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HM design portfolio


HOLLY MUMFORD P : 802.922.5878 E : hollamumford@gmail.com W : flavors.me/hollymumford A : 421 West Olive Street Apartment 1 Bozeman, Montana 59715 MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY Masters of Architecture: Expected Graduation August 2012 B.A. Environmental Design 2010 AWARDS Parent/Family Association Scholarship: 2011 The Woods Prize In Architecture : 2010 Robert C. Utzinger Scholarship : 2009 Dean Harold C. Rose Scholarship First Alternate : 2008 Provost’s Discretionary Transfer Award : 2007


TABLE OF CONTENTS: SLOW FLOW: RE_CHOREOGRAPHING THE GRAND CANYON SOUTH RIM Fall 2012 RESEARCH BASED INNOVATION: COMMUNITY HOUSING Fall 2010 ARTIST’S COOPERATIVE: STUDIO & RESIDENCE Spring 2010 FINDING ORDER: BUTTE COMMUNITY CENTER Fall 2009 INCUBATOR: WOODWORKER’S STUDIO, GALLERY, & RESIDENCE Spring 2009


SLOW FLOW:

RE_CHOREOGRAPHING THE GRAND CANYON SOUTH RIM Fall 2012 Supervised by John Brittingham

This project was fueled by a studio trip to Grand Canyon National Park with the ambition to redesign the South Rim of the park. As an entry into the Drylands Competition, this submission was from a graduate level class of 12 students, the complete submission consisting of 18 (24�x36�) boards. The team consisted of H.Mumford, S.Freimuth, S.Witmer, B.Zanoni, J.Weldon, S.Johnson, A.Frisby, A.Swinger, C.Langford, D.Rauschendorfer, T.Kraft, T.Limanek. The boards shown within this portfolio are the first six introduction boards (shown on the opposite page), a larger view of the second introductory board and an example of one of the proposed train hubs located along the south rim of the Canyon. The entirety of the project can be found at: issuu.com/hollymumford/docs/final_boards_compiled


HYDROGEOGRAPHY

THE GRAND CANYON AND

POETICS:

RIM

TO

REMEDIATING ENVIRONMENT: GABION WALL

RIVER

The gabion performs as a contemporary, morphing, visual rhyme to the architecture of the Grand Canyon and its’ native inhabitants. Gabions are adapted to watershed terrain and enhance localized water retention. Gabions bring people to water rather than water to people, a crucial issue in the Arid West.

CURRENT

TODAY

1

2030

2

2050 050

ENHANCING EXPERIENCE RE-CHOREOGRAPHING TOURISM: TRAIN & LIGHT RAIL

HABITAT REMEDIATION

E

AG

Increased CO2 emisions are the cause of the current Global Warming epidemic. The majority of Grand Canyon National Park’s 5 million annual visitors experience the Park from vehicles.

3

PHASED REMEDIATION

ENCHANTMENT

High capacity rail lines from Williams and Flaggstaff eliminate the need for private vehicles in the Park. A high frequency light-rail system increases visitor access to the majestic beauty of the canyon. The result, enhances visitor experience, builds community, and heals the ailing planet.

