boards and fasteners, or hurricane shutters • Water: A gallon per person, per day, with a three-day minimum supply; freeze ahead of time • Nonperishable foods and a manual can opener, enough for a two-week supply • Beverages • Paper plates, paper cups, plastic utensils • Emergency cooking equipment • Ice chest filled with ice • Two weeks supply of all prescription medications • Toiletries • Emergency cash supply • AM/FM weather radio • Battery-operated radio or tel-

evision • Pillows and blankets • Batteries • Matches • Cell phones/car chargers • Flashlights and battery-operated lanterns • Fire extinguisher • First-aid kit • Hammer (in case you need to break through debris) • Paper towels, toilet tissue, facial tissue, baby wipes, sanitary napkins • Bug spray • Resealable plastic bags • Plastic sheeting • Rope, tarpaulins and tape • Bleach or water purification tablets • Raincoats, rain hats, umbrellas • Games, cards, puzzles, books, See SUPPLIES, 19

Friday, May 28, 2010

Red Cross arms residents with information for hurricane season For Hometown News News@hometownnewsol.com INDIAN RIVER COUNTY — One of the goals of the American Red Cross is to educate the public on how to prepare for any disaster; for the area chapter, this means focusing on preparation for hurricane season. Hurricane season starts June 1 and ends Nov. 30, but staff and volunteers of the North Treasure Coast chapter of the American Red Cross work on educating residents all year long. “Community disaster education is necessary to assist with helping people in times of disaster,” said Sharon Rayner, director of emergency services for the area chapter. “Each one of us is responsible and needs to be responsible for ourselves in

times of disaster, especially in tough economic times when there are not enough volunteers or funds to take care of everyone at a moment’s notice. I can’t stress that enough.” One way the Red Cross informs the public is through volunteers that serve as community disaster educators. These volunteers, who serve the North Treasure Coast chapter, make presentations at mobile home parks, senior facilities and anywhere in St. Lucie and Indian River counties in response to requests. They also represent the organization at any community event where it makes sense for the chapter to participate, said Ms. Rayner. While people can come to the Vero See INFORMATION, 17


Friday, May 28, 2010

Information From page 16

Beach office of the Northern Treasure Coast chapter and pick up free brochures or call and request them, Ms. Rayner listed a few pointers that everyone should know about preparing for hurricane season: • Have at least 1 gallon of water per person a day for a length of five days, stock up on food and if they can afford to do so, purchase a portable generator. • If you leave your house, secure it and take certain items, such as medications and any important papers. They should also contact relatives or friends and let them know where they are going. “Basically, our education programs and brochures teach people to create their own evacuation plan,” she said. Also, tips and information pertaining to hurricane preparation can be used to prepare for any disaster. However, despite their best efforts, some residents still do not heed the organization’s advice.

HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010 “One of the things that tells us people aren’t prepared is, before the winds die down, they’re calling us to bring them food and water,” said Ms. Rayner, adding that people should always have enough food and water to sustain themselves for three to five days. One reason people may not be prepared for or shrug off hurricane season is because they have become complacent, which is a concern for both the Red Cross and emergency management, said Ms. Rayner. “When there aren’t storms, people forget what it was like to live through them,” she said. The American Red Cross makes referrals to those who have been impacted and are seeking assistance after disasters, but people can check any of the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s sites before and during hurricanes as well as the county’s emergency site, http://indianriver.fl.us/government/ems/disaster.ht ml, in addition to the Red Cross site, she said. For more information, visit www.ntcredcross.org, or call (772) 563-4764 (the chapter’s Vero Beach office).

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Help on the way

Photo courtesy of the American Red Cross

American Red Cross Disaster Relief trucks line up to deliver supplies to those in need.


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HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

Friday, May 28, 2010


HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

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Keeping hydrated The American Red Cross delivered large supplies of water to residents after the hurricanes in 2004.

Photo courtesy of the American Red Cross

Supplies From page 16

magazines • Important papers kept in a watertight container • Baby supplies, including formula, bottles and diapers

Message From page 3

extra batteries, a manual can opener, cash and important medications. Make sure to store items in sturdy, sealable, easy-to-carry containers. Remember to check your kit every six months and replace expired items. • Make a plan. The American Red Cross recommends creating and practicing an evacuation and communications plan. Each person in your household should know how to reach other members and where to meet if you can’t go home. As part of your communication plan, choose an out-of-area relative or friend as an emergency contact and make sure all your household members know how to contact this person. As part of your evacuation plan, choose two meeting places: one right outside of your home, in case you need to escape in a hurry, such as in the event of a home fire, and one outside your neighborhood, in case a disaster prevents you from returning

• Pet food and supplies, such as litter and pads • Fill bathtub and containers with water for sanitary use • Fill vehicle’s gas tank For more information on hurricane preparation, contact your local American Red Cross. home. • Be informed. Find out what types of disasters are likely to occur where you live, work and play, and how you would receive information from local officials in the event of a disaster. Part of being informed is learning first aid, CPR and how to use an AED, so you have the skills to respond to an emergency when help is delayed. To learn more and view CPR/AED and first-aid demonstrations, contact your local Red Cross chapter to register for a class. As you can see, the American Red Cross takes your health and safety very seriously. When Americans think of a disaster of any magnitude, they uniformly think of the Red Cross as the agency ready to respond with help and assistance. We want to continue that tradition right here in your community. With your help and continued support, the American Red Cross will always be there when help is needed most. Contact your local American Red Cross Chapter today to become involved in the noblest cause of helping save lives and empowering our citizens to make a difference.

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HURRICANE GUIDE - 2010

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