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Course of Study Holton-Arms offers a diversified college preparatory curriculum in the Middle and Upper Schools. The program is carefully designed to provide the necessary academic foundation as a student moves from grade seven to grade twelve. At each grade level, students may choose from an increasing variety of opportunities, designing their programs to meet individual needs, abilities, and interests. They also receive careful guidance regarding graduation requirements and the college admissions process. We encourage all students to strive for depth and breadth as they move through Holton-Arms. Students should aim to take four years of each major academic subject in the Upper School. They must also round out their programs with courses in Physical Education and the Fine and Performing Arts. The Holton-Arms curriculum makes available those courses that will meet the requirements of any college or university.

Requirements for Graduation A minimum of 21 credits including:  English (4 credits)  Fine or Performing Arts (1 credit, in Art, Music, Drama, or Dance, if not taken for P.E. credit)  Foreign Language (3 credits in one language)  History and the Social Sciences (3 credits - The Ancient and Medieval World, The West in the World: 14921870, and The West in the World: 1871 to the Present)  Mathematics (3 credits in Upper School – please see department description on page 25)  Science (3 credits, including Biology, in Upper School. One credit of science must be earned during grade 9.)  Physical Education (2 credits, ½ for each semester or season, by taking physical education classes or participating on interscholastic teams in Upper School. Students are required to take Fundamentals of P.E. by the end of tenth grade.)  Electives to complete requirements. The minimum course load in grade nine is five major courses. In grades ten through twelve, the minimum load is four major courses in each semester. The recommended course load for most students is five majors. Students may take six majors with permission of the Upper School Director, provided space is available.  To graduate, a student must have a 70 average in each of her last two years, and her final grade in Senior English must be at least a 70.  Community Service (50 hours in grades 9-11) to be completed by the beginning of the senior year; service may begin during the summer between grades 8 and 9.  Swimming Competency (Students must pass a swimming competency test by the end of the first semester of the senior year.)

Contents Requirements for Graduation .............................................................................................1 Suggested Program by Grade Level ....................................................................................2 General Information ........................................................................................................... 4 Library................................................................................................................................. 5 Art ...................................................................................................................................... 6 Dance & Drama .................................................................................................................. 8 English ............................................................................................................................... 11 Foreign Language .............................................................................................................. 13 Health Education ...............................................................................................................19 History and the Social Sciences ........................................................................................ 20 Math……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..25 Music................................................................................................................................. 29 Physical Education ............................................................................................................ 32 Pure and Applied Science ................................................................................................. 35 Consortium Courses .......................................................................................................... 39 Independent Study ............................................................................................................ 41

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Suggested Program by Grade Level

GRADE SEVEN Required: English 7 Chinese, French, Latin, or Spanish Mathematics 7 World Studies Science 7 Art; Guidance; Health; Music; Tools for Learning Middle School Athletics Electives: Chorus, Handbells, Strings, Winds, Production Technology

GRADE EIGHT Required: English 8 Chinese, French, Latin, or Spanish Pre-Algebra 8 or Algebra 1 (by recommendation) U.S. Political History: Foundations of American Government Science 8 Speech Middle School Athletics Health Electives to fulfill the Arts requirement Electives: Art, Chorus, Handbells, Strings, Winds, Music Technology, Drama, Production Technology

GRADE NINE Required: English 9 Algebra 1 or Geometry Biology Foreign Language level 1 or 2 Ancient & Medieval World Health Skills Physical Education Electives: Fine Arts: Ceramics, Photography, Studio Art Performing Arts: Chorus, Strings, Winds, Drama, Dance, Music Technology, Handbells

GRADE TEN Required: English 10 Geometry or Algebra 2 and Trig Foreign Language level 2 or 3 The West in the World: 1492-1870 Science in grade 10, 11, or 12

Electives: Fine Arts: Ceramics, Photography, Studio Art Performing Arts: Chorus, Strings, Winds, Drama, Dance, Music Technology, Handbells, Music Major Physical Education: Fundamentals, if not taken in grade 9

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GRADE ELEVEN Required: English 11 Foreign Language level 3 or 4 Algebra 2 and Trigonometry, Algebra 3, or Pre-calculus The West in the World: 1871 to the Present Science in grade 10, 11, or 12 Electives: Courses in Fine or Performing Arts, Health, Physical Education, if requirement not yet met

GRADE TWELVE Required: English 12 Foreign Language, if requirement not yet met Mathematics, if requirement not yet met Physical Education, if requirement not yet met Science, if requirement not yet met Suggested: 5 major courses, one in each academic discipline

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General Information Additional Major Courses Most Holton students carry five major courses during each of their four years in the Upper School. Given the academic rigor of the Upper School, it is not recommended that students carry more than five major courses. However, we do recognize that on occasion a student may have exceptional interests or circumstances that warrant taking more than five major courses. If a student wishes to take six major courses in any semester, she must write a letter of petition to the Upper School Director. This letter should be submitted when she hands in her proposed course selections in the spring. It should cite which of her courses will be her “sixth” and address her reasons for needing to take the course in the coming academic year. Please note that in order to maintain reasonable class and section sizes, a student wishing to take a sixth major will only be allowed as numbers permit. Community Service The goals of Holton’s Community Service requirement are to increase each student’s awareness of community needs and to provide her with an opportunity for service which carries with it the possibility of enhancing her sensitivity to others and a sense of her own effectiveness. To reach this end, each student is required to participate in the Middle School Community Service Program and in 50 hours of individual community service in the Upper School. A project proposal, to be submitted before initiation of the service project, is due before the end of the junior year. Projects must be completed before the beginning of the senior year. Students may begin their Upper School community service requirement hours during the summer between grades 8 and 9. Complete guidelines are available in the Upper School Office and from the Community Service Coordinator Senior Project During the month of May, each senior undertakes a senior project which she designs and, subject to Senior Project Committee approval, carries out. Some explore possible future careers; others select social service work or creative pursuits. On their return to school at the end of May, seniors meet to discuss and evaluate their experiences. They also submit a journal describing their project experience. Students whose academic commitments for graduation have not been fulfilled may not do a senior project until those requirements are met. Consortium Courses Consortium courses are offered by the Bethesda Independent Schools’ Consortium: Bullis School, Connelly School of the Holy Child, Holton-Arms School, Landon School, St. Andrew’s Episcopal School, and Stone Ridge School. Courses meet at one of the member schools three times a week from 7:00 to 7:50 in the morning and one or two evenings per month; attendance at all class meetings is mandatory. Admission to these classes is competitive, and only highly committed students should apply. While each Consortium school has its own specific admissions policy, all schools have agreed that admission is dependent on strong academic standing, favorable recommendations from appropriate teachers and departments, a stellar attendance record, well-developed writing and reading skills, intellectual curiosity, and a strong work ethic. A description of this year’s Consortium offerings and class locations can be found at the end of this packet. Audit An Upper School student may audit a course with the permission of the instructor. Arrangements for auditing are made at the beginning of the course. Guidelines are available in the Upper School Office. Pass/Fail Option Students in grades 10, 11, and 12 have the option of taking a fifth subject on a Pass/Fail basis. No course taken in satisfaction of a graduation requirement may be taken Pass/Fail. Guidelines are available in the Upper School Office. Advanced Placement Students enrolled in AP classes are required to take the Advanced Placement exam for each AP class in which they are enrolled. Elective Courses Elective courses will run only if there is sufficient enrollment.

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Library The Marriott Library strives to provide access to information for all students, encouraging them to become independent, lifelong learners. An extensive collection of curricular, co-curricular, and recreational materials, as well as state-of-the-art technology, is available to students and teachers to implement this goal. The objectives of the library program include: 1) Instructing the students in the use of the library and its resources: print, non-print, and electronic; 2) Developing the students’ research skills in accessing information; 3) Developing the students’ information literacy (i.e. not only accessing information but also learning how to evaluate the type, quantity, and quality of information needed and how to make best use of it); 4) Stimulating the students’ interest in reading fiction and nonfiction as sources of pleasure and enrichment. The library program is integrated into the curriculum at all grade levels and in all subject areas. The librarians work with students individually and in scheduled classes to help them acquire research skills, develop information literacy, and master the variety of changing information sources from books to multimedia to online databases. Basic skills introduced in the seventh grade develop in complexity each year and include a formal research paper in tenth grade. Specialized reference sources, services, and search strategies for each discipline are introduced as needed. Visit the Marriott Library on Holton’s web site for a complete overview of the library program. Reading Programs Grade level: 7-12 The librarians, in conjunction with classroom teachers, encourage the students to develop a lifelong interest in the pleasures of reading through a variety of formal and informal programs. These include presenting regularly scheduled reading activities to seventh graders, preparing book talks and bibliographies as requested by teachers, maintaining displays of new and timely materials, and providing individual reader guidance.

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Art The art curriculum of Holton-Arms actively engages each student in the process of discovering her creative vision while acquiring technical skills and gaining historical and cultural perspectives. Art courses in the Middle School provide general introductions to studio art, photography and ceramics, and reinforce skills and concepts learned at the primary level. Courses in the Upper School offer the student opportunities to concentrate in one discipline. Students work closely with members of the art faculty who encourage inquiry, experimentation, and excellence. Studios are spacious, well equipped, and open to students throughout the day. In addition to acquiring the various skills and techniques involved in a specific art discipline, the experience of creating art directly relates to development of critical thinking, mental discipline, self confidence, and the ability to solve problems. The art curriculum provides developmentally appropriate and challenging training for each student to express herself while nurturing the artistic process so that it becomes incorporated into her daily life. All Upper School courses may be repeated for credit. With each successive enrollment, increasing emphasis is placed on individualizing the curriculum to accommodate the student’s personal direction in the visual arts. Students who have taken multiple art courses are encouraged to submit a slide/digital portfolio with their college applications. They may also submit a portfolio for AP art credit at the end of their junior or senior year. One credit in the fine or performing arts is required for graduation. ART070 Art 7 Grade level: 7 (required) Art 7 is a studio art class that provides students with a multi-media approach to the visual arts. This is a transitional course that continues to build upon skills introduced in Lower School and begins to lay the foundation for further Middle and Upper School art study. Techniques in design, drawing, painting, collage, ceramics, textiles and printmaking are explored. Although these may vary slightly from year to year, emphasis is placed on the development of observation skills and the ability to make aesthetic judgments. Integration with other middle disciplines is practiced frequently. ART080 Art 8 (half year) ART085 Art 8 (full year) Grade level: 8 Art 8 is a studio art class that students may elect for either one semester or the entire year. A wide range of media is explored, preparing students for more specialized art courses in the Upper School. Techniques in design, drawing, oil painting, print making, photography and ceramics are presented. Emphasis continues to be placed on observation skills and the ability to make aesthetic judgments. This course encourages creativity and a variety of solutions to design problems. ART101 Art Minor: Drawing and Painting Grade level: 9-12 Credit: ½ per semester This introductory Upper School studio course concentrates on drawing and painting, and printmaking. Students are encouraged to explore many forms of creative expression as they continue to develop basic skills and an understanding of aesthetic expression. Students will also analyze works of art through a Visual Literacy Unit that will include online assignments, class discussions, and a self-directed museum visit. Students wishing to take a full year of Drawing and Painting Minor should list this course twice on their course registration sheets. ART131 Art Minor: Ceramics Grade level: 9-12 Credit: ½ per semester Ceramics Minor introduces students to clay as a medium of expression through hand building techniques of pinching, coiling, and slab construction. Special attention is given to craftsmanship and the development of aesthetic expression. In both semesters, both terra cotta and stoneware are used, and various techniques of surface decoration are explored. Students will also analyze works of art through a Visual Literacy Unit that will include online assignments, class discussions, and a self-directed museum visit. Students wishing to take a full year of Ceramics Minor should list this course twice on their course registration sheets.

