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MAY 16, 2018 | 514 STUDIOS | MINNEAPOLIS, MN

STRATEGIES FOR HUMAN-CENTERED DESIGN


HouMinn — Identity guide

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HouMinn


HouMinn — Identity guide

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A Distributed Practice


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HouMinn — Identity guide

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Choreography

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HouMinn — Identity guide

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Assembly


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HouMinn — Identity guide

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Disruption


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Choreography

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Assembly

Disruption


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Chopstick Pavilion by Hinori Yoshida


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Chopstick Pavilion by Hinori Yoshida


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Practice as Choreography


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Breaking the Mold

HexWall & VarVac Wall


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Thermoforming


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Mold

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VarVac 1

Cheap Variable Surfaces


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Informing the Hexwall system are several contemporary precedents ranging from Interrogating the Mold

Tara Donovan’s “Haze� installation of drinking straws mounted to a wall, to an


1 Starting 1 Starting Postion of Postion of Adaptable Adaptable Mold Mold

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2 Ending 2 Ending Position for Position for

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Vacuum Vacuum Forming Forming

Mold Base Mold Base

Hex Pistons Hex Pistons

StepperStepper Motor Motor


LIGHT

LIGHT

G

P L A NE

LIGHT

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R

LIGHT

TION

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G

P L A NE

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TION

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A IG

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SE

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LIGHT

SE

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SH E L F

Level Topography to allow Maximum Natural Light from Window

LIGHT

OM RO

TI NG SIT

P AP E R

R OL L

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RO OM

OM RO

G

SIT

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R OL L

RO OM

P AP E R

G

RO L L

D

SH E L F

D

OP

N

N

O O R ST O

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D

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OP

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A IG

SE

LIGHT

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N

LIGHT

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O

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H C R A Subtle Variation R ST OO at Door Way Opening

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R

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4

Bezier Curve Angles along Elevated Topo

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Bezier Curve Angles along Elevated Topo

Subtle Variation Space for at Door Way Door Knob Opening

ELF SH

SITTIN

4

Space for Door Knob

Level Topography to allow Maximum Natural Light from Window

SITTIN

Height of Circle at Point Location

LIGHT

3

E T I IN T PO

LIGHT

3

Height of Circle at Point Location

Flattened Topography at Eye Level

PA PE R

Radius of Point’s

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PA PE R

2

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2

Flattened Topography at Eye Level

Topography studies

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IN T PO

IN T PO

Radius of Point’s

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Within the System

CEILIN

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ELF SH

CEILIN

1

Position of Point along Surface

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CORNE

1

Position of Point along Variables Surface

CORNE

Variables Within the System

CORNE

ELF SH

ELF SH

Foot Room

Elevation of Wall D

Foot Room

O O R ST

Plan of Wall Elevation of Wall Plan of Wall

program

The wall is first propagated with a generic hexagonal pattern. To determine where the wall protrudes or recedes, issues like daylight, door swing, and body position all contribute degrees of influence.

Based on the program Based on the program Grasshopper / Rh Grasshopper / Rh


var-vac > Hexwall > forming the final panels

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1. Subtle curves and low height for light shelves.

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2. Pronounced curve and greater height at wall inset.

H C R A elit laudividni | emehcs tnerruc

eb lliw atad sihT .elfi reppohssarG a morf detcartxe ,tes atad euqinu a etareneg lliw elit laudividni hcaE .decudorp si elit wen hcae sa yllatnemercni msinahcem gnimrof muucav elbairav eht tsujda ot desu

3. Subtle curve with more height for paper roll/seating.

4. Sharper Bezier curve to create “door stop.”

4.

1.

2.

3.

topography studies

Based on the program diagram on the previous page, a series of topography investigations were produced in Based on the program Grasshopper / Rhinoceros. Lights mounted behind the 14” x 14” panels will emphasize variationsdiagram in depth.on the previous page, a series of topo Grasshopper / Rhinoceros. Lights mounted behind the 14” x 14” p

topography studie

Based on the program diagram on the previous page, a series of topography investigations were produced Grasshopper / Rhinoceros. Lights mounted behind the 14” x 14” panels will emphasize variations in dept


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Resolution

Warp


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VarVac 2

Giving up Control


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historic precedent


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Strobe

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Extinguisher


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H C R A Existing Wall

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Vent

Extinguisher


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H C R A Program Overlay

Zones of maximum porosity Zones of minimum porosity


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H C R A Wire Overlay -For Positioning Wires in Vacuum-Forming Mold

