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Mission Statement

Table of Contents

Holy Family Catholic High School

LETTER FROM PRESIDENT BRENNAN | Page 03

offers students excellence

MSHSL TRIPLE A RECIPIENTS | Page 04

in education by providing

TODAY SHOW INTERNSHIP | Page 06

opportunities to grow spiritually,

FIGHT LIKE A CHAMPION | Page 08

morally, intellectually, and physically within a community of Faith. We empower and encourage our students to achieve personal excellence,

STUDENT AMBASSADORS | Page 10 GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY | Page 12 MRS. PIATT'S CLASSROOM | Page 14 ELLINGBOE DESIGN | Page 16 HOLY FAMILY THEATER SEASON | Page 18 WINTER ARTS SHOWCASE | Page 20

to use their talents to lead,

ALUMNI NEWS | Page 22

to serve God, one another,

LEADERSHIP/FACULTY | Page 23

and the larger community.

ALUMNI CONTRIBUTORS Collage Art on Cover by Caroline Ellingboe-Shields '12 | Ellingboe Design and Photography Artist Notes: Each piece of ripped paper was chosen deliberately to represent spring, growth, bold passion, craft, fire, and spirit. Titled "The Heart in Our Fire," this design recognizes each person's passion begins deep in their hearts, and everyone's fire is different. At Holy Family, we are united by the fire within us and encouraged to pursue the fires of our passions.

Katie Galioto '14 graduated from the University of Notre Dame in May 2018. After internships at the Star Tribune, Chicago Tribune, and Politico, she is back at the Star Tribune. In March, she is leaving the Star Tribune's Duluth bureau this month and switching to covering St. Paul City Hall.

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COVER ART: Caroline Ellngboe '12

Ellingboe and Lund Stories Katie Galioto '14 | Star Tribune St. Paul City Hall Desk


Letter from President Michael Brennan

Deep within the hearts of Holy Family graduates resides the understanding that they are put on this planet to change and contribute to it in positive ways—serving as living expressions of God’s love.

Many of you know that my wife and I are parents to two sets of twins, Patrick and Quinn, and Charlotte and Maggie. And while they are twins and siblings, they are four completely different people, with personalities and interests distinctly their own. Keep in mind, they are 6 and 4, so those interests include drawing, Legos, books, and bicycles. Still, I know in God’s design they are each created uniquely in His image. These seeds of interest, planted in our home and nurtured in their formal educations, will indeed flourish over time - leading to both practical and passionate pursuits in their lives ahead. Likewise, all Holy Family Catholic High School students arrive with their own set of talents and interests, although, for most, much further developed than Legos and bicycles! Our goal is to nurture those interests—their fires—from the first time we meet them as prospective students until they graduate four years later. Frequently, our alumni continue to benefit from this encouragement as they seek out the advice and mentorship of their former Holy Family teachers, advisors, and coaches.

ABOVE: Photo by Remember Me Photography

Caroline Ellingboe-Shields beautifully illustrates the uniqueness of those God-given talents and passions in her cover art, “The Heart in Our Fire.” Caroline’s personal story and those of her fellow alumni

Eric, Grace, and Nikki, further reveal that the “heart in their fire” is their uniqueness as humans created in God’s image and loved beyond measure – an identity both cultivated and sculpted by their experiences and relationships while students at Holy Family. Further bolstering the realization of the dreams of our alumni are an ethos of hard work and the desire to use their talents for the betterment of others, whether through design, innovation, nutrition, or storytelling. Deep within the hearts of Holy Family graduates resides the understanding that they are put on this planet to change and contribute to it in positive ways­—serving as living expressions of God’s love. As we near the end of another school year, and a rather unique one at that, I pray that the seeds of hope, love, and peace – planted in us all – continue to bear the life-giving fruit that nourishes the very heart of our community. Lenten Blessings to all, Live Jesus in our Hearts – Forever!

Mike Brennan President

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MSHSL TRIPLE A AWARD KATHERINE WISE HFCHS Activities: Concert and Jazz Band Soccer, Softball Track and Field Student Council Fire Ambassadors Lasallian Youth Fire for Life Honor Society Campus Ministry Publication Design

"Maintaining strong performances in all three areas requires me to set and achieve goals as well as overcome adversity."

What are some of the advantages of maintaining strong performances in athletics, activities, and the arts? WISE: An advantage of maintaining strong performances in athletics, activities, and the arts is becoming a role model to many. Being involved in multiple areas enhances my leadership abilities and allows me to connect with various students. Maintaining strong performances in all three areas requires me to set and achieve goals as well as overcome adversity. What has inspired you to dedicate time to all of these pursuits? WISE: As an only child, the idea of becoming part of a larger family has inspired me to dedicate time to all of these pursuits. I have a love for learning and competing, which has always motivated me to do more.

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Do the skills you learn in one area carry over to the others? WISE: Many of the skills carry over from one area to the next, such as practice, teamwork, and handling pressure. Mastering a piece of music requires rehearsal. Similar to athletics and academics, music requires practice to develop skills and habits. Teamwork can take many different forms. In soccer, it can be as small as working with just the goalies or as large as the entire team. As band members, we work as duets and small or large ensembles. Academically, Holy Family provides students with opportunities to work with lab partners, small groups, or even larger groups for projects such as convocations. Games, big performances, and tests can all be stressful for students, but each area has helped me develop ways to handle those pressures.