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ART141 Art Minor: Photography Grade level: 9-12 Credit: ½ per semester This course explores the art of seeing and self-expression in black and white photography. It introduces the use of the 35 mm camera, film exposure and processing, and darkroom printing. Equal emphasis is given to technical understanding and compositional ideas. The course explores the history of photography and the role of aesthetic principles in making strong images. A 35 millimeter camera is suggested. The school owns cameras which students may borrow. Students supply their own photographic paper and film, which are available for purchase in the bookstore. All other basic supplies are provided. Students will also analyze works of art through a Visual Literacy Unit that will include online assignments, class discussions, and a self-directed museum visit. Students wishing to take a full year of Photography Minor should list this course twice on their course registration sheets. ART300 Art Major: Drawing and Painting Grade level: 10-12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: ART 101 and Departmental permission Art major is a full year course that continues the study of art as visual language. The more complex issues of color, composition, and space are pursued through exercises in drawing, oil painting, and printmaking. While the use of traditional materials and techniques is taught, the focus of the course is to teach students to see the relationship between technical skills and aesthetic expression. ART330 Art Major: Ceramics Grade level: 10-12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: ART 131 and Departmental permission Ceramics Major is a full year course that continues and intensifies the study of ceramics begun in Ceramics Minor. While hand building remains an important part of the curriculum, students are introduced to wheel throwing if time permits. Both functional and sculptural projects are assigned in the exploration and development of personal expression. Other important aspects of Ceramics Major include working with a larger variety of different clays, and both oxidation and reduction firing processes. ART351 Art Major: Photography 1 (fall semester) ART352 Art Major: Photography 2 (spring semester) Grade level: 10-12 Credit: ½ per semester Prerequisite: ART 141 and Departmental permission This course is designed for the student who has already developed photographic skills. It explores various styles of shooting: landscape, documentary and portraiture, with an emphasis on developing a point of view. Students learn to use different films such as black and white, infra red, and slow ISO films. Toning prints is also part of the curriculum. This course includes a unit on color digital photography in which students shoot with digital cameras provided by the school, manipulate the print in Photoshop, and learn the mechanics of color printing. A 35 millimeter camera is required. Students are also responsible for providing film and paper, which are available for purchase in the bookstore. All other basic supplies are provided. ART361 Art Minor: Life Drawing/Painting (fall semester) ART362 Art Minor: Life Drawing/Painting (spring semester) Grade level: 9-12 Credit: ½ per semester Prerequisite: Departmental permission Life drawing has historically served as an essential foundation of artistic training, during which the student refines skills of observation and mastery of materials and gains confidence in her work. In this course, students focus on elements of line, value, proportion, gesture, and mass. They become involved in aspects of anatomy, drawing the head, depiction of extremities, and rendering the figure in space.

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Dance & Drama We believe that a student finds her unique voice when given opportunities for self-expression. At the core of each experience in dance & drama is a commitment to collaboration, creativity, and risk-taking. Every creative process represents a journey. Every aspect of a student’s Holton education informs that process. Conversely, a student’s experience in the performing arts will inform her work in every other academic discipline. Courses in dance & drama promote the acquisition of knowledge and technical skills while encouraging the development of the imagination and aesthetic sensitivity. Opportunities in dance, drama, and performance production are offered during the curricular day. Curricular study in dance & drama also extends beyond the school day. Opportunities include: dramatic productions and workshops (some require an audition), design and hands-on experience in technical theater, and Orchesis Dance Ensemble (which requires an audition). Spacious dance studios and three theaters (including a Black Box and an amphitheater) support the performing arts experience. One credit in the fine or performing arts is required for graduation. PA080 Speech - Communication Skills Grade level: 8 (required) Students develop techniques to express and present themselves orally in a clear and confident manner. Effective communication is explored through a variety of exercises and assignments involving oral presentation. Emphasis is placed on thorough preparation and practice, pace, posture, voice, diction, and eliminating verbal litter. Students practice active listening and constructive criticism. Using the three Aristotelian appeals, logos, ethos and pathos, students will learn to make persuasive speeches. Students will also conduct a rhetorical analysis of a famous speech from history in order to discover what makes it effective, and how they can apply those techniques to their own speechmaking. PA078 Middle School Acting Workshop Grade level: 8 (elective) In Middle School Acting Workshop, students will explore the basics of drama, acting and performance, with a particular eye towards overcoming shyness and other barriers to personal expression. Students will explore the fundamentals of acting through a number of hands-on activities including drama exercises, improvisation, and scene work. Students learn the vocabulary of performance, develop spatial awareness and vocal techniques, and examine the expression of emotional truth versus theatrical demonstrativeness through multiple performance styles. Physical warm-ups, stretches, relaxation techniques, and improvisation instill confidence, promote spontaneity and imagination, and encourage a sense of ‘play,’ which is essential to the creation of a compelling theatrical experience. Group work promotes collaboration and fosters a sense of individual responsibility to the ensemble. PA0785 Middle School Production Technology Grade level: 7, 8 (elective) Students in Production Technology will learn about basic skills, tools, and techniques for creating scenery, properties, costumes, lighting, and sound. Standard theatre vocabulary, backstage procedures and theater etiquette will be included. Students will also be exposed to the collaborative creative process, organization of a typical producing ensemble, and delegation of responsibility for different production aspects. Topics may also include box office, house management, and advertising. Opportunities will be present for students to use their new skills to create actual elements for use in Middle and Upper School drama productions, musical concerts, and dance performances.

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PA101 Performance Production and Technology Grade level: 9-12 Credit: ½ per semester This course provides instruction in the creation of live performances (drama, music, dance, etc.) from the perspective of the non-performing artist. Creation of scenery, lighting, sound, and other aspects of production (other than the performers themselves) are explored. Topics covered include the tools and materials used to create a production, the safe and proper methods for using such tools and materials, basic scientific theory supporting these methods, and a brief overview of the history of stage technology. Students undertake construction and assembly projects in support of the school’s performing arts ensembles. PA102 Advanced Performance Production and Technology Grade level: 9-12 Credit: ½ per semester Prerequisite: PA101 or permission of instructor This course continues and expands upon the basic knowledge and skills acquired in Performance Production and Technology. Unusual materials, advanced techniques, and scientific underpinnings, such as electrical theory, sound propagation, and color theory are considered or expanded. Organization of the production company, stage management, and rehearsal techniques are explored. The artistic creative process and collaboration, as it relates to live performances, and application of technical aspects for artistic expression are introduced. Students undertake more complex projects in support of actual performance productions. This course may be repeated. PA105 Acting Workshop Grade level: 9-12 Credit: ½ per semester Students explore personal expression through performance. Characterization and stage relationships are developed through improvisation, ambiguous dialogues, and short scenes. Students are introduced to fundamentals of performance and gain verbal and nonverbal communication skills that promote creativity and confidence for the stage, and life. Written assignments, readings, memorization, and rehearsal time support class work. Specific assignments will be tailored to the developing skills and interests of the students enrolled. Students will analyze scenes, breaking them into specific actions and objectives for their assigned characters, and defining the given circumstances. This course is equally appropriate for students interested in exploring acting for the first time as for those with previous acting experience. This course may be repeated. PA106 Advanced Acting Workshop Grade level: 9-12 Credit: ½ per semester Prerequisite: PA105 or permission of instructor This course builds on the skills of the Acting Workshop with greater emphasis on scene study. In-depth interpretation, text analysis, and characterization are explored in support of performance. Students work to develop the skills necessary to analyze and perform any realistic scene, including defining specific actions and objectives, living within the “truth of the moment,” and physical and vocal characterization. Students work together to prepare scenes and individually on monologues. Specific term projects will be tailored to the developing skills and interests of the students enrolled. Students are encouraged to experiment beyond individual comfort zones. Written assignments, readings, memorization, rehearsal time, and play reviews support class work. This course may be repeated. PA191 Dance Composition and Choreography Grade level: 9 – 12 Credit: ½ (Credit is given for Physical Education or Performing Arts, but not both.) Dance Choreography is designed to introduce students to the creative process and compositional tools that are at the core of making dances. Students will explore various choreographic tools through short movement studies and in longer works-in-progress. Each student, regardless of ability level, will be encouraged to expand her movement vocabulary, her perception of dance, and her understanding of music and sound as expressive partners. Solo studies and small group choreographic projects will help students explore the source of movement ideas and movement development, and gain a greater appreciation for dance as a vehicle for artistic expression. This course may be repeated.

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PA 192 Dance Technique Grade Level: 9-12 Credit: ½ (Credit is given for Physical Education or Performing Arts, but not both.) Dance Technique is a minor elective course geared to the beginning and intermediate dancer, building upon the dance experiences in Lower and Middle School. The primary emphasis is on exploring the elements and stylistic nuances of modern and ballet dance technique. A typical technique class includes warm-up exercises, floor work or barre work, center work, and finally traveling combinations that encourage the dancers to move through greater space. In addition to acquiring technical skills and gaining an understanding of dance as an expressive art form, students will begin the study of dance history, and performance appreciation. This course may be repeated. PA192D Dance Technique (after school) Grade level: 9-12 Credit: ½ (Credit is given for Physical Education or Performing Arts, but not both.) Prerequisite: permission of department This course allows a student to enroll in PA/PE192 Dance Technique outside the conventional school day by taking three technique classes per week (during the first semester) with the Orchesis company members. Dancers are not eligible to perform in the Orchesis Concert or WAISDEA Festival (unless they audition, and are selected, to be part-time members of Orchesis). PA290 Dance Technique and Orchesis Ensemble* Grade level: 9-12 Credit: 1 (Credit is given for Physical Education or Performing Arts, but not both.) Prerequisite/Co-requisite: PE/PA 191 and permission of department This course provides interested students with a more intense dance experience. Company members meet four days a week, for up to two hours, for technique classes and rehearsals. Modern and ballet technique are studied in depth. Students also participate in various aspects of the choreographic process. Performance opportunities are offered through peer, faculty, and guest artist choreography. The commitment to Orchesis as a class and company spans the first two athletic seasons. * Participation by audition only.

