Holy Family Catholic High School 2019 Spring Passages

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Passages H O LY F A M I LY C AT H O L I C H I G H S C H O O L | SPRING 2019

IN THIS ISSUE: WRECKED FOREVER | Page 4 CAMPUS MINISTRY | Page 6

POLITICAL PATHWAYS | Page 8 VOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT | Page 10

ABOVE: Photo by

TEACHER SPOTLIGHT | Page 12 PROJECT STRENGTH | Page 14

FIRE AT STATE | Page 16 ALUMNI UPDATE | Page 22

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Mission Statement

Table of Contents

Holy Family Catholic High School

LETTER FROM PRESIDENT BRENNAN | Page 03

offers students excellence

WRECKED FOREVER | Page 04

in education by providing

CAMPUS MINISTRY | Page 06

opportunities to grow spiritually,

POLITICAL PATHWAYS | Page 08

morally, intellectually, and physically within a community of Faith. We empower and encourage our students to achieve

VOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT | Page 10 TEACHER SPOTLIGHT | Page 12 PROJECT STRENGTH | Page 14 FIRE AT STATE | Page 16 GALLERY | Page 20

personal excellence,

ALUMNI UPDATES | Page 22

to use their talents to lead,

LEADERSHIP/FACULTY | Page 23

to serve God, one another, and the larger community.

MEET OUR CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Mike Nelson'08 is an editor and writer at the Star Tribune in Minneapolis. Since graduating from Marquette University with a degree in journalism, he has also written for Bleacher Report, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and MLB.com. Nelson lives in Burnsville with his wife, Kim.

Katie Galioto'14 graduated from the University of Notre Dame in May 2018. Since then, she has reported for the Star Tribune and the Chicago Tribune as an intern on both papers’ metro desks. She currently works as a breaking news intern for POLITICO in Washington, D.C.

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your community, your family, your school


Letter from President Michael Brennan

As each one has received a gift, use it to serve one another as good stewards of God’s varied grace. —1 Peter 4:10

At a recent staff retreat I found myself reflecting intently upon the mission of Holy Family Catholic High School. In this prayerful analysis, it gradually became clear that I had been asking myself – and subsequently seeking to answer – what turned out to be the wrong question. For whatever reason I was fixated on searching for a “what” or a “why” to this question of mission…that is, I was on a quest to summon some profoundly esoteric rationale that supports our reason for existing as a school. What I was failing to notice, however, was the very purpose for our place in this world was right in front of me – raw and in plain sight – the whole time. In fact, it was all around me. The answer wasn’t a “why” or a “what” but rather, “who.”

ABOVE: Photo by Remember Me Photography

Allow me to provide a bit of context. On this retreat, as colleagues offered reflections of their respective journeys that led them to serve at Holy Family, it became crystal clear that the answer to “why work at Holy Family?” was never about the “what," but always about the “who.” People – individually and collectively – were at the heart of each of these stories and functioned as the cornerstones for each person’s decision to be here at Holy Family. And in similarly inspiring fashion, as three alumni shared memories of their Holy Family experiences and the impact on their lives, the common thread woven throughout the fabric of each testimonial was one of relationships – again, not “what” but “who.” To these former students, what mattered most to them was not any particular assignment, novel or lab report. It wasn’t a specific class, game or convocation. Rather, it was the people present in those experiences that mattered…

the who. Their reflections were not about how or why Holy Family impacted their lives, but instead, who impacted their lives. Who laughed with them. Who cried with them. Who celebrated with them. Who mourned with them. Who led them. Who empowered them. Who pushed and challenged them. Who showed them empathy and compassion. Who believed in them. Who loved them. As you read through the stories in this issue, you will see the same pattern emerge. The “what” and the “why” exist, but more importantly, in each case you’ll witness the “who” enter the stage and steal the show. The stories of Margaret Kirsch’s return to Ethiopia or Hannah Flom’s and Patrick StewartHester’s active civic engagement, are but a sampling of Holy Family’s ripened fruits that bear witness to our lived mission of serving others in an act of love and service to Him – the ultimate “Who.” Indeed, Holy Family Catholic High School seeks to prepare students for successful lives well beyond high school, yet it exists both for and because of people- the people we are today, the people our students will become, and the people whose lives will, in turn, be impacted by the goodness they spread throughout the world. Live Jesus in our Hearts,

Mike Brennan

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Wrecked Forever

MARGARET KIRSCH '16 SHARES THE EXPERIENCE OF RETURNING TO ETHIOPIA

I first visited Ethiopia in the summer of 2016 as a new graduate of Holy Family along with 10 other students and our chaperones, HF assistant principal John Dols, Dean of Academic Support Melissa Livermore and parent Chris Parker. Our three weeks visiting the Lasallian Brother schools in Dire Dawa and Addis Ababa seemed to fly by faster than I could imagine. I fell in love with Ethiopia­— the country, the culture, the people, and especially the kids. It broke my heart to leave and, at the same time, I had a sense of peace that I would return. 2016 ETHIOPIA TRIP: MARGARET KIRSCH, NATALIE WATLZ, JACOB FRITZ, NICK SOKOLIS, CLAIRE MELANDER. BACK ROW: KRISTA MUELLER, ANNIE ROTHSTEIN, TIM PUMPER, CLAUDIA LAROSE, ANNA MOHLING, ZACH MCCORMICK

like to come to Ethiopia and for how long so that we can plan. My dear Margaret, you are highly welcome to stay either in the school or with the Brothers. God bless, Br. Kassu."

Making Plans So, as my friends planned for a semester studying abroad, I worked with

my academic counselor to schedule my course load to complete my degree in four years with one semester off. It required that I unenroll for the 2018 fall semester and re-enroll upon my return. Taking summer classes and extra credits where I could, it all worked out. I then applied for a visa on-line and received an almost immediate response approving a threemonth stay in Ethiopia. It was happening. I was set to return to Addis Ababa. Before leaving, I called Mr. Dols and asked if we could meet for lunch. I was confident in responding to the call to return to Addis Ababa but less confident about managing the responsibilities and emotions of such an extended stay alone. He encouraged me not to have expectations going in. And he explained I could get wrecked, meaning the experiences may seem unbearably difficult. We discussed focusing on the beauty and joy in all situations, rather than the difficult things. I would later find myself recalling this advice almost daily, sometimes hourly.

MARGARET TAKING A SELFIE WITH A FEW FAMILIAR FACES FROM HER FIRST TRIP

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I packed two bags: one for my personal use and the other filled with items for the kids at the orphanage. I brought a lot of

LEFT: Photo by Holy Family Archives and Margaret Kirsch

That fall I started my first year at St. Louis University. I made friends quickly and enjoyed my classes, but I still found myself continually thinking about Ethiopia and the kids from the Missionaries of Charity home adjacent to Saint John Baptist De La Salle Catholic School in Addis Ababa. Over Christmas break of my freshman year, I contacted the school's administrator, Brother Kassu, and told him that I didn’t know when, but I wanted to return to Ethiopia again soon. He replied to my email, "Let me know when you would


paper, markers, and pencils to give to them. I added many bags of embroidery string to make friendship bracelets, and nail polish for weekend activities with the kids. I also packed new clothes for the girls and boys at the orphanage. They typically receive only used items, so to have new clothes to choose from is a special surprise. In my personal bag, I carried some chocolate and trail mix for a little change from the daily meals of misiro wat and injera (lentil stew and flatbread), four blank journals, and a few pictures of my family and friends to show the kids.

