2017 Spring Passages Magazine

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Passages H O LY F A M I LY C AT H O L I C H I G H S C H O O L | Spring 2017

STRATEGIC PLAN UPDATE | Page 04 MEET US IN ST. LOUIS | Page 12

EYE ON THE SKY | Page 05 HIGHLIGHTS | Page 14-17

A LIFE BY GOD'S DESIGN | Page 8 ALUMNI UPDATES | Page 15


Mission Statement

Table of Contents

Holy Family Catholic High School

LETTER FROM PRESIDENT/PRINCIPAL BROWN | Page 03

offers students excellence

GROWTH AND EXCELLENCE UPDATE | Page 04

in education by providing

EYE ON THE SKY | Page 05

opportunities to grow spiritually,

SMITH FINDS OPPORTUNITY WITH THE GOPHERS | Page 06

morally, intellectually, and physically within a community of Faith. We empower and encourage our students to achieve personal excellence,

A LIFE BY GOD'S DESIGN | Page 8 MEET US IN ST. LOUIS | Page 10 SCHOLASTIC ART AWARDS | Page 12 GALLERY | Page 14-17 A FRESH LOOK FOR GOLF | Page 18 TACKLING TRAGEDY | Page 20

to use their talents to lead,

ALUMNI NEWS | Page 22

to serve God, one another,

LEADERSHIP/FACULTY | Page 23

and the larger community.

ON THE COVER: Emily Sokolis Across the pages of this magazine, you will find stories and images of Holy Family students who are seizing diverse and dynamic opportunities in academics, Catholic spirituality, activities and leadership.

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2017 Women and Mens Fire Fencing Teams

COVER: Paula Charchenko of Design by Paulie Marie;

With over 90% of our students involved in more than one activity, Emily finds herself in good company among peers engaged and excited to make the most of their high school experiences.

LEFT: Holy Family Yearbook Photography

Emily Sokolis is one of those students. As a sophomore, she is a three-year veteran of our fencing team. She also sings in the choir and next year will add two additional vocal ensembles to her schedule. She is a member of the jazz band and will play the role of James in our spring musical, James and the Giant Peach.


Letter from President/Principal Kathleen Brown

The significance of transformational education connects us. It took me a long time to synthesize the information in the stories about our alumni presented in this volume of Passages. So much passion! So much innovation! During spring break, however, I was able to think about two experiences offered to our school community: a mission trip to Haiti and the hosting of two homeless families in our building. Then I saw the significance of how transformational education connects us. In Haiti, our students discovered the stark truth about their good efforts visiting orphanages, distributing water, and caring for the ill. How difficult it must have been for them to write an article that concludes days of service “. . . will have no long term influence on the well-being of Haitian people as a whole.” Yet they continued to make each day’s work matter.

ABOVE: Photo by Bryan Olson Photography

The mission of Families Moving Forward compelled us to host two families who need temporary housing until permanent placements can be found. Students, parents, faculty, and staff volunteered to entertain the children, be companions to the adults, cook and serve meals, and stay overnight. Most heartening was how so many of our students returned multiple times once they realized how important their presence was to these families.

The decisions each of us make today predict how we will respond to challenges in the future. They are what guide us from the perceptions through which we see the world now to a wiser understanding that will drive us to take action where our gifts fit needs. The expectation we tend to place on ourselves is to be spectacular when a willingness to be led is what is necessary. When faith pursues understanding, we often wind up in places we never imagined we would go. This type of leadership, servant leadership, is a place at the crossroads of humility and trust, a place to which Adam, Amy, Nathan, Nick, and Peter must have traveled many times. Each of the stories in this issue reveals how responding to a need is more important than being in control. Each shows the power of connecting with people. And each shows that it is by helping people find their places, we often find ours. Living Jesus in our hearts,

Kathleen A. Brown president/principal

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2017-2021 Strategic Plan: Growth and Excellence In keeping with our promise to share updates on the progress of the 2017-2021 Strategic Plan: Growth and Excellence, I am excited to provide a snapshot of some of the work that is now well underway in our five priority areas. Objectives are researched, planned, and executed by administrative leadership and faculty and staff committees for mission. These are just a handful of the many exciting new initiatives we are working on as we execute on Growth and Excellence. I look forward to keeping you apprised of our work as it progresses and ask for your prayers and continued input along the way. Kenna J. Dooley Vice President for Advancement

Develop Christian Leaders Holy Family is committed to providing increased Christian formation for all school family members – students, faculty, staff, coaches, parents, and board members, thereby expanding the integration of faith components in activities, curriculum, and service. To that end, the following initiatives are now underway: • Mass is offered at 7 a.m. prior to each meeting of the Board of Directors (six times per year), and all students, faculty, staff members and board members are invited to attend. • Alumni and alumni parents in select professional fields spoke to the junior and senior classes as part of the Leadership Institute’s expansion to include career information. • A third counselor will be added before the 2017-18 school year to provide each student the opportunity to work with the same counselor all four years and develop a portfolio of interests and skills that will help discern college and career choices.