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English The English program provides students with the skills and insights necessary for academic competence and for growth as independent and creative individuals. It introduces students to the literary genres and to many of the great writers. It helps students to see literature as an art form, and as a way to know the world and to extend and understand their own experience. It trains students to be accurate, thoughtful readers and to write clear, correct, and fluent English. Students take English each year in the Middle and Upper Schools. Four credits of upper school English and a final grade of at least 70 in Senior English are required for graduation. ENG07 English 7 Grade level: 7 (required) This course concentrates on the development of basic skills necessary in all subject areas: reading, writing, grammar, vocabulary, research, and discussion. Students study the Arthurian legend, Animal Farm, poetry, Two Old Women, and A Raisin in the Sun. Writing activities include expository and creative writing. ENG08 English 8 Grade level: 8 (required) Students study a variety of genres: short stories, poetry, novels (The House on Mango Street and To Kill a Mockingbird), and a Shakespearean comedy (A Midsummer Night’s Dream). The writing program includes critical as well as creative and personal writing, using topics derived from literature read in class. ENG09 English 9 Grade level: 9 (required) Credit: 1 This course familiarizes students with Greco-Roman mythology to provide a frame of reference for understanding universal themes and allusions in art and literature. The students look for these themes as they study The Odyssey, Romeo and Juliet, Their Eyes Were Watching God, The Catcher in the Rye, The Metamorphosis, Persepolis, and poetry. In composition, students practice skills in writing paragraphs, essays, and narratives. The course also includes grammar, vocabulary study, research, and speech skills. ENG10 English 10 Grade level: 10 (required) Credit: 1 This course stresses skills in close textual reading and expository writing techniques. Students read a wide variety of American novelists ranging from Nathaniel Hawthorne (The Scarlet Letter) to F. Scott Fitzgerald (The Great Gatsby), Richard Wright (Black Boy), Ernest J. Gaines (A Lesson Before Dying), and Amy Tan (The Joy Luck Club). Students also read short stories, personal essays, poetry, and plays and write an extensive properlydocumented research paper. The class emphasizes vocabulary skills and the basic rules and usage errors of English grammar. ENG11 English 11 Grade Level: 11 (required) Credit: 1 This course introduces students to major writers in each of the significant periods of English history from the Anglo-Saxons to the Romantics, to the Post-colonial novel. Students study works from a variety of genres— epic poetry, lyric poetry, plays, and novels—to examine the major themes of British literature. Texts include Beowulf, Gardner’s Grendel, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Shakespeare’s Macbeth, Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Brontë’s Wuthering Heights, and Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions. The writing program is primarily expository and includes vocabulary study. Please note: Students prepare for the English AP examinations in Language and Composition and in Literature in review sessions outside of class. SENIOR ENGLISH Grade Level: 12 (required) Credit: 1 Seniors elect one of the following sections of English 12. Course availability is subject to sufficient enrollment. All English 12 courses conclude with a term paper. The first semester of this course is designed to help seniors write effectively and to become discriminating judges of their own work. All teachers use Ken Macrorie’s Telling Writing as the basic text. Students read aloud what they write for class, hear comments and suggestions, then rewrite and revise. They also study the writing of professionals and end the course by writing a short story or cultural narrative of their own.

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ENG123 English 12/Representations of Women in Literature This course examines the way woman is presented in poetry and fiction. Students read short stories, novels, and poems that present various images of woman (submissive wife, angel, dominating wife, woman on a pedestal, sex object, old maid or spinster), keeping in mind what Coleridge believed — that a great mind is androgynous. Works include Toni Morrison’s Beloved and three others chosen by the class. ENG124 English 12/Banned Books This course explores the reasons public officials and ordinary citizens alike have tried to limit what others can read, despite the First Amendment protections Americans think they have. We will start with Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn, which was banned immediately upon its publication as the “veriest trash. . . suited to the slums”, even though years later others called it “the best book we’ve had” and “the book with which we as a literary people began.” The class will select other classic works considered dangerous, offensive, or both, from the list of “100 Most Frequently Challenged Books” over the last 10 years. Writers will likely include Toni Morrison, Margaret Atwood, John Steinbeck, and Kurt Vonnegut. ENG 125 English 12/Sixties Protest Literature John Lennon said, “We were all on this ship in the sixties, our generation, a ship going to discover the New World.” This course aims to make the sixties come alive for seniors through the literature that defined and influenced the era. The words of the writers and musicians under study helped fuel the civil rights movement, black power, the women’s liberation movement, and the fight against the Vietnam War. Authors will include: Malcolm X, Norman Mailer, Ken Kesey, Eldridge Cleaver, Sylvia Plath, and Bob Dylan. ENG126 English 12/War and Literature This course will examine how artists portray the experience of war in works of art. Students will read works of poetry, fiction, memoir, and drama and also explore other evocations of war—in the visual arts, music, and film. Recognizing that art both reflects and reshapes the way we think, the class will look at how war literature has changed society’s views of war and how war has changed artists’ visions. The course will begin with a brief review of early texts about war and then focus primarily on the works of the twentieth century. Works will include excerpts from Homer, Shakespeare, and the WWI war poets, Catch 22, and The Things They Carried among others. We will also read critical works such as Paul Fussel’s The Great War and Modern Memory. Students will participate in the teaching as leaders of discussion. ENG127 English 12/Shakespeare Students will read four of Shakespeare’s finest plays: Hamlet, King Lear, and two plays to be selected. The course will be run as a seminar, with students taking some responsibility for leading discussion on different elements in each play, including the concept of a tragic hero, parent-child relationships, the role of women, and controversies related to race and religion. To the degree possible, we will see local productions of the plays and compare different film versions of them.

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Foreign Language The ultimate goal of foreign language study is to acquire linguistic, communicative and cultural competences in a given target language. The foreign language courses at Holton are designed to build these competences through the integration of the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students engage in activities and tasks that require accurate and creative application of learned knowledge and skills. In doing so, they also develop understanding and appreciation of the culture of which the language they are learning is an integral part. Holton’s foreign language program offers courses in four languages: Chinese, French, Latin, and Spanish. In Chinese, French, and Spanish, communicative competence that enables students to fulfill real-life functions in the modes of conversation, description, narration and evaluation is emphasized. In Latin, students are trained to gain a solid command of vocabulary and grammar and to become a competent reader of classic Latin literature. Three credits in one language are required for graduation. CH070 Chinese 1A Grade level: 7 Credit: ½ Chinese 1 A is a beginning course in the study of Chinese designed for students who start a foreign language in Middle School. Both Pinyin (a Chinese phonetic system) and characters (the writing system) will be taught so that students will be able to communicate both orally and in written form in most essential everyday life situations. Students will help to celebrate Chinese holidays and do other activities to introduce Chinese culture in a fun and appealing way. CH080 Chinese 1B Grade level: 8 Credit: ½ Prerequisite: Chinese 1A The primary goal of Chinese 1B is to build upon the content covered in Chinese 1A and continue to lay a solid foundation in oral communication and writing skills for learning at higher levels. The course places a great emphasis on Chinese culture and engages students in research and group projects on such topics as calligraphy, Chinese cooking and the history of China. CH095 Chinese I Grade level: 9-12 Credit: 1 Chinese 1 is an introductory course designed for Upper School students who are either beginning learners or who do not have a sufficient background in language to enroll in Chinese 2. Both Pinyin (a Chinese phonetic system) and characters (the writing system) will be taught so that students will be able to communicate both orally and in written form in most essential everyday life situations. Students will help celebrate Chinese holidays and do other activities to introduce Chinese culture in a fun and appealing way. The course is offered only if there is sufficient enrollment. CH090 Chinese 2 Grade level: 9-12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Chinese 1B or Chinese I Chinese 2 reinforces and further develops the skills acquired in Chinese 1A and 1B of Middle School. Students tackle more grammatical features and expressions that are Chinese-specific and expand their vocabulary to increase the ability to communicate in Chinese. Development of oral proficiency continues to be a key component th st of the learning process. Exploration of a changing China in the 20 and 21 centuries as well as its cultural traditions is incorporated into learning through research projects, videos, and short stories. CH110 Chinese 3 Grade level: 10-12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Chinese 2 Chinese 3 further develops the knowledge and skills acquired in Chinese 1 and 2. It adopts a balanced approach toward skills in three modes of communication: interpretive, presentational, and interpersonal. Students learn to perform daily practical and social functions in the three modes with increased linguistic complexity and awareness of cultural appropriateness. They continue to build a larger functional vocabulary and work toward mastery of the core of Chinese grammar.

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CH120 Chinese 4 Grade level: 10-12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Chinese 3 Chinese 4 is designed for the students who have successfully completed the study of Chinese at the intermediate level. Using the themes that bear much relevance to students’ lives as the contexts for learning, the course introduces complex sentence structures and builds a significantly larger vocabulary to increase the depth and expressiveness of communication. Students are engaged in the communication tasks that not only develop oral proficiency but also require integration of all four skills - listening, reading, speaking and writing. CH130 Chinese 5 Grade level: 10-12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Chinese 4 Chinese 5 is an advanced course designed for the students who have successfully completed the study of intermediate-high Chinese in the previous year. It trains the students to increase depth and expressiveness of communication in a variety of personal, social, and cultural settings. Classes engage students in producing discourses on a range of topics in the descriptive, narrative and evaluative modes of expression and in developing insights into the Chinese cultural and social values through discussions and presentations. CH200 AP Chinese Language Grade Level: 11-12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chinese 4 and permission of the Foreign Language Dept. AP Chinese Language and Culture is offered to qualified and motivated students who intend to engage in an intensive study of the Chinese language and culture comparable to a second-year course in Chinese at the college level. Students build on the knowledge and skills covered in the previous years and develop automation and authenticity in their use of the target language. They work to achieve a high level of proficiency that will allow them to take the AP exam with confidence and success. Students enrolled in this class are required to take the AP Chinese Language & Culture exam. FR070 French 1A Grade level: 7 Credit: ½ French 1A, designed for beginning French students, introduces students to the French language and helps them build a strong foundation of the language. Students will develop a solid understanding of grammar, work on accurate pronunciation, learn to speak in complete sentences, read and comprehend a basic text, and participate in a simple conversation. FR080 French 1B Grade level: 8 Credit: ½ Prerequisite: French 1A nd French 1B, designed for 2 -year French students, further develops student skills in listening, reading, speaking, and writing French. In addition, students will become familiar with the main aspects of French culture and civilization, including the cultures of some of the approximately three dozen countries in the world where French is an official language and where there are strong cultural ties with France. FR095 French I Grade level: 9-11 Credit: 1 An introductory course designed for Upper School students who are either beginning French learners or whose background in the language is insufficient to enable them to enroll in a second-level French course. Students are introduced to Francophone culture and learn basic vocabulary and grammar structures that enable them to communicate and engage in simple conversations about daily life. They study the present tense and the past tense of regular verbs. This class is offered only if there is sufficient enrollment. FR090 French 2 Grade level: 9-12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: French 1B or French I French 2 is an intermediate course in the French language. Students do extensive work in grammar and vocabulary development. The choice of readers and the depth of concepts studied vary with the needs of individual groups. Students continue to develop communication skills in the French language and to explore the rich and exciting aspects of the French culture. Students will use vocabulary and grammar structures to further develop the ability 14


to communicate both through writing and through speaking. FR110 French 3 Grade level: 10-12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: French 2 French 3 is course for students who have satisfactorily completed two years of French and who wish to increase their communicative competence in French. Emphasis is put on strengthening students’ ability to communicate and function effectively in a wide variety of contexts using the major language skills: aural comprehension, oral production, reading comprehension, writing, and grammar. Exposure to authentic materials will be used to enhance vocabulary acquisition. Cultural aspects of Francophone countries are an integral part of the course material. FR115 French 4: French Conversation and Composition Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: French 3 or its equivalent French 4 is a course for students who have satisfactorily completed three years of French and who wish to increase their communicative competence. The intensive development of communicative competence in French is oriented around the investigation and discussions of a theme or themes culturally relevant to French or Francophone societies. Emphasis is put on a continued development of spoken and written expressions in the French language through readings and discussions of civilization and culture materials. Conversations and compositions in French are related to the readings. Culture is emphasized throughout the year. FR130 French 5: Cinéma et Francophonie Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: French 4 French Conversation and Composition or its equivalent French 5 is a course for students who have satisfactorily completed four years of French and who wish to pursue their study of the language and its culture. The focus of this course is to expand the students’ knowledge of French and Francophone countries primarily through movies, television programs, music, art, and newspapers, with emphasis placed on spontaneous use of the language. It is offered only if there is sufficient enrollment. FR190 Advanced Placement French: Language Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of French 3 and/or French 4 and permission of the Foreign Language Dept. AP French language is an Honors course for students who have successfully completed French 3 or French Conversation and Composition. Students are exposed to the various formats of the Advanced Placement exam and are trained in aural, oral, and written exercises. In addition, students study cultural topics and more complex language structures through francophone literature, films, and newspapers. Projects and presentations are an integral part of this course. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP French Language exam. LA070 Latin 1A Grade level: 7 Credit: ½ In Latin 1A, students begin the study of the Latin language and Roman culture. This course emphasizes grammar and builds vocabulary through reading a text in Latin based on the life and adventures of Horace. Cultural information about Rome’s early history includes sections on education, slavery, religion, the role of women, mythology and historical figures and events. Throughout the year, students will learn the connections between the English language and Latin through the study of their derivatives. LA080 Latin 1B Grade level: 8 Credit: ½ Prerequisite: Latin 1A Students continue to review Latin 1A grammar and vocabulary while learning new grammatical concepts and vocabulary as the narrative follows Horace’s life from his education in Rome to university in Athens. The end of the Republic and the roles of famous Roman figures such as Caesar and Cicero are studied and discussed. LA095 Latin I Grade level: 9-11 Credit: 1 Latin I is for students who begin the study of the Latin language and Roman culture in the Upper School. They learn grammar and vocabulary through reading and doing exercises from a text based on the adventures of a Roman 15