The Academics, Arts, and Athletics Award, known as the Triple 'A' Award, honors high school seniors throughout the state who have a 3.0 or higher-grade point average and who participate in League-sponsored athletic and fine arts activities. Holy Family's selections for the Class of 2021 are Katherine Wise and Bishop Schugel.

BISHOP SCHUGEL HFCHS Activities: Concert Band Soccer Hockey Simpson House Fire Ambassadors Honor Society Campus Ministry

"I also learned many new skills, which allowed me to grow as a person and excel in each of the three categories."

What are some of the advantages of maintaining strong performances in athletics, activities, and the arts? SCHUGEL: I have met tons of new people and established strong relationships with my teammates, classmates, and band mates. I have learned many new skills, which allowed me to grow as a person and excel in each of the three categories. What has inspired you to dedicate time to all of these pursuits? SCHUGEL: My brother Sawyer, a sophomore at St. John’s University, has always been heavily involved in academics, athletics, and the arts, so I followed in his footsteps. My parents encouraged us to be well-rounded students and leaders. They taught me to give my best effort to anything I do.

Do the skills you learn in one area carry over to the others? SCHUGEL: All three areas teach different skills, but they carry over to each other. One example of this is how school has taught me to have good time management, which has helped me be on time and organized for sports events. Another example is that in sports, you have to think while playing the game way more than one would expect, so to be able to think quickly on the ice and the soccer field, I have adapted some of the tactics that I use to study for tests to my routine for studying game film. For tests, I break apart sections of the curriculum into 20-minute study sessions, so I break up each period of the game into similar sessions for the game film.

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Hoping Today is a Sign of Tomorrow VIRTUAL INTERNSHIPS PROVIDE VALUABLE FIRSTHAND JOURNALISM EXPERIENCE

Universal program was recognizing Lund and the seven other college students who worked on the show last summer.

For a few minutes last July, the face of Gracie Lund '18 smiled on TV screens across the United States. TODAY Show anchors Craig Melvin and Hoda Kotb waved to Lund and her family, who were Zooming into the New York City studio from their Victoria home. It was National Intern Day, and the popular NBC

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It wasn’t Lund’s first appearance on the TODAY Show. At age 10, she and her dad woke up before sunrise to watch Al Roker go live from the Vancouver Winter Olympics. A producer dug up the clip of young Gracie holding a sign on the top of a Canadian mountain.

names in broadcast journalism. She completed a summer internship with TODAY and spent her fall semester interning with Andrea Mitchell Reports on MSNBC.

“I always say that was a defining moment,” Lund reminisced. “That’s when I knew what I wanted to do.”

The job would have normally taken her to NBC’s New York office at 30 Rockefeller Plaza, but the intern program was made virtual after the COVID-19 outbreak. From her parents’ home in Minnesota, Lund had a front-row seat to coverage of some of the biggest topics in the busy year: the pandemic, the racial reckoning that followed the death of George Floyd, and the 2020 election.

Now a junior at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, Lund has spent months working with some of the biggest

One day during the summer, Lund recorded a Zoom call between TODAY’s Carson Daly and musician LL Cool J discussing


racial justice. Another time she helped produce a segment featuring a North Carolina pen pal program for nursing home residents isolated by the pandemic. On election night, she prepared research packets for Mitchell before the veteran reporter went on air in Washington, D.C. Lund is studying journalism and political science, so watching the longtime foreign affairs correspondent in action was surreal at times. “It was just so cool to be a part of it all,” Lund said. “I met so many really amazing, passionate people.” The experience solidified her desire to seek a career in broadcast journalism, but even before the TODAY Show Lund was hooked on storytelling. At Holy Family, she was an editor of The Phoenix, led service groups to Minneapolis’ Simpson House and traveled with the school to Guatemala and Haiti. “I think Holy Family taught me that I wanted to do something that would help others. And maybe journalism isn’t the traditional route you would think of for that,” Lund said.

LUND IN THE TODAY SHOW LIVE AUDIENCE AT THE VANCOUVER WINTER OPLYMPICS.

“But whenever I think of the TODAY Show or different news shows, I always think of all the different stories and perspectives they bring to people,” she added.“They keep public officials accountable. They give voices to people who otherwise may not be able to reach that audience on a national and world level.”

On the televised National Intern Day segment, Kotb told Lund that one of the TODAY’s senior producers made a similar cameo on the show as a child. “If that’s a sign of things to come,” the anchor said, “maybe you’ll work here too.”

HODA KOTB WAVED TO LUND AND HER FAMILY, WHO WERE ZOOMING INTO THE NEW YORK CITY STUDIO FROM THEIR VICTORIA HOME.