Invest in Facilities, Infrastructure, & Technology Through the establishment of a committee of faculty and community members, we committed to the creation of a 3-5-year plan to prioritize and expand our use of technology for learning. Below are a few outcomes of their work. • The newly established Technology Committee developed a plan to align, optimize and prioritize resources to foster academic learning. • Two technology labs were updated during the 2016-17 school year and a third will be completed this summer. • A wireless network was added so that two networks now support the expanse of the building. • A significant expansion in funding of the technology budget over the next two years was approved by the Board of Directors. 4

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Be a Welcoming and Connected Community In our effort to preserve Holy Family’s distinctive sense of family, we continue to create more opportunities to welcome new families and remain connected with those we have served. In the past few months: • HF parents, students and staff came together to host two homeless families for an Alternative Spring Break in partnership with Families Moving Forward. • The Father Daughter Dance was brought back by supportive parents in February, with more than 140 dads and daughters in attendance. • We have increased alumni outreach, including hosting gatherings in Milwaukee, Chicago, Boston and Minneapolis.

Exhibit Excellence in Faculty, Staff, & Programs We will institute an enhanced professional development program to ensure continuous program improvement, thereby meeting the needs and expectations of students and their families. Progress occurring in this area includes the following: • A formalized technology training program is being developed to guide all faculty and staff throughout each school year. • Expanded use of teacher and student course evaluations will drive faculty professional development expectations. • An Activities Committee of the Board of Directors was formed (Fall 2016), with an early focus on benchmarking programs, developing a tool to gather and respond to parent and student feedback, and standardizing activities department procedures.

Leverage Resources for Growth As we position ourselves for enrollment growth, we will carefully align resources with programs and initiatives that best serve our mission to provide students with opportunities to grow spiritually, morally, intellectually and physically within a community of faith. Exciting developments in this area include: • The Board of Directors unanimously voted to freeze tuition for the 2017-18 school year. At the same time, they approved the rollout of a new Merit Scholarship program that provides a financial reward to incoming 9th graders for their middle school accomplishments in the areas of academics, service, leadership, and fine arts. Both decisions affirm our commitment to keep a Holy Family education within reach for the families who desire it. • An expanded transportation program will now provide busing to and from the communities of Shakopee, Prior Lake, Eden Prairie, Edina and Mound. • Partnerships with area Catholic middle schools have been formed to offer 8th grade students high school credit for successfully completing morning classes in engineering, mathematics, and two world languages at HFCHS. A regional middle school band is growing.


"We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit." - Aristotle While at Holy Family, Amy Forbes '09 and classmate Emily Hoffman, with the support of social studies teacher, Dr. Holly Pottebaum, started what is now a popular activity: Mock Trial. This program introduces students to the American legal system and provides a challenging opportunity for personal growth and achievement.The exposure to the structure of the legal system, the ability to experience the roles involved in court cases, and the necessity of being able to think quickly, assess accurately, and respond persuasively was something Amy thought would be compelling. She was right. Amy attended Wake Forest University in North Carolina on a ROTC scholarship. She majored in English and minored in journalism. During her four years she deftly balanced hundreds of hours of ROTC requirements and heavy course loads. That work ethic never waned. Years later, Amy earned a master’s degree and was deployed for a tour of duty to Afghanistan. Being stationed in the Afghanistan desert, far from home and family, can be grueling and

stressful. Again, Amy saw the potential for something that would support mental clarity, function as a healthy diversion, and create a lifelong interest. At Wake Forest, she had created an archery club. That activity became a way for individuals on the largest U. S. military base in Afghanistan to hone skills or learn new ones.

Amy worked with the Army Morale, Welfare, and Recreation program to establish a range. Then she contacted Walk-On Archery to secure a target. The organization presented her with not one, but five targets plus posters, hats, and other supportive items. The range opened with lessons available for beginners and opportunities for individuals to develop skills on their own time. With her tour of Afghanistan complete, Amy is currently in the Air Force learning to be a pilot, something few women in the military pursue. Her goal is to co-pilot a commercial plane with her father. We know now that traditional boundaries do not limit the ideas and energy of Amy Forbes. Seeing needs and finding solutions are her strengths.

AMY RECENTLY PAID A VISIT TO HOLY FAMILY TO PRESENT DR. HOLLY POTTEBAUM WITH A FLAG FLOWN OVER BAGRAM AIRFIELD, AFGHANISTAN. SHE SPOKE AT CONVOCATION AND EXPLAINED HER DEPLOYMENT TO DR. POTTEBAUM'S APÂŽ U.S. HISTORY STUDENTS.

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Smith Finds Opportunity With the Gophers SERVING AS TEAM MANAGER PROVIDES ALUM WITH A UNIQUE VIEW INTO COLLEGE ATHLETICS

ESPN reports the likelihood of becoming a manager for a Division 1 athletic program is about the same as playing for such a program. HF alumnus Nick Smith '13 beat those odds and landed a four-year opportunity with Division 1 University of Minnesota Mens Basketball.

Balancing a busy schedule in college was not a new thing for Holy Family alumnus Nick Smith '13. As a very active student at Holy Family Catholic High School, he participated in football, track and field, mock trial, honor society, campus ministry, Youth in Government, and basketball as a manager. By his senior year, Smith had decided he would become involved in sports at college, not as an athlete, but as a manager of a team. He submitted his resume to the University of Minnesota mens basketball office. He called often to remind the Director of Basketball Operations of his unfailing interest in becoming a student manager. After a summer interview, the job was his.

The opportunity provided Smith with a way to contribute to a Division I basketball program, but he was also a college freshman who needed to adjust to a new schedule and responsibilities. Smith says about his challenges, “The biggest thing was that I was starting college and joining the basketball program, so it was double the learning experience. Almost every day included helping out with 7:00 a.m. workouts, going to class, and attending practice in the afternoon. It took a while to find the balance between school and managing.” While the tasks were much greater than his work as a team manager at Holy Family, the time management skills required to take on such a commitment were not.