family. There is significant emphasis on the relationship of Latin to English vocabulary and grammar and on showing the connections between the ancient and modern worlds. The course is offered only if there is sufficient enrollment. LA090 Latin II Grade level: 9-12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Latin I or Latin 1B Students complete the study of basic grammar through reading and exercises. They learn about daily life in Rome and follow the political struggles as Romans faced the dissolution of the republic and the establishment of the Empire. There is significant emphasis on the relationship of Latin to English vocabulary and grammar and emphasis on showing the connections between the ancient and modern worlds. LA110 Latin III: Roman Prose and Poetry Grade level: 10-12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Latin II For Latin II, students read selections from Martial, Apuleius, Plautus, Pliny, and others in the first semester. In the second semester, students are introduced to more prose and poetry by reading selections from Ovid, Catullus, Vergil, and others. LA115 Latin IV: Advanced Readings in Latin Literature Grade level: 11-12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Latin III This course continues the process of introducing students to the great works of Latin literature. Students will read selections from the poems of Catullus, the Odes of Horace, and the Metamorphoses of Ovid. Further readings will be based on the interests of the students, but may include additional passages from Ovid (the Heroides or the Amores), prose works of Cicero, comedies of Terence and Plautus, etc. The course will include a mix of translation, reading for comprehension, vocabulary-building, and review of grammar, but there is significant emphasis on analysis and interpretation of literature. LA115H Latin IV: Advanced Readings in Latin Literature (Honors) Grade level: 11-12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Latin III and permission of the Foreign Language Department See LA115 for a general description. Students taking the honors level (recommended for those who intend to continue to AP Vergil in the senior year) will attend the same class as non-honors students, but will meet additional requirements: 1) a midterm examination instead of a midterm project, 2) fewer vocabulary resources on tests and quizzes, 3) additional sight-reading passages, and 4) translations of additional passages/poems of Catullus, Horace, and Ovid. LA200V Advanced Placement Latin: Vergil’s Aeneid Grade level: 10-12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Latin III and permission of the Foreign Language Department Students read the Aeneid: Parts of Books I, II, IV, VI, X and XII in Latin and the rest in English. Exposure to other interpretations of the story of the Trojan War in literature, art, music, and film enhances the study of this great epic. Increased emphasis on textual analysis and literary criticism takes us to a more sophisticated level of interpretation. A full year’s study of the Aeneid familiarizes students with Vergil’s style and vocabulary and immerses them in the world of heroes and mythology while emphasizing Roman history, values, and religion. Students enrolled in this class will take the AP Latin exam. SP070 Spanish 1A Grade level: 7 Credit: ½ Spanish 1A is an introductory course for beginners and advanced beginners in which students learn basic vocabulary and grammar concepts relevant to daily life. Students are introduced to reading, writing, speaking and listening through various classes, at home, individual and group activities. Primary emphasis is placed on Spanish vocabulary and Spanish and English grammar concepts. Students will learn about different Spanish-speaking countries around the world and people of Hispanic heritage here in the United States.

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SP080 Spanish 1B Grade level: 8 Credit: ½ Prerequisite: Spanish 1A Spanish 1B builds on the themes and concepts introduced in Spanish 1A. This course further develops student skills in listening, reading, speaking, and writing Spanish. Furthermore, students will learn about different lifestyles and celebrations of Spanish-speaking countries around the world and people of Hispanic heritage here in the United States. SP095 Spanish I Grade level: 9-11 Credit: 1 Spanish I is an introductory course designed for Upper School students who are either beginning Spanish learners or whose background in the language is insufficient for them to enroll in Spanish 2. This course will focus on building basic vocabulary, learning communication skills and using different strategies to convey meaning and develop appreciation of the Hispanic culture. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to communicate with ease basic facts and ideas in Spanish, both verbally and in writing. The course is offered only if there is sufficient enrollment. SP090 Spanish 2 Grade level: 9-12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Spanish 1B or Spanish I Spanish 2 is a novice-high to intermediate-low level course. Students are expected to have mastered the vocabulary and grammar points learned in Spanish 1 (1A/1B) to be able to succeed in this course. Students work extensively in grammar and vocabulary to continue developing their communication skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing in the target language. Students are exposed to the different cultures of the Spanish language so that they learn to identify and find the connections between them. Students will start reading articles and authentic Spanish short stories and poems. SP110 Spanish 3 Grade level: 10-12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Spanish 2 Spanish 3 is an intermediate level course. Students are expected to have mastered the vocabulary and grammar points learned in Spanish 2 to be able to succeed in this course. Students work extensively in grammar and vocabulary to continue developing their communicational skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing in the target language. Primary emphasis is placed on the ability to communicate hypothetically as well as concretely. Students continue to deepen their knowledge of the different cultures of the Spanish language with a focus on the seven elements of culture. Students will improve comprehension through the use of authentic media and literary sources, which play an important role in both language acquisition and cultural awareness. SP115 Spanish 4: Spanish Conversation and Composition Grade level: 11-12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Spanish 3 Spanish 4 is designed for students who have satisfactorily completed three years of Spanish and who wish to review major grammatical topics and increase their communicative competence. This course will focus on building communication strategies while developing appreciation of the Hispanic culture. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to express ideas and facts, to comprehend and participate in formal and informal conversations involving an advanced level of vocabulary, and to write precisely, convincingly and correctly on topics of general interest. SP130 Spanish 5: Hispanic Culture through Media Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Spanish 4 Conversation and Composition or equivalent This course is designed for students who have successfully completed four years of study of Spanish and who wish to pursue their study of the language and Hispanic culture at the non-honors level. This course will focus on using the media to develop awareness and appreciation of the cultural aspects of various Spanish speaking countries. Students will be engaged in activities that require high proficiency in language production. The course is offered only if there is sufficient enrollment.

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SP200 Advanced Placement Spanish: Language Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Spanish 3 and/or Spanish 4 and permission of the Foreign Language Department Students taking this course are interested in continuing an in-depth study of the language and further developing their communicative and reading skills in Spanish. Students read a variety of authors whose work reflects the diversity of Spain, Latin America, and the U.S. Hispanic population. They also review the more advanced grammatical topics. Students taking this course will achieve a high level of mastery of grammatical topics covered in previous levels and will demonstrate the ability to revise their own work. Students enrolled in this class are required to take the AP Spanish Language exam. SP210 Spanish 5: Honors Spanish through Film and Theater Grade level: 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: AP Spanish Language and permission of the Foreign Language Department After many years of learning Spanish grammar, students move on to a higher level of study. Honors Spanish through Film and Theater is a course devoted to expanding the students’ knowledge of the cultures of Spain and Latin America primarily through movies, plays and television programs, as well as music, art and literature. This course will allow students to understand the cultural nuances of the Hispanic world, starting from the beginning of the Spanish culture through present day Spain and Latin America. The course will culminate with an analysis paper based on a play or a film of the students’ choice. SP220 Advanced Placement Spanish: Literature Grade level: 11-12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: AP Spanish Language and permission of the Foreign Language Department AP Spanish Literature is a course for students who have successfully completed the AP Spanish Language course and who are interested in continuing an in-depth study of Spanish Literature. Students will interpret and analyze, in Spanish, works from seven centuries of Hispanic literature from Spain and Latin America. The works include a wide variety of genres that will enable students to trace the history of Spanish prose, poetry, and drama. Authors range from Cervantes to Sor Juana de la Cruz to Neruda to Garcia Marquez. Students enrolled in this class are required to take the AP Spanish Literature exam. The course is offered only if there is sufficient enrollment. .

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Health Education HE070 Health 7 Grade level: 7 (required) Health 7 meets once per cycle, all year long. Class discussions and instructional activities are designed to encourage behavior choices that will enhance physical, intellectual, emotional, and social wellbeing. Course units include total wellbeing, skin care and sun safety, and drug and alcohol education. Students learn the importance of problem solving and decision making strategies for optimal health and analyze media messages that promote risky behaviors. HE075 Guidance 7 Grade level: 7 (required) th Guidance 7 meets once per cycle, all year long. Class discussions and activities center on helping all 7 grade students develop a positive attitude toward self as a unique and worthy person. The class is also designed to help students learn developmentally appropriate communication skills with teachers, parents, and other adults in their lives; to help students gain life-planning skills that are in harmony with their needs, interests, and abilities; and to help students develop responsible social skills. The class also focuses upon important character traits such as respect, trust, honesty, flexibility, and compassion. HE080 Health and Guidance 8 Grade level: 8 (required) Health/Guidance 8 meets twice per cycle for one semester and is divided into two units. One unit is taught by the Middle School Counselor and addresses topics related to social, emotional, and physical health. These topics include but are not limited to sleep, depression, relationships, stress, cultural diversity, and harassment. The second unit is taught by a health teacher and addresses the physical components of health. It is divided into two areas of concentration; 1) nutrition and 2) reproductive and sexual health. Nutrition topics include the food guide pyramid, nutrient review, sustainable food systems, eating disorders and disordered eating, and bone health. Reproductive and sexual health education focuses on reproductive anatomy, the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and sexually transmitted infections. HE090 Health and Guidance 9 Grade level: 9 (required) Credit: ½ This one-semester minor course is divided into two units. Unit 1 is taught by the School Nurse and addresses a variety of topics including human sexuality, gynecological and urogenital examinations, birth control methods and STIs. Also included are adolescent brain development and the effects of alcohol on the brain, the integument, including medical considerations for tattoos and piercings. All topics are addressed from a medical and scientific perspective only. Analysis of possible biases of Internet domains as sources of medical information is included. The second unit is taught by the Upper School Counselor and addresses the impact of personal behaviors on social and emotional health through discussions of body image and healthy eating, harassment and sexual decision making, substance abuse, the dangers of technology and cyber bullying, depression, suicide and stress. There is also a focus on helping a friend with the above issues. HE110 Current Issues in Women’s Health Grade level: 11-12 Credit: ½ This one-semester minor course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to translate health knowledge into healthy behavior, now and in anticipation of life after Holton. The emphasis is on the skills and attitudes that will promote healthy decisions about substance use, stress management, sexuality, nutrition, and personal fitness and safety. Offered only if there is sufficient enrollment.