Heading Back On September 10, 2018, I boarded an airplane at Chicago O'Hare to begin my 22-hour journey back to Ethiopia. Excited. Ready. Leaving the rest up to God. I had talked to Brother Kassu only once or twice, I prayed he knew I was serious and would be at the airport when I arrived. Thankfully, my phone was able to connect to service quickly after landing in Addis Ababa. I sent a text to Brother Kassu alerting him of my arrival. Ding. Came his reply, "I am here." I wrangled my suitcases from baggage claim and stepped outside the doors of the airport. Within minutes, I was warmly greeted by Brother Kassu, and two others, Brother Solomon and Brother Peter. I arrived at the end of the rainy season. Heavy rain knocked the power out on my first night. As I laid in bed in complete darkness, I was keenly aware of my distance from home. I recall thinking, "Wow. I am really here." I felt a mix of panic and excitement. I was in a new place knowing only Brother Kassu and living in the home of Lasallian Christian Brothers and Sisters. I was about to start a teaching job with 60 students per class, and yet I barely understood the language they spoke. I prayed for peace and fell asleep excited but equally terrified of what was to come.

ABOVE: Photo by Margaret Kirsch

Loving Kids I had two weeks to begin my lesson planning for my teaching assignment at St. John the Baptist De Lasalle School. I was assigned three all-girl sections: one section of grade 9 biology and two sections of grade 10 English. The school educates 2000 students in grades K-12, and sections have 60 students. I had little to no teaching experience previously,

LAST DAY OF CLASS WITH ONE OF HER 10TH GRADE ENGLISH CLASSES

and many of my fellow teachers held their Master’s degrees or doctorates. I planned lessons and wrote exams with few resources. When we had sporadic internet connection for a month, most of my lesson content came from my recollection of what I had learned in high school. I grew to love teaching and seeing my 180 students each day. I embraced the challenge of doing more with less, especially in biology. I wanted the girls to experience the excitement of discovery in science. So, even though we only had three working microscopes and 45 minutes, 63 ninth grade girls piled into the lab and practiced using a light microscope to observe cells. At times, I still can’t believe we did it. During the school days when I wasn't teaching, I would walk over to the orphanage to help take care of the babies, toddlers, and those with higher needs. I helped with feedings and diaper changes. I held and cuddled the little ones. Many of them spend all day in bed because their caretakers do not have time to give extra attention to the little ones as they are busy taking care of the basic needs of everyone. After lunch, I rocked the babies to sleep and sang, clapped, and danced with the toddlers. I spent my evenings and weekends with the kids at the orphanage next door. Many of the kids I had met on my first trip in

2016 were still there. We quickly picked up where we left off and spending time with them became some of my most cherished memories of my three-month stay. I would help out with homework and reteach things the girls didn’t understand. Around us, about ten different other things would be happening. It was a crazy, beautiful mess. Weekends provided a break from homework. We spent hours playing card games, dancing, making bracelets, watching the boys play soccer, and simply hanging out. Every day flew by so fast. The first term ended in early December marking the end of my stay as well. Many times over those months I was broken knowing these children do not have families to hug them, to rock them to sleep at night, and say, “I love you." But as I boarded my plane home, it was the joy of their smiles and the happiness they shared with me that floated through my mind. As predicted by Mr. Dols, these kids wrecked me...in all of the heart-wrenching and beautiful ways he said they would.

Margaret Kirsch re-enrolled at SLU following her trip and is completing a degree in nutrition and dietetics. Following completion of her bachelor degree, she plans to pursue an accelerated nursing program.

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The Lasting Power of Campus Ministry KATIE GALIOTO '14 REFLECTS ON THE IMPACT OF HOLY FAMILY’S CAMPUS MINISTRY PROGRAM.

The squishy black couches were the same. The motivational posters stuck to the white cinder-block walls were the same, as was the white board covered with colorful scrawls. Mrs. Bosch was there, of course, with her trusty clipboard and pencil, the only tools she needs to command her cohort of teenage campus ministers. But as soon as I entered the room, my eyes were drawn to the back wall. A few inches above some orange flames framing the word “FIRE” was a signature—my own, from 2014, the year I graduated from Holy Family. My black Sharpie autograph was surrounded by my classmates’ black Sharpie autographs, which were surrounded by those of our predecessors and successors. Almost a decade of campus ministers are represented on that wall. I walked over to one of the squishy black couches and handed my sister a coffee. Anna is a senior at Holy Family now, and I am a nice older sister. Also I needed some caffeine in my veins to stay awake for a B Period class.

SENIOR CAMPUS MINISTRY STUDENTS LEAD PRAYER AT CONVOCATION

I perched near another squishy black couch and opened my little reporting notebook. I’m working as a journalist nowadays, which I’m guessing is the reason my alma mater asked me to write about its Campus Ministry program. In some ways, it is hard to describe what exactly Campus Ministry is. The program is something so special, so unique to Holy Family. But I will try my best.

Shaping the Spiritual Foundation The goal of Campus Ministry, as Assistant Principal John Dols describes it, is to train Holy Family students to minister to other students. The school first offered Campus Ministry as a class in 2007, an option for students’ senior-year theology requirement. That inaugural group of campus ministers took charge of planning and leading daily convocations, class retreats, and community service projects—work previously handled, for the most part, by faculty.

MEGAN ROTH '19 SIGNS THE WALL

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In the years since, Campus Ministry transformed into an institution at Holy

Family, a privilege for those in their final year at the school. Seniors who choose to sign up for the class are tasked with providing opportunities for the school to grow in faith, service, and community. “It certainly is the vehicle for students to shape the spiritual formation of Holy Family,” Campus Ministry instructor Lynnae Bosch said. She and Dols have provided guidance to campus ministers over the years, but the bulk of the decisions are made by students. “As a school, we are so proud of our students and so confident that after three years of training, we are comfortable with them going out, giving messages, and teaching other kids,” Dols said. Campus ministers are in charge of some of the school’s biggest events, like the highly anticipated Thanksgiving and Christmas Convos debuted each year before holiday breaks. They’re also in charge of the small behind-the-scenes details—the type of work, Bosch said, that can be overlooked.


The 17- and 18-year-old campus ministers coordinate all-school Masses, and they design reconciliation services during Advent and Lent. They organize spiritual retreats at local elementary schools, just as they do for their Holy Family peers— students have an all-class retreat each of their four years at the school.