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Fight Like a Champion ERIC REQUET'S COMPETITIVE DRIVE PUSHES HIM TO HELP OTHERS

Eric Requet '16 made his mark at Holy Family as a standout athlete and exceptional student. He was captain of both the football and baseball teams and holds school records in both sports— three defensive interceptions in one football game as a sophomore, and 22 stolen bases during his senior baseball season. Requet considered pursing both sports after high school. Instead, he chose academics and tradition, becoming the 15th member of his family to attend Notre Dame. “I was part of the (Holy Family) robotics team and that drove my interest in engineering,” recalls Requet, who graduated this past May in mechanical engineering with a concentration in bioengineering. That decision didn’t mean he couldn’t feed his competitive drive. He found an outlet in Notre Dame’s rich intramural program, taking up boxing, football (both flag and full contact), baseball, soccer, ice hockey, floor hockey, broomball, Wiffle® ball and basketball. “Everyone agrees I’m overly competitive,” he laughs. “Sports is an outlet for me to be the best I can.”

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Fighting to Help Others Boxing, a longstanding “Fighting Irish” tradition, is where Requet made his mark. With more than 200 participants, it’s the most popular intramural sport on campus. Organized in 1920 by legendary football coach Knute Rockne, the boxing program’s “Bengal Bouts” became a campus fundraiser in 1931 for the Holy Cross Missions in Bangladesh. “Strong bodies fight, that weak bodies may be nourished” is the tournament’s motto. And it has stuck for 90 years. Many students join the club to simply work out and learn a new sport, never stepping into the ring. That’s not Requet’s style. He entered his first Bengal Bouts as a freshman, sparring just enough to qualify. “I started the program after Christmas break because a broken finger kept me out of all sports my first semester,” he explains. “But I never debated doing the tournament. I wasn’t going to waste the workouts.”

line-pumping experience filled a competitive gap he was seeking.

That fight was a reflection of his entire jourThe following year he trained harder and ney. He was bloodied early, receiving medsmarter, adding defense to ical attention for a bloody his raw boxing skills. Denose. Yet he pressed on "Being spite his hard work, Requet and wore down the decompetitive experienced something new fending champion, the in the semifinal Bouts that same fighter he lost to the means putting year—uncertainty. The deprevious tournament. He it all out there, feat was enough for him to used his endurance and question returning to the punishing body blows even when times ring. against the ropes to reach are tough." his greatest goal.

A Man on a Mission

What drew Requet back his junior year was less for himself, redemption or pride. It was about helping others. The hard work in the gym wasn’t just helping feed his needs. It was making a difference for others.

Requet’s Punishing Style

“My biggest growth was around the mission,” he explains. “When I was a freshman, I didn’t understand what the Bengal Bouts and its mission were all about. As I competed through the years, the mission became my focus.”

At 5-foot-10 and 185 pounds, Requet earned a reputation in the club as a scrappy, aggressive fighter, delivering nonstop, powerful punches. He won his first fight delivering a second-round knockout.

Working hard for others helped him grind it out at more practices. Push harder and polish technique. He focused on conditioning and making sure each workout had purpose.

“It was kind of insane,” he recalls. “The kid was pretty good, and I didn’t expect that to happen.”

Requet returned to the Bouts as the underdog. The crowd was there to see a championship rematch of the team’s two captains who fought to a draw the previous year. But Requet rewrote the story. He defeated one captain in the semifinals, then redeemed his most devastating de-

That tournament, Requet reached the quarterfinals before taking his first loss to a much larger 6-foot-4 senior lefty who went on to become champion. But the adrena-

feat in the Championship Round.

“For your 185-pound champion, and your winner, by unanimous decision, in the gold corner, Eric ‘Cheese Sandwich’ Requet!” the announcer boomed, and the referee raised Requet's left hand skyward.

Fighting Spirit Continues Requet went out a champion that day, never to return to the ring. He was sidelined his senior year after being diagnosed with Lyme disease, but was elected by fellow boxers as senior captain and fulfilled his duty. He continued to lead workouts, help others train and raise money for the Holy Cross Missions. Requet is most proud of the $200,000 raised by the Bengal Bouts his senior year. “Being competitive means putting it all out there, even when times are tough,” Requet says. “I had to battle through injuries. I put it all on the line. I know there is nothing I would have done differently.” Today, he brings that same fighting spirit to his career. Following his graduation from the University of Notre Dame, Requet moved to Los Angeles to work as a research and design engineer improving insulin pump technologies. “Diabetes impacts so many and I hope to make advancements that can have a positive impact on millions of people,” he says. “From my boxing experience, I know this is just the start of the journey." “And I’ve learned that along the way, even when you lose, it isn’t the end of the road. There is always something on the horizon, and you just have to learn everything you can from the experience."

ABOVE (COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME) REQUET IN THE 2019 BENGAL BOUTS CHAMPIONSHIP

Watch: Search “Eric Requet Bengal Bouts Championship” on YouTube to see Eric's 2019 title fight. P a s s a g e s | Spring 2021 9


Sharing a Lived Experience STUDENT AMBASSADORS SHARE THEIR HOLY FAMILY EXPERIENCES

Holy Family's admissions team prides itself on showing prospective families the "real" Holy Family during their campus visits. This year's Covid-19 protocols required a new way of introducing our school to families. Vice President for Enrollment and School Partnerships Scott Breimhorst created Fire Family Visits, small group, socially-distanced opportunities for families to visit and remain safe doing so. These events replaced the larger format open houses. From October through February, he and admissions associate Katie Miller hosted more than 60 Fire Family Visits and dozens of individual personal family tours. To accommodate the demand for visits, Breimhorst and Miller added another team member, or rather, 90 new team members, with the introduction of a student ambassador program. The Fire Ambassador Program's vision is to embrace the mission of Holy Family Catholic School and put our student leaders in the spotlight. Students in grades 10-12 applied for the

HOLY FAMILY ADMISSIONS TEAM SCOTT BREIMHORST AND KATIE MILLER

Fire Ambassador Program in the spring of 2020. Neither the students nor the admissions team anticipated how critical the ambassadors would be in meeting the

increased interest in our school and this new approach to welcoming families.