Fewer Lines (Acoustically Absorptive) More Lines (Acoustically Reflective)


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H C R A Panel Prototyping Tests

Insulated wires attached to underside of lid

Interchangeable lids to accommodate different panel sizes


Max Bubble Height (in):

3.0”

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Panel Prototyping Tests

Panel Prototyping Tests

Material Thickness (in):

.08” Material Thickness (in):

Panel Prototyping Tests

.118”

Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 90 Sec Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 240 Sec

Max Bubble Height (in): Material Thickness (in):

3.75”

Material Thickness (in): 0.08 6.0”

Max Bubble Height (in):

.06”

Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 60 Max Bubble Height (in): 3.0

Panel Prototyping Tests Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 90 Sec

Max Bubble Height (in):

3.0”

Material Thickness (in):

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.08”

Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 120 Sec Panel Prototyping Tests

Max Bubble Height (in):

3.75”

Material Thickness (in): 0.08 Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 90

Panel Prototyping Tests Material Thickness (in):

.118” Height (in): 3.75 Max Bubble

Material Thickness (in):

.06”

Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 270 Sec

Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 120 Sec Material Thickness (in): Max Bubble Height (in):

5.5”

.08”

Material Thickness (in): 0.06 Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 90 Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 120 Sec Max Bubble Height (in): 3.0 4.0”

Panel Prototyping Tests

Material Thickness (in):

.06”

Material Thickness (in):

Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 180 Sec

Max Bubble Height (in):

11.0”

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Panel Prototyping Tests

Panel Prototyping Tests

Material Thickness (in): 0.08 Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 120 Max Bubble Height (in): 3.75

.08”

Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 150 Sec

Max Bubble Height (in):

6.5”

Material Thickness (in): 0.06 Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 120 6.5” Max Bubble Height (in): Max Bubble Height (in): 5.5

Material Thickness (in): 0.08 Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 120 Max Bubble Height (in): 4.0

Panel Prototyping Tests

Panel Prototyping Tests

Material Thickness (in):

Material Thickness (in):

.06”

.08”

Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 180 Sec

Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 210 Sec

Max Bubble Height (in):

10.75”

Material Thickness (in): 0.06 Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 180 9.5” Max Bubble Height (in): Max Bubble Height (in): 6.5

Material Thickness (in): 0.06 Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 210 Max Bubble Height (in): 10.75

Material Thickness (in): 0.08 Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 150 Max Bubble Height (in): 6.5

Material Thickness (in): 0.08 Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 180 Max Bubble Height (in): 9.5

Material Thickness (in): .118

Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 240 Max Bubble Height (in): 6.0

Material Thickness (in): .118 Time Under Heat Lamp (sec): 270 Max Bubble Height (in): 11.0


Cut Path

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MILL WASTE

energy

energy

waste

re-usable

Milled MDF vs. VarVac

MILLED MATERIAL WASTE GENERATED USING TRADITIONAL MDF FORM-WORK

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waste

re-usable

PLYWOOD

WIRE

FORM WASTE

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MOLD

PLYWOOD WASTE GENERATED MAKING VARVAC MOLD

MOLDS NEEDED TO CREATE FORTY PANELS [40]

MOLDS NEEDED TO CREATE FORTY PANELS [1]


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MANIPULATING MANIPULATING MANIPULATING THEMANIPULATING MOLD MANIPULATING THE MOLD THE MOLD THETHE MOLD MOLD

MANIPULATING MANIPULATING MANIPULATING THEMANIPULATING MOLD MANIPULATING THE MOLD THE MOLD THETHE MOLD MOLD

ONE DIMENSIONAL ONE DIMENSIONAL ONE DIMENSIONAL ONE MANIPULATIONS ONE DIMENSIONAL MANIPULATIONS DIMENSIONAL MANIPULATIONS MANIPULATIONS MANIPULATIONS

TWO DIMENSIONAL TWOTWO DIMENSIONAL DIMENSIONAL TWO MANIPULATIONS TWO DIMENSIONAL MANIPULATIONS DIMENSIONAL MANIPULATIONS MANIPULATIONS MANIPULATIONS

a b a b

x

x

c

c

c

a a. amount/dia. a. ofamount/dia. foam a. pistons amount/dia. of foam a. pistons of a.amount/dia. foamamount/dia. pistons of foamofpistons foam pistons VARIABLES VARIABLES VARIABLES VARIABLES b.VARIABLES densityb.of foam density b. ofdensity foam b.of foam b.densitydensity of foamof foam

a. b. c.