Then we prayed. A campus minister grabbed the microphone and thanked God for creating our family with a purpose. “Dear Lord, we know that you have plans for us individually and for our family as a whole,” she prayed. “Help us to have an appreciation for each other’s personalities, gifts and even our weaknesses.”

The campus ministers are the ones who run to Costco to pick up enough snacks to feed more than 100 hungry high-school students on retreat and set up the giant projection screen for assemblies. Each day, they stand before the entire school community and lead them in prayer.

We clasped hands and said the Our Father. We turned to the American Flag and said the Pledge of Allegiance. After announcements, the chatter resumed as students and teachers began to make their way to the next class. I stayed for a moment at the top of the bleachers.

“For the younger students, to see someone their age do that every day, I think there’s power in that,” Bosch said.

It was impressive, I thought, that a group of 17- and 18-year-old had been in charge of everything that just happened. A straggling group of campus ministers was still taking down the giant projection screen.

The Cornerstone of Community The bell rang, announcing an end to B Period, and I joined the herd of students parading to the gym—a walk down memory lane. As some 400 students clamber to their spots on the bleachers, I watch the group of campus ministers leading the day’s convocation. They scramble to check in on all the last-minute details, exchanging whispers and a few nods, before one grabs the mic and says the magic words. “Let us remember we are in the holy presence of God.” I’ve never tried it, but I wonder if you said those words someplace—a bar, perhaps, or a crowded restaurant—full of Holy Family alumni, would a hush fall over the room? Would we remember the days we spent in those same bleachers, when those words were uttered and all the chatter—the gossip, the gabbing, the giggles—ceased? The convocation on the day of my visit was Holy Family Feud, a knockoff of the popular game show created by surveys campus ministers collected. On the gym floor, senior Ryan Bowlin quizzed competing students and faculty on the preferences of Holy Family students— their favorite uniform tops, their favorite sporting events, their favorite cafeteria foods. It was clever. It was funny. The team of teachers crushed the team of students, though, to be fair, they had years of institutional knowledge on their side.

In preparation for my visit, Mrs. Bosch asked the campus ministers to write down what they learned from the class and why they valued it. Many said it gave them great public speaking experience or helped them practice organizational skills while planning large events. Some spoke of creativity, of cooperation, of faith, of leadership. I thought back to my own time as a campus minister. Certainly, I learned those skills—skills that would prove to help me immensely in future leadership roles I took on in my college dorm and campus newspaper. But like I said, it’s hard to articulate exactly why I think Campus Ministry is so valuable to the Holy Family community. Because it does so much more. “It is a cornerstone of Holy Family culture,” one student wrote. “I think,” another wrote, “it’s the center of the community aspect that makes HF so great.” I went back to the Campus Ministry classroom to grab my bag and looked at the back wall, the wall my sister and her classmates will sign before they head off to college. This year’s campus ministers will soon pass on the torch to the next group. And the Holy Family tradition of faith, service and community will live on.

ABOVE: KINDESS ROCK PROJECT CREATED DURING THE SIXTH GRADE REATREAT AT ST. HUBERT SCHOOL. THE RETREAT IS PLANNED AND LED BY HFCHS SENIOR CAMPUS MINISTRY STUDENTS.

Campus Ministry Responsibilities Holy Family's campus minister and theology teacher, Lynnae Bosch, and seniors who register for Campus Ministry Class work to meet the spiritual needs of students through: •

Daily Convocation

All-School Monthly Mass, as well as Grandparents Day Mass, Ignite the Fire Mass, Baccalaureate Mass, four class retreat Masses, and the Senior Mass.

Training Eucharistic Ministers for our school community

Class retreats

Reconciliation services

Advent/Lent programing

Service Day

Ongoing service opportunities

Catholic Schools Week activities

Founders Week programing

Outreach to middle schools and faith formation programs

Lasallian Youth Club

Hearts on Fire Club

Lasallian Youth Assembly trip

Story written by Katie Galioto '14. See Katie's bio inside the front cover of this magazine.

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FLOM AT HER COLLEGE GRADUATION

FLOM NOW MANAGES THE DIGITAL COMMUNICATION CHANNELS OF MN GOV. TIM WALZ

Political Pathways began at Holy Family INTRODUCTION TO GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS IN HIGH SCHOOL SPARKS FUTURE CAREERS

"It was an incredible feeling to show up for work at the stately structure for the first time," states Patrick Stewart-Hester, who snagged a job at the U.S. Capitol fresh out of St. John's University in Collegeville, MN. “It’s still incredible. It’s one of those things where you hope it really never stops being incredible,” says Patrick, who graduated from Holy Family Catholic High School in 2009. “It’s a building where so much history has taken place.” These days, Patrick is a witness and contributor to that history. He’s a deputy legislative director for Rep. Elise Stefanik, a young Republican congresswoman from the Adirondack Mountain region of New York. He advises the representative on specific policy areas — lately, a lot of his work has been focused on education and environmental issues — by helping draft and vet legislation. 8 P a s s a g e s | Spring 2019

He also attends committee hearings with Stefanik, monitors debates on the House floor, meets with constituents and activists to discuss policies, and coordinates with government departments and agencies about regulations affecting New York’s 21st District. It keeps him busy, he jokes modestly.

jetted off to D.C. for college at George Washington University. That led to internships at the White House during the Obama administration and on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” Then, after graduating, Hannah stuck around the nation’s capital to work for a political marketing firm.

Curiosity Blossoms

As the 2018 midterms approached, she returned home. It was an exciting time in Minnesota politics, with a governorship, two senate seats, and a handful of competitive congressional districts all up for grabs. Hannah took a job with the state Democratic party, serving as the organization’s digital director throughout the campaign cycle.

For Hannah Flom, too, a curiosity about the political sphere blossomed at Holy Family. Extracurricular activities like Mock Trial and Youth in Government's Model Assembly spurred the 2012 alumna to consider a career in public service for the first time. She took the natural next step and

Perhaps most notably, Democrat Tim Walz was elected governor by a sizable

But, Patrick adds, he loves the work. It’s fulfilling, it’s exciting, and it’s something he’s had an interest in for a long time — since he was a floppy-haired teenager balancing mock trial meets and soccer practices and U.S. history homework in high school.

Come November, Minnesotans cast their ballots. As the election night results trickled in, they brought good news for Hannah and her team: Democratic candidates scored victories across the state.

ABOVE: Photos by Hannah Flom '12

Looming over the National Mall sits the iconic white building, a domed neoclassical edifice with exterior grandeur indicative of the gravity of the work conducted inside.


margin. Shortly after the win, Hannah was asked to join the governor-elect’s transition team, and — after Walz’s inauguration in January — his full-time staff. As digital director for the Office of Governor Walz & Lt. Governor Flanagan, she manages the communications channels of the governor’s office. Hannah accompanies the governor and lieutenant governor to events, takes their photos, runs their social media accounts — all with the goal of making government accessible, transparent, and engaging, she said. In January, she went with the lieutenant governor to a familiar event at the state capitol. Students from across the state came to St. Paul for the annual Model Assembly program, a weekend-long state government simulation. High schoolers drafted bills, debated in committees and ran campaigns for offices. Not too long ago, Hannah was sitting in their seats, excited about the prospects of a career helping better the lives of Minnesotans and Americans. “And here I am now,” she says.