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History and the Social Sciences We believe that an understanding of the past is essential to responsible citizenship in a democracy and to the ability to make sense of a complex world. We offer a program of history and social sciences that presents the history of individual countries in a global context and uses themes to transcend lists of dates and names and help students develop a deeper understanding of the United States and the world in which they live. Middle School students begin with a world cultures course in seventh grade and proceed to our eighth grade course in which they learn about the government of the United States in an historical context. In ninth grade all students study selected non-western societies of the ancient and medieval world. In tenth and eleventh grades students study the History of the United States and Europe in a global context. Our elective program is designed to encourage students to pursue their interests in other social sciences and histories. Three credits in history are required for graduation: The Ancient and Medieval World, The West in the World: 1492-1870 and The West in the World: 1871 to the Present. HSS070 World Studies Grade level: 7 (required) This course approaches the regions of the world by looking at geographic, economic, political, social, historical, and cultural aspects of human activity. Major units include regional studies in Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. Themes typically include political and cultural history, economic development, effects of colonialism, current events, and an introduction to the world’s major religions. Students apply their core knowledge in evaluating historical events as they apply to conditions in today’s rapidly changing world. Students develop reading, writing, and research skills necessary to the study of history and social studies. The course includes a field trip relevant to one of our units of study. Sources include text, films, news articles, the internet, and other media sources. HSS080 U.S. Political History: Foundations of American Government Grade level: 8 (required) This course covers United States history with a spotlight on American government. Students study the origins, evolution, organization, and operation of American government beginning with the foundations of American government from Greek and Roman influences to the Magna Carta. Students examine events leading to the American Revolution and establish a base for investigating the Constitutional Convention. The chronology continues to the present with a focus on the functions of the three branches of government within particular historical contexts. Students will explore these topics through readings, research projects, field trips in the nation’s capital, and discussion of current events. HSS090 The Ancient and Medieval World Grade level: 9 (required) Credit: 1 This course serves as an introduction to the discipline of history and includes significant work with primary sources. Students will explore the relationships among religion, government organization, social structure, economic exchange, technology, and examples of visual art, architecture, and literature. Ancient and Medieval societies studied include those in China, India, Mesoamerica, Africa, the Islamic World, and Europe. Throughout the year, students will work to develop their skills in reading, note-taking, technology and, most importantly, analytical thinking and writing. Each semester of the course culminates with a research project that draws upon resources both within and outside the Holton community.

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HSS100 The West in the World: 1492-1870 HSS100H The West in the World: 1492-1870, Honors Grade level: 10 (required) Credit: 1 This two-year sequence emphasizes the interrelationship between American and European history as well as the relationship of both to the wider world. The course begins with the Renaissance in Europe and the Age of Exploration that led to the first contact between Europeans and native American culture and the origins of black slavery. The American and French Revolutions are examined as part of the same transatlantic revolutionary age. A study of Nationalism, Romanticism, and the growth of Liberalism, as well as the countervailing forces of Conservatism, sectionalism, and racism leads to the course’s conclusion with Marx, the failure of the Revolutions of 1848, and the Mexican War. A study of national unification movements including the Civil War in the United States and the consolidation of Germany and Italy forms the basis for examining the uses and abuses of nationalism.

HSS110 The West in the World: 1871 to the Present HSS110AP The West in the World: 1871 to the Present, Advanced Placement Grade level: 11 (required) Credit: 1 A continuation of the study of American and European History in the context of the wider world. Major themes include mass movements of the political right and left, the emergence of political consciousness among women and minorities in America, as well as colonial peoples throughout the world, the growing acceptance on the part of government of responsibility for the welfare of their people, and the increasing influence on the West of events and ideas of the non-Western world. An Advanced Placement section is available that prepares students to take both the European History and United States History Advanced Placement examinations, which are requirements of the AP section. HSS124 Advanced Placement History of Art Grade level: 11, 12 Prerequisite: Departmental Permission Credit: 1 A survey of art and architecture from the Paleolithic era through the twenty-first century. The course emphasizes visual culture in Europe and the Americas but also includes consideration of art beyond the European tradition. In addition to analyzing the content and compositional elements of works of art, students investigate pieces within their historical contexts, studying issues of patronage, function, gender, religion, politics, and economics. The course includes monthly visits to Washington museums. Evaluations are based on tests, papers, museum presentations, podcasts and participation in class discussions. Students prepare for the Advanced Placement exam, which is required. HSS128 What is Religion? Grade Level: 11,12 Credit: ½ A course dealing with the nature of religious experience through the study of both Western and Asian religions. This course seeks to develop a holistic portrait of the religious traditions studied. Although the emphasis is upon doctrinal beliefs and historical developments, the art, music, rituals, pilgrimage sites, images of sainthood, and prayers will also be used to gain an appreciation of the "feel", the experiential component, of the community. It is hoped that students will acquire a greater awareness and sensitivity to the multiplicity of religious traditions and their cultural expressions. In addition to readings and discussions, the course includes tours, films and internet exploration. Offered if numbers allow.

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HSS131 Contemporary History: Food, Community, and the Environment (fall semester) Grade level: 12 (11 with instructor's permission) Credit ½ An exploration of the political, social, economic, environmental, and ethical consequences of our most basic daily decisions – what to eat. Through readings, films, a field trip, and projects involving the production and consumption of food (i.e. growing it and eating it), we will look at how our food system has shaped our global environment, our cities and towns, our bodies, and our minds. This course will also ask students to try out different documentary forms (such as video or blogging) as a means of making sense of where our food comes from and how the global food chain affects our lives. Ultimately, this course seeks to encourage an active engagement with the most urgent issues of our time: global warming, environmental degradation, population pressures, and the depletion of natural resources and, more positively, to reconnect us with the natural world. Offered if numbers allow. HSS132 Contemporary History: Voices (spring semester) Grade level: 12 (11 with instructor’s permission) Credit: ½ Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor This course studies the ways information and ideas are communicated in the twenty-first century. To that end, we will examine various documentary forms of expression, such as newspapers, television news, and web sites, as well as documentary films and other modes of documenting reality. In terms of content, this course will focus on life in urban American, examining pressing issues including (but not limited to) poverty, education, drugs, politics, the urban environment, and the police. The centerpiece of the course is the epic history of a year in the life of inner-city Baltimore, The Corner, by David Simon and Edward Burns, and the HBO miniseries based upon this work. All students in the course will develop and create, on their own or with groups, their own documentary exploring an issue of pressing importance to them. Offered if numbers allow. HSS141 Latin American History: Conquest and Colonization (fall semester) HSS142 Latin American History: Industrialization, Modernization, and Sociopolitical Change (spring semester) Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: ½ each semester A study of Latin American history from the European conquest to the present. The first semester focuses on Latin America’s conquest and colonial history; the second on modern Latin America from independence to the present. Students have the option of taking either or both semesters. The course will move chronologically and will address questions of colonization, political self-determination, race, and what it means to be a “modern” and “developed” nation. Class methodology will be heavily Socratic although mini lectures (15-20 minutes) will occasionally be used to set up new topics or provide needed depth to supplement textbook reading. Offered if numbers allow. HSS151 History of Philosophy – not offered in 2011-2012 Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: ½ An historical overview of the evolution of philosophical thought, including Western philosophers from Socrates to Hegel. Offered if numbers allow. HSS152 Existentialism -- not offered in 2011-2012 Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: ½ A study of existentialism beginning with its roots among the Greeks and tracing its modern evolution in the works of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, DeBeauvoir, Camus, and others. Offered if numbers allow. HSS160 Introduction to Psychology Grade level: 11-12 Credit: ½ Psychology is the academic study of behavior and experience. This course introduces students to human behavior, cognition, human psychological development, personality, social groups, and psychological disorders and their treatment. Guest speakers, videos, and in-class demonstrations supplement the lectures and discussions. Offered if numbers allow.

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HSS190 Advanced Placement U.S. Government Grade level: 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor This course integrates one semester of A.P. U.S. Government with selected global and local issues. Students learn about the institutions of American government, public opinion and voter behavior, public policy, and civil rights. In addition in the fall, students study globalization and read works by Thomas Friedman. The spring semester includes an examination of challenges facing inner cities in America, including poverty, education, drugs, politics, the urban environment, and the police. The centerpiece of this part of the course is the epic history of a year in the life of inner-city Baltimore, The Corner, by David Simon and Edward Burns, and the HBO miniseries based upon this work. HSS200 Advanced Placement Economics: Microeconomics Credit: ½ HSS205 Advanced Placement Economics: Macroeconomics Credit: ½ Grade level: 11, 12 Prerequisite: Departmental permission Co-requisite: Pre-calculus or higher A study of microeconomic theory that prepares students to take the Advanced Placement examination in Microeconomics, which is required. Topics include market analysis, consumer choice, individual market demand and supply, cost of production, competition and monopoly, and equilibrium analysis. This course uses data and requires a strong working knowledge of algebra, but it should be accessible to any student enrolled in pre-calculus or above. A study of macroeconomic theory that prepares students to take the Advanced Placement examination in Macroeconomics, which is required. Topics include measuring GDP, inflation and economic growth, aggregate demand and supply, employment, investment and capital, economic growth, money and monetary policy, fiscal policy, the business cycle, trading with the world, and the dollar. This course uses data and requires a strong working knowledge of algebra, but it should be accessible to any student enrolled in pre-calculus or above. HSSCO01 (Micro) AP Economics (consortium) Credit: ½ HSSCO02 (Macro) AP Economics (consortium) Credit: ½ See HSS200 and HSS205 for course description Please see Consortium section for information on location and class meeting times. HSS210 Global Studies through the Lens of Sustainability This class is offered with Landon to 12th graders. Enrollment is limited and granted by department and division permission. Global Perspectives on Sustainability aims to help students achieve a better understanding of the relationship between globalization and issues of sustainability. Using the perspectives, or “lenses” of culture, politics, environment and geography and economics, students investigate challenges and opportunities in trying to achieve a sustainable society. Beginning with the classic definition of sustainability as stated by the Bruntland Commission in 1992 at the World Summit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the course provides students with tools to discuss and explore major global challenges such as global warming, overpopulation, and terrorism. Students then study forces in the US and a variety of other countries that influence sustainability and investigate how they as citizens can influence institutions and other individuals to make changes in the way we live.

HSSCO07 AP Art History (consortium) Credit: 1 AP Art History is a chronological survey of pre-historic to modern architecture, painting, and sculpture, covering traditional western works and selected works of cultures beyond the western tradition like those of China, Japan, India, South America and Africa. Major areas of study include ancient Greek and Roman sculpture and architecture, medieval and Renaissance religious and secular painting and sculpture, and 19th century revolutionary realistic, impressionist, and post-impressionist painting and design. Artistic form, style, vocabulary, technique, and context also are examined. Image recognition is important, and study skills, such as critical reading, essay-writing, and test-taking are emphasized. Homework includes reading, and flashcard and test preparation. Extra class sessions will include time for review and visits to local museums in Washington and Baltimore. Please see Consortium section for information on location and class meeting times. 23


HSSCO11 AP Psychology (consortium) Credit: 1 The Advanced Placement program in psychology is an intensive yearlong program designed to prepare students for the CEEB Advanced Placement examination. The systematic and scientific examination of the behavioral and mental processes of human beings and other animals allows students to explore the theories, principles and focus of each of the major sub-fields of psychology. During their course of study, students identify, investigate and apply the methods psychologists use to explore the processes involved in normal and abnormal thinking and behavior. All enrollees must sit for the AP exam given in the spring. Please see Consortium section for information on location and class meeting times.