c

c

x

a

a

a

depth a. of drilling depth a. of drilling depth a. of drilling a.depth of depth drilling of drilling amount b. of drilling amount b. ofamount drilling b. of drilling b.amountamount of drilling of drilling diameter c. of drilling diameter c. of diameter drilling c. of drilling c.diameter diameter of drilling of drilling x x x x

x

x

x

x

x

x x

x

b

x

x x

x

x

b

x

x

a. b. A. B.

x

x x x

b

a

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b

b

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A B a b

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MOLD MOLDMOLD MOLD MOLD

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lengtha.of cablelength a. of cable lengtha.of cable a.length length of cableof cable droop b. length droop b. length droop b. length b.droop length droop length resulting A. droop resulting A. droop resulting A. droop A. resulting resulting droop droop resulting B. angleresulting B. angle resulting B. angle B.resulting resulting angle angle

a

a

a

a

a

x

x

x

x

x

Ab A B a B BA a b b x

a b

x

x

b

Ab A BB B A a B aA b b x

a b

x

x

a b

b

B

b

A

B

A

MANIPULATIN MANIP M

THREE DIMENS THREE TH

a. A.

projection a. length projection a. projection lengtha. length a.projection projection length length pistonb. diameter piston b. diameter pistonb. diameter b.piston piston diameter diameter pistonc.locationpiston c. location pistonc.location c.piston piston location location

b

a

a

b

a

b

b

a

c

b

x

a

b

a

c

x

a

c

b

a

x

a

c

x

c

air input a. aira.inp resulting A. volume result A.

b

b

a

x

b

FORM FORMFORM FORM FORM

Inflated Mold: Inflated The Infl M Horizontal Horizontal Piston Horizontal Mold: Piston Horizontal Diameter Piston Mold: Horizontal Mold: Diameter ofPiston pistons, Piston Diameter Mold: of pistons, Mold: Diameter of pistons, Diameter of pistons, of pistons, Mold: Tension Tension Tension Mold: members Mold: Tension Tension Tension Tension members Mold: are Mold: placedmembers Tension are Tension placedmembers are members placedare placedare placedModified Modified Foam Mold: Modified Foam A block Mold: Modified FoamModified ofMold: Afoam block Foam is AFoam of drilled block Mold: foam Mold: ofis Afoam drilled block A is block of drilled foam of foam isTension drilled is drilled Unstable Unstable Material Unstable Mold: Material Unstable Foam Material Mold: Unstable pistons Mold: Foam Material Material pistons Foam Mold: pistons Mold: FoamFoam pistons pistons EXPERIMENT EXPERIMENT EXPERIMENT EXPERIMENT EXPERIMENT of varyingofdensity varying ofand varying density dimension. ofdensity and varying ofdimension. varying and density dimension. density and dimension. and dimension.

the mold the is depend mold the length interior length length ofprojection, interior of interior length projection, stiffness length ofprojection, interior (mold of stiffness interior projection, and stiffness (mold projection, and (mold stiffness stiffness and(mold (mold and and within thewithin mold.within the Changes mold. thewithin Changes in mold. cable within the Changes length in mold. thecable mold. Changes in and length cable Changes length in andcable in and cable length and of and to varyingtodepths varying to and varying depths frequency. todepths and varying to frequency. varying Compression and depths frequency. depths Compression and frequency. and Compression frequency. Compression Compression pumped into pumped thepum bla in molded) piston molded) and location piston and molded) are piston location molded) variables. and location are piston and variables. piston are location variables. location are variables. are variables. tension are tension the primary tension are thevariables. are primary tension thetension primary variables. are the are variables. primary the primary variables. variables. molded) and and failureand arefailure variables. and failure are variables. and arefailure and variables. failure are variables. are variables.


MANIPULATION OFMANIPULATION THE MANIPULATION MANIPULATION OFMOLDED THEOF MOLDED THEOF MOLDED THE MOLDED MANIPULATING THE MOLD

MANIPULATING MANIPULATING MANIPULATING THE MANIPULATING MOLD THE MANIPULATING MOLD THE MOLD THETHE MOLD MOLD THREETHREE DIMENSIONAL THREE DIMENSIONAL THREE DIMENSIONAL MANIPULATIONS ONE DIMENSIONAL DIMENSIONAL MANIPULATIONS MANIPULATIONS MANIPULATIONS MANIPULATIONS MOLDMOLD FAILURE MOLD FAILURE MOLD FAILURE FAILURE