Setting the Foundation When asked separately who had the biggest impact on them during their time at Holy Family, Patrick and Hannah didn’t hesitate one bit before answering and agreeing. Patrick says. “It was Holly Pottebaum. She made all the difference.”

ABOVE: Photo by Patrick Stewart-Hester '09

“The way that she taught was so engaging,” Hannah echoed. “It made me think differently about politics and government and really kind of drew me into this exciting field where the work you do is really impactful.” Dr. Pottebaum, a longtime presence in the school’s social studies department, also leads many of the after-school activities for civic-minded students — Model Assembly, Model United Nations, and Mock Trial. Patrick remembers a time Dr. Pottebaum took a group of students to the University of Minnesota to see former Secretary of State Colin Powell speak. “I think high school is really early to start thinking about what you’re interested in long-term, but Holy Family helped encourage an interest of mine,” he recalls. “And it gave me experiences in that area I think much earlier than other people in high

STEWART-HESTER AT THE DOOR OF THE WEST WING OF THE WHITE HOUSE. DURING A GENERAL VISIT

school have.” In addition to the skills and passions Holy Family cultivated, the school’s emphasis on compassion and charity prepared students for a career path serving the public. “One of the big things that we learned a lot about in all our theology and religion classes was about giving back and the importance of service in our everyday lives,” Hannah shares, who spoke of the “servant leadership” philosophy she and her colleagues try to embody. In today’s political environment — arguably one of the most polarized in American history — the abilities to listen, empathize, and compromise can be among the most valuable qualities for those seeking bipartisanship and lasting government impact. “I think Holy Family does a really good

job helping shape who you want to be as a person and how you need to look at — whether it be your coworkers or your neighbors or your friends — how you see the humanity in people,” Patrick says. One Fire alumnus serves a Republican, the other a Democrat. Neither spoke ill of the other’s party. Both are driven by a call to serve others through their work in politics. A call that, perhaps, they first heard in a white-walled classroom in Victoria, Minnesota, at a high school whose Catholic tradition is extending — through its alumni — to far-off places, like the cavernous chambers of Congress.

Story written by Katie Galioto '14. See Katie's bio inside the front cover of this magazine.

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CAROL AND LILLI '18 HOLDING THE ORIGINAL SKETCHED DESIGN OF THE SET FOR THE LION, THE WITCH, AND THE WARDROBE

Volunteer Spotlight: Carol Graupman HFCHS ALUMNI PARENT CAROL GRAUPMAN CONTINUES TO SHARE HER TALENTS WITH SCHOOL PRODUCTIONS

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Four years later, Carol looked to repeat the experience with her other daughter Lilli '18, then a senior at Holy Family. They considered a painting class until the day Lilli came home from school saying the lead costume designer for the school's production of "The Wizard of Oz" would be unable to finish the costumes due to a death in the family. She wondered if her mother would help her complete a few costumes. The few costumes turned into 72 pieces in 10 days. Carol and Lilli loved working together, and Carol loved her introduction into the HF theater program.

Her girls are now both at college, and Carol is still volunteering her creative talents to Holy Family's theater department. We caught up with her to see what continues to bring her back to volunteer with our productions. HF: Was your work on The Wizard of Oz your first in costume and set design? Carol: Well, my educational background is in environmental and interior design with a minor in theater. I currently work as a designer and event planner. Events are theatrical productions by nature. I've created sets and costumes for various

ABOVE: Photo provided by Carol Graupman

Carol Graupman knows how quickly the high school years fly. So much so, when her oldest daughter Alaina was a sophomore at Holy Family, Carol decided they should do a mother-daughter activity as a way to connect with each other. Carol, a former professional ballroom dance instructor, and Alaina, a trained dancer, decided to audition for roles in a local dance company's production of The Nutcracker. Alaina was selected as a beautiful snowflake and fairy, and Carol, as she describes, landed the role of "a very non-descript Townsperson #23."


local theaters, but most of my recent work was for productions at St. John the Baptist Catholic School in Excelsior. HF: What do you find most rewarding about working in an emerging high school program such as ours? Carol: I love that theater is the place where all of the fine arts interlock. The actors, singers, artists, sound engineers, and carpenters all have to collaborate with each other to make a show happen. I also love the kind of opportunities students have because of the size of this school. Our kids are very talented, and there is a place for them to use their talents within this program beginning in ninth grade or even earlier. I am drawn to the school's commitment to hiring highly qualified directors like Eric Olson. It's a commitment to excellence in all things that makes me proud to be a part of this program and this community. HF: What are the challenges and the advantages of working with our black box performance space? Carol: I view it more as a different approach to performance and design. For example, the lack of a theatrical grid ceiling forces us to be more creative in our plan when hanging things from support systems. A new performance space needs its own correctly sized modular pieces. So, we've created satellite stages that we can flex and work into multiple productions. With each show, we are adding to the school's inventory of hard and soft goods for future uses. The black walls and ceiling require more lighting and more vibrant and vivid colors for both sets and costumes. I love to work with colors, so in many ways it's expanded our imaginations. Corry Hammett, our co-set designer and a theater Jill-of-all-trades, says, "We have to make each set its own special world." So, we do. From the minute our guests walk in the school foyer, they step into the world we've created— maybe it's Kansas, Narnia or under the sea. Even our snacks in the concessions are themed to the experience we have designed. It's a lot of work, but truly a labor of love. For our student actors, it forces them

VIBRANT COLORS HELP THE PRODUCTIONS COME TO LIFE IN THE HF PERFORMANCE CENTER

to remain in character, engage in more significant ways, and stay focused for the entire two hours. There is no hiding in this space. I think it translates into incredible life skills for them as they move onto college and careers. One day these kids will have to give a presentation in college or at work, make a toast at a wedding, and work as part of a collaborative ensemble. The opportunity to be a part of so many productions throughout their years here is giving them not only confidence but practical life skills. HF: The set crew is comprised of students and parent volunteers with varying levels of experience and artistic abilities. How do you and Corry make it work? Carol: Fortunately, when we were creating Narnia, HF alumni parent Jennifer Farner shared her organizational talents with us. She created a master list of everything we needed— people, paintbrushes, glue guns...you name it. She made sure we were set to go on building and painting days. It is an invaluable template we still use today. Current HF parent Kim Pellicci has become the stage mom for everyone. She keeps everyone fed and makes sure parents stay informed. And, then there are parents who show up and say, "Put me to work." I think they find the same joy in it that I did with Alaina and Lilli.