SMITH ON SENIOR NIGHT WITH COACH PITINO, PARENTS LUCY AND JOEL, AND SIBLINGS ABBY '20 AND CHARLIE.

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Smith excelled in both areas. He majored in finance and accounting at the Carlson School, interacting with many people from the business side of the University of Minnesota Athletic Department along with donors and other highly successful people. Some of his tightest connections, Smith says, are those with the Gopher players and coaches: “The coaching and administrative staff stayed pretty constant through my four years, so it was easy to develop relationships. It is a close-knit group. In my freshman year, I did a lot of dog sitting for coaches when the team was traveling. I think that proved to them that I was dependable.” Of the players, Smith considers many of them as brothers.

SMITH AND THE 2014 NIT MENS BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS U OF MN GOPHERS


Photos courtesty of University of Minnesota Athletic Department

NICK SMITH (HOLY FAMILY '13) WORKS WITH UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA BASKETBALL PLAYER REGGIE LYNCH DURING A RECENT PRACTICE IN MILWAUKEE.

Smith progressed from a dependable dog sitter to a reliable member of the managing staff. About the evolution of his tasks, he says, “Starting out, it was basic stuff like setting up practice or workouts and making sure the water, balls and equipment were out and ready at a moment’s notice, including Hall’s cough drops and grape Ice Breaker gum, Coach Pitino’s favorites. Managers assist with practice drills and keep a towel close to wipe sweat off the floor. During the games we take care of water bottles, towels. statistics, and player match ups.” Over time, however, Smith’s duties evolved into more strategic tasks. By the spring of his sophomore year, he

was promoted to Head Team Manager and Student Office Assistant. He began to assist game scouts, produce scouting reports, do administrative work, and create camp plans. He was in charge of packing for road trips, handling meals at home and on the road, and additional coaching staff needs throughout the day. Smith had diffiuclty choosing a few special memories from his time with the Gophers. The Armed Forces Classic against Louisville in Puerto Rico, wins against Michigan State on the road, and ten days in Spain in 2015 all made the initial list. Ultimately, though, it is the 2014 NIT Championship win during Smith’s freshman year that is most

memorable: “It was crazy to be on the floor of Madison Square Garden in New York. It was incredible to win a title like that in my first year, and it resulted in one of the best selfies I've ever taken!” Having an array of unique experiences that he can carry with him, Smith explains how he is looking forward to a very different type of schedule. “I am going to put my degree to use. I am entering the real world as an Audit Associate at the Minneapolis Deloitte office.”

Article written by Bennett Smed '11. Bennett graduated from Bethel University with a degree in journalism. He currently is the assistant golf professional for The Pines Golf Course at Grandview Lodge.

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A Life by God's Design A LESSON IN ALLOWING GOD TO BE THE ARCHITECT OF OUR LIVES

Upon graduation, I set out to start a career and that’s when I started to realize that something (or someone) was missing in my plan: God. - Nathan Rooney '04 When you graduated from high school what were your plans? I had a plan to attend North Dakota State to pursue a degree in architecture. In my mind, I had my future all mapped out: I would graduate from college, start a career as an architect, design and build my own house, and do all of this by the age of 30. It started off as I expected, graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Design and a Master’s degree in Architecture. Upon graduation, I set out to start a career and that’s when I started to realize that something (or someone) was missing in my plan: God. When and how did you recognize or find an interest to do something else? During high school at Holy Family, I began to have this sense that God may be calling me to serve Him in some special capacity through my vocation and career, but I didn’t know how. I would describe it as that little voice in your head that keeps reminding you of something. This voice stayed with me through college, but I was too busy trying to execute MY plan. When I graduated from college and began to search for work in my career field, this voice became stronger and more obvious to me. I began to pray more about where God might be calling me to serve him and reluctantly began to hand over the reigns of my plan to what He was asking of me, whatever that might have been. I began to pray actively and discern my vocation, viewing it is as something distinctly different from simply a career choice. Over the next several months, the thought of learning more about the priesthood began to flood my heart and my prayer life. I decided to take a step to learn more, even if this meant leaving my career in architecture and allowing MY plan to evolve into HIS plan. How did you reconcile changing direction? It was hard. Very hard. All of the time, energy, hard work and money that I had devoted to MY plan seemed like it might disappear and be all for nothing. However, I also knew that I wasn’t truly happy in the path that I had chosen for myself. It

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IN HIS ROLE AS PASTORAL ASSOCIATE, NATHAN'S RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE LITURGICAL MINISTRIES FOR THE 55+ SENIOR GROUP INCLUDING LUNCHEONS & OUTINGS, PASTORAL FUNERAL MINISTRY, AND TEACHING RELIGION CLASSES, BOTH IN THE DAY SCHOOL AND WEDNESDAY EVENING RELIGIOUS EDUCATION PROGRAM.