Beyond Introductions Miller dedicates her efforts to ensuring a very personal approach to student visits. She manages a spreadsheet populated with the ambassadors' activities, interests, and academic course information. She then uses the data to match student ambassadors with prospective students for the Fire Family Visits. For example, if the prospective student likes math and basketball, Miller scours the spreadsheet and arranges one or more ambassadors with those courses and activities as the visit guides. Holy Family enrollment increased by 21% this year; families joined our community over the summer and during the school year. Ambassadors pair with ninth-grade and transfer students to support students through their high school journeys and help with their transitions to Holy Family. They

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can reach out to their ambassador anytime they have questions or need advice from another student. The 11th-grade ambassadors also lead BTC (Beyond the Classroom) sessions to pass on advice and help the ninth-grade class connect as classmates.

Building a Resume of Skills The large group of volunteers allowed Miller to divvy up responsibilities by grade levels. The 11th-grade ambassadors focused on ninth-grade orientation and transition. The 12th-grade ambassadors led Fire Family Visits, and due to the heavily booked calendar of Fire Family Visits, junior and sophomore ambassadors also stepped in to lighten the load. Ambassadors help with a wide variety of tasks including congratulatory videos for new applicants, follow-up tours, transfer orientation and mentorship, mailings, webinars, special events, and outreach to future Fire families. Not only are their acquired skills significant additions to college resumes, but they are also life skills relevant to future opportunities at college and in careers. Above all, it helps further instill the Holy Family commitment to serving your community by reaching out to others and helping them feel welcome and valued. And, the ambassadors remain eager to do so, often

AMBASSADORS MEET WITH NINTH-GRADE STUDENTS TO HELP ESTABLISH CONNECTIONS.

showing up for every opportunity offered.

Growing into Leaders As our students lead more and more visits, their confidence grows. While always present for Fire Family Visits, the admissions team now steps back as the student ambassadors share their Holy Family journeys and answer questions about classes, activities, friendships, school lunches, and uniforms. When asked questions about what they love most about their school, the most repetitive answer from our ambassadors has been, "I know it may sound cliché, but we really are a Family." As they listen from the back of the

admissions center, Miller and Breimhorst feel like proud parents to their group of ambassadors. Miller recalls the moments listening to ambassadors' stories, "Our ambassadors have told such amazing stories during these visits. They've warmed our hearts, made us laugh, and even caused me to shed a few tears, but they are all different and they all show our prospective families the impact of a Holy Family education."

Irreplaceable Asset Breimhorst finds one of the largest gifts of the ambassador program is the authentic stories students share with visitors to our school. He says, "As a Holy Family parent, I can go on and on about what I love about this school. But when a prospective parent asks a question and receives a current student's heartfelt answer and personal story, it becomes pretty hard to argue that Holy Family isn't the best place for your kid."

LEFT IMAGE: AMBASSADORS WRITE NOTES OF ENCOURAGEMENT AND PREPARE ACCEPTANCE PACKAGES FOR MEMBERS OF HOLY FAMILY'S CLASS OF 2025.

As our seniors graduate, additional ambassadors will be needed to fill their roles. Students currently in grades 9-11 interested in becoming ambassadors are invited to stop by the admissions office or email Mrs. Miller at millerk@hfchs.org.

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Golden Opportunity NIKKI ELLIOTT AND HER BUSINESS PARTNER BELIEVE IN ELEVATING HEALTHY SNACKING

Looking back, Nikki Elliott '10 is certain some of the most important lessons she learned at Holy Family Catholic High School were outside the classrooms. They were from the teachers, teammates, coaches, and a tight-knit group of friends that became like family. “They saw potential and pushed me to believe in myself,” Elliott says. She still remembers their positive messages and encouragement. Today she shares the same energy with those around her, including her business partner, Michelle Razavi. Together, they are on an entrepreneurial journey where believing in their brand and its mission is the path to success.

Elevating a crowded snack category In late 2019, the pair teamed up to launch a high-protein collagen snack that Razavi first started making in her San Francisco kitchen. Sensitive to dairy, gluten, and the long list of preservatives, artificial sweeteners, and processed fibers found in most “clean” protein bars, she set out to create a functional snack that wouldn’t upset her stomach. Razavi left a digital marketing career and invested her savings in the creation of an uncompromised natural snack with

sustainably-sourced collagen, plant protein, and antioxidant superfoods the body needs to thrive. She quickly realized a strong business-minded partner was essential to help build a brand, not just a product. She turned to Elliott as a perfect co-founder. A mergers and acquisitions consultant for PwC in San Francisco, California, Elliott had the financial savvy and lived the same adventurous, on-the-go lifestyle that defines their brand. Elliott invested money saved for grad school to help bootstrap

2010 Womens 4x100m Relay Class A State Champions:Wondra, Spinner, Kemmerer, and Elliott

Nikki with her parents on graduation day at Boston College

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A post-college move to San Francisco proved a great fit for Nikki's adventure lifestyle.


their operation, confident that together they were a powerful team. Razavi runs the day-to-day operations, while Elliott handles the numbers, in addition to her full-time career at PwC. “Michelle pushes this company forward, and it wouldn’t be what it is without her full-time devotion,” says Elliott.