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Mathematics The Mathematics Department at Holton-Arms offers a sequence of rigorous courses that cover traditional college preparatory material. At the same time, Holton recognizes that all girls do not acquire mathematical skills at the same rate or develop the ability for abstract thinking at the same age. There is no Ninth Grade Mathematics course, for instance; rather, our offerings provide a variety of placement options at a given grade level. The goal of placement decisions is to offer each girl a course that challenges her and allows her to take risks, but at the same time provides her with a reasonable opportunity to experience the satisfaction of success. In Middle School, students review and extend their understanding of skills and concepts in arithmetic, geometry, and number theory begun in Lower School before embarking on a full course in Algebra 1. After the first year of algebra, all Upper School students study Geometry followed by Algebra 2 and Trigonometry. Goals for students throughout the sequence include mastery of fundamental operations along with development of calculator and problem solving skills and an appreciation for the structure and applications of mathematics. Students are required to have a graphing calculator beginning with the Geometry course. Although any student’s greatest resource is herself, she will, at Holton, learn that even more can be accomplished through working with her classmates and teachers. Individual conversations and one-to-one help sessions between a student and her mathematics teacher are an integral part of the Holton experience. Three credits are required for graduation: one of which is Geometry and Trigonometry for students graduating in 2013 or earlier; one of which is Algebra 2 for students graduating in 2015 or later. Members of the class of 2014 should see the Math Department chair regarding the graduation requirement. MA070 Mathematics 7 Grade level: 7 (required) This course is an integrated study of arithmetic, algebra, and geometry. Topics include properties of and operations with real numbers, exponents, square roots, and elementary geometric concepts, and problems. The concept of a variable is introduced to provide a background for elementary algebra. Emphasis is placed on reading a mathematics textbook and understanding how to picture mathematical concepts. MA080 Pre-Algebra 8 Grade level: 8 (required if not taking Algebra 1) This course concludes the general mathematics program with a review of the fundamentals of arithmetic. Word problems and the language, vocabulary, and notation used in mathematics are stressed. Topics from geometry include conceptualization of perimeter, area, and volume, and relationships in a circle. Emphasis is also given to equations in one variable and other basic abstractions of beginning algebra. MA080A Algebra 1 MA080H Algebra 1 Honors Grade level: 8 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Permission of department This course is for Middle School students with strong analytic skills, mature study habits, and high achievement in previous courses. In this course, students focus on the properties and operations of the set of real numbers. Emphasis is also placed on developing students’ skills in factoring and multiplying polynomials; solving linear, quadratic, and systems of equations; and solving inequalities and word problems. The ability to absorb and master large amounts of material quickly and with little review is essential. An honors section is available for qualified students, if numbers allow. 26 MA090 Algebra 1 Grade level: 9 Credit: 1 (required if not taking Geometry) This course is a study of elementary algebra, based on the elements, operations, and properties of the set of real numbers. Emphasis is placed on developing students’ skills in factoring and multiplying polynomials; solving linear, quadratic, and systems of equations; and solving inequalities and word problems. MA095 Geometry – for students enrolled in Algebra 1 during the 2010-11 school year Grade level: 9, 10 (required) Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Algebra 1; permission of department 25


This introductory course in Euclidean geometry includes a study of the structure of a mathematical system, stresses the nature of a deductive proof, and presents the basic trigonometric functions. Algebraic skills are reviewed and used to solve problems involving special right triangles, circles, coordinate geometry, area, and volume. MA095H Geometry Honors - for students enrolled in Algebra 1 during the 2010-11 school year Grade level: 9 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Algebra 1; permission of department This rigorous course in Euclidean geometry includes an emphasis on deductive proofs (both direct and indirect). The properties of the six basic trigonometric functions are also introduced. Algebraic skills are used to solve challenging problems involving special right triangles, circles, coordinate geometry, area, and volume. The ability to absorb and master large amounts of material quickly and with little review is essential. Offered if numbers allow. MA110 Geometry and Trigonometry – for students enrolled in Algebra 2 during the 2010-11 school year Grade level: 10, 11 (required) Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Algebra 2 This introductory course in Euclidean geometry and trigonometry includes a study of the structure of a mathematical system, stresses the nature of a deductive proof, and presents the basic trigonometric functions. Algebraic skills are used to solve problems involving special right triangles, circles, coordinate geometry, area, and volume. Student use of Geometer’s Sketchpad software is also integrated into the course. Students will need their Algebra 2 textbooks during the fourth quarter study of trigonometry. MA110H Geometry and Trigonometry Honors – for students enrolled in Alg. 2 during the 2010-11 school year Grade level: 10 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Algebra 2; permission of department This rigorous course in Euclidean geometry and trigonometry includes an emphasis on deductive proofs (both direct and indirect) and the properties of the six basic trigonometric functions. Algebraic skills are used to solve challenging problems involving special right triangles, circles, coordinate geometry, area, and volume. The ability to absorb and master large amounts of material quickly and with little review is essential. Students will need their Algebra 2 Honors book during the fourth quarter study of trigonometry. Offered if numbers allow. MA100 Algebra 2 – not offered in 2011-2012 Grade level: 10, 11 (required) Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Geometry; permission of department required This second-year algebra course reviews the following topics covered in Algebra 1: quadratics, systems of equations, inequalities, polynomials, and rational expressions. New topics include sequences and series, complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, and analytic geometry. MA105 Algebra 2 and Trigonometry – not offered in 2011-2012 MA105H Algebra 2 and Trigonometry Honors -- not offered in 2011-2012 Grade level: 10, 11 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Geometry; permission of department required This second-year algebra course continues the study of the following topics covered in Algebra 1: rational numbers, systems of equations, inequalities, polynomials, and rational expressions. New topics include sequences and series, complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, analytic geometry, and an extension of the trigonometry studied in Geometry. An Honors section is available for qualified students, if numbers allow. The ability to absorb and master large amounts of material quickly and with little review is essential for success in an honors course. MA115 Algebra 3 and Trigonometry Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Geometry and Trigonometry for 2011-2012 This course is for students who want to develop a fuller understanding of earlier courses and to explore applications of mathematics. Topics include properties of functions, matrices, sequences and series, logarithms, trigonometry, and probability, as well as a review of elementary algebra.

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MA120 Pre-Calculus Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Geometry and Trigonometry or Algebra 3 and Trigonometry and permission of department for 20112012 This rigorous course prepares students for study of the Calculus. Functions are emphasized, including polynomial and rational, circular (trigonometric), exponential, and logarithmic functions. Other topics may include matrices and determinants, sequences and series, the binomial theorem, probability, and limits. A strong recall and working knowledge of Geometry and Algebra 2 and Trigonometry are essential for success in this class. MA120H Pre-Calculus Honors Grade level: 10, 11 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Geometry and Trigonometry Honors and permission of department for 2011-2012 This course includes an extensive study of trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Particular attention is paid to the properties of their graphs. Other topics include polynomials, analytic geometry, matrices and determinants, sequences and series, the binomial theorem, polar coordinates, and probability. During the fourth quarter, students begin their formal study of calculus. The ability to absorb and master large amounts of material quickly and with little review of Geometry and Algebra 2 and Trigonometry is essential. Offered if numbers allow. MA130 Introduction to Calculus Grade level: 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus or permission of department This course reviews functions, slope, and trigonometry. After completion of this extensive review, the concepts of limits, continuity, and derivatives are studied. The course concludes with a study of antiderivatives and integration techniques. Generally, the content of this course is not as broad or as deep as the content of Calculus AB. Offered if numbers allow. MA190 Advanced Placement Statistics Grade level: 11,12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Geometry and Trigonometry and permission of department for 2011-2012 Co-Requisite (for 11’s): Pre-Calculus or higher. The course follows the syllabus for the Advanced Placement examination in Statistics. Students study the tools for collecting, organizing, and displaying data. They learn about planning and conducting surveys and experiments and drawing conclusions from their results. The course includes probability, the properties of the normal distribution, and statistical inference. Offered if numbers allow. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP Statistics exam. MA200 Advanced Placement Calculus: AB Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus and permission of department* This rigorous course follows the syllabus for the Advanced Placement examination in Calculus AB. Topics include functions, analytic geometry, limits, differentiation, and integration. * This permission is seldom granted unless a student has earned at least a B in Pre-Calculus. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP Calculus exam. MA200BC Advanced Placement Calculus: BC Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus Honors and permission of the department This course covers a syllabus that is both more intensive and more extensive than that of Calculus AB. Some additional topics covered are vectors, parametrically defined curves, and infinite series. Students taking this course should come with a thorough knowledge of limits, continuity, and the derivative and its applications. Offered if numbers allow. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP Calculus exam. MA220 Multivariable Calculus and Differential Equations Honors Grade level: 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Advanced Placement Calculus: BC This course will continue the study of calculus begun in the Advanced Placement course. Specific topics include partial derivatives and their applications, vector-valued functions, multiple integrals, and Green’s Theorem. During 27


the second semester, the emphasis will be on the basic methods of solving differential equations. Offered if numbers allow. MACO01 Multivariable Calculus (consortium) Grade level: 11,12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: AP Calculus AB or BC This advanced level math course, designed for students who have completed either the AB or the BC Advanced Placement syllabus, deals with functions of more than one independent variable. Topics will include partial differentiation, multiple integrals, vector-valued functions and differential operators, Stokes’ and Green’s Theorems and methods of differential equations. The physical concepts of flux, circulation, divergence and work will receive special attention, as will the central notion of a conservative field.

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Music The goal of the music program is to help students discover the value of music and all the arts in their lives. The study of music develops cultural literacy and aural sensitivity. General music classes and performing ensembles promote the development of musical understanding and technical skills and encourage the development of the imagination and aesthetic sensitivity. Students explore music from a wide range of cultures, styles, and musical traditions. In doing so they develop a deeper understanding of music as a reflection of society and humanity. Opportunities for making music are available to all interested students. The large performing ensembles (chorus, string orchestra, and wind ensemble) rehearse during the curricular day and do not require an audition. Additional ensembles for highly motivated and capable musicians meet before or after school and students are selected by audition. Outstanding rehearsal spaces, two theaters, a music technology lab, and individual practice rooms support the musical experience. One credit in the fine or performing arts is required for graduation.

Middle School MU070 Music 7 Grade level: 7 (required) Music 7 students examine the role of popular song in American culture and in their own lives from the perspectives of performer, composer, and social historian. The Music Technology Lab serves as a focus for hands-on exploration of popular song styles and their roots, beginning with the turn of the century and the blues. Using electronic keyboards and composition software, students arrange, create, and improvise. They also produce and deliver their own radio show capturing the music and culture of a particular decade in the 20th century. MU085 Music 8: Technology Grade level: 8 (elective) This semester course is open to eighth grade students interested in exploring the opportunities that music technology affords for creating, arranging, and understanding music. Students will work with Garage Band, a music sequencing program, and Sibelius, a notation program, to explore and manipulate the ingredients of the music they listen to and perform. Students will use keyboards and software to expand their understanding of music theory and will then apply new musical concepts to their creative work. The course will accommodate all levels of musical knowledge and understanding. MU095 Middle School Chorus Grade level: 7, 8 Middle School Chorus is open to seventh and eighth grade students interested in the study and performance of choral music. Emphasis is placed on basic vocal technique, music literacy, two and three-part singing, stylistic interpretation, and musical understanding through the study and preparation of choral literature from various cultures and musical traditions. The Middle School Chorus prepares music for at least two concert appearances each year. This is a full year course. MU097 Middle School Handbells Grade level: 7, 8 Handbell Choir is open to interested seventh and eighth grade students. Opportunities are available to perform a variety of music at school and in the community, frequently in conjunction with other Holton performing groups. This is a full year course.