wasn’t that life was bad, but, again, I had this sense that there was a better option for me out there, one in which I would feel more fulfilled by who God was calling me to become. Who provided support and guidance to you as you were discerning your change of careers? My parish priest, Fr. Bob White, was very instrumental during this time in my life. Fr. Bob had first encouraged me to pray about my vocation when I was in high school and so it was easy to go back to him after college to continue the conversation. We shared several meals together discussing vocations and he suggested that I meet with other priests to learn about their vocation stories, which I did. I also attended a retreat offered by the Archbishop and made a seminary visit to see what a seminarian’s life was like. Additionally,


my classmate and best friend from Holy Family, Fr. James Peterson, supported and encouraged me during this time. What was the sequence of events as you began to pursue a calling to work in ministry/church life? I began meeting with Fr. Bob for about a year before contacting the Archdiocesan Vocations Office to meet with the Vocations Director. Over the next 8 months, I attended the Archbishop’s retreat and made my visit to the seminary. After my visit, I applied to enter the seminary and had an interview with the Vocations Director immediately following. Although it had gone very well, I sensed that God wasn’t calling me to pursue priesthood at that time, at least not yet. I discerned that I would hold off on pursuing seminary for one more year, during which I met Kayla, who would eventually become my wife. Shortly after meeting Kayla and after much prayer, I sensed that God was calling me to the vocation of marriage. During this time, I continued to discern to which career path God was calling me. Shortly after Kayla and I were married, I applied for a school secretary position at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church in Savage. I didn’t have a background in secretarial work and this was a very different career path from what I had envisioned for myself. Placing MY plan in God’s hands, I was able to secure an interview with our parish pastor, Fr. Mike Tix, who I had come to know over recent years. During the interview, he mentioned that the parish had been looking to create a Pastoral Associate position that would, in essence, serve as an assistant to the Pastor on a wide variety of tasks within parish life. I immediately knew this was where God needed me at this point in my life, that voice in my head affirmed it. After discussions with Kayla, it was abundantly clear that this was HIS plan for this specific point in my life and I finally sensed that fulfillment in God’s plan that I had been chasing. You recently spoke to our juniors during Leadership Institute. What message did you have for them? In each one of our lives, there are so many opportunities to place our trust in God. We call that faith. And yet, faith can be hard because we can become so focused on our own plans, on what we want and what we think others might want for us. What I had neglected to do earlier in my life was to invite God actively into the conversation of where He was calling me and who He was calling me to become. It was about me and I had plans to fit God in there eventually, when it seemed convenient. Faith tells us that God is always looking out for our best interest, even when it might be scary. Faith tells us that if we include Him in the conversation, even when it’s not convenient for us, He will guide us where we need to be.

NATHAN'S WIFE, KAYLA, IS THE SPECIAL NEEDS FAITH FORMATION COORDINATOR AND SAFE ENVIRONMENT COORDINATOR AT ST. JOHN NEUMANN CATHOLIC CHURCH IN EAGAN.

Pray always! The best way to cultivate the virtue of faith and to know where God is calling you to be, is through a life of prayer. And don't just pray once in a while; pray every day for at least 10 minutes! This will help you to know God’s voice and to trust in where He is calling you. An analogy that I once heard: imagine answering the phone when your mom calls and she says “Hi, it’s me." You immediately recognize her voice because you’ve heard it so often. Compare that to someone you don’t know as well calling you and saying, “Hi, it’s me." You would have a hard time recognizing their voice when they call. The same is true with God: the more time we spend actively listening for His voice, the better we will recognize it when He calls, and the more faith we will have in placing our trust in Him. If any, how has your experience at Holy Family played a role in your life since graduation? Holy Family and members of the school community continue to hold a special place in my heart. The life lessons that I learned while there still form my decisions today. Holy Family is where I first learned how to pray, it is where I learned how to be a man of God and a husband to my wife, and where I learned the values of servant leadership. There are still very specific lessons and moments from my time spent in Holy Family classrooms that I am reminded of often in my dayto-day life. I came to know role models who showed me the way, so that one day, I could show someone else the way. It continues to feel like home.

If you have a story idea about an alumnus, please share it via email to communications@hfchs.org.

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Meet Us in St. Louis

HF ROBOTICS WINS REGIONAL TOURNAMENT TO QUALIFY FOR WORLD COMPETITION

Holy Family Robotics is in its sixth season competing in the nationally recognized, FIRST® Robotics Competition. This year the team earned a trip to St. Louis for the FIRST® World Competition in April and the MSHSL State Tournament in May. On Saturday, January 7, 2017, Holy Family Robotics team 4207 Pyrobotics gathered in the Performance Center for the live stream of the 2017 FIRST® Robotics Competition Kick-off. More than 83,400 high school students on 3,336 teams at 123 venues around the globe joined the 2017 Kickoff via Twitch live stream and picked up their team’s Kickoff Kit to begin the six-week robot-building season. The program's organizers, FIRST® (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology), described the objective of this year's challenge, 2017 FIRST® SteamworksSM game, as follows: two adventure clubs– alliances of three teams each– were to prepare for a long-distance steamship race by collecting fuel (balls) for the boiler to build steamship pressure, while robots and pilots (human players stationed on the airship) collect and install missing gears to engage the airship’s rotors. In the final moments of the game, the robot can climb a rope on the airship for liftoff. Based on points earned when launch time reaches zero, the Alliance best prepared for flight wins. Fueled by inspiration from the launch, the team immediately went to work evaluating the challenge, planning and designing the robot in CAD software, building the physical robot, and writing the program for competition. In just a little over six weeks the robot would need to be completed for competition and sealed in a bag until the first day of the 10,000 Lakes Minnesota Regional Event at Williams Arena on April 6.