ISSUES

S

MIT

ST

RE

UTH

HER

RIM

VILL

E

AG

T

T

IN

IN

E

ON

PO

VIEW

GRA

SH

T

PO

ND

OSH

SO

IN

N

PO

T

ER

RA

MO

DES

VIEW

VILL

GRAND CANYON SOUTH RIM TRAIN LINE P A R K H E R E

P A R K H E R E

HIGH SPEED TRAIN ELECTRIC TRAIN

FLAGSTAFF

WILLIAMS

DEPENDENCY ON TRANSPORTED WATER: THE ARID WEST

AMONG THE FASTEST GROWING STATES IN THE COUNTRY

CURRENT

ISSUES

5 1

LAND REMEDIATION

3

2

4

CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARID WEST

Grand Canyon

POPULATION

2

SAN DIEGO: 1,307,402

4

PHOENIX: 1,445,632

3

LAS VEGAS: 1,951,2669

5

DENVER: 600,158

VISITOR AWARENESS 5%

PRECIPITATION

8miles

33

DECREASING

1 - 4 WEEKS

TO LA

SNOWMELT

s

157mile

TO SAN DIEGO

TODAY

20%

335mil

RUNOFF

es

1/ 3

TO PHOENIX & TUCSON

WATER SUPPLY

238mile

s

TO DENVER WAT E R I N T H E W E S T

DEPENDENCY ON TRANSPORTED WATER: GRAND CANYON SOUTH RIM

GABION INFRASTRUCTURE: PRECEDENTS

2

2050 050

3

EVAPORTATION 7%

TEMPERATURE

1. 3° - 2. 4°

HERMITS REST

SOUTH RIM VILLAGE

DESERT

ELIMINATION OF CARS

POWER DEMAND

42000 W

23miles

POPULATION

INCREASED VISITORS

53 %

5 MILLION PEOPLE

TO GRAND CANYON SOUTH RIM

VISITORS ACTIVELY PARTICIPATE IN LANDSCAPE REMEDIATION

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1.5

MILLION

C A R S

10 MILLION PEOPLE N O C A R S

VISTORS ENAGING IN A RIM TO RIVER TRAIN EXPERIENCE

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AWARENESS & EDUCATION

MICRO TO MACRO / ISSUE TO SOLUTION

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COUPLING SYSTEMS

INVITING VISITORS TO ENGAGE IN A WATER CONSCIOUS LIFESTYLE

SITE: Grand Canyon National Park South Rim PROPOSAL: Creating water awareness through landscape and water remediation.

2030

SPRING( )

- EDWARD ABBEY

SLOW FLOW

1

INCREASING

We are so many, the Canyon is but one. We are so busy, the Canyon is so passive and slow.

LOS ANGELES 3,792,621

PHASED INFRASTRUCTURE

1

RESTORATION, CONSERVATION, & AWARENESS

RIVER

RE-CHOREOGRAPH

RIM

SLOW FLOW is a phased remediation proposal for Grand Canyon National Park’s South Rim, its 5 million annual visitors (projected to be doubled by 2050), employees, residents, their annual water consumption and the cost of that consumption. Each scale of the proposition is defined by a top down/bottom up strategy mitigating the water-energy nexus that strives to inspire dissemination and conservation through education, exposure of systems, and enhanced visitor experience.

RE-TEXTURE

The multi-valent approach and scale begins with re-texturing the landscape of the existing watersheds at the South Rim. The introduction of inexpensive & easily implemented gabion walls as a set of architectonic strategies works to slow the flow of water.

RE-MEDIATION

DO

...!? SOLUTION: PHASED REMEDIATION STRATEGIES

ER

RIV

GABION WALLS EDUCATION TRANSPORTATION WATER SYSTEMS ENERGY

RA

LO

CO

MICRO

Enhanced water retention, vegetation, habitat, visitor experience through water consciousness, and connection to the resource are the omnipresent themes. Phase one re-textures the land. Phase two re-choreographs the existing land-use through an understanding of environment, infrastructure, and means of transport.

DESIGN INNOVATION

RE-CHOREOGRAPHING LAND USE BY WATERSHEDS

WATERSHEDS + GABION WALLS + AWARENESS + COUPLING STRATEGIES = BALANCE

EXISTING ARBITRARY LAND USE AT THE SOUTH RIM Land and water use, changing economies, and debates concerning political and economic controls have defined what the Park is today. Acquiring water for the Park has always been energy intensive, importing via trains and pumping from the Trans-canyon Pipeline.

COLORADO RIVER BASIN: A DYING WATERSHED The Colorado River is one of the most controlled rivers on Earth, supplying water for 30 million people. Intricately engineered outgoing diversions impede the river’s flow and often prevent it from reaching the Sea of Cortez.

Grand Canyon National Park recieves over five million visitors annualy and provides a unique oppourtunity to spread the message of water conservation throughout the world.

VISIBLE WATER SYSTEMS

DISSEMINATING WATER EDUCATION WORLDWIDE

Through a bottom-up approach, visitors are exposed to the water issues of the arid west and are invited to actively participate in seeking solutions. Interpretiive displays and visible water awareness significantly enhances the Grand Canyon experience

ADAPTATION

SCREENS Digital awareness displays take visitors on a virtual tour of the Colorado River, exposing them to the wonders and conservation issues that embody the Mighty Colorado.

TRAIN High capacity and high frequency train system replace vehicles in the Park.

Potable Water

ENVIRONMENTAL

VORTEX TURBINE

WATER TREATMENT Greywater and harvested rainwater are filtered, treated, and reused at the building site to reduce freshwater demand.

WATER REFILLING STATIONS

REPLICABILITY

DEPENDENCY ON TRANSPORTED WATER Hydration is of paramount importance in the desert. Water refill stations provide potable water for visitors and make them aware of where it comes from and how much they are using.