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MU099S Middle School String Orchestra MU099W Middle School Wind Ensemble Grade level: 7, 8 Co-requisite: Private study recommended Middle School instrumental music ensembles afford interested students the opportunity to grow through performance. Emphasis is placed on improving tone quality, developing technique/musical expressiveness, and acquiring an understanding of the stylistic characteristics of literature from various cultures and musical traditions. The ensembles rehearse separately. Middle School students may be selected by audition from the large ensembles for instrumental chamber ensembles, Chamber Orchestra, and Jazz Band. These are full year courses.

Upper School MU100S Upper School String Orchestra MU100W Upper School Wind Ensemble Credit: 1 MU100CO Chamber Orchestra* MU100JB Jazz Band* Grade level: 9-12 Prerequisite: 2 years of study on instrument or departmental permission. Upper school instrumental music ensembles afford interested students the opportunity to grow through performance. Emphasis is placed on improving tone quality, developing technique/musical expressiveness, and acquiring an understanding of the stylistic characteristics of literature from various cultures and musical traditions. The ensembles rehearse separately. Students may be selected by audition for instrumental chamber ensembles, Chamber Orchestra, and Jazz Band. All ensembles are full year courses. * Participation by audition only. Students selecting Chamber Orchestra must also register for String Orchestra or Wind Ensemble. MU110 Upper School Handbell Choir* Credit: 1 Grade level: 9-12 Upper School Handbell Choir affords interested students the opportunity to grow through performance. Emphasis is placed on improving technique and music expressiveness, and acquiring an understanding of the stylistic characteristics of literature from various cultures and musical traditions. * Participation by audition only. MU120 Upper School Chorus Credit: 1 MU120CS Chamber Singers* MU120SC Swing Choir* Grade level: 9-12 Chorus is open to interested students who share a passion for making music in a choral ensemble. Emphasis is placed on vocal training, part singing, stylistic interpretation, music literacy, and musical understanding through the study, preparation, and performance of choral literature from various cultures and musical traditions. Attendance at one outside choral concert each semester is required. Upper School Chorus is a minor class that prepares music for at least three concert appearances each year and meets for two class periods per cycle. All ensembles are full year courses. * Participation by audition only. Students selecting Chamber Singers or Swing Choir must also register for Chorus.

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MU170 Music Technology Grade level: 9-12 Credit: ½ Prerequisite: Permission of instructor This one-semester course in the Music Technology Lab is designed for students interested in applying their technical and musical skills and knowledge in creative pursuits. Projects range from songwriting and arranging, to orchestration, to the creation of video soundtracks. Students continue to develop a functional understanding of music theory as well as expertise in using notation and sequencing programs. Instruction in these areas is individualized according to a student’s current level of experience. MU120M Music Major: Upper School Chorus & Music Theory/Music History MU100SM Music Major: Upper School String Orchestra & Music Theory/Music History MU100WM Music Major: Upper School Wind Ensemble & Music Theory/Music History Grade level: 10-12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Departmental permission Music Major is a combination of two ensemble rehearsals per cycle and two music theory/music history classes per cycle. Music Major is designed for students wishing to expand their knowledge of music history and music theory, students who need a firmer technical foundation to support their work in the ensemble, and students who wish to explore music beyond the confines of the ensemble rehearsal period. Primary emphasis is on studying music theory, acquiring skills for sight-reading, expanding the musical frame of reference through critical listening and analysis, and developing a fuller understanding of the historical context for the repertoire studied in rehearsal. The Music Technology Lab will be used for music theory, sightreading, and ear training. Music Major is a full year course and can be repeated for credit.

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Physical Education Physical Education is an essential component of a curriculum that serves to educate the whole child. Carefully selected activities and diverse instructional programs promote and encourage lifelong maintenance of habits that contribute to efficient mental and physical functioning in our students. Risk taking is encouraged in an environment that is supported by respect and positive reinforcement. Cooperative team situations provide the student with the opportunity to problem solve and feel successful through a group effort. A major goal of the physical education program is to promote an interest in physical activity that continues throughout the student’s lifetime. All students must earn two credits and must have passed a swim competency test by the end of the first semester of their senior year. If a student fails the swim competency test, she must enroll in and pass the Beginning Swimming course. Credits can be accomplished by completing four activities, which may include taking physical education classes and/or participating on interscholastic teams. Students earn 1/2 credit for the successful completion of each of these activities. Freshmen must earn at least 1/2 credit during their ninth grade year. Students are required to take Fundamentals of Physical Education for one semester in either the ninth or tenth grade. Middle School Program PE078 Middle School Physical Education / Athletics All middle school students are required to participate in Physical Education/Athletics within the designated time period. Each season middle school students will gather to choose one activity from a wide range of competitive interscholastic and non-competitive or fitness-oriented options. Participation in Physical Education/Athletics will occur four days out of every six-day cycle. With the exception of game days and other off-campus activities, practices will conclude by 3:30 pm. The Middle School Physical Education / Athletics program recognizes and responds to the unique characteristics of young adolescents in its instruction, activities, expectations, and goals. In the Middle School we seek to develop and strengthen fundamental skills in a variety of activities. Coaches and students should seek to explore rather than specialize in athletic opportunities. Middle School Physical Education / Athletics will focus on teamwork and sportsmanship, health and safety, responsibility and accountability, and building meaningful relationships. Upper School Program The Physical Education instructional curriculum places major emphasis on developing lifetime habits of cardiovascular and physical fitness. The following minor courses are open to all students in grades 9-12 and can be repeated. PE101 Fundamentals of Physical Education Grade level: 9-12 Credit: ½ This required course provides students with the concepts and skills which are basic to acquiring and maintaining personal fitness. Instructional components include fitness evaluation and design of individual programs to develop muscle strength and flexibility, cardiovascular endurance, and exercise for stress management. Examples of activities in this course include aerobics, weight training, walking, running, and swimming. The course culminates in a class-wide triathlon competition. Prerequisite: Must have completed swim competency test PE105 Personal Fitness/Lifetime Activities Prerequisite: PE101 Grade level: 9-12 Credit: ½ This physical education course will reinforce and build upon the fitness concepts and skills acquired in Fundamentals of Physical Education. Students will not only implement personal exercise and weight training programs, but they will also be challenged to participate in and acquire knowledge of various lifetime sports. Activities will include individual and team sports.

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PE170 Beginning Swimming Grade level: 9-12 Credit: ½ The Beginning Swimming course provides students with the concepts and skills needed to pass the swim competency test required for graduation. Students will receive individualized attention based on their individual ability. Students will develop their swimming endurance as well as stroke technique in the front crawl, backstroke, elementary backstroke, breaststroke, and treading water. The swim test is 150 yards of the pool swimming nonstop, jumping into the deep end and surfacing, and treading water for 2 minutes. In addition to passing the graduation swim requirement; the goal of this course is for all the students enrolled to have a basic level of comfort in and around the pool setting. PE172 Life guarding Grade level: 9-12 Credit: ½ The purpose of the American Red Cross Lifeguarding course is designed to teach candidates the knowledge and skills needed to prevent and respond to aquatic emergencies. The course content and activities prepare candidates to recognize and respond quickly and effectively to emergencies and prevent drowning’s and injuries. Students must be 15 years of age or older by the end of the course, be able to swim 300 yards continuously, surface dive and retrieve an object from the deepest end of the pool, and swim 20 yards carrying a 10lb brick. Upon successful completion of the course of 80% or better, students will receive an American Red Cross lifeguard and first aid certification and CPR certification for the professional rescuer. PE191 Dance Composition and Choreography Grade level: 9-12 Credit: ½ (Credit is given for Physical Education or Performing Arts, but not both.) Dance Choreography is designed to introduce students to the creative process and compositional tools that are at the core of making dances. Students will explore various choreographic tools through short movement studies and in longer works-in-progress. Each student, regardless of ability level, will be encouraged to expand her movement vocabulary, her perception of dance, and her understanding of music and sound as expressive partners. Solo studies and small group choreographic projects will help students explore the source of movement ideas and movement development, and gain a greater appreciation for dance as a vehicle for artistic expression. This course may be repeated. PE192 Dance Technique Grade level: 9-12 Credit: ½ (Credit is given for Physical Education or Performing Arts, but not both.) Dance Technique is a minor elective course geared to the beginning and intermediate dancer, building upon the dance experiences in Lower and Middle School. The primary emphasis is on exploring the elements and stylistic nuances of modern and ballet dance technique. A typical technique class includes warm-up exercises, floor work or barre work, center work, and traveling combinations that encourage the dancers to move through greater space. In addition to acquiring technical skills and gaining an understanding of dance as an expressive art form, students will begin the study of dance history, and performance appreciation. PE192D Dance Technique (after school) Grade level: 9-12 Credit: ½ (Credit is given for Physical Education or Performing Arts, but not both.) Prerequisite: permission of department This course allows a student to enroll in PA/PE192 Dance Technique outside the conventional school day by taking three technique classes per week (during the first semester) with the Orchesis company members. Dancers are not eligible to perform in the Orchesis Concert or WAISDEA Festival (unless they audition, and are selected, to be parttime members of Orchesis). PE290 Dance Technique and Orchesis Ensemble* Grade level: 9-12 Credit: 1 (Credit is given for Physical Education or Performing Arts, but not both.) Prerequisite/Co-requisite: PE/PA 191 and permission of department This course provides interested students with a more intense dance experience. Company members meet four days a week, for up to two hours, for technique classes and rehearsals. Modern and ballet technique are studied in depth. Students also participate in various aspects of the choreographic process. Performance opportunities are 33


offered through peer, faculty, and guest artist choreography. The commitment to Orchesis as a class and company spans the first two athletic seasons. * Participation by audition only.