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ROBOTICS TEAM MEMBERS: (FRONT) THOMAS MAHOTA, GRANT SMITH, MARY RUKAVINA, BRENNA JONES, COACH NICK LIVERMORE; (MIDDLE) COACH GARY KANNEL, MEREDITH STRIGEL, CASEY GESS, ANDREW WALTZ TIMOTHY ZEIEN, LUKE SCHNEIDER; (BACK) JACOB SANDEFUR, OWEN LUTZ, NIKOLAI CHARCHENKO, DOMINIC PEICHEL, COLIN DOSEDEL, BRANDON BUELTEL. (NOT PICTURED ZACHARY GALLUS)

Following the "bag and tag" date in February, the team can continue to fine-tune its design on a replica test robot. Adjustments can be made, new parts printed on the school's 3-D printer, refinement written in the program, and practice driving sessions rehearsed repeatedly. Team coach and robotics and engineering teacher Nick Livermore estimates the teams spends over 1000 hours preparing for the qualifying event.

The hours of preparation boil down to the three-day regional event. Tools, equipment and spare parts are packed up and brought to Williams Arena, one of three qualification venues held in Minnesota. Practice sessions begin on Thursday, April 6, and final tweaks are made for the Friday qualification rounds. Random draw places each team in eight three-team alliances to compete in eight qualification rounds. Following


(LEFT) ROBOTICS DRIVE TEAM MEMBER COLIN DOSEDEL WATCHES THE ROBOT MAKE ITS ASSENT UP THE ROPE IN THE FINAL SECONDS OF THE MATCH. (UPPER RIGHT) NIKOLAI CHARCHENKO MAKES ADJUSTMENTS TO THE ROBOT IN PREPARATION FOR THE NEXT MATCH. (LOWER RIGHT) DRIVER GRANT SMITH IS SUPPORTED BY DOMINIC PEICHEL AND TOMMY MAHOTA DURING COMPETITION.

the eight qualification rounds, the eight top-seeded alliances each select two teams to join their alliance through a 1-8 snake draft. From there, the newly formed teams must compete in the final tournament through single best of threequarter, semi, and final rounds. HF Team 4207 was selected by #2 seeded Greenbush Gators to join the Hutchinson Tigerbots to create what

became a very strong alliance. The alliance moved through the quarterfinal and semifinal match to win in a quick two games in the final round. All three teams were named the 10,000 Lakes Minnesota Regional winners and qualified for the world competition in St. Louis at the end of April. The event solidified their top 30 ranking in Minnesota and secured an invitation to the MSHSL State Tournament in May.

Livermore attributes this year's success to the following: "I think our robot's consistency and our strength in playing a strategic, defensive game when needed, helped us to be a desirable alliance partner."

Corporate sponsors Strom Engineering, Stratasys, Lean Partners, and Emerson provide financial support to assist with material costs and competition fees. P a s s a g e s | Spring 2017

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Tanner Braun, “Empty Nutrition”

SCHOLASTIC ART AWARD WINNERS

Regional Gold Key Award Recipients: Tanner Braun, Photography, “Empty Nutrition” Tom Mahota, Ceramics, Rusted Red Teapot Caitlyn Shipp, Photography, “The Woman of the Masquerade” - Denotes Gold Key Winners 12 P a s s a g e s | Spring 2017 - Scholastic Art Awards

Jonathan Grunow, ”Forest Portrait”

Any student from 7th through 12th grade is eligible to submit one or more single works of art as well as a portfolio made up of eight works of art. Works that are judged as being successful for inclusion in the state exhibit are awarded either a Gold Key Award, a Silver Key Award or an Honorable Mention. All works that receive a Gold Key Award are automatically entered in the National Scholastic Art Awards competition that takes place in New York. The Minnesota Scholastic Arts Award Exhibition is hosted at the University of Minnesota's Regis Center for the Arts with the award ceremonies taking place at the Weisman Art Museum.

Eleanor Erdman, “Pier”

The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards recognize the vision, ingenuity, and talent of our nation’s youth, and provide opportunities for creative teens to be celebrated. Each year, increasing numbers of teens participate in the program.


Lily Graupman, Girls and the Window

Tommy Mahota, “Rusted Teapot”

Claire Melander, “Me”

Caitlyn Shipp, “The Woman of the Masquerade” Lucy Treat, Drawing, Wearing Air

Regional Silver Key Award Recipients: Peter Kerkvliet, Animation, “Animation Demo Reel” Tom Mahota, 8-piece Ceramic Portfolio, "Sculpture vs Function" Regional Honorable Mention Award Recipients: Tanner Braun, Photography, “Explore” Tanner Braun, Photography, ”Cruise” Tanner Braun, Photography, “Aliens are Real" Eleanor Erdman, Photography, “Pier” Lillian Graupman, Painting, Van Gogh in a Box Lillian Graupman, Painting, Girl and the Window Jonathan Grunow, Photograph, ”Forest Portrait” Jonathan Grunow, Photograph, “Black and White Portrait” Tom Mahota, Ceramics, “Pillar Vase” Tom Mahota, Ceramics, “Pit Fire Moon Vase” Tom Mahota, Ceramics, “Pit Fire Bud Vase” Claire Melander, Photography, “Me” Caitlyn Shipp, Photography, “What Lies Beyond” Caitlyn Shipp, Photography, “The Superior Wave” Lucy Treat, Drawing, Wearing Air P a s s a g e s | Spring 2017 - Scholastic Art Awards 13


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7 PHOTO CREDIT: 2. CLAIRE MELANDER '19; 3,5, AND 8: JOHN GRUNOW '18 7: NATIONAL SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHY

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1. After losing a closely-contested match to Foley in the first round at the State Tournament, the Fire tennis team rebounded against St. James, winning 4-3 to advance to and win the consolation championship. (Submitted photo) 2. Fire hockey made its first-ever Section 2AA Championship appearance on Wednesday, March 1, at Mariucci Arena. The Fire, ranked 5th in the state, faced off with Eden Prairie, ranked 1st in the state. The game came down to the final seconds and the Fire narrowly missed their first trip to the MSHSL State Tournament. 3. This season marked the 11th consecutive year, Holy Family Cross Country sent at least one runner to the State Cross Country Meet at St. Olaf College in Northfield, MN. This year it was long distance runner and University of North Dakota commit Kendra Franck. 4. Fire pitcher Michael Jensen signed his National Letter of Intent to play baseball with Division 1 University of Oklahoma. 5. Axel Ruschmeyer signed his National Letter of Intent as a preferred walk-on with the University of Minnesota football program. Axel was one of 30 players selected to the 2017 Minnesota Vikings All-State Team. 6. Samm Dalsin, center, is surrounded by friends after signing her National Letter of Intent to play soccer for Minnesota State University-Moorhead.

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7. After defeating the Annandale Cardinals in the section semifinal, the Holy Family girls basketball team played in their second section final game in as many years. 8. Brooke Bowlin signed her National Letter of Intent to play softball for St. Cloud State University. Brooke also scored her 1000th career basektball point in her final season. P a s s a g e s | Spring 2017 - Athletics Gallery 15


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4 1. HF Math League team won second place in their bracket at the Minnesota Mathematics League State Tournament. This is the highest place in school history. 2. Gigi Shannon earned a Superior Rating with a perfect score on her cello solo at the Section 5AA Individual Instrumental Music Contest. (Pictured with her accompanist Pat Schaffran.) The clarinet duet of Natalie Wideman and Mitch Hausback, string ensemble of Maddy Kohrman, Melissa Espinoza, Gigi Shannon, and Nicole Espinoza, and Jazz Ensemble also earned Superior ratings. Chorale earned a Superior rating at the Large Group Vocal Music Contest. 3. The HF Theatre Department performed its one-act play, You're Driving Me Crazy! in January. Its second production of the year, James and the Giant Peach, will be performed in May. 4. FRC team 3558 Firebots took first place in the Mankato qualifier for the 2017 State FTC Competition. Members of the team: Zach Gallus, Jonah Beulke, Simon Hagen, and Jake Sandefur. 5. HF Knowledge Bowl placed 2nd in the conference and Team Plural Moose qualified for the region meet. 6. Voices of Fire attended the McNally Smith College of Music's 2017 Vocal Jazz Festival. Gabi Schiffler and Natalie Carter earned "Outstanding Solo Vocalist" awards. 7. Thirty HF students attend the 2017 Youth in Government Model Assembly weekend in St. Paul. 8. Womens Epee won the team state championship based on the team's season performance and the individual performances at the state tournament event. Womens Foil won the foil state team championship as well as the 2017 State Squad Event. 16 P a s s a g e s | Spring 2017 - Activities Gallery


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A Fresh Look for Golf

ADAM IVERSEN '09 COFOUNDS A GOLF APPAREL LINE FOR THE NEXT GENRATION OF GOLF

As a third grader, Adam Iversen ’09 would be dropped off at the local Chaska Par 30 with a $5 bill. His parents would jokingly refer to it as the “cheapest daycare in town,” and Adam would spend many of his summer days on the course. His interest in golf lead him to his first job at Hazeltine National Golf Club, where he caddied throughout high school. Despite his passion for the game, his skill peaked as “a mediocre golfer at best," and he started viewing golf as nothing more than a fun hobby. Now as the co-founder of a golf apparel company, Swannies, he reflects on the amusing and sometimes crazy journey that led him back to the game. At first glance, it’s difficult to find the common thread in Adam’s experiences after graduating from Holy Family. While attending the University of Minnesota, he took an entrepreneurship course that brought together students from different academic backgrounds to solve global challenges in emerging economies. In stark contrast to the engineering courses to which he was accustomed, this class didn’t come with right or wrong answers. He was encouraged to think critically about complex problems with undefined parameters, unclear inputs, and vague success metrics. It was a liberating experience

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and he began seeking challenges to exercise this critical lens. This led him to working with artisans in rural India, developing wetland restoration techniques in Malaysia, and leading an education reform group. The same appetite for a challenge is what brought Adam back to golf. When one of his teammates from the entrepreneurship course became disillusioned with the corporate world, he asked Adam if he’d be interested in exploring an idea with him. Armed with a rudimentary understanding of business planning and plenty of confidence, Adam and his teammate, Matt, started working together. Matt was a former high school golfer who had spent the summer playing the sport in a pair of Nike sandals, and he lamented the fact that there were no cool sandals designed for golf. Adam knew someone with a 3D printer, and within a week they were prototyping their designs. The businessmen named the creation Swannies and took to Kickstarter after nearly a year of refining their product. Their Kickstarter campaign was met with a lot of enthusiasm, allowing them to hit their goal of $20,000 in pre-orders and making their idea a reality. After opening an online store and


selling the sandals at 15 golf courses in the Twin Cities area, they started making shirts, hats, and other lifestyle products for casual golfers. The original motto, “Golf Should Be Fun,” has resonated with casual golfers who often feel ostracized by a culture that accepts only those who behave, dress, and play a certain way. “Golf, traditionally, has a pretentious attitude problem.” says Iversen, “For golf to continue to attract younger, casual golfers, this needs to change. Young golfers aren’t playing the game the same way as previous generations, and the Swannies brand is the voice for this wave of golfers.” Of the many initiatives the Swannies team is involved in to promote this new attitude, one such event sticks out – The Swannies Party Scramble. As the name suggests, the tournament incorporates not only a nine-hole golf score but also performance in various party games (e.g. cornhole, ladder toss) to determine the winning team. Adam and Matt are currently raising seed funding on an equity crowd-funding website, SeedInvest, and are the first company from Minnesota to be approved for funding on the highly selective platform. This relatively new format for raising investment capital allows accredited and non-accredited investors to invest side by side under the same investment terms. They were also selected for the Minnesota Angel