After months of meticulous recipe formulation, they placed the first order of 5,000 bars branded BYLD Bar. While waiting for the inventory, they quickly launched a website and began social media blasts announcing the new product. The first production run of bars sold out in under ten weeks.

Healthy mind, healthy life

“That was the moment we said let’s do this…this is going to be something,” Elliott says.

At Holy Family, Elliott was a member of four state-qualifying dance teams and a standout sprinter earning multiple trips to state in the 4x100m relay and the 100-meter dash. She went on to attend her dream school, Boston College. At BC, she was a cheerleader on the sidelines of football and basketball games. She developed a passion for health and wellness by teaching group fitness classes at the university’s rec center. Her drive and sense for adventure were continuing to build. She interned with PwC in Minneapolis, accepting a fulltime position in their San Francisco office after graduating. Moving to the West Coast meant making new friends. The easiest way—stay involved in something she loved. “I started teaching group fitness classes at Equinox at 5:30 a.m. to accommodate my busy work schedule,” Elliott says. “It created an incredible community—the girls that came to my classes are still my best friends in San Francisco. It’s where I met Michelle, who was also an instructor.” The two became fast friends, bonding over balancing teaching fitness with corporate jobs.

Silver linings in challenging times Manufacturing the first batch of bars true to Razavi’s recipe was the first of many challenges. They worked with food scientists to scale the kitchen recipe to commercial production and received a fair amount of pushback to add preservatives and additives typically in shelf-stable foods.

Building a business and brand comes with many inflection points, but no one could plan for a global pandemic. When we launched, the world looked a lot different,” Elliott admits, “Our customers were constantly on-the-go, traveling the world, working long days at the office, and relied on protein bars to fuel them. Our growth strategy was to build brand awareness in the fitness space—be in the shops of gyms and studios, at the checkout counters of wellness shops, and at endurance events—places where we could meet our health-conscious target market directly. COVID-19 changed that.” They quickly pivoted from retail to a scaled digital-focused strategy, positioning the snack as a healthier choice to fuel consumers’ hectic days at home. The young start-up added two more flavors and rebranded as ELAVI (pronounced el-ah-vee), a portmanteau of their last names that implies an elevated snack experience. “2020 has been about finding the silver linings,” Elliott says. “I am so proud of what we’ve accomplished in our first year of business despite the macroeconomic setbacks. With a standout product and sheer grit, we maintained growth in a crowded category while staying true to our brand and commitment to quality. However, we couldn’t have done it without the constant support of each other and from our friends, family, and community—a lesson that still rings true since my days at Holy Family.”

The company name is a portmanteau of the last names of business partners Nikki Elliott + Michelle Razavi.

The original snack has now been joined by two additional flavors.

LEARN MORE about ELAVI at elavi.co and follow on Instagram at @heyelavi.

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Welcome to Mrs.Piatt's Classroom ELIZABETH PIATT ADAPTS HER CLASSROOM AND CURRICULUM TO MEET IN-PERSON GUIDELINES

Holy Family math teacher Elizabeth Piatt is not a stranger to adapting to new environments and protocols. She grew up in northwest Arkansas, received a bachelor's degree in secondary education with a math emphasis from Missouri State University, and a master's in curriculum and instruction from State University of New York. Before finding her way to Victoria and a full-time teaching position at Holy Family, she moved five times with her husband Michael and their two children Lillian and Landon, following Michael's job promotions and teaching in five different school districts in 12 years. After spending the 2019-20 school year as a long-term substitute for a local school district, Piatt jumped at the opportunity to apply for a full-time teaching position in a school near her home and with a strong sense of family and community. Moving frequently and restarting at new schools has made Piatt a seasoned professional at entering a school culture. She describes her approach, "I've learned to jump right in, ask a lot of questions, and put myself out there a little bit more." However, she admits collaborating with colleagues under COVID protocols can be more isolating, "We meet and exchange ideas more through emails with fewer visits to each other's classrooms." Still,

she describes her fellow faculty members and the school's administrators as "always willing to listen and support each other." She says, "Everyone wants to work in an environment where they feel heard and valued. When I walk into this building in the morning, I feel like it is my happy place." Waiting for her each day are six sections of geometry students, two of those sections being Honors Geometry, and one includes a class of Guardian Angels Catholic School math students. She appreciates the strong culture of respect at Holy Family and enjoys her students' positivity toward learning and the caring and respectful relationships between students and teachers.

submitted what she needed to, and check to see if she missed any on-line sessions." She says, "After my kids go to bed, my Holy Family students know I am available by email and sometimes by video chat so we can share our screens and work through some problems." For her, the balance to this demanding schedule is summer, when she and her children will wake up each day to play and only play. They have her undivided attention.