Interscholastic Program Holton-Arms is a member of the Independent School League, the Washington Metropolitan Private School Swimming & Diving League, and the National Capital Area Scholastic Rowing Association. Students who are selected to participate on one of the interscholastic sports teams as a player or manager are granted ½ credit in Physical Education. Team managers work with both their coach and the Athletic Director as they carry out needed duties and fulfill a personal work-out schedule. Fall Season PE300 Varsity and Junior Varsity Field Hockey PE310 Varsity and Junior Varsity Soccer PE320 Varsity and Junior Varsity Tennis PE330 Varsity and Junior Varsity Volleyball PE340 Varsity Cross Country Winter Season PE400 Varsity and Junior Varsity Basketball PE410 Varsity Swimming and Diving PE420 Varsity Ice Hockey PE430 Varsity Indoor Track and Field PE440 Club level Crew Training Spring Season PE500 Varsity and Junior Varsity Lacrosse PE510 Varsity and Junior Varsity Softball PE520 Varsity Tennis PE530 Varsity Track and Field PE540 Varsity and Novice Crew

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Pure and Applied Science In a world increasingly shaped by and comprehended in terms of science and technology, it is important that our students be prepared to understand, evaluate, and use the knowledge and methods of those disciplines. The science program seeks to teach basic scientific principles, skills, and habits of critical and analytical thinking through strong foundations of learning in the biological, physical, and environmental sciences. Students with high interest and ability have the opportunity to pursue these disciplines at advanced levels. We strive to instill in each student an awareness of her natural environment, including the principles and processes that govern it. We also hope to offer students the opportunity to explore problem solving through applications in forensics, engineering, robotics, computer programming and our Science Research Program. Three credits, including Biology, are required for graduation. SCI070 Science 7 Grade level: 7 (required) Science 7 is an investigative life science course. We begin the year by defining life and learning about cells. Students learn how living organisms are classified and how species change over time, and then they explore and compare organisms in each of the six kingdoms. Student knowledge of anatomy is enhanced through dissections and lessons about human body systems. The year concludes with a unit on ecology. SCI080 Science 8 Grade level: 8 (required) This is an exploratory course that introduces major topics in physical science. Time is spent on the development of basic lab skills, ultimately enabling students to develop independent laboratory experiments and write lab reports. Topics include the study of matter, atomic structure, chemical reactions, motion, force, gravity, and energy. Students are encouraged to apply deductive reasoning to experimental results as a tool for understanding these topics. SCI100 Biology Grade level: 9 Credit: 1 An introductory course that explores the major topics of the biological sciences: cell energetics, molecular biology, human physiology, biochemistry, genetics, and evolution. Major themes include science as investigation and inquiry, the history of biological concepts, structure and function relationships, genetic continuity, regulation and homeostasis, and the biological basis of behavior. SCI100H Biology Honors Grade level: 9 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Departmental permission Co-requisite: Geometry An introductory course that explores major topics of the biological sciences including biochemistry, bioenergetics, autotrophy, cell respiration, cell structure, gene expression, Mendelian genetics, advances in molecular genetics, and evolution. Major themes include science as investigation and inquiry, genetic continuity, regulation and homeostasis, and bioethical issues. SCI110 Chemistry SCI110H Chemistry Honors Grade level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Algebra 2; permission of department required for honors section (beginning with the 2012-2013 school year, the co-requisite will be Algebra 2 and Trig) This introductory course presents fundamental concepts of inorganic chemistry. Major topics covered are atomic structure, electron clouds and probability, periodic trends, stoichiometry, rate and equilibrium, chemical bonding, gas laws, thermo chemistry, and oxidation-reduction. Laboratory work is qualitative and quantitative and formal. Written laboratory reports are an essential component of the course. Mathematical applications are covered in greater depth in honors chemistry. SCI120 Conceptual Physics Grade level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 Pre-requisite: Biology and Algebra 1 This survey course covers force, motion, and energy; heat; properties of waves; electricity and magnetism; optics; and modern physics. The course includes some calculations but stresses understanding of the 35


underlying concepts. SCI120A Physics Grade level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Geometry and Trigonometry This course covers the general content areas of physics. Mechanics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, and modern physics are covered as preparation for college level physics. This course emphasizes a mathematical understanding of the concepts. SCI120H Physics Honors Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisites: Permission of department Co-Requisite: Pre-Calculus or higher This course covers the five general content areas of mechanics, kinetic theory and thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, and modern physics. Understanding of the basic principles and the ability to apply these principles in the solution of problems are major goals of this course. SCI125 Environmental Science Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 This is a course of investigation into current problems and topics in the environmental sciences. It includes units on ecosystem structure, function, and balance; the impact of population growth; problems facing world agriculture; identification and protection of endangered species; conservation of resources; energy and its use; and the causes and effects of pollution. There will be occasional research papers and reaction papers to readings. A few laboratory exercises, outdoor experiences, and field trips will be included. Students will develop expertise in the use of relevant library and internet resources and improve their research techniques. Current events as told in the news media will be a part of daily discussions. Offered if numbers allow. SCI135 Applied Sciences: Forensics & Medical Laboratory Technology Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Biology 1 Using reference materials such as Saferstein’s Criminalistics, and Zimmerman’s Killer Germs, students in this class will conduct lab work that includes simulations, case studies and lab practical tests and that will involve handling live organisms and microorganisms. Topics will include: trace evidence, serology, pathology, fingerprinting, DNA evidence, medical microbiology, urinalysis, and infectious disease. Students will chronicle their daily work in a research journal; other assessments include written case files, free response tests and research projects. Offered if numbers allow. SCI150 Introduction to Engineering Grade level: 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Algebra 2 Credit: 1 Introduction to Engineering is a project based course where students work in collaborative teams. Basic concepts of the engineering design process and teamwork are central to each activity. Students are engaged in hands-on experiences and learn through doing. The course relies on modeling, problem-solving, and documenting progress. The course also discusses the ethical choices of engineering and how technology can make an impact on society. Introduction to Engineering is designed to challenge and inspire. Offered if numbers allow. SCI160 Computer Programming & Robotics Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Geometry & Trigonometry and Introduction to Engineering or by permission of department. The focus of the course is computer programming through various applications. Students will engage in technical problem solving through MATLAB and computer simulations. In addition, they will also learn the ICGUI (a version of C) in conjunction with robot design to perform autonomous tasks. Using sensor units students will also discuss control systems and feedback. Emphasis will be placed on design and construction of electronic circuits. Projects will have a group focus. Presentations and report summaries will be required for each project. SCI190 Advanced Placement Environmental Science 36


Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry or Chemistry Honors and permission of department This comprehensive college-level course follows the Advanced Placement syllabus to prepare students for the AP examination in Environmental Science. Topics considered are geology, the atmosphere and meteorology, oceanography, ecosystems and ecological principles, population dynamics, energy, renewable and nonrenewable resources and their management, conservation biology, agriculture, pollution, environmental quality and health, global changes, environmental policy and sustainability, and environmental planning. In addition to lectures and discussions, labs and field work are major components of the course. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP Environmental Science exam. SCI200 Advanced Placement Biology Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisites: Biology I and Chemistry or Chemistry Honors (a full year of Chemistry is recommended); permission of department The Advanced Placement Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of one introductory course usually taken by biology majors during their first year of college. The course covers three general areas: molecules and cells, genetics and evolution, and organisms and populations. The AP Biology course also includes a substantial laboratory component. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP Biology Exam. SCI230 Advanced Placement Physics: C Level Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 Prerequisites: Pre-Calculus Honors; Physics or Physics Honors; and permission of department The curriculum of this course focuses on two content areas, mechanics and electricity and magnetism, which are covered in depth in preparation for the C level Advancement Placement examination offered by the College Board each May. This challenging course is recommended for students who have a desire to major in engineering or the physical sciences at an undergraduate institution. The depth of study in this course requires the use of calculus. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP Physics C exam. SCI140 Science Research Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: Ÿ Prerequisite: Permission of department Science Research is a full year minor course which meets one period per cycle as an independent study. It is a pass/fail course and will not count towards the science graduation requirement. Any interested student in grades 11 or 12 who can meet the time commitment may participate in this program. The course will focus on learning what scientific research involves, possible visits to a few regional research laboratories, brainstorming possible research topics, and determining students’ interests. Students will be carefully placed in a laboratory setting under the supervision of a mentor who is a research professional. The student, with the help of the mentor, will formulate a plan for conducting original scientific research. The bulk of the research will occur during the summer in a 6 - 8 week period. It is possible that a student conduct research during the school year, but she must have time available in her schedule, be fully committed to spending that time at the research facility (meeting with her mentor at least once a week), and find a willing mentor. Students who participate in the Science Research Program will be expected to give a poster presentation of their research to the school community. Students who have completed at least one summer of research will be encouraged to participate in regional and national science competitions.

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Consortium Courses Consortium classes meet three mornings per week at the host school from 7:00-7:50 am. Students are responsible th for providing their own transportation. Enrollment from each school limited; 12 grade students receive priority placement. (See page 4 for addition information.) The Consortium currently offers the following courses: AP Economics, Holton-Arms AP Art History, St. Andrew's AP Psychology, Bullis Multivariable Calculus, Landon

HSSCO01 (Micro) AP Economics Credit: ½ HSSCO02 (Macro) AP Economics Credit: ½ Grade level: 11, 12 AP economics prepares students to take the AP exams in both microeconomics and macroeconomics. The first semester of AP economics concentrates on an introduction to microeconomics. This college-level class explores how and why individual consumers and firms interact to manufacture, sell, and purchase goods and services. Microeconomics examines how people choose between work and leisure and why firms charge particular prices for specific quantities of production. Topics include consumer theory, theory of the firm, factor demand (labor markets), and selected topics such as methods to discourage or control pollution. Classroom experiments examine theory from an applied perspective and activities include reading an “economic romance” novel. In the second semester, study focuses on the macroeconomy, how the national economy regulates output, growth, and inflation. Macroeconomics uses many of the analytical tools developed in the first semester study of microeconomics to explore and explain the performance and function of national economies. Software simulations will enable students to track and manipulate macroeconomic policies to achieve balanced growth. Topics include inflation, unemployment, the federal budget, international trade and exchange, the business cycle, and long-term economic growth. This course uses data and requires a strong working knowledge of algebra, but should be accessible to any student enrolled in pre-calculus or above.

HSSCO07 AP Art History Grade level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 AP Art History is a chronological survey of pre-historic to modern architecture, painting, and sculpture, covering traditional western works and selected works of cultures beyond the western tradition like those of China, Japan, India, South America and Africa. Major areas of study include ancient Greek and Roman sculpture and architecture, medieval and Renaissance religious and secular painting and sculpture, and 19th century revolutionary realistic, impressionist, and post-impressionist painting and design. Artistic form, style, vocabulary, technique, and context also are examined. Image recognition is important, and study skills, such as critical reading, essay-writing, and test-taking are emphasized. Homework includes reading, and flashcard and test preparation. Extra class sessions will include time for review and visits to local museums in Washington and Baltimore.

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HSSCO11 AP Psychology (consortium) Credit: 1 The Advanced Placement program in psychology is an intensive yearlong program designed to prepare students for the CEEB Advanced Placement examination. The systematic and scientific examination of the behavioral and mental processes of human beings and other animals allows students to explore the theories, principles and focus of each of the major sub-fields of psychology. During their course of study, students identify, investigate and apply the methods psychologists use to explore the processes involved in normal and abnormal thinking and behavior. All enrollees must sit for the AP exam given in the spring..

MACO01 Multivariable Calculus (consortium) Grade level: 11,12 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: AP Calculus AB or BC This advanced level math course, designed for students who have completed either the AB or the BC Advanced Placement syllabus, deals with functions of more than one independent variable. Topics will include partial differentiation, multiple integrals, vector-valued functions and differential operators, Stokes’ and Green’s Theorems and methods of differential equations. The physical concepts of flux, circulation, divergence and work will receive special attention, as will the central notion of a conservative field.

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Independent Study IND100 Independent Study (half year) Credit: ½ IND200 Independent Study (full year) Credit: 1 Grade level: 11, 12 The independent study program is designed to give able and motivated juniors and seniors the possibility of designing and pursuing a course of study independently. Independent study does not replace a course offered in the existing curriculum or any course required for graduation, and a student pursuing independent study must carry four major courses in addition to the independent study. Independent study may be pursued for one semester or a full academic year, and the topic for study may be interdisciplinary or restricted to one major field. Criteria for independent study projects are established by the departments. Evaluation of the study will be honors, pass, or no credit. In either case, a letter of evaluation will be given to the student at the completion of the project. A student who wishes to pursue an independent study program should initiate the process by consulting with her faculty advisor and requesting "Independent Study Guidelines" from the Upper School Office. Year-long or first semester Independent Study projects must be submitted for approval by the end of April of the preceding school year. Spring semester Independent Study projects must be submitted for approval by the end of November of the previous semester.

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MS Course Offerings SY 11-12  

Holton-Arms offers a diversified college preparatory curriculum in the Middle and Upper Schools. The program is carefully designed to provid...

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