HF: Have you found yourself surprised by our students in any way? Carol: We chose this school for our girls because of the community and the incorporation of faith in its activities. I have found when you volunteer and see it up close, it puts you in awe a little bit. There is a generosity of spirit as I see how patient students can be with each other and how they lift and support each other. They are incredible role models to the middle school students who join our casts. It's not perfect. People get tired or anxious, but there is a sense of family. When they gather in a circle and grab each other's hands to pray before performances, it is all set aside and they wish each other the best. They are a family. HF: Is there anything else you'd like to share? Carol: This school is blessed with visual and performing directors and educators who are passionate about what they teach and who want each student in their programs to experience success. I encourage anyone who loves the arts to support the continued growth of these programs at Holy Family through sharing time, talent, or treasure.

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Teacher Spotlight: Leslie Swanson REDISCOVERING HER ZEAL FOR HER VOCATION AS A CATHOLIC EDUCATOR

I feel so blessed to be teaching at Holy Family because last year, during my 11th year of teaching, I began to question my journey as a teacher, and I almost quit the field. I have always had an interest in teaching for Holy Family, but there were never any openings. I am originally from Arizona, so in 2011, I moved back to my hometown for several years. I made the decision to return to Minnesota in the summer of 2017. When I decided to relocate, I called Kathie Brown; I knew there were not any openings at Holy Family, but I figured I would introduce myself and get some information about both the school and the other Catholic schools in the area. To be honest, I did not think she would call me back— I was just a random stranger calling to ask about a job that did not exist, and let’s face it— a principal’s time is precious during the day. Not only did Kathie call me back, but she talked to me for 40 minutes on the phone. It was evident how passionate she was about the school and this community. I was so appreciative of that phone call- no, there was not a job available, but that conversation reinforced my passion for Catholic schools and my continued interest in what the community of Holy Family had to offer. After returning to Minnesota, I began the 2017-2018 school year working at a very large public school in the area, hoping that this would be the perfect fit. I had just left a Catholic high school in Arizona that I had worked at for five years. This school was very similar to Holy Family in its ideals and vision. I adored being there, so trying to replace this community was already going to be challenging. Transitioning to this newer and larger school left me feeling lost and out of place- I could not be creative in my classroom- I was a robot cranking out curriculum that did not feel like my own. I decided to sit down with the principal to discuss how I was feeling. To my dismay

and disappointment, he was cold and distant, not eager to listen to my worries and concerns, and unfortunately, not willing to help in general. Disheartened, I walked out of his office, cried all the way back to my classroom, and started to mourn the loss of a teaching career that I once adored. As it would turn out, a few months later, Holy Family had an opening for an English position, and despite my discouraged attitude, I contacted Kathie to let her know I was interested. On the day of my interview, I told myself “just try your very best in the interview and leave it in the hands of God.” When Kathie called to offer me a position teaching AP Literature, Honors American Literature, and College Writing, I knew this was my opportunity to work at a school that truly aligned with my teaching philosophies. I was certain this was God’s way of telling me that not only was I not done with the vocation of teaching, but I was also not done with the vocation of being a Catholic educator.

I am grateful for this community. Our administration trusts us to design our curriculum in a way that best fits our unique teaching styles, and they support us to establish a creative vision for our classrooms. I am even more appreciative of the students who show up every day ready to work diligently; they care about their studies and, more importantly, they care about being genuinely good human beings. I am so thankful for all of the wonderful experiences I have had as an educator this year. To the Holy Family community: you are the reason I am still teaching today. Ms. Swanson holds a Bachelor of Science in Broadcast Journalism; a minor in English from Northern Arizona University; a postBaccalaureate degree in Secondary English Education, Arizona State University; a Master’s degree in English, Northern Arizona University

P a s s a g e s | Spring 2019 13


PROJECT STRENGTH

STRONGER. TOGETHER .

In April of 2018, Activities Director Nick Tibesar sketched out the vision he had for the space and brought it forward to school leadership for approval to present the idea to the HF Booster Club.

On any given day 150-200 students use the Holy Family weight room during sports practices, after school workouts, and physical education classes. Until last fall, the room's inflexible arrangement and dated, single-use devices limited our strength coaches and physical education teachers. Age and heavy use was showing on the weights, floors, and even mirrors. The weight room no longer reflected the level of pride we take in every aspect of our school and activities culture.

14 P a s s a g e s | Spring 2019

The Booster Club recognized this project fit well with their commitment to provide the leadership and financial support necessary to sustain and grow high-quality programs. They agreed to assist in any way they could. The goal was simple: Transform the current outdated weight room into a safe, effective, modern training space to better support our students as they strive to reach their health, fitness, and athletic performance goals. Tibesar and Assistant Activities Director Tim Triplett consulted with directors from area high schools and private training companies. They looked at a variety of

designs and equipment, and ultimately tailored a plan to match the exact specifications of our space and school. The final design was based on the most current research and best practices with our students as the #1 focus. While deemed critical, the April 2018 sketch had not made the 2019-2020 budgeting season, and the project would require alternate funding. In addition to launching the first integrated summer training program, FIRE POWER, in 2018, the Holy Family activities department and Booster Club also launched an education campaign within our community to increase awareness of the need and the costs to overhaul the space. The community responded to the call and by mid-August equipment was ordered and volunteers were rolling up their sleeves to clear out all of the old equipment, and painting and prepping for the future. In early-November, the new floor, mirrors, and equipment were ready for use. Remaining funds were used to


refinish the floor of the multi-purpose room next door which is used as a studio for the dance team and P.E. classes as well as by the baseball, softball, and golf teams. The new space is flexible, open, and functional. Built around six zero-clearance Olympic platforms, it easily transitions between strength training and agilityquickness training. The double-sided half racks, another hallmark of the space, are integral to optimizing our footprint. Replacing single use benches and racks with integrated training units opened up more space to train more athletes, more effectively, at the same time. Since the completion of the project in November, usage has increased markedly by classes, individuals, and entire sports

teams. The Booster Club also hosted a six-week Winter Wellness Series on Friday mornings at 6:00 a.m. in the two spaces. Velocity Training generously provided staff members to offer a strength training class in the weight room and HF parents and professional instructors, Cathy Charpentier and Leanne Schugel, offered pilates classes. The series was attended by current parents, staff, alumni, alumni parents, students, and their friends. When asked to reflect on the project, Tibesar said, "I can't offer enough gratitude to the many volunteers and staff who logged many hours painting, planning, moving, and hauling. Thank you to everyone who supported our Booster Club and this project!" He went on to say, "We are extremely proud of the changes that have been made in a short amount of

time, in what has clearly been a team effort. A special thank you to our Booster Club Planning Committee of Jo Puklich, Nicole Muschewske, Tony Kirsch, Nichol Kirsch, and Jeremy Quinn who were instrumental in the success of this project and others." Contact the activities department if you are interested in being a part of the events listed below or the booster club's next big plan. Mark you calendars for the following HF Booster Club events: June 22 - Running on ENKI 5K July 15 - Ready, Tee, Fire Golf Event July 2019 - Booster Club Enrollment Drive August 2019 - Fall Kick-off Events!