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TWO DIMENSIONAL MANIPULATIONS

a b

c

x

b a

a. inputamount/dia. of foam pistons air input a. air input a. air input a. air VARIABLES b. density resulting A. volume resulting A. volume resulting A. volume resulting volumeof foam

b

a

b

a

a

a. milling dimension a. milling dimension a. milling dimension a. milling a. dimension depth of drilling b. etching length/depth b. etching length/depth b. etching length/depth b. etching b. length/depth amount of drilling c. diameter of drilling

a. A.

on length iameter ocation

b

a

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x x

x

x

b

a

b

a

b

a

b b

a A

x

c

x

c

A

A

x

b

a

x

b

a

c

b

a

c

b

a

c

a

c

A B a b

x

c

A

a. milling projection a. milling length projection a. millinglength projection a. milling projection a. length length of length cable b. milling width/depth b. milling width/depth b. milling width/depth b. milling width/depth b. droop length c. amount of c. milling amount ofc.milling amount ofc.milling amount of milling droop A. resulting B. resulting angle A. resultingA. deformation resulting A. deformation resulting deformation A. resulting deformation

a

a

a

a

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MOLD

A

A

A

b

x

B

A

a. material a. milling material dimension milling a. material dimension milling a.a.material dimension milling dimension projection length b. amount of b. material amount of regions b.material amount regions ofb.material regions of material regions b.amountpiston diameter c. piston location A. resultingA. form resulting A. form resulting form A. resulting form

a

a

a

b

a

b

b

a

b

c

b a

x

b

A

A

A

A

A

FORM

Milled Foam MilledMold: Foam Milled AMold: sheet Foam Milled AofMold: sheet foam Foam AofisMold: sheet foam milled of AisMold: to sheet foam milledis of foam of istofoam milledPlastic Plastic Milling: Plastic Variability Milling: Variability Plastic through Milling: Variability through the manipuVariability through the maniputhe through maniputheare manipuMaterial Material Hybrid Material Hybrid + Milling: Material Hybrid + Milling: Variability Hybrid + Piston Milling: Variability +Mold: isMilling: Variability is Variability is is InflatedInflated Mold: The Inflated Mold: available The Inflated Mold: available interior The Mold: available interior volume The available volume interior of Mold: of volume interior of volume of Diameter rMold: Piston of pistons, Diameter Mold: of pistons, Diameter of pistons, of pistons, Horizontal Diameter of pistons, Tension Mold: Tension members placedModified Foam Atomilled block istodrilledMilling: Unstable Material Foam pistons EXPERIMENT varying varying depths. depths. varying This series This depths. varying of series experiments This depths. of series experiments This tests of series experiments tests of experiments tests tests created by using hybrid materials in the molding lation of lation the material of lation the material of being lation the formed material being of the formed before material being the formed before being the before formed the before the created by created using by created hybrid using materials by hybrid using materials in hybrid the molding materials in the molding in the molding the mold the is mold dependent the is mold dependent the on is the mold dependent on amount is the dependent amount on of the air amount on of air the amount of air of air ojection, terior sstiffness (mold projection, and stiffness (mold and stiffness (mold and (mold and length of interior projection, stiffness (mold and within the mold. Changes in cable length and to varying depths and frequency. Compression of varying density and dimension. unpredictability unpredictability through unpredictability breakage. through unpredictability breakage. through breakage. through breakage. process.process. Regions of theprocess. sheet behave vacuumvacuum formingvacuum forming process.forming vacuum process. process. forming process. Regions Regions of the should sheet Regions of the should sheet of location thebehave should sheet should behave into thepumped into bladder. the pumped into bladder. the bladder. into the bladder. nd iables. location are piston variables. are location variables. are variables. pumpedpumped molded) and piston arebehave variables. tension are theprocess. primary variables. and failure are variables. differently whendifferently heat anddifferently force are applied. differently when heat when and heat force when and are heat force applied. and areforce applied. are applied.