THE ARID WEST HIGH FLOW_25 maf

ALLOTTED WATER_18.5 maf

10 YR AV. FLOW_15 maf

ARIZONA_2.8 maf

UTAH_1.4 maf IRRIGATION/AGRICULTURE

NEW MEXICO_.64 maf

10

MUNICIPLE/INDUSTRIAL

NEVADA_.3 maf

OTHER

0T

E RATI O VAP

ON

H

COLORADO_2.6 maf

CALIFORNIA_4.4 maf

G R A N D C A N Y O N SOUTH RIM A N N U A L VISITORS:

IA

ID ER

M

5 10 MILLION

Today: 5 Million Visitors 2050: 10 Million Visitors Water resource awareness observed at Grand Canyon Ideas of resource conservation spread worldwide

TODAY

FOG COLLECTION

MILLION

EDUCATION

2 0 5 0 PROJECTION

LOCALIZED WATER MANAGEMENT

N

DECREASED ENERGY INPUTS

Visual connections increase visitor awareness of water conservation systems through visual exposure to water conservation solutions.

DEPENDENCY ON TRANSPORTED WATER

RAIN COLLECTION Rainwater is harvested directly at the building scale from roof and hardscape surfaces.

REDUCED GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS

DESERT VIEW_1.2 Mgal/YR PHANTOM RANCH_1.7 Mgal/YR

LIVING MACHINE Living systems treat black and grey water and provide a sustainable, decentralized means for the reuse of waste water.

NPS OPERATIONS

OTHER

RECYCLED WATER_ 54 Mgal/YR

AWARENESS SIGNS

SOUTH RIM_120.3 Mgal/YR

TOTAL CONSUMPTION_146 Mgal/YR EXTRACTED FROM ROARING SPRINGS_367.9 Mgal/YR

Water Awareness Kiosk Exposes visitors to local and worldwide water conservation issues and inspires them to implement their newfound awareness into their everyday lives. T144

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Living Machine Water Treatment System

...! VISIBL

WATE

SYSTEM

Horizontal Flow Subsurface Wetland

Tidal Wetland Reuse Storage Tank

Primary Tank

SCREEN

VARIABILITY

CONCESSIONAIRES

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Decentralized Water Catchment

SOLAR ENERGY Large scale solar arrays are installed to provide power for transportation and water transfer.

GRAND CANYON SOUTH RIM

NORTH RIM_19.5 Mgal/YR

This submission is from a graduate level class of 12 students and faculty mentors. The complete submission consists of nine entries and 18 boards formatted as per the diagram to the right.

Individual Building Water Catchment and Filtration

Fog is condensed over large, porous building surfaces and is gravity fed to a collection basin for reuse.

CISTERN WINDOW

THE HUMID EAST

POWELL’S VISION

Wastewater: Black Water

Decentralized Water Treatment Cluster System

CURRENT ISSUES

LOW FLOW_5 maf

The political, social, economic, environmental, physical, and visual foundations for this intervention are inspired by John Wesley Powell’s watershed map of 1878.

Wastewater: Grey Water

Treated Service Water

In-line turbines work with gravity fed water to generate electriciy.

MEXICO_1.5 maf

THE ARID WEST POLITICAL BOUNDARIES

Gabions slow the flow of water and remediate the landscape.

SCALABILITY

WYOMING_.6 maf

MACRO

GABION

CIVIC SPACE

WATE

AWARENESS KIOSK

Interpretive displays expose visitors to water conservation issues and solutions and explain site specific gabion intervention strategies.

FEASIBILITY

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CISTER

Water awareness kiosks provide visitors with potable drinking water and a water consevation education experience.

REFILLIN

STATIONS

WINDOW

AWARENES

SIGN

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SLOW FLOW

MICRO TO MACRO / ISSUE TO SOLUTION

SITE: Grand Canyon National Park South Rim PROPOSAL: Creating water awareness through landscape and water remediation.

R

RIVE

RE-CHOREOGRAPH

RIM

SLOW FLOW is a phased remediation proposal for Grand Canyon National Park’s South Rim, its 5 million annual visitors (projected to be doubled by 2050), employees, residents, their annual water consumption and the cost of that consumption. Each scale of the proposition is defined by a top down/bottom up strategy mitigating the water-energy nexus that strives to inspire dissemination and conservation through education, exposure of systems, and enhanced visitor experience.