TOP LEFT (PAGE 14): CLOSE UP OF LEGEND DOUBLE -SIDED HALF RACKS AND TROY BARBELL WEIGHTS LOWER LEFT (PAGE 14): TIBESAR'S ORIGINAL VISION FOR THE SPACE THIS PAGE TOP LEFT: FIRE SOCCER AND HOCKEY PLAYER MAEVE KELLY LIFTING USING THE FLEXIBLE FREE WEIGHTS DURING AN AFTERNOON PHYSICAL EDUCATION CLASS THIS PAGE TOP RIGHT: GRAPHICS ABOVE TRAINING ROOM ENTRY LOOKING OUT OVER CONDITIONING MEZZONI BOTTOM LEFT: CUSTOM FLOORING WITH ZERO CLEARANCE OLYMPIC PLATFORMS

P a s s a g e s | Spring 2019 15


Breaking through the State Wall HOLY FAMILY BOYS SOCCER CLAIMS FIRST SECTION TITLE AND STATE TOURNAMENT APPEARANCE

Holy Family Catholic's success this season on the soccer field can be summed up in talent, skill and finish. Claiming the program's first boys section title, the Fire entered the Class A State Tournament as one of a handful of teams that had a legitimate chance at a title. Head coach Jorge Oconitrillo reflected on how this year's team was able to at last give the Fire a State appearance, "This year the team had the highest number of players ever playing year-round soccer at the premier level. That makes a great difference in terms of experience and competition. That, combined with the athleticism and hard work of many other kids formed the perfect storm."

All square at one into the second half, sophomore midfielder Andres Garcia one-timed a pass from Kevin Ortiz, in the

THE BOYS SOCCER TEAM CELEBRATES THEIR SECTION CHAMPIONSHIP VICTORY

air, from short-range in the 54th minute for the Packers' winning goal. Holy Family Catholic did strike first, a Bennett Creager tap-in off a Luke Puklich cross from near the end line in the 13th minute. The Fire had the better of play early, connecting all three levels with short, precise passing. Austin turned up the heat late in the first half, a Bryce Richter save keeping the Packers off the scoreboard. It was only momentarily, Austin scored on a rebound on a scrum in the box to tie the match.

CREAGER CHASES A PASS AT THE STATE QUARTERFINAL

16 P a s s a g e s | Spring 2019

Holy Family Catholic had two quality chances, both off the left foot of Puklich

from the corner, one directed wide from Joseph Fasching, another rising high over the net from a Creager header. The Fire had a pair of free kicks late in regulation played away by the Austin defense. Holy Family Catholic finished its season with a 17-3 record. All three losses for the Fire came by a 2-1 score. When asked what he expects from future Holy Family teams, Coach Oconotrillo replied, "The future looks great! We have many returning players and another group of kids working very hard to make the squad for the first time. They know what it takes to make it now, and I believe this will not be our last time."

This excerpt from Eric Kraushar's Chanhassen Villager article printed with permission.

PHOTOS BY COLLIN NAWROCKI '21

Unfortunately, Holy Family Catholic ran into an Austin team with equal talent, equal skill and on October 24, maybe a bit more luck. The Fire would miss moving on by just one goal, with the final score 1-2.


Agerland Returns to State

Two Swimmers at State

AGERLAND RETURNED TO STATE AS THE SECTION 2A CHAMP

REIS '22 AND ELSNER '20 COMPETE AT STATE

Sophomore tennis player, Ally Agerland, successfully defended her Section 2 A singles title to earn a return trip to the 2018 MSHSL Class A Singles State Tennis Tournament. Agerland was edged out of the first round in a 2-1/2 hour, three set match with a final score of 6-7 (6-8), 6-4, 6-4. She bounced back from the first match to take on and win her next two matches on the way to the consolation championship, where she lost in a tough battle to Minnehaha Academy's Thornfinnson. HF Tennis head coach TJ Garin looks forward to Ally's continued growth and leadership. He says, "Ally continues to make big strides in her game, most recently winning a national junior team title with her off season team. I look forward to her adding that experience to her "arsenal" of weapons for the coming season as she leads our team as a captain and sets the bar high for the rest of th girls."

Freshman Ellen Ries and junior Annabelle Elsner, swimming with the Mound Westonka/Holy Family co-op, both qualified for the MSHSL State Class A Swim Tournament. The 400 freestyle relay team of Ellen Ries, Ava Kittleson, Annie Springer and Ashley Storm broke a school record in prelims with a time of 3.38.31 and earned seventh place in finals of the state tournament.. The 200 IM Relay team of junior Annabelle Elsner (backstroke), Hannah Hall (breaststroke), Annie Springer (butterfly) and Jaylyn Storm (freestyle) swam their fastest time (1.52.86), breaking the school record that was set in 2015 (1.54.16). They earned 17th place at state and just missing qualifying for finals by .04 seconds.

A Final Shot at the State Tournament

TOP LEFT PHOTO BY MN PREP PHOTO

BOTTOM PHOTOS BY HF PARENT CAROL FRANCK

GRIT AND DETERMINATION EARNS MARSCHALL THE FINAL STATE SLOT

Ellie Marschall had a heart-breaking finish at the 2017 Section 4A Cross Country Meet. A junior at the time, she missed state by one position, by less than a second. In the 2018 race, the finish line approaching, Marschall knew it was going to be close. Digging deep, she passed a runner in the final steps. Finishing in 13th place with a time of 20:49.40, this time around, Marschall would qualify for state, ironically by less than a second, four tenths of a second to be exact. When asked about her season, Ellie had this to say, "Throughout my senior season, state was always a goal I had for myself. When I found out I qualified at sections, it was the most amazing feeling not just to win, but to be surrounded by my extremely supportive teammates, coaches and family members. At state many of my teammates, friends, and family showed up to watch me compete for the last time. It was exciting that I got to finish my cross county career at state on the very same course where I had my first race ever as a seventh grader. The past six years running cross country helped me learn to trust myself, my team, and that years of hard work and dedication pays off." MARSCHALL RECEIVES A BOOST OF SUPPORT AT STATE

P a s s a g e s | Spring 2019 17


Still Champions HOLY FAMILY GIRLS BASKETBALL GOES UP TEMPO UNDER NEW COACH ADRIAN TURNER

Having just finished the final exhausting drill, Fire Girls Basketball Head Coach Adrian Turner signaled practice was over. How did the players react? They broke out into a raucous round of clapping. It’s a daily celebration of the hard work the team put in that day and what’s to come tomorrow. It’s one of many new traditions Turner helped form within the program in his first year at the helm. During a season filled with success, the celebration doesn’t end with practice.

“Coming in from Day 1, the talk was State. We embraced it,” Turner says about the team that finished the regular season 20-5. “We didn't run from the expectation. We knew what we had coming back. We knew where the program had been the last couple of years. And it was like, ‘What are we going to do to get to that next level?’”