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Further Developments

Ice Molds for thermoforming


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Ice Molds for thermoforming


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Paper Architecture 1 Pulp Wall


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Forming Strategies


spread on smooth surface spread on smooth surface

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round 02 round 02

round 03

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round 04

round 04 round 04

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spread on backing spread on backing thick / thin spread on bumpy surface spread on bumpy surface

spread on bumpy surface aspect ratio spreadon onbumpy bumpysurface surface backing backing on bumpy surface

backing on bumpy surface backing on bumpy surface


Round 1

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Round 2

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Round 3

Round 5

Round 4

Round 6


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Round 7

Round 9

H C R A Round 8

Round 4


7”X7” PAPER

PAPER PULP FORMING PROCESS PAPER PULP FORMING PROCESS

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7”X7” PAPER

TAPE

TAPE

Paper Pulp Forming Process

1. Bottom surface of backing paper layer taped

2. Water sprayed on top surface of backing paper layer

1. Bottom surface of backing paper layer taped

2. Water sprayed on top surface of backing paper layer

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PAPER PULP

SANDPAPER

PAPER PULP

TAPE

H C R A TAPE

4. Second layer of tape added to lock radius of backing paper layer and layer of sandpaper added for adhesion of 4. Second layer of tape added to lock paper pulp radius of backing paper layer and layer of sandpaper added for adhesion of paper pulp

Fig 2.

3. Backing paper layer self-curls to a specific radius - dependent upon volume of water sprayed 3. Backing paper layer self-curls to a specific radius - dependent upon volume of water sprayed

5. Paper pulp layer applied to backing paper - backing paper initailly flattens

6. Paper pulp curls to original radius of backing paper layer as it dries

7. Finished, radiused paper pulp panel removed from backing paper layer

5. Paper pulp layer applied to backing paper - backing paper initailly flattens

6. Paper pulp curls to original radius of backing paper layer as it dries

7. Finished, radiused paper pulp panel removed from backing paper layer


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Further Developments


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Result After Drying

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Result After Drying

H C R A Same diameter plastic pressed into paper form Same diameter plastic pressed into paper form

Plastic formed around diameter plastic joined to create structure

Variable mold

Plastic pressed between paper pulp

Plastic formed around diameter plastic joined to create structure

Variable mold

Plastic pressed between paper pulp


Shallow 1

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Perspective

Elevation

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Shallow 2

Round 3

Round 6


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Paper Architecture 2 Hydrox Wall


wood goo

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H C R 2. A

Forming Strategies


1 cement: 5 paper/pulp

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1 cement: 5 paper/pulp cement:pulp

1:4 cement:pulp

1:3

1:2

1:1

2:1

1:0 (cement only)

1:4

1:3

1:2

1:1

2:1

1:0 (cement only) 1 cement: paper shredded 5 paper/pulp

shredded paper

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mechanical pulp

shredded paper

mechanical pulp

1 shredded paper: 1 kraft pulp 1 shredded paper: 1 kraft pulp kraft pulp

1 shredded paper:

kraft pulp 1 kraft pulp Material test 1: Magnesium-phosphate cement (mixed with ratio of 3:1 MgO and NaH2PO4) mixed with varying ratios of two types of pulp, mechanical raw pulp and kraft paper pulp. Material test 1: kraft pulp Magnesium-phosphate cement (mixed with ratio of 3:1 MgO and NaH2PO4) mixed with varying ratios of two types of pulp, mechanical raw pulp and kraft paper pulp. Material test 3: paper type blended blended+shredded shredded kraft pulpratios of MgO and NaH PO cement with varying ratios of shredded paper and kraft pulp Varied 2 4 cement:paper 1:1

paper type cement:paper 1:1

H C R A blended

blended+shredded

shredded

Material test 3: Varied ratios of MgO and NaH2PO4 cement with varying ratios of shredded paper and kraft pulp 1:1 cement:paper kraft pulp MgO:NaH2PO4 1:1 Material test 3:1:1 cement:paper

1:2

1:5

1:8

1:2

1:5

1:8

1:2

1:5

1:8

Varied ratios of MgO and NaH2PO4 cement with varying ratios of shredded paper and kraft pulp MgO:NaH2PO4 1:1

cement:paper 2:5

cement:paper

cement:paper 2:5

1:1

MgO:NaH2PO4 1:1

Material test 4: Varied ratios of shredded paper with cement to test for strength, density, and surface durability

Material paper type test 4:shredded paper

kraft pulp

no paper

cement:paper:glass 1:1:1 shredded paper paper type

kraft pulp

no paper

shredded paper

kraft pulp

no paper

Varied ratios of shredded paper with cement to test for strength, density, and surface durability

cement:paper 1:5 cement:paper 1:5

Material test 4: cement:paper:glass Varied ratios of shredded paper with cement to test for strength, density, and surface durability 1:1:1 paper type cement:paper:glass 1:1:1

Material test 2: Varied ratios of cement to paper with three amounts of paper processing: blended; blended and shredded mix; shredded Material test 2: Varied ratios of cement to paper with three amounts of paper processing: blended; blended and shredded mix; shredded