Investor Tax Credit, where any accredited investor will receive 25% back on an investment in the form of a federal tax credit. The Swannies team has grand ambitions and are on pace to have their lifestyle apparel in over 350 golf shops by the end of 2017. They continue to grow their online store, expand their social media presence, and pursue licensing and distribution deals in Canada, Denmark, and Japan. Adam will be attending the Ready Tee Fire Golf Classic at Deer Run Golf Club in Victoria on July 17, 2017, and Swannies team is the official raffle prize sponsor for the tournament.

Adam will be attending Watch for Swannies at the Ready Tee Fire Golf Holy Family's Classic at Deer Run Golf Club Ready Tee17,Fire in Victoria on July 2017, Golf Classic and the Swannies team will be on July 2017!! providing shirt 17, for the event.

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Tackling Tragedies BY KATHLEEN SCHURMAN, CATHOLIC SCHOOLS CENTER OF EXCELLENCE, APRIL 2017 ISSUE

As a football team captain or as a young man battling a debilitating disease, Peter Westerhaus is an example of faith, peristence, and courage. Peter Westerhaus has stared death in the eyes several times over. And yet, he keeps smiling.

Throughout 2014, he had three surgeries removing his large intestine — ending his football career.

Nevertheless, muddling through adversity wasn’t easy.

What got him through those dark years?

“I had to embrace my faith, which was rooted in my upbringing and Catholic education,” said Westerhaus, 24, a graduate of Shakopee Area Catholic Schools (SACS).

“Before I was sick, my faith was part of me. When I was full of despair, the prayers and values I had learned from family and school allowed me to hold on, giving me the foundation needed to succeed and take on the tough stuff.”

He attended Holy Family Catholic High School in Victoria and won Minnesota’s Mr. Football 2010. The 6-foot-3-inch 235-pound linebacker signed on to play football for the University of Minnesota. The NFL seemed within his grasp. However, tragedy struck its first blow.

“It meant so much to me knowing they were praying,” he said.

While hiking in the Grand Canyon that spring with his parents, Jon and Sue Westerhaus, and his brother, David, a rock struck him in the forehead, cracking his skull. He needed 50 stitches, suffered a severe concussion and lost 30 pounds while recuperating.

Eventually, he resumed playing football.

Helping others access cures Westerhaus, who lives in Plymouth, graduated from the Carlson School of Business in 2016. He founded a nonprofit called Achieving Cures Together (www.achievingcures.com), which helps support academic research focused on microbial restoration therapy — a procedure that can eliminate an antibiotic-resistant superbug, which kills 30,000 people a year and nearly killed him. He’s collaborating with Dr. Alexander Khoruts, one of his own physicians, in this pioneering therapy, which is 90 to 95 percent effective.

“My weight returned sophomore year, and I was making good plays,” he said.

Since Westerhaus started this nonprofit endeavor in 2016, his organization has supported the treatment of 80 people.

But by the Gophers’ first game that fall, he was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis. Medication didn’t suppress the disease. He was in and out of hospitals. Sleep was a stranger.

“As much as I wanted to play football, I now see my illness as a gift, because it helped me put things into perspective,” he said. “It challenged me to grow in my faith and to help others who are battling their own crisis.”

With the medical setbacks, he was red-shirted his freshman year.

LEFT: Photo by Robert Cunningham

At the peak of his illness, a teacher brought him hundreds of cards from the students at SACS. A teammate from Holy Family organized a prayer service.

Then in 2013, a life-threatening infection developed.

This article printed with permission by the Catholic Schools Center of Excellence. If you'd like to hear more of Peter's story, visit the December 7 Facebook post on the University of Minnesota Carlson School of Management's Alumni page at www.facebook.com/carlsonmba

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Alumni Updates 2006

2011

COLEY (HOCKETT) WRIGHT and her

husband, Brandon, welcomed son Bates Stephen Wright on February 9, 2017. He weighed 9 lbs 6 oz and was 19.5" long.

BRADY RIESGRAF recently presented

his group experimental research project at the Mayo Clinic. He is a senior at St. John's University, Collegeville, majoring in biology/pre-med and is a part of the the Entrepreneurial Scholars and Mayo Innovation Scholars programs.

MARIAH VALIANT graduated in Spring

2016 from College of Saint Benedict with Bachelor of Arts in Biology and minor in Theology. She is working as a veterinary technician for Banfield Pet Hospital until applying for Veterinary School Fall 2018.

2012

2008 GREG WESTERHAUS graduated from

RYAN DAHL married Kate McMillan on June 18th, 2016, at Guardian Angels Catholic Church in Chaska. Ryan's brother, Justin Dahl '15, and sister, Kalie Dahl '20 and seven of his Holy Family classmates were also in the wedding.

the Alliance for Catholic Education (ACE) Teaching Fellows program through the University of Notre Dame in 2015 with Master of Education. He is currently in his fourth year of teaching at Holy Trinity High School on the north side of Chicago, his original placement for ACE.