RE-TEXTURE

The multi-valent approach and scale begins with re-texturing the landscape of the existing watersheds at the South Rim. The introduction of inexpensive & easily implemented gabion walls as a set of architectonic strategies works to slow the flow of water.

RA

LO

CO

RE-MEDIATION

DO

SOLUTION: PHASED REMEDIATION STRATEGIES

ER

RIV

GABION WALLS EDUCATION TRANSPORTATION WATER SYSTEMS ENERGY

MICRO

Enhanced water retention, vegetation, habitat, visitor experience through water consciousness, and connection to the resource are the omnipresent themes. Phase one re-textures the land. Phase two re-choreographs the existing land-use through an understanding of environment, infrastructure, and means of transport.

RE-CHOREOGRAPHING LAND USE BY WATERSHEDS

WATERSHEDS + GABION WALLS + AWARENESS + COUPLING STRATEGIES = BALANCE

EXISTING ARBITRARY LAND USE AT THE SOUTH RIM Land and water use, changing economies, and debates concerning political and economic controls have defined what the Park is today. Acquiring water for the Park has always been energy intensive, importing via trains and pumping from the Trans-canyon Pipeline.

COLORADO RIVER BASIN: A DYING WATERSHED The Colorado River is one of the most controlled rivers on Earth, supplying water for 30 million people. Intricately engineered outgoing diversions impede the river’s flow and often prevent it from reaching the Sea of Cortez.

TH

0 10 ID ER

M IA N

THE HUMID EAST

THE ARID WEST POLITICAL BOUNDARIES

MACRO

POWELL’S VISION The political, social, economic, environmental, physical, and visual foundations for this intervention are inspired by John Wesley Powell’s watershed map of 1878.

This submission is from a graduate level class of 12 students and faculty mentors. The complete submission consists of nine entries and

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POINT S SHOSHONE OVERLOOK / CAFE / BICYCLE RENTAL 3

1

2

3

RIM GABIONS EXTRUDED, INTERSECTS WITH TRAIN HUB

GABIONS DEFINE THRESHOLDS ON THE PATH TO THE RIM

SHOSHONE POINT

SHOSHONE POINT SECTION

WRITE SOMETHING HERE PRECEDENT OR EXPERIENCE SHOT

LIC / FA ST

VIEW OF ENTRY INTO THE TRAIN HUB, MARKING THE FIRST GABION THRESHOLD.

PUB

SHOSHONE POINT SITE PLAN PROPOSAL

TRANSIT HUB

SHOSHONE POINT PERSPECTIVE

PRIV

ATE

/ SL O

W

SHOSHONE WATERSHED

INTRODUCTION OF GABION WALLS & TRAIN HUB IN WATERSHED

IN

IN

A TR

A TR

The site has been conceived conceptually as an experience moving from fast, public space of the train hub to slow, private space at the canyon rim. Gabion walls are inserted into the watershed, progressively slowing the flow of water (remediating the watershed) and slowing the experience of the visitor. The gabion walls create water conservation awareness and strengthen the visitor’s understanding of water solutions as they are continuously reminded visually and experientially of slow flow. As visitors journey towards the rim, the path cuts through a repetition of gabion walls, each framing a closer view of the canyon. The outlook serves as a punctuation to the experience, presenting the user with a reinforced connection to the resource - the Colorado River.

PHASED REMEDIATION

FLAGSTAFF

PROJECT STATEMENT S

M

IA

ILL

W

GABION, TRAIN HUB, WATER AWARENESS KIOSK

GABION THRESHOLD

VIEW FROM THE TRAIN HUB OUT TO THE RIM PATH, THE SECOND GABION THRESHOLD IN SIGHT

PRECEDENT: PARC DEL GARRAF, BARCELONA

PRECEDENT: RICHARD SERRA, CLARA-CLARA PROJECT

Vegetal walls constructed from galvanized wire mesh are a main feature of the Parc del Garraf. This idea of a large “growing” wall is seen at Shoshone Point within the gabion walls that become the train hub.

Richard Serra’s tension of space between the two curved elements that make up Clara-Clara is re-invented through the gabion thresholds that mediate the path to the rim.