Material test 5: Introduction of crushed glass with cement and paper paste as aggregate for increased compressive strength Material test 5: Introduction of crushed glass with cement and paper paste as aggregate for increased compressive strength


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60% Pulp

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40% Pulp

20% Pulp


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Further Developments


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Printable Waste

Sawdust, pulp, and glue make a printable matrix


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Practice as Assembly


The problems that we face, not only in the building industry (like affordability, sustainability, resilience, and equity) but as a society more generally, are growing more complicated and increasingly require specialized expertise to solve. Architects who successfully address and actively engage big, messy problems understand the value of working in diverse teams. Through interdisciplinary collaboration and applied research, solutions are less predictable, more sophisticated, more effective.

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If architects want to participate in solutions to problems bigger than buildings, with cultural and societal significance, we must learn to adapt—to play different kinds of roles on different kinds of teams. When we are willing to participate on a team in a capacity other than as the lead coordinator, we open ourselves to new ways of thinking, and new design opportunities.

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Hypernatural

Architecture’s new relationship with nature

myThread Pavilion by Jenny Sabin


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Neri Oxman Silk Pavilion


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GEOSPHERE Rocks, minerals, and the geophysical world

ATMOSPHERE Clouds, gases, and meteorological phenomena

HYDROSPHERE Water, ice, and marine environments / fluid dynamics and hydraulic behavior BIOSPHERE—MICROBIAL Microbes, bacteria, and other microscopic life

BIOSPHERE—BOTANICAL Plants and other macroscopic photosynthetic species BIOSPHERE—ZOOLOGICAL Animals, insects, and other macroscopic animate life NOOSPHERE Humanity and the sociotechnological revolution


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GEOSPHERE Rocks, minerals, and the geophysical world

Venus and Spider Chairs


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ATMOSPHERE Clouds, gases, & meteorological phenomena

Cloudscapes Tetsuo Kondo & Transoloar Energietechnik GmbH


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HYDROSPHERE

Water, ice, and marine environments / fluid dynamics & hydraulic behavior

Digital Water Pavilion by Carlo Ratti Associati


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BIOSPHERE—MICROBIAL Microbes, bacteria, and other microscopic life logical revolution

Microbial House by Philips


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BIOSPHERE—BOTANICAL

Plants and other macroscopic photosynthetic species

HygroSkin Pavilion - Achim Menges, David Oliver Krieg, & Stephen Reichert


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BIOSPHERE—ZOOLOGICAL Animals, insects, and other macroscopic animate life

Chrysalis III - Andrew Kudless | Matsys


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NOOSPHERE

Humanity and the sociotechnological

Data Grove by Future Cities Lab


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The Birds & The Bees (& the Bats, & the...) Orbacles & Pollinators


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THREE EXPERIENCES - TWO FUTURES

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Orbacle A HOUSE / Bird House ORBACLE A / BIRD bird population CURRENTcurrent BIRD POPULATION

Orbacle B /FOOD Bird Food ORBACLE B / BIRD Future Emissions FUTURE - LOW- Low EMISSIONS

Orbacle / Bird Bath ORBACLE C / BIRDCBATH Emissions FUTUREFuture - HIGH- High EMISSIONS

HOUSE - SOUND The bird houses are filled with nesting materials, and activated with bird sounds, coming from speakers hidden in the modules, powered by solar

FOOD - FRAGRANCE The bird feeders are filled with varieties of Minnesota seeds and grains, and activated with passive fragrance from diffusers.

BATH - WATER The bird baths are filled with water, activated by overflow that drips down the modules to the ground below.

House - Sound

Food - Fragrance

Bath - Water


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By 2080, Common Loon willinbe “By 2080, the Common Loonthe will be spending its summers Canada, its its summers in Canada, haunting call butspending an echo in the memories of Minnesotans. ”

its haunting call but an echo in the memories of Minnesotans - Audubon Birds and Climate Change Report

Common Loon Loon Common Gavia immer Gavia immer

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Audubon Birds and Climate Change Report

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CURRENTCurrent

Population POPULATION 139.9 139.9 SIZE .805 Size .805

Future FUTURE>>Lowe LOW Emission EMISSIONS Population65.325 63.325 (-53%) POPULATION (-53%) LATITUDE CHANGE -.29 - 0.29 Latitude Change

Future>>HIGH HighEMISSIONS Emissions FUTURE

Population16.275 16.275 (-88.37%) POPULATION (-88.37%) LATITUDE CHANGE -.0045- .0045 Latitude Change