Picking Up the Pace Hiring Turner was the first step toward that goal. He replaced Head Coach Ellen Thompson, who cemented her place in Holy Family history when she took the team to the State Tournament in 2016. With the tradition of winning now established, Turner brought a more up-tempo style of play. “It definitely was a little tough at first 18 P a s s a g e s | Spring 2019

THE TEAM CELEBRATES THEIR SECTION CHAMPIONSHIP VICTORY

because the style of play was a lot different,” says senior Julia Geurs, one of the team’s three captains. “I feel like our big thing last year was structure, structure, structure. This year we transitioned into a faster pace— getting up and down the floor as quickly as we could.”

and the team reached the section finals each of the last two seasons and the state tournament the year before that.

The result? Many more points in transition, in part sparked by an aggressive defense.

Amid all the winning, though, came two difficult stretches:

“Last year we really focused on fundamental defense,” senior captain Grace Conroy recalls, "and with steals, it was more of, ‘You've got to be very confident that you're going to get that steal.' This year it was always go for the steal. That made a big difference.” Having an experienced senior team didn't hurt, either. The Fire’s five seniors have played together since eighth grade

This season included a perfect 12-0 mark at home and win streaks of eight and 12 games.

• The Fire lost its first two games to open the season - against Hill-Murray and DeLaSalle, both ranked in the top 10 of Class 3A; • January brought a tough stretch of consecutive conference losses at Hutchinson and New Prague. In that stretch, junior guard and key contributor, Grace Elander, broke her nose and missed the New Prague game. Turner said the season-opening losses

ABOVE: Photo by Colin Nawrocki '21

The Fire finished the regular season ranked fifth in Class 2A and won a share of the Wright County Conference championship, a Holy Family girls basketball first. The historic regular season built on what the Fire knew to be true from the beginning of the season: This team was special.


were eye-opening. He expedited implementing his system, which included an aggressive trap defense. The other side of it was learning more about his players’ skills and using those to exploit opponent weaknesses. “I thought we’d have some more hard knocks,” Turner shares. “Really, the reason we avoided them is that the girls are just really good at adjustments. And their leadership is outstanding.”

Building Leaders Turner didn’t have to move far when he accepted the Holy Family head coach role. He was the assistant girls basketball coach at Chanhassen High School and was named the 2014 Section 2AAAA Assistant Coach of the Year. When Turner learned about Holy Family’s Convocation, the daily student-led event where the entire school gathers in the gym, he was all in.

and scripture. “A lot of messages get introduced to the girls to try to set a tone going into our weekend or our next games.” Tibesar says this team tradition is a “phenomenal” addition to the program.

“That’s building strong leadership in these kids,” Turner says. “I enjoy being involved with people who are leaders. You can get a lot of things done with folks who know how to lead.”

“It’s no surprise when you take those extra steps to build strong bonds between coaches and players and between players and players that it translates to positive results on the court,” says Tibesar.

Leadership is a trait Activities Director Nick Tibesar recognized in Turner as he interviewed for the position.

Turner also impressed Tibesar by organizing an alumni night early in the season.

“When we are looking for people, it is really important to us that they understand the balance between being a high school coach and the opportunity to have a transformational impact on young people’s lives,” Tibesar says. “It’s not just about winning games. It’s about changing lives and inspiring and empowering young people.”

Faith On Fire

ABOVE: Photo by Colin Nawrocki '21

THE TEAM CELEBRATES THEIR SECTION CHAMPIONSHIP VICTORY

Being a man of faith didn’t hurt Turner’s candidacy either. While playing baseball at Grambling State University, which is a public institution, Turner appreciated how his coach's chapel services helped bring his team together. It’s something he implemented with the Fire. “That’s been a fun thing for us,” Turner says of 'Chapel,' which includes singing

“It really helps to further the message to our kids that you’re not just here to help us win games right now,” Tibesar says. “It’s not just a four-year transactional relationship. We’re trying to build relationships for a lifetime, and we hope that you want to come back and cheer on the team and maybe even send your kids to Holy Family someday."

Competing at State Senior captain Leigh Steiner had hopes that down the road, when she returned to Holy Family’s gym, she could look up and see a 2019 girls basketball state championship banner hanging from the rafters.

Those dreams were cut short during the quarterfinal game of the MSHSL Girls’ Basketball State Class AA Tournament. The Fire were defeated, 60-49, by a formidable Albany team who was playing in memory of a long-time, beloved coach.

“I feel like we knew we’d be really good this season,” says Steiner, who was named to the state All-Tournament Team. “So many good things happened and that we were ranked made us all realize that we were close to accomplishing our dreams.” Despite the loss, Holy Family moved into the consolation bracket determined to play their best until the last buzzer. They defeated St. Peter, 64-59 in a first-round overtime win, fighting back from a 10-point deficit. They returned on Friday, March 14, to a flood of support from Fire student student fans, staff, and parents, for a shot at the Consolation Championship. They finished the season on a winning note, defeating Proctor, 47-33, earning a fifth place state finish and the consolation title. Coach Adrian Turner summarized the season following the quarterfinal loss. "One of our team goals was to never give up. We have met that goal every step of the way. I let them know we're still champions. We earned our way to play for this championship. Albany beat us, and that happens. We are still who we are. We're section champs. We're conference champs. These girls have a lot to be proud of."

Story written by Mike Nelson '08. See Mike's bio inside the front cover of this magazine.

P a s s a g e s | Spring 2019 19


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6 Photo Credits: 1. TeMo Photo 2. Collin Nawrocki '21 3. Paula Charchenko

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1. Fire Football under new head coach Tim Triplett played in the section championship. 2. Fire Girls Hockey competes as an independent program for the first time in school history. 3. All three performances of the winter musical, "Little Mermaid," were sold out.

4. Graham Miller '21

4. Allie Phillips '19 and Carson Liebeg '20 performed at the perennial favorite, Fall Coffee House.

5. Graham Miller '21

5. HF Shark Tank 2.0 included three alumni on the judges panel: Caitlin Tvrdik '06 (pictured), winners of the 2018 HF Shark Tank, Brady Richter '18, and Griffin Johnson '18.

6. Yearbook submission 7. Lynnae Bosch 8. Collin Nawrocki

6. Riley Palattao was named a 2019 National Hispanic Scholar by the College Board. 7. Fire for Life Club attended the 2019 Minnesota Catholic Conference's "Catholics at the Capitol." 8. 100 youth dancers joined our dance team for their fall youth clinic. P a s s a g e s | Spring 2019 21


ALUMNI UPDATES 2005

2009

MEGAN WEIBOLD recently married Mark Freeman in St. Louis, MO. Megan is currently the 6 o'clock newscast producer at KSDK in St. Louis. She and her husband enjoy living in the Gateway City along with their dog Burt Macklin.

PAT BALIUS recently earned his Master's Degree at the University of Minnesota in epidemiology with a minor in biostatistics. He was accepted as a PhD candidate at the University of Minnesota this fall in the Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology program. Additionally, Pat was selected as the recipient of the Lester Breslow Scholar Award for academic excellence in his Master's program. JAKE BORK is engaged to Cassandra Fenton. Jake is a graduate of Arizona State University, and is employed in sales at Machinio Software. An August wedding is planned.