At times this year, however, choosing to work in a school educating its students in-person while her children are distance-learning has at times made this young mother feel as though she is choosing the education of other peoples' children over her children's educations.

Still, she wouldn't have it any other way. Even with the additional demand on her home life and time required to prepare lesson plans to accommodate social distancing, a handful of on-line students, and the unexpected, Piatt prefers teaching her students in-person versus teaching them on-line from home. Within her classroom, she can walk around to their small groups and offer additional help, and she finds students engage with their classmates and the lesson much more organically and frequently.

She explains, "My daughter, Lillian, is in first grade in a distance learning daycare with other children of Tier 1 workers such as educators and healthcare workers. I taught her to tell time so she could join her Zoom meetings, and when I get home, I go over her assignments, make sure she

As an educator, Elizabeth Piatt hopes to make a subject such as math easier for all students and to help students have the best high school experience. Like the Holy Family community, she believes the best learning and social experience for all students happens on campus, in person.

TEACHING IN-PERSON ENABLES PIATT TO MOVE AROUND TO SMALL GROUPS DURING IN-CLASS COLLABORATION TIMES.

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Pushing the Boundaries of Design PANDEMIC LIMITATONS OPEN DOORS FOR NEW IDEAS AND CREATIVITY

Caroline Ellingboe Shields '12 always loved to doodle. Sophia Nord '12 remembers sitting in the classroom next to her childhood friend, who had the best handwriting and little sketches on notebooks. “It doesn’t surprise me at all that she went into graphic design,” Nord said. “And it doesn’t surprise me that she’s amazing at it.” In 2019, after almost three years in the corporate design world, Ellingboe launched her own business, Ellingboe Design and Photography. The work lets Ellingboe show off her many creative talents. She helps clients develop brand identities and designs whatever print or digital materials they need. She shoots photos for businesses or events and seamlessly integrates the images into companies’ websites. She creates mixed-medium collages to help inspire others through art for their homes or offices. Ellingboe had mulled the endeavor since graduating in 2016 from Bowling Green State University, where she studied graphic design and minored in marketing. A trip to Thailand a few years later spurred her to make the leap. “I wanted to work with people who have passionate ideas,” Ellingboe explained. “People who have drives and motivations and ideas that they want to bring to life.” People like Nord, who was running a salt yoga studio and spa in Wayzata with her mom and sister Emily '13. When the COVID-19 pandemic forced the studio and spa to close temporarily, Nord began exploring ways to do some revamping. She hired Ellingboe to help. Soon The Cave Salt Yoga and Spa had a colorful new logo, updated brand guidelines, and an improved website.

her newfound shelter-in-place time to bolster her portfolio and connect with more clients, while also experimenting with different hands-on art projects (some of which she sells on Etsy and her website). “I’ve been creating constantly just to keep the juices flowing,” she said. Ellingboe credits Holy Family with helping develop her interest in design through her work on the school yearbook. “Because we were at such a small school, I felt like I had those kinds of intimate experiences with my classmates and teachers,” she reflected. “That’s the type of relationship that I pursue with my design clients.” Ellingboe is based in Minnetonka, but works with businesses all over the world. She uses her social media pages— @ellingboedesign and @ellingboephoto—to reach potential customers, showcase her work, and provide daily doses of creative inspiration. One day on the job is never the same as the next. Ellingboe will go from photographing a small wedding to designing a resume for a young professional to planning an online forum for qualifiers of the Boston Marathon (a project in progress). She squeezes a part-time gig coaching gymnastics into her busy schedule. “I think that one positive thing the last year did bring us was more time,” she said with a laugh. “For small business owners, including myself, it was a time to really dive into our own businesses and work on reaching people in new ways.” “I saw it as an opportunity to finally make everything I want,” she added. “To push the boundaries of my creativity.”

“Everything I said, she was able to take and turn into a vision,” Nord remembered. “They’re a small, local business—which I’m all about—and I’ve known them my whole life,” Ellingboe said. “I was honored to be asked to work with them.” During the pandemic, Ellingboe noticed many others making similar efforts to refresh their on-line presences. She used

P a s s a g e s | Spring 2021 17


The Magic Lies in the Possibilities NEW THEATER DIRECTOR EXPLORES THE POSSIBILITIES WITHIN HER CASTS' IMAGINATIONS

THE THREE LITTLE PIGS PORTRAYED BY PHOEBE JOHNSON '24, LAURA THEIS '22, AND BONNIE BECK '23 FROM "ORANGE IS THE NEW GLASS" PHOTO CREDIT: COLLIN NAWROCKI '21

In the five years since it opened, the Holy Family Performance Center transformations include a giant peach, an undersea kingdom, Oz and Narnia, and even a chocolate factory. While this year's Covid-19 limitations, unfortunately, left audiences on the flip-side of a screen rather than enveloped in set designs within the black box theater, it did not stop the Holy Family Theater Department from pursuing a full theatrical season.

that focuses on everything—tech, writing, stage management, and a theater community. The reason I decided to do a season is for just that reason. We can have a straight play that is new and exciting written by a new playwright. Then we get to write something and then we will do a musical. If you can't sing or are busy with another activity during one production, you still have two chances to be in a play."