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One Module Three Modification ORBACLE ORBACLE ORBACLEORBACLE BB ORBACLE B-///BIRD BIRD BIRDFOOD FOOD FOOD BB/ /BIRD BIRD FOOD FOOD ORBACLE ORBACLE ORBACLEORBACLE CC ORBACLE C///BIRD BIRD BIRDBATH BATH BATH CC/ /BIRD BIRDBATH BATH

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ORBACLE ORBACLE ORBACLEORBACLE AA ORBACLE A///BIRD BIRD BIRDHOUSE HOUSE HOUSE AA/ /BIRD BIRDHOUSE HOUSE

Orbacle MINN_LAB MINN_LAB MINN_LAB MINN_LAB MINN_LAB

A / Bird House

current bird population House - Sound

BUpdate / Bird Food Project Project ProjectOrbacle Update Update Update Project Project Presentation Presentation Presentation Update Presentation Presentation April April April 10th 10th 10th 2017 2017 2017 April April10th 10th2017 2017 Future - Low Emissions Food - Fragrance

Orbacle CORBACLES / Bird --Bath ORBACLES ORBACLES -Creative Creative Creative ORBACLES ORBACLES City City City-Challenge Challenge Challenge Creative - CreativeCity CityChallen Challe Future - High Emissions Bath - Water


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Pollinator Houses

S


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Paper Pulp + Seeds paper pulp + seeds

Bee House bee house

Tulip Pollinator

Sourced materials combined to decay and foster growth

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Sacrficial Layer sacrificial layer


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+4

Season’s Cycle

Miner bees lay eggs insect grows as home decays New bee emerges. Plants grow.

+9

+12

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little brown myotis BL 2.4-3.9" WS 8.7–10.6" yuma myotis BL 3.3-3.9" WS 9.3" california myotis BL 2.8-3.7" WS 11.0-13.0" long-eared myotis BL 3.0-3.7" WS 9.0-10.0" townsend’s big-eared bat BL 4.0" WS 11.0" big brown bat BL 4.3-5.1" WS 13.0"

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BC bat species

Vancouver?

Roost in buildings?

Bat house user?

Natural roosts (summer)

little brown myotis

yes

common

yes

snags, rock crevices, cliffs, mines

yuma myotis

yes

common

yes

snags, rock crevices, mines

long-legged myotis

yes

occasional

no

cliffs, rock crevices, snags, stumps

western small-footed myotis

yes

occasional

no

cliffs, rock crevices, mines

california myotis

yes

occasional

yes

snags, mins, bridges, rock outcrops & crevices

buildings, mines, caves, rock crevices

fringed myotis

unknown

occasional

no

mines, cliffs, rock crevices, snags

mines

long-eared myotis

yes

occasional

yes

cliffs, snags, stumps, slopes, outcrops, crevices, mines

mines, buildings

keen’s long-eared myotis

yes

no

no

mines, cliffs, snags, rock crevices

snags, rock crevices

northern myotis

no

rarely

no

snags

townsend’s big-eared bat

yes

common

yes (big)

cliffs, caves, buildings, mines

western red bat

unknown

no

no

trees

hoary bat

yes

no

no

snags, trees

silver-haired bat

yes

no

no

trees, snags (cottonwoods)

big brown bat

yes

common

yes

snags, cliffs, rock crevices

pallid bat

no

potentially

no

cliffs, outcrops, snags, buildings, mines, orchard

rock crevices?

spotted bat

no

no

no

cliffs

cliffs, mines

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Half of the sixteen bat species in BC are listed as vulnerable or threatened

BC has the greatest diversity of bats of any province

Raise awareness about bat conservation in BC Identify bat roost sites in buildings Conserve and enhance bat habitat Provide support to landowners with bats in buildings Engage residents in citizen ‐science to monitor bat populations

BATS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

Natural roosts (winter)

mines, caves, rock crevices mines

mines, caves, rock crevices mines, cliff crevices

mines

mines, caves, rock crevices migrates? migrates

snags, mines, buildings buildings, mines


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outer bat chamber inner bat chamber