GABION THRESHOLD

GABION THRESHOLD

GABION OVERLOOK

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RESEARCH BASED INNOVATION:

SHARING IS CONTAGIOUS - COMMUNITY HOUSING Fall 2010 Supervised by Chris Livingston

In the Spring 2010 I received the Woods Prize, a scholarship dedicated to travel and drawing. I decided to use the scholarship for an independent study / research studio for my final semester of undergraduate study. I designed and wrote my semester based on innovation in housing: creative, sustainable, and affordable design. The semester began with 5 weeks in Western Europe, researching a variety of housing projects. The rest of the semester was spent in Bozeman designing a housing community for a growing city. Bozeman, Montana is developing at an exponential rate with a trend of suburban sprawl encroaching on the natural environment. The edge of the city is now undefined, blurring the threshold between urban and rural space. By developing vacant land within city limits, undeveloped land on the edge of the city remains preserved. By implementing an affordable housing project downtown, a balance of social and market-rate housing is found, combating specific areas of social deprivation. The design has taken shape in the form of a community-based housing with a focus on urban agriculture & cooperative living.


North Bozeman Ave

North Black Ave

North Tracy Ave

Lamme St

East Mendenhall Street

4

10

5

10

2

3

5

9

Main Street

1

6. parking 7. mail 8. shared laundry 9. shared lounge 10. bike storage

11. workshop 12. 1 bdrm unit 13. 2 bdrm unit 14. 3 bdrm unit 15. 4 bdrm unit

5

triple glazed windows

1

11

9

12

1. garden 2. chickens 3. playground 4. recycle 5. community entry

7 5

1

7

13

vertical wood cladding

8

4

14

horizontal wood cladding 15

identifiable green doors 6

Ground Floor Plan, Site

Exterior Perspective from Lamme Street


ARTIST’S COOPERATIVE: STUDIO & RESIDENCE Spring 2010 Supervised by John Brittingham

Wallace Avenue Artists Cooperative is a creative hub for artists and the community of Bozeman, Montana. The pairing of private studio-housing and public gallery space creates a dialogue through interlocking spaces between the internal (private, interior) and the external (public, exterior) as the cohesive whole of the co-op begins to dissolve boundaries between the two dialectics. Each space is interlocked with another, creating shared service masses. Operable windows create passive ventilation, while the southern solar exposure is harnessed through PV panels. All of the drawings created for this project went through a layering process of hand drawing & digital re-working.


MASSING CONCEPT

GALLERIES

CIRCULATION MASS EXIT STAIRWAYS

GALLERY SERVICE MASS BLEACHED WOOD GALLERY DARK WOOD GALLERY ENTRY MASS

SERVICE MASS DWELLING STUDIO

STUDIO-HOUSING


STUDIO-HOUSING

GALLERIES

a

open to below

b

open to below

j

l

i

c e

d

3rd Floor Plan

g

f

q

entry

k

open to below

m

h

o

2rd Floor Plan

Ground Floor Plan: Studio-House section n

a) Living Area b) Bedroom c) Bathroom d) Laundry e) Deck f) Upstairs Studio g) Kitchen h) Dining

i) Studio j) Garage k) Office l) Lobby m) Gallery 1 n) Gallery 2 o) Gallery 3 p) Gallery 4

p

open to below

Ground Floor Plan: Galleries

2nd Floor Plan

3rd Floor Plan


Perspective of Gallery 1, Looking Towards the Lobby

Section Perspective of Studio-Housing

Perspective of Gallery, Second Floor, Looking South-west


FINDING ORDER:

COMMUNITY CENTER & MARKETPLACE Fall 2009 Supervised by Heath (Tad) Bradley

This project is a community center and marketplace for the city of Butte, Montana. Critical thought was given to the cities past, once a booming red light district centered around a prosperous mining industry, now a town struggling to keep its character and livelihood. Conceptually, the solution is based on creating order from disorder through the use of materials, engagement with the senses, and spatial ordering. A wood planking system (based on the rhythm and spacing of footsteps) defines order through repetition, found throughout the building at crucial moments. Smooth concrete dually defines disorder, as the repetition and sensual properties of wood is void. A central courtyard housing reflecting pools defines an oasis of purity for the community members of Butte, as their natural water source has been destroyed from mining. The presentation for this project was done completely by hand using graphite and vellum. Each perspective was created through a mixed media layering process.

Opposite page: Graphite & Vellum Hand-drawn Boards (58� x 52�)


1.

2.

3.

1. Modeled Detail of Reflecting Pools 2. Design Development 3. Entry and Street View 4. Marketplace looking through to reflecting pools

4.


PLEASE VISIT: flavors.me/hollymumford for examples of artwork, graphic design & inspiration.


THANK YOU!


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