2006 KATE RADDATZ and her husband, John, welcomed their first child, Rowan Jack, in February 2018.

ROLLIE LACY was traded from the Cubs to the Rangers to the Tampa Bay Rays, and is now playing in High Class "A" with the Port Charlotte Stone Crabs. 2015 RYAN ANTON completed study abroad at Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Australia, and also a six-month internship with Ryan Companies, Minneapolis. He is currently a senior at Purdue University pursuing a degree in Building Construction Management. 2016 AARON NOWAK launched SlabStox, a data-driven digital platform for sports-card prospectors. The platform includes thriving Instagram and Facebook communities and the deepest card-prospecting content in the digital space. This summer, Aaron will debut a new SlabStox app at the 2019 National Sports Card Collector’s Convention in Chicago. Holy Family alumni collaborating with Aaron during his SlabStox launch include entrepreneur and mentor Bobby Mason '12 and fellow Badger and mathematician Hank Hopkins '15.

2010 ALEX RICHELSEN completed a year-long assignment in Hyderabad, India expanding an office and starting a client service team for Eze Software Group. He transitioned to a sales engineering role in New York City. 2013 ALY ANTON is a first-year medical student at Midwestern University, Chicago, following gap year opportunities in Honduras and as a scribe in Fairview emergency rooms. She received her undergraduate degree in pre-med and Spanish from Notre Dame in 2017.

GRACE MEIDL is completing her Junior year at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls pursing a degree in communication sciences and disorders. This year Grace was accepted into an internship program called APEDT. Through this internship she is working with a nonprofit service dog training organization called PawPADs based in Lakeville, MN. The dogs are all dual-trained for both diabetic alert and physical mobility assistance. Her role is to aid in completion of the training process so the dog can be placed into service. She received a grant to research the benefits of having a resource dog available in elementary schools. The picture features a 1-year-old golden/lab cross, Charlie, that she is working with this semester.

2008 SARAH (MULLEN) TRUMBLE and her husband, Mike, welcomed a baby boy, Oliver Blue, into their home on February 6, 2019. He has been a great baby and big sister Finley is so excited to have the title "Big Sister."

Please email alumni college and career updates as well as name and address changes to communications@hfchs.org. 22 P a s s a g e s | Spring 2019


SCHOOL LEADERSHIP MICHAEL BRENNAN | President KATHLEEN BROWN | Principal

BOARD EMERITUS JOHN RADICK, CHAIR BARB BURKE STEVE BURKE TOM BURKE THEO CHALGREN TONY DENUCCI FR. DOUG EBERT BOB FAFINSKI MARY FAFINSKI ANNE FURLONG JOHN GEISLER DIANA GOEBEL SCOTT GUILLEMETTE BOB KEMMERER MARK LANO BRIAN LAVELLE ANNE LAWLER BILL MILLER CHRISTOPHER MOAKLEY JOE MORIN BERT NOTERMANN JENNY RICHELSEN ROB ROY DEB SECREST BILL SLATTERY MARY STEINER JANE STONE BILL TRAXLER FR. BOB WHITE

2018-2019 BOARD OF DIRECTORS TOM FURLONG | Board Chair ROBIN KRIER | Vice Chair JOHN BIERBAUM | Board Treasurer MARC TERRIS | Member at Large PAUL ROTHSTEIN | Board Secretary DON BORNHORST DIANNE DEERING ANTON ANGELO GALIOTO THOMAS GARRY TONY KIRSCH DR. SCOTT KIER SCOTT O’BRIEN MICHAEL PUKLICH BRENDA REDDAN JOSEPH THOMAS '06 FR. ROLF TOLLEFSON TYLER TREAT

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION JOHN DOLS | Assistant Principal and Campus Minister MELISSA LIVERMORE | Dean for Academic Support

FINANCE ERIN HESSE | Director of Finance CHERYL KUMARADURAI | Accountant

ACTIVITIES NICK TIBESAR | Activities Director TIM TRIPLETT | Assistant Activities Director

SUPPORT STAFF TERRI FARR | Administrative Assistant

ADVANCEMENT KENNA DOOLEY | Vice President for Advancement SCOTT BREIMHORST | Executive Director of Admissions MATT THULI | Director of Individual Giving and Alumni Relations ROB BELL | Admissions Officer LAURA PODERGOIS | Marketing and Communications Manager PAULA CHARCHENKO | Events and Marketing Coordinator AMANDA CAHILL | Advancement Office Coordinator

GUIDANCE AND LEARNING SUPPORT JOSHUA RUTZ | Counselor ANGELA SCOTT | Counselor PAIGE LEPAK | Counselor KRISTA MCCOY | Counselor KATELYN SWYGMAN | Learning Support TRACY BOERBOOM | Information Resources FACILITIES & MAINTENANCE PAUL WHITAKER | Facilities Manager PAUL ABBAS | Maintenance

2018-2019 TEACHING STAFF ENGLISH ZACHARY BROWN CARLEE KOCON ERIC OLSON LESLIE SWANSON FINE ARTS LAURA BOILLAT ANNELISE BROWN '05 SHELAGH GAMBLE BRAD PERRIN-SMITH MATHEMATICS KAREN ATKINSON GARY KANNEL MICHAEL LEVERENTZ MICHAEL MURRAY

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND WELLNESS KELLY BARNHOLDT PAUL RUSSO SCIENCE JOSHUA DWYER IAN PARZYCK JIM TISEL JIM WALKER SOCIAL STUDIES SARAH HALVORSON PATRICK MAUS '03 HOLLY POTTEBAUM

TECHNOLOGY GARY KANNEL NICK LIVERMORE BRAD PERRIN-SMITH (Technology Coordinator) THEOLOGY DOUGLAS BOSCH LYNNAE BOSCH BRENDAN MCINERNY NATHAN SCHLEPP WORLD LANGUAGES JACOB DUECK KAREN KIDROWSKI ALEXANDER MYTNIK JORGE OCONITRILLO P a s s a g e s | Spring 2019 23


8101 KOCHIA LANE, VICTORIA, MINNESOTA 55386 |

@holyfamilyfire

facebook/hfchs

PHONE: 952.443.4659 | WEB: HFCHS.ORG

@holyfamilyfire

24 HOURS OF COMMUNITY STRIKE A MATCH. LIGHT A FIRE.

Holy Family’s Day of Giving is a 24-hour campaign with the simple goal of inspiring the FIRE to come together, show pride in our school, and provide essential funding to support opportunities for our students.

Follow Day of Giving events and progress on all Holy Family social media channels and our webpage:

HFCHS.org/day-of-giving

Join us at Deer Run Golf Club

MONDAY, JULY 15, 2019

for the 23rd Annual Ready Tee Fire Golf Classic! Support our school while enjoying a fun day of golf, camaraderie, and opportunities to win great prizes!