H C R A LEDs in outer layer glow according to thermal imaging data from previous day while bats are at rest

approx. 1m

circumferential vent created by lower density of concrete in outer layer at specified location

sun

entrance to outer chamber landing strip for outer chamber

min. 10 cm

entrance to inner chamber

14

landing strip for inner chamber

min. 10 cm

vertical post

elevation 1:5

section 1:5

DIGITAL PROTOTYPE overcast

N


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Fabric and Concrete


M E T H O D O LO GY

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M E T H O D O LO GY M E T H O D O LO GY B I O LO G I C A L R EQU I R E M EN T S Bspecies, I O LO G I Croosting A L R EQU I R E M EN T S preferences, B I O LOdimensions, G I C A L R EQU I R E M EN T S habitats species, roosting preferences, dimensions, species, roosting habitats preferences, dimensions, habitats

+ + +

M AT ER I A L P OSSI B I LI T I E S M AT ER I A L P B I LI T I E S explorations &OSSI configurations M AT ER I A L P OSSI B I LI T I E S explorations & configurations explorations & configurations

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M A N I PU L AT I O N M A N I PU L AT I O N

gravity

8

gravity

http://dataphys.org/ http://dataphys.org/

SI T E S T R AT EG I E S

SI Tproximity E S T R ATto EGfood I E S & water, installation, SI T E S T Rforces AT EG & I Efactors S environmental installation, proximity to food & water, environmental forces & factors installation, proximity to food & water, environmental forces & factors

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M A N I PU L AT I O N

http://dataphys.org/

+ + +

http://www.mgsarchitecture.in/

http://www.mgsarchitecture.in/

http://www.clubmarine.com.au/ http://www.clubmarine.com.au/

tension

molding

tension

molding

http://www.mgsarchitecture.in/

http://www.clubmarine.com.au/


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Early Prototype Layers of fixed fabric provide both safety and thermal control


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Practice Practiceas asDisruption Mischief


An expanded approach is necessary for architects, one that grows out of a mischievous attitude that challenges the boundaries of our disciplinary territory. With a more expanded approach, we will regain some of the relevance we have lost as a discipline and serve a more central role in solving bigger, more complex societal problems.

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This isn’t to suggest that architects should shift away from what they do they best or that schools of architecture should shift the education of architects away from the profession’s core competencies. The discipline’s core competencies are precisely what make architects so adaptable and so capable of doing more.

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Fashion and Waste House of Style


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1890

1920

1930

1970

1980

1990

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1940

1950

1960

2000

2010

2015


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H C R A Kristin Olynik

Is it possible to design a fashionable garment that is stylish precisely because it is also designed for post-cosumption? We are collaborating with apparel designers to create a line of jeans that anticipates an alternative future life.


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Chance + Decay The Blind Nurse


The Blind Nurse explores new ways for architecture to behave at a phase when architects have long abandoned it: its decay. When architects consider this phase as important as the design and construction of a building, we accept that a building is fundamentally part of our larger natural ecosystem, that it is not distinct from nature, but part of it. A building’s obsolescence can be as thoughtfully considered as its construction.

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Chance

H C R A Dunny Blind Box Toys


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Decay & Growth

Nurse Log


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Soil

E T I “Leg” in foreground

Possible seed in well

Pulp

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Select Orientation

Remove Wrapper

Leg 2

Leg 3

Possible Section

Object Settles


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3D Printer Prototype

Wood pulp

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Wood pulp & Soil(30%)

Wood pulp & Soil(65%)

Wood pulp & Magnesium Concrete

Decay and growth over time

Speculative Pulp and Plastic assembly model


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Permutations


Most objects are designed to last forever,existing statically in the world, unresponsive until they are thrown in a landfill. Blind Nurse is purposefully temporal. It has a birth and a death. It catalyzes and then yields to future growth. Its full purpose is revealed slowly and its narrative only understood through repeated viewing. It is a dynamic, surprising, and ultimately emotional proposition, to which we can uniquely relate because, like architecture and like all of us, it will eventually wilt away.

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Chemical Reactions Aloha Evolution


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H C R A ‘INTERSTATE H-1’ WITH

GASOCH ROMIC INK

carbon monoxide

methane

lead

nitrogen dioxide

CO

CH4

Pb

NO2

OVERLAID ON A MINIMAL DESIGN, THE COLORFUL PATTERNS OF GRUNGE MORPH ACROSS THE SHIRT IN RESPONSE TO THE PRESENCE OF AIR POLLUTANTS.

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Pl

ay

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ov i

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HouMinn — Identity guide

Logo

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HouMinn


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THANK YOU

PRESENTED BY:

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH:

Strategies for Human-Centered Design  

Minneapolis - 5/16/2018

Strategies for Human-Centered Design  

Minneapolis - 5/16/2018