2013 LAURA MUEHLBAUER recently

2010

JAY ROANE married Emily Roberts on August 13, 2016 at the Basilica of St. Mary. The officiant was Father Bob White of St. Victoria Catholic Church, Victoria.

CLAYTON FORNER was installed into the

completed an intellectual property research project for the Mayo Clinic. She currently attends St. Olaf College and will graduate this May with a B.A. in chemistry with distinction and Phi Beta Kappa Honors. Following graduation, she will attend graduate school at the University of Wisconsin-Madison as she pursues a degree in analytical chemistry.

Ministry of Lector on January 15, 2017. He is a seminarian at the Pontifical North American College in Rome.

MICHAEL ROANE graduated from Drake

University in December 2016 with a joint Bachelor Degree in Marketing (Sales and Sales Management) and Entrepreneurial Management. While there, Michael played four years as a linebacker for Drake's Division 1 football program, ending his career as captain of the team, an All-PFL honorable mention, and a selection into the National Football Foundation's Hampshire Honor Society.

2014 KATIE GALIOTO is the new managing

editor at The Observer, the student-run, daily print and on-line newspaper of The University of Notre Dame and Saint Mary's College. She currently is spending the semester abroad in Rome.

Please email alumni college and career updates as well as name and address changes to communications@hfchs.org.

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2016-2017 BOARD OF DIRECTORS CHRISTOPHER MOAKLEY | Board Chair BOB KEMMERER | Vice Chair JOHN BIERBAUM | Board Treasurer TOM FURLONG | Member at Large ROBIN KRIER | Board Secretary DON BORNHORST TARA COLLINS DIANNE DEERING ANTON ANGELO GALIOTO SCOTT GUILLEMETTE ROB HEITHOFF STEVE HOCKETT CHAD KOEBNICK FR. ERIK LUNDGREN SCOTT O’BRIEN MICHAEL PUKLICH BRENDA REDDAN JENNY RICHELSEN PAUL ROTHSTEIN MARC TERRIS JOSEPH THOMAS '06 FR. ROLF TOLLEFSON

BOARD EMERITUS BARB BURKE STEVE BURKE TOM BURKE THEO CHALGREN TONY DENUCCI FR. DOUG EBERT BOB FAFINSKI MARY FAFINSKI ANNE FURLONG JOHN GEISLER DIANA GOEBEL MARK LANO BRIAN LAVELLE ANNE LAWLER BILL MILLER JOE MORIN JOHN RADICK ROB ROY DEB SECREST BILL SLATTERY MARY STEINER JANE STONE BILL TRAXLER FR. BOB WHITE

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION KATHLEEN BROWN | President & Principal JOHN DOLS | Assistant Principal & Campus Minister NICK TIBESAR| Activities Director

SUPPORT STAFF LINDSAY BURGER | Advancement Office TERRI FARR | School Office

ADVANCEMENT KENNA DOOLEY | Vice President for Advancement SCOTT BREIMHORST | Executive Director of Admissions MATT THULI | Director of Individual Giving and Alumni Relations ROB BELL | Admissions and Financial Aid Officer LAURA PODERGOIS | Marketing & Communications Manager

STUDENT SUPPORT MELISSA LIVERMORE | Dean for Academic Support KRISTA MCCOY | Counselor JOSHUA RUTZ | Counselor HEATHER KLOSTERMAN '09 | Paraprofessional MEG REDSHAW | Learning Support ADAM WILSON | Information Resources

FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ERIN HESSE | Director of Finance GAYLE MORIN | Accountant

FACILITIES & MAINTENANCE PAUL ABBAS MICHAEL ETBAREKH KEVIN MOREHOUSE

2016-2017 TEACHING STAFF ENGLISH ZACHARY BROWN CARLEE KOCON RYAN MENDEN '10 CASE UNVERZAGT FINE ARTS LAURA BOILLAT ANNELISE BROWN '05 SHELAGH GAMBLE ANNA OLSON BRAD PERRIN-SMITH MATHEMATICS KAREN ATKINSON DAVID HOPKINS GARY KANNEL MICHAEL LEVERENTZ MELISSA LIVERMORE

PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH PAUL RUSSO ANNE SLOAN SCIENCE JOSHUA DWYER IAN PARZYCK JIM TISEL JIM WALKER SOCIAL STUDIES SARAH HALVORSON PATRICK MAUS '03 HOLLY POTTEBAUM

TECHNOLOGY GARY KANNEL NICK LIVERMORE BRAD PERRIN-SMITH (Technology Coordinator) THEOLOGY DOUGLAS BOSCH LYNNAE BOSCH NATHAN SCHLEPP ANDREW WITCHGER WORLD LANGUAGES JACOB DUECK KAREN KIDROWSKI ALEXANDER MYTNIK JORGE OCONITRILLO

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8101 KOCHIA LANE, VICTORIA, MINNESOTA 55386 |

PHONE: 952.443.4659 | WEB: HFCHS.ORG

Holy Family Theatre Department presents its spring musical! FRIDAY, MAY 12 7:00 P.M. SATURDAY, MAY 13 2:00 P.M. AND 7:00 P.M. TICKETS $5 HFCHS PERFORMANCE CENTER Bring the whole family! JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH is presented through special arrangement with Musical Theatre Internationl (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI.www.MTIshows.com