The department kicked off its season in late November with four live-streamed performances of Tyler Dwiggins' "Orange is the New Glass." Veteran Holy Family cast members welcomed new actors and crew members as they performed Dwiggins' comedic modern fable starring traditional fairy tale characters. After a brief rest for the Thanksgiving

Under Guthrie veteran and Holy Family Director of Theater Anna Crace, the department is creating a season of shows centering around the theme of fairy tales. Crace selected the theme to provide a little magic for the casts and audiences. She explains, "Everyone can use a little bit of magic right now. It allows us to come out of ourselves a little bit and explore new possibilities and new worlds." Possibilities are what she hopes students will find under her direction, "I'm looking to create a theater department at Holy Family that doesn't just focus on acting but one ORIGINAL SCRIPT AND PRODUCTION OF THE ONE-ACT PLAY "DUST-PC" PERFORMED VIA ZOOM 18 P a s s a g e s | Spring 2021


holiday, the department set straight to work writing a one-act play for January's 2021 MSHSL One-Act play competition. Under the guidance of Crace and written entirely over Zoom meetings, Holy Family's one-act cast wrote the original script for the play, "Dust-PC." Their writing soon revealed art imitating life as they constructed the plot around an initial premise of fairy tale characters caught in some sort of lockdown on their kingdom. During the writing process, all ideas and creative input were welcome and encouraged. Writing prompts and character creation inspired the scriptwriting. Monologues eventually transformed into conversations. The result was a fully-developed script for nine characters in a modern-day fairy tale titled "Dust-PC." The script tells the tale of Charmalot, a kingdom on lockdown due to the contamination of flight transportation fuel, pixie dust. The contaminated dust affects members of the Charmalot Kingdom differently, including bouts of itchy rashes, singing, rhyming, and anger that, if left untreated, could lead to evil. As they come to grips with the contamination's reality, the kingdom pulls together to discover and resolve the contamination source. With the script in a final draft by late December, the cast began rehearsing over Zoom. Simultaneously, the tech crew developed the framework to bring the show to life within the MSHSL's One-Act Competition guidelines. The play presented its characters as part of Zoom calls resolving their kingdom's dilemma. The production required complex coordination

SOPHOMORE MICHAEL GARLETS MANAGES THE SOUND BOARD FOR ONE-ACT PLAY.

of lighting, sound, projection, and technology integration. Each member of the cast selected props and costumes most befitting their portrayals of well-known characters: Robin Hood, Evil Queen, Merlin, Tinkerbell, Rapunzel, White Rabbit, Peter Pan, and Little Mermaid. On January 28, the cast performed and recorded their show for submission for the 2021 MSHSL One-Act Section competition. While the piece did not advance to the state competition, the performance received high praises from judges. One judge's notes read, "As an original script, I applaud you for taking this moment in time and putting your own spin on it."

Moments after the one-act props were stored and the costumes hung, auditions began for the year's largest production, Stephen Sondheim's musical, "Into the Woods." Following two shows with virtual audiences and resolved to find an audience-safe space, Crace merely had to look out the window to discover the solution­—the four mid-April performances of the musical will be held outside on the Holy Family Campus, appropriately, with a set created in the woods. Limited seats will be available for the spring musical, "Into the Woods." Watch the Holy Family website and social media channels for more information.

THE ENTIRE CAST OF "ORANGE IS THE NEW GLASS" CELEBRATE DURING THE FINAL NUMBER OF THE SHOW. PHOTO CREDIT: COLLIN NAWROCKI '21

P a s s a g e s | Spring 2021 19


GABY CORONA '22

JAIDEN LINDEMANN '23

PATRICK HERRON '24

BERKLEY NEUBAUER '24

Winter Arts Showcase LILY SCHAFFER '24

Students from Ms. MacDonald's art classes and Mr. Perrin-Smith's photography classes displayed their first semester creations during the Holy Family Visual Arts Virtual Winter Showcase. The show featured 265 pieces of student artwork from all grade levels including many pieces from youngest student-artists, members of the class of 2024. To see the full art show, visit http://hfchs.org/events/2020-winter-art-showcase.

20 P a s s a g e s | Spring 2021


KEENAN OLSEN '24

CATHERINE DUECK '24

CLAIRE DUNCAN '24

PHOEBE JOHNSON '24

ZOE SCHUELE '24

P a s s a g e s | Spring 2021 21


Alumni Updates 2004 NATHAN AND KAYLA ROONEY wel-

comed their third daughter, Lucia Anastasia, on October 28, 2020. Lucia joins big sisters, Heidi & Eviana.

2007 JASON AND KELLY (O'BRIEN) EGGIMAN welcomed 11 pound baby girl, Penelope Shea, in September 2020. She joins big brothers, Theodore and Finnegan.

In the fall of 2020, the HFCHS Alumni Committee introduced virtual conversations for alumni hosted by alumni. These events respond to our alumni community members' expressed desire to have a space to connect and learn from each other as our country continues to grapple with various social justice issues. While this year's conversations center around racial justice, the committee does intend to expand the topics in the future. Participants are encouraged to listen and join the discussion with open minds and hearts. There is no obligation to speak, but shared thoughts and comments should remain respectful. What is said and learned in this space stays remains anonymous. On behalf of the alumni committee, Holy Family shares information about upcoming alumni-only conversations via email and its social media accounts (Facebook/Instagram/Twitter: @hfchsalumni).

2016 JOE OAKMAN graduated in December

2020 from Colorado State University with a degree in Construction Management. In January, Joe started with RA Nelson LLC as a project engineer in Vail/Avon, Colorado.

Alumni wishing to be notified of future conversations and events are encouraged to provide current contact information using the alumni update form on the school website or via email to Director of Alumni Relations Matt Thuli at thulim@hfchs.org. Thank you to our hosts and participants for engaging in this important and educational series. We hope to see new faces and hear from new voices in upcoming events.

2016 JORDAN ARITT-STEELE graduated

in May 2020 with a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice from the University of North Dakota. He participated in the Air Force ROTC program while in college and is now a Commissioned Officer (2nd Lieutenant) stationed in North Carolina.

CORRECTION: Our apologies to Jordan Aritt-Steele for the misspelling of his last name in the Fall 2020 issue of Passages Magazine.

22 P a s s a g e s | Spring 2021


SCHOOL LEADERSHIP MICHAEL BRENNAN | President JOHN DOLS | Principal

BOARD EMERITUS DIANNE ANTON BARB BURKE STEVE BURKE TOM BURKE THEO CHALGREN TIM CUROE TONY DENUCCI FR. DOUG EBERT BOB FAFINSKI MARY FAFINSKI ANNE FURLONG ANGELO GALIOTO JOHN GEISLER DIANA GOEBEL SCOTT GUILLEMETTE BOB KEMMERER MARK LANO BRIAN LAVELLE

2020-2021 BOARD OF DIRECTORS TYLER TREAT | Board Chair ROBIN KRIER | Vice Chair JOHN BIERBAUM | Board Treasurer TOM MURPHY | Member at Large KELLEY THOMES RIES | Board Secretary CHADY ALAHMAR TOM FURLONG DR. SCOTT KIER TONY KIRSCH BARRY LIESKE CHRISTOPHER NELSON SCOTT O’BRIEN MICHAEL PUKLICH BRENDA REDDAN TODD STOHLMEYER MARC TERRIS FR. ROLF TOLLEFSON MIKE WARMKA LISA WEATHERS '09 RUSTY ZAY

BOARD EMERITUS ANNE LAWLER FR. ERIK LUNDGREN JEAN MARSCHALL BILL MILLER CHRISTOPHER MOAKLEY (LATE) JOE MORIN BERT NOTERMANN JOHN RADICK JENNY RICHELSEN PAUL ROTHSTEIN ROB ROY DEB SECREST BILL SLATTERY MARY STEINER JANE STONE BILL TRAXLER FR. BOB WHITE

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION MELISSA LIVERMORE | Assistant Principal for Academic Support MATT THULI | Assistant Principal for Student Life & Alumni Relations

SUPPORT STAFF MAUREEN BRENNER | Administrative Assistant SARAH PINAMONTI, RN | School Nurse

ACTIVITIES NICK TIBESAR | Activities Director TIM TRIPLETT | Assistant Activities Director

GUIDANCE AND LEARNING SUPPORT JEREMY BALDWIN | Counselor PAIGE LEPAK | Counselor KRISTA MCCOY | Counselor JOSHUA RUTZ | Counselor MEG REDSHAW | Academic Support ANNIE KANDIKO | Academic Support TRACY BOERBOOM | Information Resources

ADVANCEMENT SCOTT BREIMHORST | Vice President for Enrollment JACK KELLY | Chief Development Officer LAURA PODERGOIS | Director of Content Strategy & Communications BRENDAN MEIER | Digital Marketing Specialist AMANDA CAHILL | Advancement Office Coordinator KATIE MILLER | Admissions Associate FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ERIN HESSE | Director of Finance JODI SMITH | Accountant

FACILITIES & MAINTENANCE GREG HEINEN SHAUN PLOTNIK LISA PLOTNIK RICH SMITH BLAINE WEGNER

2020-2021 TEACHING STAFF ENGLISH ZACHARY BROWN DIEDRE DIGGINS CARLEE KOCON LESLIE SWANSON FINE ARTS LAURA BOILLAT SEAN BARKER ARIELLE MACDONALD BRAD PERRIN-SMITH MATHEMATICS KAREN ATKINSON GARY KANNEL MICHAEL LEVERENTZ SUE LOEFFLER ELIZABETH PIATT ASHLYN SCHREINER

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND WELLNESS LAUREN KAHLE PAUL RUSSO SCIENCE JOSHUA DWYER IAN PARZYCK DR. JIM TISEL JIM WALKER SOCIAL STUDIES WILL EGAN '14 PATRICK MAUS '03 DR. HOLLY POTTEBAUM TRENT WIEBUSCH

TECHNOLOGY GARY KANNEL NICK LIVERMORE BRAD PERRIN-SMITH (Technology Coordinator) THEOLOGY DOUGLAS BOSCH LYNNAE BOSCH FR. NELS GJENGDAHL BRENDAN MCINERNY NATHAN SCHLEPP WORLD LANGUAGES DIERDRE DIGGINS JACOB DUECK KAREN KIDROWSKI JORGE OCONITRILLO


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Holy Family Catholic High School 2021 Spring Passages  

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